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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

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zzrider

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About zzrider

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    New England
  1. Recent pic from a couple weeks ago. My wife sailing her Capri 18, with me on our C&C in the background.
  2. I had a boom tent on our previous Sabre 28 and have one now on our current C&C. Love it. Nothing fancy, just a simple Sunbrella rectangle with grommets on all four edges. It's almost always up when we're on the mooring. Great sun & rain shelter, makes the cockpit feel cozy when just hanging out. Easily stands up to the 15-20+ kt breeze that often blows through here.
  3. Thanks for input all! I agree it's a rare event; 25 years and two boats with jib halyard snapshackles and this is the first time I've had one blow open. Nevertheless, it's still one more thing that can go wrong. And given that I can think of no compelling reason for a snapshackle on a jib halyard when exclusively using a furler, AND the fact that a simple bow shackle with screw pin is both cheaper and fool-proof, I think I'm pretty much done with snapshackles.
  4. I have not yet recovered the sky'd halyard. I've got three headsail halyards at the masthead. I just pulled the sail down so I could put a spare halyard on it and rehoisted. Nice trick recovering your spin halyard. Unfortunately my genoa's luff is full hoist, there's no strop on the halyard, and it appears the halyard sucked all the way into the mast with just the shackle itself stuck in the sheave. I can't even see it from the deck. I'm going to replace the one remaining unused halyard with a new one with a just a spliced eye (it's time anyway). Some calm morning I'll go up the mast to recover the sky'd halyard and rehoist the genoa again on the new halyard. Spongedeck: i dunno if it's customary or not to use a snapshackle on a halyard with a furler swivel. Like I said I never gave it any thought. Both this C&C and my Sabre before it had "quality" snapshackles on all the jib halyards. Now that I've been given cause to think about it, I'm thinking it's utterly pointless to have a snapshackle of any kind on a jib halyard that attaches to a furler swivel. Why would I ever care about wanting to be able to open it quickly? It's a more or less permanent connection.
  5. So my boats have always had jib halyards with the customary snap shackle on the working end, and this is something to which I never gave any thought. Until last weekend when I was out sailing. Single handed. And I decided I wanted to heave-to for a bit to take a lunch break. And as I made ready to reef down the big 145 genoa to facilitate heaving-to, there was a nice BANG! and the luff of the genoa suddenly went slack. Yep the damn snap shackle decided it was a good time to open. Henseforth, now all jib halyards shall have only a spliced eye with a moused bow shackle to the furler swivel. So let it be written. Bright side: now I know I can execute an unplanned, single-handed takedown & rehoist of the big gennie at sea.
  6. Crap. Thanks man. You having problems with the bolts? I've been thinking of taking the mast step off before the rig gets stepped just to take a good look at them (something I haven't yet done).
  7. I have a wing keel 34+. Yes there is one (maybe two) directly under the mast step casting. There are also at least two under the aftmost piece of cabin sole that's between the companionway steps and the removable bilge panels.
  8. yep, PASS. Way too much $$$ for a sketchy project boat. C22s are everywhere.
  9. Dunno if 36' is too small for your needs but the 90's era C&C 34+ (aka 34/36 aka 36XL) can easily be had for your budget with $$ left over for refit or upgrades. Wing keel version draws 5'. PHRF right around 100, nice aft cabin that my wife loves, overall great interior, easy to singlehand. I have a wing keel 34+ and absolutely love it. The C&C 37/40+ from the same era was also made with a 6' wing keel if you want 40'.
  10. You'e really going to befuddle BC as there is no such paint as VC - There is VC Offshore and VC 17M and they are quite different. What they do have in common is their salt water anti-fouling abilities suck. VC Offshore is a vinyl paint and needs to be sprayed or sanded to get a smooth finish Sets up very hard and is difficult to remove. VC 17M is intended for fresh water use, can be rolled on, is very thin, needs no sanding to end up smooth and comes off easily (rub with alcohol to remove IIRC) https://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=2325 I found this "VC17 wipes off easily with alcohol" claim to be incredibly untrue. My C&C came from the Great Lakes with VC17 on it that I had to remove when I brought it out to the east coast. I tried the alcohol thing but all I got was a lightly discolored rag. It would have taken forever to completely remove this way. I ended up sanding it all off, which actually went pretty quickly. Have Petit hydrocoat on it now, which I am happy with.
