galacticair

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About galacticair

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    Anarchist

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    San Francisco
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    Multihulls

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  1. galacticair

    Crewsaver Offshore vs Pro PFDs

    Thank you for checking. From what I looked at, all their manual stuff is more inshore/coastal, nowhere near the same full specs of their 190N Offshore models. Bummer. I like the idea of a good Hammar inflator, but I still don’t believe in it during a multihull capsize - once you’re in the water you want to be able to move away quick before a multi turtles, not being hobbled by a large inflated pfd... Back to browsing Spinlock deckvests I guess.
  2. galacticair

    Crewsaver Offshore vs Pro PFDs

    The Crewsaver models look good, thanks everyone for the information. Very timely for me. Does anyone know if they can convert to manual-inflation only? (the spinlocks have a small kit for this, basically removes the automatic inflator and replaces with a small plug). I sail multihulls and don’t want to risk auto inflation in capsize scenarios. I do think the Crewsaver site and specs info could be a whole lot better. Their model nomenclature is basically impossible to understand, and it’s rarely clear how features differ (@George Dewey: you give the best description i’ve seen, and that’s after spending a fair bit of time researching the models online).
  3. galacticair

    Crewsaver Offshore vs Pro PFDs

    Just to confirm, do the crewsavers have crotch straps? What bugs me even more is that most inflatable pfds (WestMarine, Mustang, Revere, SOS...) in the US do not have crotch straps, even as an option. Unless you go to the very high end (Spinlock Deckvest, etc), and even there it’s hard to know which have the straps vs don’t, unless you dig deep into the product details. Everything I have read suggests crotch straps are a must, so it’s a bummer they are hard to find integrated into US models. Is it because they are not USCG approved/required?
  4. galacticair

    WTB Wind / Speed / Depth Intruments / GPS

    I contacted Garmin and they confirmed the Nexus MRC box is no longer manufactured. Here's what they had to say: "Unfortunately the Nexus MRC is no longer available or serviced. Your best option of locating a replacement will be Dick Booth Marine. He specializes in legacy Nexus systems." As for West Marine, I didn't check with them whether their site listing means they have it in stock. Either way, now that the MRC been discontinued, Garmin/Nexus is out of the running for our mast rotation adjustment -- back to the Raymarine Tacktick path then...
  5. galacticair

    Corsair / Farrier 31 /9 variations

    What’s your program? Racing, cruising, a bit of both? In the Bay Area most boats that race are the F-31R rotating+extended mast version with transum hung rudders, rating -15 to +10 on PHRF. Fun boats to sail. Interiors vary a lot, as do boat weights. You probably want the R variants since you are in a light airs area. F-9 / F-9R is homebuilt / kit version of the F-31R, as far as I know. But i’m no expert - there are good specs / materials online if you google. F-31-1D is the turbocharged version of the F-31R with a bigger mast, significantly faster (about -35 PHRF if I remember correctly).
  6. galacticair

    WTB Wind / Speed / Depth Intruments / GPS

    To my surprise West Marine is still listing the "Nexus MRC Box (mast rotation compensation)" on their site. So maybe Nexus is still an option -- I'm going to ask Garmin customer service to understand if those are still being manufactured... (none of the other usual marine electronics sites lists it as available)
  7. galacticair

    WTB Wind / Speed / Depth Intruments / GPS

    One more non-trivial consideration if you plan to lift a hull regularly: for true wind calculation, you need good boat speed calcs (regardless of rotating or fixed mast). Most instrument systems and chartplotters use the boat's log as speed source, which is fine for a monohulls, but much less good for a multihull... This is specifically a beef I have against Raymarine -- neither the wireless instrument range nor their Axxiom plotters allow the user to modify the speed source to GPS speed. Garmin, B&G do not have this problem. That's why I'm aiming for a hybrid solution where Raymarine wireless system with mast rotation sensor provides the corrected AWA (using B&G wind transducer input AWA relative to mast, and AWS), but then send that back to a B&G Vulcan plotter that calculates TWS/TWA with GPS speed as a source.
  8. galacticair

