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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

Cap'n Crunch

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About Cap'n Crunch

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  1. Clipper Does a Vestas

    Not wishing to be pedantic or anything, but looking at their 'map' I think they should check the location of Seattle before setting off on leg 6/7. Just sayin'.
  2. Sailing around the world in a San Juan 24

    ?Mimsy hoist onto deck of Korean ship? Looked after and dropped off near Saipan?
  3. B.C. Marine Weather Reporting

    Well, whaddyaknow... It just came back on. Sloop must have some useful contacts in the CHS.
  4. B.C. Marine Weather Reporting

    http://collaboration.cmc.ec.gc.ca/cmc/wbs/bplatstat.html So...we are planning to fix it end of october.
  5. B.C. Marine Weather Reporting

    according to NOAA, it's busted until Oct. 2017. Knackered all summer. Pathetic, really.
  6. Vendee Globe 2016?

    (Quote) "Hello Everybody...." ?Could Armel turn his AIS transmit off? AIS situation looks to Alex's advantage. I know this would be dangerous in these shipping lanes, but he won't be sleeping. It looks as though Alex's will probably be off so...?temptation? Race rules? Go, Alex BTW!!!
  7. Cable Ferry / Denman Island

    Thanks for that, Cap'n Ishmael. Good advice, I'll take it. Regarding the pic, that's a coastguard protecting the cables (in the middle) from the herring roe fleet. Or vice versa. The green light on the cable ferry/boat-like thing means it's OK to cross the cables. For a boat. For a sub-surface net, probably not so much. As I said in the spring: 'what could possibly go wrong?' Stay safe, out there.
  8. Cable Ferry / Denman Island

    Caption this: buckley bay ferry.tiff
  9. Cable Ferry / Denman Island

    There is much to like about ferries in BC. But the decision to go with this cable thing is turning out to be a real head-scratcher. (Link below: Smoke (passengers) but no fire (BC Ferries) -dead in the water for >2hours) http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/new-denman-island-cable-ferry-stranded-by-hydraulic-failure-1.3603763
  10. Kirkwall to Scapa Flow mid-summer sail

    Watching those older orkney chaps sailing their mini-knarrs (I missed the name) was great. Keeping up the tradition of their ancestors who opened up much of North America to trade with europe (Hudsons Bay Company), I guess. Wonderful video, Dylan. Seeing that landscape reminded me of something I heard once: The shetlander is a fisherman who has a farm; The Orcadian is a farmer who has a boat.
  11. Cable Ferry / Denman Island

    That's interesting, Ishmael. Thanks for posting the image. I have CHS charts via Fugawi and have balked (so far) at the update fee ($150/yr for eastern Vancouver island alone) I see there's a note posted in the CHS updates that says 'cable ferry' and Navionics seems to have placed this label where they were told to by the hydrographic service. No mention of the (I believe unconventional) addition of 'red/green traffic lights' as marine signals, either on the CHS website or the chart. As I said before: "What could possibly go wrong with this scheme?" (I know, sarcasm is the lowest form of wit, but I can't help it).
  12. Cable Ferry / Denman Island

    No Problem. Not the place to bring up QON, I suppose.
  13. Cable Ferry / Denman Island

    I just think a regular ferry ( boat) would be far, far less risky. I doubt that this aquatic cablecar thing will save much money, which seems to be what's driving this idea. Cutting corners on staffing costs seems to have been a major contributor to the Queen of The North sinking. I don't know that anyone ever did the cost savings/negative impact analysis on that particular case. How does BC Ferries get insurance to cover a system like this? How long before we see the chart updated I wonder?
  14. Cable Ferry / Denman Island

    The crossing is almost exactly 1nm. This will probably be a bit like the tug and barge situation all of the way up the coast: tugboat captains just cut the power when they see (inevitably a motorboat) going between tug and tow; cable drops, boater whizzes over the cable, oblivious of the fact that they narrowly escaped disaster. Most of these folks don't need no stinkin' charts or VHF anyway. A very large Bayliner used to sit in a yard in west van, surrounded by police tape, after a well-known fatal accident of this type in Vancouver a few years ago. Google SunBoy. I believe the biggest technical concern is (the rumour that) the thing may not (based on sea trials) have enough power to be safe in windy conditions, that (in contrast to the tugboat situation outlined above) this thing will have little or no steerage if it has to reduce power (e.g. to avoid slicing a kayaker/motorboater/pod of Orca 0.5nm away) and that the rationale (saving money on marine staff, 'aquatic cablecar thing with its own motors' cheaper than boat) may not work out as hoped. Basically, that a real boat would have been a more known quantity. The new thing has a maximum speed of 6knots under ideal conditions, hence the estimates of the wait time. My own concern is that the above is complicated by the shoal to the south that constricts the channel, that the channel east of the cable is I think a no-anchor area due to services to the island, the current and typical high wind down the channel. Just another set of navigational concerns for those in the know, but a potential fiasco for others. The new aquatic cablecar thing is certainly going to be surprising for the casual boaters and for visiting mariners on this coastline.
  15. Cable Ferry / Denman Island

    Apparently this is the longest cable ferry in the world. Rumour has it that many in the marine industry are crying foul on this one on technical grounds, and this is partly why it took 2 years to get federal approval. Rumour 2 has it that the sea trials did not inspire confidence. Last time I was there it was a beautiful sunny day with 30knot wind blowing down the channel (at right angles to the cable). This is typical. What could possibly go wrong ? (Maniacal laughter in background) From the CBC website: [The chap in the picture is holding the piece of paper that will be distributed at education sessions for local boaters, showing the red and green lights that don't appear on the charts. No confusion there]. Red signal lights have been installed at the cable ferry docks to indicate when other boats must stop. "So when this thing is running in the summertime, shuttling back and forth, the channel is basically closed to traffic for a very big percentage of the day," said Peter Kimmerly, a retired sea captain — who was the senior master of the nearby Hornby Island ferry for 12 years. Jamie Marshall, vice-president of fleet operations for BC Ferries, shows off an information sheet on the cable ferry's operation for local boaters. (Megan Thomas/CBC) Kimmerly also wonders whether all boaters will be aware of what the new signal lights mean. Education sessions are also being held for local boaters, BC Ferries said.