Beachcomber

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About Beachcomber

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    Anarchist

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    Indianapolis
  1. ...yet another worthless sportboat. I don't understand why people attach fixed ballast to dry-sailed boats that are raced around the cans. If you want to sail a dinghy, sail a dinghy. And if people start fitting sportboats with canting keels and hydraulic systems and engines to drive them, I will just shake my head in dismay...
  2. Hydroptere held the Nautical Mile absolute record for 5 years, and the 500 m record for less. That's pretty impressive for a boat that's capable of sailing (on both tacks!) across an ocean. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_sailing_record
  3. I fear that the most important safety lesson here hasn't been learned: that the most important decisions cannot be delegated to one person. In the world of aeronautical engineering, peer review is one of the most important ways we avoid making mistakes. And similar practices are followed in the cockpits of commercial aviation. And that worked out really well for the passengers onboard the German wings flight. You're only confirming my point of the importance of peer review. And it's why the FAA in the US requires a member of the cabin crew to be in the cockpit when one pilot is out of it.
  4. I fear that the most important safety lesson here hasn't been learned: that the most important decisions cannot be delegated to one person. In the world of aeronautical engineering, peer review is one of the most important ways we avoid making mistakes. And similar practices are followed in the cockpits of commercial aviation. It's telling that it was Ian Walker who showed how the reef didn't show up on the zoomed out map. And I'm pretty sure he said "we [meaning himself and Si Fi] checked it out and marked it as a no go area".
  5. Wrong, sir. The mark is completely relevant, which is presumably why you cited Rule 18. Here it is, with my comments in bold: 18 MARK-ROOM 18.1 When Rule 18 Applies Rule 18 applies between boats when they are required to leave a mark on the same side and at least one of them is in the zone. <Check, this is the case> However, it does not apply (a) between boats on opposite tacks on a beat to windward, <Not on a beat> ( between boats on opposite tacks when the proper course at the mark for one but not both of them is to tack, <neither boat needs to tack> © between a boat approaching a mark and one leaving it, or <neither boat leaving the mark> (d) if the mark is a continuing obstruction, in which case rule 19 applies. <Not a continuing obstruction> The bottom line is, you can't call starboard if you're going downwind within 3 lengths of any mark, including a finish mark.
  6. Vestas definitely had room to finish; a) they did not hit SCA until they turned broadside trying to avoid the mark b ) SCA were not given a penalty for failure to give room. Vestas definitely had room to finish; a) they did not hit SCA until they turned broadside trying to avoid the mark b ) SCA were not given a penalty for failure to give room. If they "fouled" SCA in turning to avoid the mark, then the can't have been given enough room.
  7. Indeed. Not just Knut, but the rest of the commentary team too. Admittedly the footage wasn't great (zoomed in too tight), but by my reckoning, Vestas was within 3 lengths of the finishing mark and entitled to room. The finish is not like the start - it's like any other mark on the course. After the incident, Knut seemed to correct himself, and said something about the judges having ruled that SCA had given Vestas enough room to round the mark (which I think they didn't). Does anyone know what the judges actual ruling was?
  8. What started as a sensible post with good advice on how to get onto a "big boat" in this thread was made into a ridiculous one the front page on how to get into a "racing boat" by whoever edited yet. Yes editors, dinghies are racing boats too, and I don't think I'll ever understand the American fetish for big boats, or this websites fixation on them.
  9. The website is called Sailing Anarchy. There is no thread Police.
  10. No it wasn't. The Internet is not the same thing as the World Wide Web. The internet came out of a Darpa funded project in I don't know, the 70s maybe. The Internet is what a lot of other services run on, like email, voip, ftp, torrents, and yes the www. A Brit working at Cern invented the www, which was a mashup of the internet and hypertexts. The first graphical browser which rendered pictures as imbedded in the hypertext was written at the NCSA at U of Illinois.
  11. +1 Got to love it when Australians are using an American invention, the Internet, on their American computers with American processors, running American Software to boast about how they won the America's Cup. Once.
  12. Change and 2XD, Thanks for your thoughtful replies. I say that with only partiial sarcasm, because now I don't have to point out how uncouth some of you Aussies are. You already made that point. Recidivist, you're right, I am an idiot. Unlucky for you, I design the jet engines that power the airplanes you fly in. I hope they don't blow up, catch fire, or snap in half and sink or anything...
  13. Can someone translate this to English so I can understand it? -thanks
  14. It's Ostriches from South Africa and Kangaroos from Oz, right? Looking at this thread, I think I must have that wrong, given the Australian Ostriches who think that an article where the Dutch naval architect who conceived of, designed and tested the winged keel says as much somehow confirms that the yacht was a purely Lexcen design. In the face of the evidence, stick your heads in the sand Ozzie Ostriches! This is the most telling quote in the article: "Ben did things by feel and intuition, but in the America's Cup that will get you nowhere. It is a very scientific thing" Lexcen was a cut-it-and-try kind of guy from the 18 ft skiff class, not the type equipped with the back ground to understand induced drag and design a keel with winglets. The rest of the article: Winged keel not Lexcen's design, Dutch architect claims