    WTB Wind / Speed / Depth Intruments / GPS

    I faced a similar decision recently for a 27ft racing cat (36ft rotating mast) that had existing minimal Raymarine / Tacktick wireless instruments (depth, speed log, Racemaster compass), but nothing else. Starting with rotating mast considerations, since those limit options very fast (though not relevant to PIL66). In order of price, the options are: (1) No mast rotation compensation -- use a standard wind transducer and focus on apparent wind speed (does not require correction), and angle relative to mast (instead of relative to boat). Multis are apparent wind boats so this works very well upwind (pretty easy to deduce true wind, and easy to set reefing rules like reef to 2nd reef at 32kts AWS), and also works well for angles downwind (though hard to tell true wind speed when off the wind). Did this on Top Gun for years, happy with it. But none of the fancy layline or other modern plotter calcs work since you don't have true wind (though if really needed to get true wind say at night, you can always center your mast). (2) Raymarine Tacktick wireless -- going to try this on our 27ft cat. Rotation sensor alone costs US$710. It's not clear what else you need -- you need a compass and wind transducer obviously, but Raymarine help forum suggested you might be able to use non-wireless and perhaps even non-Raymarine compass + wind transducer, so long as you pipe that data into the wireless network (via the Raymarine Microtalk wireless gateway). You also need at least 1 Raymarine wireless multi-function display to calibrate the wireless network (multi-funciton display is key -- wind display with the wind arrow does not handle calibration...). I'm not sure where is the "brains" that does the rotation calculations -- in the rotation sensor, or in the digital display? I'm going to give it a shot soon with a hybrid setup, but I don't know if it will work: Raymarine wireless mast rotation sensor (new, still need to buy), Racemaster compass (existing, should also serve as digital display for calibration), B&G 608 wired wind transducer (more affordable than wireless, and no bad connection risks) via NMEA 2000, Raymarine Microtalk wireless gateway (to let B&G and Raymarine talk to each other). If all new, expect to spend US$2000-2200+ just for this, but at least you get a compass and display. (3) LCJ capteurs LCJ-C-RM ultrasonic wired transducer ($1500) plus separate mast rotation sensor like the Honeywell gurok mentioned. US$1700 total. No display or compass included, interfaces with other instruments via NMEA 2000. Some question-marks on how well an ultrasonic wired transducer performs -- my guess is ok, so this was tempting. (4) B&G Hercules (H5000, or old H3000) processor with one of the Honeywell rotation sensors (or a B&G rudder angle feedback sensor that can also be used to measure mast angle), plus a B&G wired wind transducer. Opens up advanced calibration, but very quickly well above US$3000 and you are locked into a Hercules system.... My favorite solution above all of the above was actually a Nexus server plus mast rotation compass, generally similar to Raymarine approach, but with much better calibration options. However after Garmin bought Nexus, they appear to have deprecated the mast rotation compass and it is now impossible to find... The Nexus gear doesn't have great lifespan, so even if I found a mast rotation compass today, I'd be very reluctant to go down this path without knowing that I could ever find a replacement compass if needed.
  9. galacticair

    R2AK 2018

    It’s been pretty clear for a while now that Ravenous is not really racing - more like an extended camping trip. I’m sure they’ve seen a lot of beautiful spots but am mystified why they bothered with the race fees & all - they don’t seem to seek publicity, so maybe being in the race provides a bit of extra safety? It’s also hard to make sense of their track - sometimes they do weird tacks/gybes with very little mileage gained (akin to Dock Rat, but the boat is very different...), and they also do a lot of night sailing which is strange given if you’re willing to take that long to get to Ketchikan then you’d think you’d be relaxing every night and enjoying the daylight....
  10. galacticair

    R2AK 2018

    Back to the back end of the fleet, I’ve been both intrigued and marveling at Team Ravenous’ track since day 1. Much like the Prindle 19 in 2017, it seems like they’ve decided to take the sightseeing route to Ketchikan. Including covering only 70nm in the last 3.5 days since Campbell River, stopping about 4-5 times... That certainly explains all the gear they were overloaded with in the start pictures (literally to the point of looking like the stern was half sinking - the Hobie 20 not having very high volumes to start with). The racer in me is a bit flabbergasted - in 2017 we took about 24hrs to transit Seymour and all of Johnstone Str in the Nacra 20, despite light winds, including several hours stopped in Campbell River waiting for the current. On the other hand, the traveler in me is very envious of all the spots they are exploring along the way. I’m zooming all the way in on the tracker (satellite view) and genuinely enjoying seeing where they land each day. It also looks like they’ve done good research about where to stop, taking advantage of some of the better rest spots along the way — so, while random looking, I am guessing their track is everything but. Sounds like a mighty way to go up North. Keep it up Ravenous, just don’t take too long or the sweeper will come calling!
  11. galacticair

    R2AK 2018

    Congrats to SLAG and all the other finishers - great tight racing this year, lots of really good matches to watch, all the more so for being unexpected. The meet-up of the top 3 at Bella Bella was definitely a highlight on the tracker and videos. I too find it tempting to fall into the trap of pointing out X team’s mistakes or lack of speed, but then I remember part of this race’s ethos is its openness to all willing adventurers - I invite anyone who thinks they could have gone faster to sign up for next year. No excuses, pick your boat and go! Along the way there’s plenty to learn about being cold to the bone, or sweating from hours of pedaling in glassy calms, or feeling tired to the point of hallucination from never-ending watch rotations, or worried about a turn in the weather, or dreading pushing too hard at night, straight into a log... All the teams faced this and more this year - as in any year - and the better teams made it on top.
  12. galacticair

    R2AK 2018

    So here’s a question: has anyone on any of the top 6 boats ever done R2AK before? (SLAG, Lagopus, Wild Card, Ptarmigan, BlueFlash, STTPR) It’s pretty fun to watch how new this year’s crowd is. There’s going to be a lot of stoked crews at the finish when they see their result.
  13. galacticair

    R2AK 2018

    Tell us more!
  14. galacticair

    R2AK 2018

    What a difference 6hrs makes... not sure why Wild Card invested so much going that far W... Seems decisive taking them out the top 2.
  15. galacticair

    R2AK 2018

    Interesting choice by SLAG. Inside Aristazabal fairly reasonable (pretty direct and hopefully ok wind), but will be really interesting to see if they continue then inside of Banks. Inside Aristazabal (Laredo Channel) is only 20nm, but Banks (Principe Channel) is 40nm. Once you are inside Banks you are committed and stuck if no wind... Last year on the Nacra 20 the winds were fairly light around this portion and Laredo treated us well daytime (decent wind, downwind like now), but Principe at night killed us as we had to paddle all night to make it through. We were happy to learn that our following competitor had also gone down Banks, otherwise we thought they had just run around us on the outside. So it seems there’s much to lose staying in... maybe SLAG will split the middle and take Banks on the outside next...