hasybesma

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About hasybesma

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  • Location
    The Netherlands
  • Interests
    sailing, humans on planet Earth.
  1. In the video Chris White and Henk de Velde are talking about wing masts. https://chriswhitedesigns.smugmug.com/CUSTOM-POWER-TRIMARANS/Trimarans/JUNIPER/i-kqSSNvn
  2. hasybesma

    Looking for Rogue Wave

    There's an article with recent pictures on 'sauver Roque Wave' in Golden Oldies newsletter August 2016. http://www.goldenoldies.biz/NEWSLETTER37.pdf
  3. hasybesma

    Frog

    Good to hear you're still cracking Cosmic Egg jokes, aye. Hmmm...You sure Eric isn't in highest possible spiritual spheres worshipping holy grounds of yet unidentified foiling sailable objects? Hope she sails well, the Frog that is.
  4. hasybesma

    The cruising boats that make you dream thread...

    You think they should stop making shirts? Oh, not at all….. you're not a gen unless you got a nice shirt on governor are you…….
  5. hasybesma

    New imoca boats

    All what is known is that CDK is currently completing a full build-optimisation and refit of the yacht. Pics from here: https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=1760998817505034&id=1702954373309479 The name of Heerema's sailing team "No Way Back" can be read through the plastic
  6. hasybesma

    Looking for Rogue Wave

    From GO newsletter No.12 2008: After a visit in dec. 2007 Charlie Capelle thought Roque Wave's structure pretty sound although looking very rough and Harald Halvorson is mentioned as owner? who was supposed to bring the boat to France and also ordered a new mast. Nic Barham whom I visited in 2008 when he had the Val Tahiti Belle for sale also told he sailed Roque Wave several times in Dubai and might know more. I might still have his address somewhere. The link to the newsletter: http://www.goldenoldies.biz/NEWSLETTER12.pdf
  7. hasybesma

    New imoca boats

    Vid from the Vendee Globe site with some skippers elaborating a bit about the new boats. http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x3azdm8_start-jacques-vabre-transat-va_sport
  8. hasybesma

    New imoca boats

    Pieter Heerema's RC44 was called "no way back".
  9. hasybesma

    The cruising boats that make you dream thread...

    Well, quite a lot of thought's actually. Already quite some years ago it was the cruising boat of my dreams, as a matter of fact. That very same boat, the empty hull, standing for years in a corner of a shed at "Atlantic Yachts" in Harlingen the Netherlands, where I lived at the time. Already carrying the name "Nagy Barat", which means big friendships in Hungarian. At one point I was notified by the owner of the shipyard it came up for grabs. I didn't have any grabs already owning a boat so it was sold and was moved to an other part of the country. I clearly remember it being loaded on a trailer leaving me with my thoughts…& dreams... I thought then and still think now this Dick Zaal design "Northern Light" has beautiful sea kind & worthy lines. There once was a website following the, then owners I think, working on the yacht's interior & outfit but progress was slow, very slow, and I lost track and perhaps also real interest in pretty heavy displacement yachts. A couple of weeks ago it turned up again and as I said, still like the lines. There are better pictures and more detailed info in the link. http://www.jachtmakelaardijkappers.nl/jachten/83013/colin-archer-type-northern-light-51.html
  10. hasybesma

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    With all respect to your newly acquired boarding ladder building capabilities, I like the idea, but would the boarding ladder not be safer and even more lighter with with some grip holes and perhaps rounding off the outside top for better ergonomics & looks and, to be honest, more in character with Frankie's classic style. We tried it out and found we grabbed the shrouds right from the dinghy, so handholds were unnecessary. I don't understand the "round the outside top" comment as the ends are already all rounded...... Ok, my lack of proper explaining and knowledge of nautical english. What I meant was something a bit more like the pictures. The ladder looks so heavy & boxy compared to the lightness & refinement of Frankie's lines.
  11. hasybesma

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    With all respect to your newly acquired boarding ladder building capabilities, I like the idea, but would the boarding ladder not be safer and even more lighter with with some grip holes and perhaps rounding off the outside top for better ergonomics & looks and, to be honest, more in character with Frankie's classic style.
  12. hasybesma

