Jackett

Members
  • Content Count

    41
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About Jackett

  • Rank
    Newbie

Profile Information

  • Location
    222
  • Interests
    dasdasd

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Jackett

    J/105 shoal keel. How much slower?

    Yes, its slower if you're racing. For your intended use stated over on the main forum, you're not going to notice the speed difference.
  2. Jackett

    Trouble finding good daysailer options

    Given he hasn't specified a budget, I'd say that this meets all his needs perfectly: https://www.wally.com/wally-sail/tango.html Can be sailed by 2, but plenty of room for 7. Fast, has wheel steering (two in fact, so bonus marks), a real head. Come on Sea2 ocean, refine your requirements a bit more. Else I win.
  3. Jackett

    Anchoring a Sprit Boat

    If there's a bit of current, a bucket or two streamed off the stern works pretty well to stabilise things
  4. Its not the sheer thats the problem. Its the line made by the plan laps. You can begin to see it on the photo of the boat coming out of the shed. Look at the line of the bottom edge of the second plank down. Its got quite a tight curve in the zone under the cabin window, then the curve seems to flatten off. If you could see the plank line all the way back to the transom the line would look like its curving down. It doesn't actually curve down but thats what the eye sees. Its very apparent in the photo of the same boad at the link below (second photo down): http://dixdesign.com/ch21sailing.htm Its definitely an artefact of the design, rather than the builder, as the same effect appears in all the boats, most of which are built from CNC cut kits.
  5. Nope, designers 'mistake'. Either that or a lot of builders making the same mistake - it shows up in every boat built to that design (and in the smaller 19 foot version). Not always so apparent - depends on the angle the photos taken from, but its there. I think its an optical effect resulting from trying to keep the buttocks nice and staight for speed, while also trying to keep the width of the plywood planks uniform.
  6. So do I - I've been toying with building one for the last couple of years. Just a pity the lap lines have that funny kink and the reverse curve in them towards the stern when viewed from many angles - Quite apparent in the photo Crash posted. I know its only an optical effect, but I just know it would annoy me every time I look at the boat. Its put me off committing to starting the build so far.
  7. Given Hallberg Rassy have built boats from 24 feet - 65ish feet in length for something like 60 years, unless you give us an idea of the size and price range you're interested in, you're not going to get a very useful response. The makes of boats that are comparable to the oldest, smallest Hallberg Rassey boats are very different to those comparable to the newest, 50+ foot boats.
  8. Jackett

    Boat launch anarchy

    I agree. I was in the same situation. I looked at how often I sailed the boat in a typical year, and hence the cost per outing (annual fee / number of outings). I then made an honest assessment of how often I'd sail the boat if stored ashore and I had to launch it each time. The cost per outing came out more than twice as much, because of all those evenings and half days where I just wouldn't be bothered to go out. If you then factor in the increased preparation time for a dry sailed boat (resulting in less time on the water on the days you can be bothered to launch) and the reduced enjoyment because of the chore of launching and recovery I don't think you'd have been able to persuade me keep the boat ashore even if it were free.
  9. Jackett

    Coolboats to admire

    Whereas most Brits can't help looking at a north american design and wanting to drop the bowsprit by a couple of inches! You can always spot which side of the atlantic a design was drawn by whether the bowsprit continues the shearline or is closer to parallel with the waterline.
  10. Jackett

    Wing Keel Theory: problem solved, or not?

    Maybe now, under some rule systems. But originally it was developed based on some sound aerodynamics to minimise separation of the flow (same reason that aircraft wings often have slats). Whether that theory really carried over to yacht keels all that well, with their often steeper and changing angles of attacks, and annoying random motion due to the pesky waves has long been a matter of debate. There is a good paper (probably more than on) on tandem keels by Warwick Collins, who first developed it - it used to be available on the internet, but a quick google hasn't turned it up. He had one fitted to a production boat (Laser 28, I think) that did pretty well in racing against the stock boats, especially allowing for the reduced draught, but of course you never know how much of that is the keel and how much is the quality of the crew.
  11. Jackett

