TwoLegged

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About TwoLegged

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  1. TwoLegged

    Another Interesting Home Built Steel Boat

    The comments below the line are a trainwreck. A horde of fans/enablers shouting down anyone who dares question the work
  2. TwoLegged

    Mocking Ads on Craigslist

    Lovely. PD racers are way cool. Kinda like Phil Bolger took steroids before reinventing the Optimist for DIY adults
  3. TwoLegged

    Mocking Ads on Craigslist

    that's lovely.
  4. TwoLegged

    Mocking Ads on Craigslist

    PD racer = Puddle Duck Racer = v clever super-cheap mini-racer for use on ponds. http://www.pdracer.com/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puddle_Duck_Racer
  5. TwoLegged

    Cruising a J-24

    @Panoramix Yes, we had great fun, and we learnt a heck of a lot. It left me with a lifelong aversion to leadmines for coastal cruising. Our sailing was so much more fun and far easier than all the big heavy boats, and anchoring and mooring was much easier too. We were dinghy sailors, and sailed the J like a big dinghy, actively driving it ... but unlike a dinghy we didn't have to use toe straps, we could have hot tea on deck and crash out on a quarter berth if we needed a break. I have many wonderful memories of those cruises.
  6. TwoLegged

    the greatest

    Imp won races. But didn't set any significant new design direction
  7. TwoLegged

    the greatest

    The real answer is that it didn't take so long. The Uffa Fox-designed Flying 30 launched in 1951, and Van de Stadt's Black Soo in 1959. Twenty years later, Ganbare was way heavier than either Huff or Black Soo. It was still a non-planing boat, which hadn't caught up
  8. TwoLegged

    the greatest

    Why are you all obsessing with the 1970s? Most of that decade's racing was dominated by dead-end design elements. Pintail sterns, mad distortions, high CoG, high displacement, stupid rig. Ganbare included most of those follies; she was light only when compared with other heavyweights. The boats which restored sanity were the Farr designs. But Farr's boats merely picked up on a tradition established a generation earlier. The modern offshore boat began with the Uffa Fox-designed Flying 30 back in 1951: a planing offshore boat launched a full 25 years before Californian ULDBs put planing back on the offshore menu. The Irish-built and Irish-owned Flying 30 Huff of Arklow is believed to be the only surviving Flying 30. Huff is ten feet longer than Ganbare, but only about 20% heavier. Or look at the 1959 Van de Stadt Black Soo: a superlight, chined, planing boat with a D/L ratio which makes Ganbare look like a Sumo wrestler. So if you're looking for the most important design in the modern era, forget Ganbare. She's just a roadbump from the dark days when the IOR channelled topflight racing into ridiculously slow and ill-mannered designs.
  9. TwoLegged

    Cruising a J-24

    Back in the late 70s / early 80s, my family cruised extensively in a J/24. One adult plus one big dog plus one or two teenagers. We covered the east, south and south-west coasts of Ireland, and were often on board for a week or two. In Irish weather, which means cold and lots of rain. We had a wonderful time. The boat was as fast as a 30-footer in most conditions, and we often outsailed 40-footers downwind. So we had fast passage times and much less work to achieve them. Our boat was almost standard. We varnished and tidied the interior, but AFAICR we added no fixtures. We used the standard gimballed 2-burner stove, washed the dishes in a bucket, and stored water in 5-litre plastic jugs which had been used before for some food purpose. Food storage in plastic plates slid under the cockpit, and a bucket-and-chuck-it toilet. It was camp cruising, but a big step up from our previous unballasted open boat. We thought having an actual cabin was superb luxury. The only major mod we made was to seal off the cockpit lockers from the cabin. This was a mod on all new boats after an Irish J/24 sank when the lockers opened in a knockdown, and it was v easily made to older boats. So, now that I'm the same age as my parents were then, would I do it again? Yes, if I had a low budget and a teenage crew, I might; it would still be fun. With adult crew it might be a bit cramped, and adults might not be so keen on bouncing around the deck to change headsails, reef etc. But single-handed? No way. We had the original deck layout with everything led back to the cockpit. The racing boats all changed that in the early 80s to involve more crew, which wrecked it for cruising. You could reinstate the old deck layout, but ... The boat simply isn't directionally stable enough to do single-handed sail changes ... and if you started adding roller headsail, revised mainsail reefing, an autopilot and a 12v battery plus charging, then you're adding a pile of stuff which makes the boat heavier and slower. That misses the point of sailing a J/24 in the first place. And here's the biggie: angle of vanishing stability (AVS). A J/24's AVS is just over 90deg, which is barely more than a dinghy. A fit and active crew coastal cruising in daylight can handle that. But if you add in any one of single-handed, offshore and darkness, the chances of a 90 degree knockdown are way increased. If you inverted and sank on your own, your chances of survival would be negligible. In theory you could add a keel bulb, but you'd need a lot of extra structure to do it. The std keel mounting is barely adequate as designed, and would need to be radically redesiqned to take a bulb. Some contemporaneous designs such as the Moore 24 had much better stability. Most newer designs have much better stability. That size boat is great for coastal cruising. But if I really wanted to cruise fast and light again, then I'd much prefer a newer design like a J/80, which has the stability. Or better still, one of the v clever French designs such as the Django 770
  10. TwoLegged

    Piper OD .. dayboat

    It is a parking brake cum surge brake. Mode 1: parking. Pull lever and lock it. Mode 2: normal driving. Fully release lever, and flip out the pawl over the piston so it is free to move. Now if the trailer starts pushing the car fwd (e.g. when car brakes are applied), the piston is pushed back and the trailer brakes itself. Mode 3: reversing. Fully release lever, and flip in the pawl over the piston, so that the piston cannot move. Now you can reverse without trailer applying its own brakes. I thought this was how trailer brakes were set up on all light trailers. Heavy ones have a plug-in-link to the towing vehicle's hydraulics (e.g. on what you folks call a "semi" and we call an "articulated truck" or "artic") ... but AFAIK this is how all Yurp does it for trailers over the EU 750kg unbraked limit and below whatever the threshold is for fully-linked brakes. How do Muricans brake light trailers?
  11. TwoLegged

    Piper OD .. dayboat

    Buy a dose of ply and a stash of epoxy, and get @willp14335 to design an epoxy ply hull to fit on top of the keel. Then you will have a boat whose design credits are shared by two naval architects born a century apart. One of the great designers of the mid-20th century in posthumous collaboration with a rising star of the mid-21st century.
  12. TwoLegged

    A Form of Cruising...

    I'd think it more likely to be his tiller.  But look at the photos. He has no tiller
  13. TwoLegged

    A Form of Cruising...

    I presumed he had been wearing it on his own torso. I hadn't even considered the possibility that he was tucking his rudder into y-fronts
  14. TwoLegged

    A Form of Cruising...

    TMI !
  15. TwoLegged

    Daysailer 22' to 30'

    I see a lot to like about the Saffier. Tasty lines, and high ballast ratio on a light hull. However the self-tacking jib is one of those evil short track types. Fine upwind in flat water, when a narrowly-sheeted blade is ideal ... but no use once the sheet is eased. Even when daysailing or cruising, I like my sails to set properly, and that jib would offend me every time I was reaching. The Hoyt jib boom as used on the Alerion and the Harbor 25 is a much better all-rounder. Both those boats are heavy, but at least their rigs are not crippled.