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    As a result of the mentioning of Oceanus I read the tread about Bill Garden when he deceased in April 2011. In there was a valuable exchange of opinions between Bob and Tad Roberts about Bill. Tad wrote to Bob among many other things: "Well as you know the real magic is in creating a "character" design that is just short of cartoonish, it's so easy to drop over that edge. Garden was a master at skirting the edge but never going over." I think this is so true and gave real credit to the natural, almost nonchalance, organic flair of Bill Garden's designs. There is also this kind of magic when I see pictures of Francis Lee. Apart from the here more or less general confusion to recognize the bow from the stern there is some nice puzzlement with me regarding the dimensions of the Sliver. Sometimes when there are no apparent things in the direct setting of the boat that immediately give away the real dimensions I can happily see a 30 or 40 foot boat, before I realize again thats 60 feet of very nice sliverishness. Faux wood: A short story about a prize application of faux wood when I was racing "Skûtsjes" some 30 years ago. In that time a lot of skûtsjes were again restored and were rediscovered to be great fun to race. As ever everything took more time and money then anticipated and it was decided to put the rig of another boat on the one we were supposed to race. Only the skûtsje we were racing was 16 m and the Tjalk we took the entire rig of was 23 m and had on the gooseneck a big hydraulic cylinder mounted with large steel sleeve on the 25 -30 cm diameter massive oregon boom to be able to put some workable pressure as outhaul on the loose footed main which of course was a big no no in very conservative skûtsje-raceland. On the day of the first race everything was ready . We didn't have had a single day of practice and the end of the boom only stuck out some 4.5 m past the rudder (which was only allowed because it wasn't mentioned in the rules) but the big hydraulic cylinder with the steel sleeve was invisible…. apart from some rubber hoses coming out of the (faux) wood The faux wood was so realistically applied by the artist owner of the skûtsje that even some of the crew never noticed this faux feature. We didn't even do that bad during the regattas and sometimes surprised everybody with the still legendary spurts of speed the boat reached at moments only to be beaten by the entirely new to crew handling of the boat at the buoys. Of course we made sure a small but efficient, innocent whistling, crowd gathered around the man working the biggish handle on the hydraulic pump when some outhaul to flatten the main was needed. The racing was challenging at moments, not to say hairy with the 140m2 main and 80m2 jib if I remember the numbers well, but we sailed and learned a lot. Another small detail with the motley crew was that of course everyone had a dog or dogs. On the more windy days we simply couldn't afford to leave someone to watch & tame the dogs as everybody was needed to tame the boat. So the 15 or so very varied dogs, from Newfoundlanders, Pit-Bulls, Chow-Chow's and many more big and small undefined species were left on the anchored de-rigged talk to take care of themselves. When the racing was done we would look through binoculars if there were possibly any casualties. Never..they were always happy quietly lounging aboard which changed of course the moment we stepped back on board.
  13. hasybesma

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    9 Months? I didn't know a baby version of the Sliver was expected.
  14. hasybesma

    Uglyboat Admiration Society Hang Out

    Really not sure if its the future of mono sailboat design and reminds me of the New Magic Breeze: General GRP one-off Dick Zaal Ocean Vamp "New Magic Breeze", dim.: 13,70 (lwl approx. 12,00) x 5,01 x 1,12/2,60 mtrs, built in 1988 by Frans Maas/Standfast Yachts, The Netherlands, headway approx. 20 mtrs, grp hull, deck and superstructure, shallow draft flat hull with centreboard (hydraulically operated) waterballast (600 ltrs) and "lifting-body", twin rudders, retractable bow dagger-board, displacement: approx. 8 tonnes, ballast (keel): approx. 1,6 tonnes + waterballast 600 ltrs in wingtanks, fueltank: ltrs, watertank: ltrs, Whitlock mechanical wheelsteering and emergency tiller. It was build in 1988 with the Ostar in mind. The hopes and expectations for the boat were very high but after the skipper was given a pretty severe beating by the boat in not that bad weather it was, to my knowledge, never inscribed in a relevant race again. I,ve seen it planing by though in flat water on a broad reach and that looked pretty spectacular at the time. Weird. Whats with the dagger board at the bow? Picture1.jpg To compensate/overcome rudder deflection when using big headsails.