  11. I don't think Salus is USCG approved. Not that this necessarily matters to the OP - but just wanted to note this. There are some good foam PFD's available from Helly Hansen and Baltic. Baltic also makes a hybrid - some foam flotation with inflatable (manual or auto) in addition Note that most foam PFD sold in the US are not really offshore appropriate and are typically type III or less If you are in the water offshore you will greatly appreciate a float collar and enough flotation to keep your face out of the piss I really like the look of that Salus. Christian raise a good point - I really should not have used the term "offshore", should have said "coastal". At this point I'm not really looking for a type I, really just a more robust Type III for normal coastal conditions. Back to the Salus. Poking around, I found this: http://boatingindustry.ca/marine-products/3863-the-coastal-keelboat-vest-by-salus-marine-wear ... which claims, “The Coastal” Keelboat Vest by Salus Marine Wear just received Coast Guard Approval for your sailing enjoyment starting this spring. Odd that they don't mention this in the product info on their website. I'm assuming it's considered a Type III. Canadian Coast Guard not USCG Ohhhh.... d'oh! So since I have a Canadian boat, it's cool, right?
  12. Chris, I'll cast my lot along with the chorus advising a wise purchase like you mentioned above. Your use case is very similar to mine: very limited availability of long blocks of time, but unpredictable sporadic days and nights scattered at random throughout the season. Owning is the answer, it's your boat, go there when you want. Regarding maintenance: as others have mentioned, if you buy a well-built boat that was well maintained by previous owners, ongoing maintenance really isn't that big of a deal. I agree with the poster who mentioned it as a "zen" thing: I despise house maintenance of any sort, and with cars the only thing I do myself is oil changes (sometimes). But working on your own boat is different. Spiritually more akin to working a motorcycle. Spring commissioning and fall winterization is the bulk of the work, very little to do during the season when the boat is in the water unless you bought a project boat that needs alot of rehab. If you've got $50k or more for the boat purchase, you don't have to buy a rehab project. One thing I will say about Sabres and Tartans that you ought to think about though, is all that exterior teak both boats have in abundance. Brightwork is a love it or hate it thing, and I am in the HATE IT camp. My prior boat was a Sabre. I loved that boat but I hated dealing with the teak. Unless you're resigned to either completely ignoring it and letting it go grey, or paying the yard to religiously maintain varnish, there is no good answer to dealing with it, and maintaining it yourself requires you to waste good sailing weather. This was actually a major consideration when shopping for the boat that came after the Sabre, and is big reason why my current boat is a C&C. The only exterior teak is the cabin-top handrails and the companionway drop boards and trim.
  13. Can't you tell from looking at the inside of the hull in the bilge? I can clearly see where the core in my C&C ends from the inside. Ends about a foot from turn to the keel stub.
  14. I don't think Salus is USCG approved. Not that this necessarily matters to the OP - but just wanted to note this. There are some good foam PFD's available from Helly Hansen and Baltic. Baltic also makes a hybrid - some foam flotation with inflatable (manual or auto) in addition Note that most foam PFD sold in the US are not really offshore appropriate and are typically type III or less If you are in the water offshore you will greatly appreciate a float collar and enough flotation to keep your face out of the piss I really like the look of that Salus. Christian raise a good point - I really should not have used the term "offshore", should have said "coastal". At this point I'm not really looking for a type I, really just a more robust Type III for normal coastal conditions. Back to the Salus. Poking around, I found this: http://boatingindustry.ca/marine-products/3863-the-coastal-keelboat-vest-by-salus-marine-wear ... which claims, “The Coastal” Keelboat Vest by Salus Marine Wear just received Coast Guard Approval for your sailing enjoyment starting this spring. Odd that they don't mention this in the product info on their website. I'm assuming it's considered a Type III.
  15. I presently have a mediocre water-sports style life vest which I like because it's not too bulky and is quite comfortable, but I'm starting to look around for a more robust offshore-appropriate NON-inflatable vest with more buoyancy, and with pockets and lanyard rings. I don't want an inflatable vest of any sort. Mustang seems to have some decent ones, but I figured I'd solicit some opinions here. In particular, I'd like one that would work well with a harness underneath it since nobody seems to make a non-inflatable vest with a built-in harness.