    Dave's perfect sailboat

    What a silly thing to say on an online forum! Each of us reading this knows that they, and only they, know what is the perfect boat for Dave. Everyone else, including Dave, is just plain wrong.
  12. Jackett

    Something different for CA

    Given I work as a civil and structural engineer in teh UK, I can confidently state that nothin in teh above response is correct. There is no UK 'building control' which holds structural drawings for all buildings. If you're lucky the owner of the building may have some drawings, but probably not. Some councils have a central depository of drawings of buildings they own, but again its hit and miss what they have and whats been lost. If someone does have drawings, they are invariably the property of the owner of that building, to do with as they please. As standard in UK (and every other part of the world I've worked in) for building and structural design contracts the finished design becomes wholly the property of the client. They archive old submissions of structural calculations for building controls (https://www.istructe.org/getattachment/cfd44f46-987b-4013-9f30-750e4a19fd47/Building-Control.pdf - guidance from Istructr-E on this). Some of these include detailed drawings, especially older ones, I once found some gems really neatly drawn by hand. If you ask nicely, they will let you access the drawings, I've never managed to make a copy though. In most places where I have worked, there was a disclaimer at the bottom of the drawings saying no copying without permission otherwise copyright infringement. At least this is how it was working in the late noughties when I was there. You were very lucky in the local authorities you dealt with. Very few (and none I've yet worked with) archive anything beyond the statutory minimum time. And what they do have rarely includes full structural drawings - as you'll see from the IStructE guidance this level of detail doesn't need to be provided for building regs approval - depending on the complexity of the building, you can get away with a few pages of calculations and some hand sketches. You just need to provide sufficient information to prove sufficiency of design. But the lack of copying is nothing to do with authority from the designer, as the IP doesn't belong to them. You need the permission of the owner of the building at that time. If you have that, they'll happily provide you with copies (at a cost, of course)
  13. Jackett

    Something different for CA

    Given I work as a civil and structural engineer in teh UK, I can confidently state that nothin in teh above response is correct. There is no UK 'building control' which holds structural drawings for all buildings. If you're lucky the owner of the building may have some drawings, but probably not. Some councils have a central depository of drawings of buildings they own, but again its hit and miss what they have and whats been lost. If someone does have drawings, they are invariably the property of the owner of that building, to do with as they please. As standard in UK (and every other part of the world I've worked in) for building and structural design contracts the finished design becomes wholly the property of the client.
  14. Jackett

    foil assisted cruiser

    What a bunch of negative comments, on a forum claiming 'anarchy' and where you all moan about average white blobs and all boats looking the same . . . Trunk cutting through the accommodation - its a 56 foot yacht with relatively high freeboard, so I'll image it will be below the sole. Rattling in its trunk at anchor? Modern roller systems are pretty good at stopping that. And when not in use it fully retracts into the case - so its not being pushed around by the watter, so what's causing it to move around and rattle? Uncomfortable motion? Well any lightweight, fast boat isn't exactly comfortable. But the DSS allows a narrower waterline as you're less reliant on form stability, which should help, plus the fin may act as a good damper. Certainly the reviews of DSS in Yachting World etc. all seem to comment on the DSS improving comfort. Anyway, I thought the consensus here is that most people are wimps who just sail from marina to marina in nice weather, so who cares about comfort in rough seas? No, I've nothing to do with the company, never sailed a DSS equipped boat and it may well be a rubbish boat. But based on what experienced sailors who've sailed DSS equiped boats have to say maybe this is something to keep an eye on, maybe even raise a modicum of excitement?
  15. Jackett

    My newest project

    Bob, Sorry, I've been separated from my computer for a while and only just checking back in. Did you get a chance to scan the accommodation drawing for Loon? I got the 'Bluewaters Cruisers' book in my Christmas stocking after you mentioned it here. Some very nice designs of yours I'd not seen before. You're just going to have to do another book, to include all those drawings you didn't fit into the first!