WunHungLo

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About WunHungLo

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    Super Anarchist

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  • Location
    PNW
  • Interests
    Offshore or coastal racing and passages, navigation & tactics

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  1. WunHungLo

    Flying Fifteen: the boat for everyone

    There were 73 Flying Fifteens from around the world on the start line at the 2019 Worlds in Ireland. Still going strong and Ovington make a very nice carbon FF. None of the pics above showed singled handed sailing, but I've attached some to this post that are. They can be comfortably single handed up to 15 knots TWS upwind. After that, more effort needed. Using the double pole, self launching system with a chute launching tube like a 5o5 makes hoisting, gybing and dousing simple single handed. If you're a regular single hander in heavier breezes, then get a single reef put in the main at around 12.5% of luff length. That happens to comply with OSR Cat 4 in case you race handicap and need a means of reefing for safety compliance. Fully crewed and a reef, 25 knots is comfy too. In one design racing, a reef is unnecessary and the boat handles well in 25kn. At the last worlds, there was solid breeze for all but 2 days. The pics of the worlds by Jonny Fullerton.
  2. WunHungLo

    Flying Fifteen: the boat for everyone

    There are 10 known FF's between San Diego and British Columbia. Here's mine fully restored 2017/2018 from the keel to masthead. The class association for Canada is on Facebook at FFI-CAN As I'm the only one active in Vancouver, I race PHRF at 214 (which includes a credit for the Torqeedo Ultralite 403 outboard required for PHRF.). We do ok in a mixed fleet between the FF's 20ft LOA and 30ft LOA cruiser racers on races around the cans, and some "distance " races up to 16 or 20 miles . It's a load fun particularly when the breeze is on. We got an ORC International measurement cert just to see what the polars looked like. The rig is a Selden Alto with twin carbon poles like a 5o5 system. Not bad for a boat built in 1986
  3. WunHungLo

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    Aaah, finally going with plan A, an asymm furler. I think you will have fun with this !!
  4. WunHungLo

    My newest project

    A number of years ago, I opened a 1953 Corton and had to run it through a coffee filter to get rid of the sediment !!
  5. WunHungLo

    My newest project

    As befitting the unpretentious designers, we had some italian, no-nonsense, reliably good reds, and a bottle that Kim brought. It disappeared too fast to get a picture of the label !! Ron brought a Rioja and a white, as he put it, token Kiwi wine "to show te flag"
  6. WunHungLo

    My newest project

    One of the more important cultural exchanges was the Marmite versus Vegemite discussion !! Oh, and Ron played his brushes and drum sticks. We have a drummer for future gigs
  7. WunHungLo

    My newest project

    I will just wear my chauffeur's uniform
  8. Not denying the usefulness of cleats, it looks like I will be the sole defender of the rail !! Having sailed in this region for 25+ yrs, and sailed around Vancouver Island five times, I think I have docked at most popular docks, and quite a few remote ones. I have been lucky I suppose, to have never been splinter bitten by the wooden rails, and like the round metal rails seen at many commercial docks, gas docks, and government docks. In docking, I can't recall wishing there was a cleat to lassoo because I came in fast enough that I needed to use it to brake. Assuming that most people approach the dock slow enough that you can step off onto the dock calmly with a line in hand, the rails give a lot of flexibility in where you position yourself. On this coast in particular, there are lots of places that harbour commercial fishing boats of varying sizes, in addition to the apparently rail-challenged leisure boat users The rails offer flexibility to tie up where there's an opening, flexibility to tie up without getting in amongst another boat's lines, and the freedom to leave without messing with other boaters' lines that invariably trap yours when you're limited to sharing cleats. When we've had to raft up as we frequently do during the Van Isle Race, or other events with many competitors, the rails have really demonstrated these positive aspects. So in the immortal words of Ronnie Johns, HTFU everyone LOL
  9. WunHungLo

    Production MORC boats

    Not MORC typeforms. Everything except the rear quarter of the boat was typical of MORC, incuding the sailplan. With some minor tinkering on reducing penalties of the one design spec, they measured and sailed competitively under MORC.
  10. WunHungLo

    Production MORC boats

    I liked the MORC Rule and still like the well rounded abilities of a lot of boats designed to it. As far as the comment about not planing, anything can plane with enough wind Here's a shot by the great photographer Franz Rosenbaum (dec'd) of my old boat in 1983, racing under MORC. We had definite planing moments have crossed 20 miles of Lake Ontario in 1.5hrs And on a less windy day......
  11. WunHungLo

    CATARI comes along at Pacific Seacraft

    what are you getting? is it an ORR rating? the US ORR rating doesn't come with targets or polars - although you can buy them as part of the US Sailing Performance Package. the European ORCi international rating comes with targets but not polars.., but again, they sell a performance package with polars you are racing in the usa, right - so i assume you are getting an ORR rating, not an ORC rating... anyway, i recommend getting the performance package. the polars for your boat will be reasonably good out of the box, and will make a good starting place if you want to refine them based on observed performance. The ORC organization does offer all the performance info a typical club racer would want, at a very reasonable price. For Designers, there is a license fee of €500 to have access to the VPP and run as many tests as you wish for as many boats as you wish, purely for the VPP output, without any need to go through a local handicapper for results.
  12. WunHungLo

    CATARI comes along at Pacific Seacraft

    This thread is really about Catari, but since FL is in the frame, FL was designed as a "gentleman's daysailer" and consequently is not equipped to meet the safety requirements for Swiftsure. In particular, it has no lifelines or pulpits. It can be rigged with jacklines but the race requirements ignore their functionality, except they are required once you have lifelines !!! Go figure !! We could have more classic boats in this event if the priority were given to jacklines as mandatory, and lifelines as optional !! Given the size of the boat, its stiffness, the way it's rigged, the handholds, plus jacklines, lifelines are a bit over the top (as well as ugly and totally unsuited for gentlemanly day sailing !!). The decision to use ORC was to take advantage of its VPP, and get a very cost effective, and comprehensive package of performance info, versus ORR, and its comparably excessive cost. As an aside, most of the big boat fleet in Seattle has, or is getting an ORC rating.
  13. WunHungLo

    My newest project

    Pete, stated perfectly !!
  14. WunHungLo

    CATARI comes along at Pacific Seacraft

    A quick update: custom aluminum shims have been made and anodized for various clutches and turning blocks, after laying out all lines on deck to ensure fair leads. Some of the deck hardware was relocated following that exercise, and as a result, some small areas have been recored to support the loads of the hardware.. By the end of Jan, all deck hardware will be installed. Electronics and electrical systems are also being installed.
  15. WunHungLo

    My newest project

    Does this qualify? Small bulwark, toe high, a bit higher at the bow. http://i1196.photobucket.com/albums/aa404/cwz1/boat%20stuff/bulwark1.jpg I can't believe someone designed that lead. look at the wear in the coming. I suspect it's supposed to go through a foot block first. Equally likely is that the genoa was originally designed to be sheeted from the toe rail. Catalina did that on the 30's.... and the first thing racers do is add a new inboard track. The combing isn't as high though so they don't have the problem the boat in the picture does. Beats me how that sailor could be happy with that lead. Pure laziness or cheapness. Even if he wanted to use the adjustable inboard cars, he could still take the sheet out to a block on the rail, then to the winch, to avoid that dumb chafe over the coaming.