SemiSalt

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About SemiSalt

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  • Birthday 10/20/1946

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  1. SemiSalt

    Life aboard a sub-20' Sailboat

    John Welsford designed an 18' boat of Flicka-like proportions called Swaggie for long range cruising. Interior of a Swaggie under construction:
  2. SemiSalt

    Life aboard a sub-20' Sailboat

    When Phil Bolger got a commission for a minimum live-aboard (Jesse Cooper design, shown below), it came out at 26'. To do that, he resorted to such extremes as an off-center mainmast, off-center dagger board, and vertical companionway ladder. When he designed another boat with most of the oddities fixed, it was up to 30'.
  3. SemiSalt

    Life aboard a sub-20' Sailboat

    I've just gotta stop trusting my memory.
  4. SemiSalt

    Life aboard a sub-20' Sailboat

    Twenty feet is doable if the boat is designed for that particular purpose. William Garden designed a 20' apartment for student.
  5. SemiSalt

    When good designers produce ugly boats.

    I think the apparent flex is an artifact of the way the camera scans.
  6. SemiSalt

    When good designers produce ugly boats.

    Back when I was in college, I suggested to a physics professor that you could get all the magic ratios, e.g. Reynolds Number, more in line if the model was foreshortened. He dismissed the idea out of hand.
  7. SemiSalt

    Gaff Rigs

    Anyone interested in wishbone ketches should look up Frederic Fenger.
  8. My Hunter 28 has a fractional rig, originally adjusted only with a turnbuckle. I changed it to a typical adjustable arrangement with a multi-purchase tackle. No problems though I don't sail in strong winds or big seas. A friend had a Tartan 33. When he asked a guy from S&S (Bill Langan?) how to make the boat faster, his immediate reply was "running backstays>"
  9. SemiSalt

    When good designers produce ugly boats.

    How well do CDF results match up with tank tests?
  10. SemiSalt

    When good designers produce ugly boats.

    IIRC, some in every case, but not in every box.
  11. SemiSalt

    When good designers produce ugly boats.

    Reading Sail4's post, I was reminded of another characteristic of gaff rig: it's difficult to get a big foretriangle. As an example, look at the Camden Class sloop. This is what a hot racing class looked like just before the Marconi rig took over. The mast is not as high as the main even though the main has a rather low aspect ratio. There is just not enough height there for a big jib. Aside from that geometry issue, the staying isn't anywhere near as good. Spreaders, if any, had to be above the throat of the gaff. No standing backstay, although runners were usual. Stays were looped around the mast aloft which leaves a little slack.
  12. SemiSalt

    When good designers produce ugly boats.

    We had a Morgan 30-2 at the club for a long time. When I first saw it, it was owned by a formal naval officer, and I thought the bow looked the part. I'm not sure how it stacks up overall, but that one was very impressive upwind in a breeze (when they everything set right). And I'm still losing races to the earlier Morgan 30.
  13. SemiSalt

    Gaff Rigs

    William Garden included a design called Privateer - An Ancient Dream Ship in his book Sailing Yachts. I don't know whether he expected a boat to be built to the design. He did do some designs just because an idea caught his fancy. Anyway, this boat is very heavy and very picturesque. It came to mind because I remember this quote from the book: "Two sail plans were developed, the simpler and perhaps most practical schooner rig, or the old-time cutter, with a mile or so of gear for the man who owns a rope walk and likes to be busy roaming the deck with a handy-billy setting things up.With neither rig nothing could be more pleasant than sitting on a cask contemplating the full curve of the mainsail as she bowls along toward the horizon." And that is the romance of gaff rig.
  14. SemiSalt

    When good designers produce ugly boats.

    I think the gaff rig is pretty much obsolete. A modern Marconi rig can be trimmed with a lot more precision and has a lot fewer opportunities for chafe. However, the Marconi main is not especially wonderful downwind, so racers and many cruisers use light sails of various kinds in compensation. The gaff main is much worse than the Marconi main upwind, but much better downwind, especially broad reaching. So, if you're a cruiser of the "gentlemen don't sail to windward" school, or if you want to eschew light sails, there may be a gaff-rigged yacht that will work for you. Once upon a time, it might have been said that a gaff rig can be repaired anywhere, but a Marconi rig needs parts from the industrialized world. I'm not sure that's a very strong argument anymore.
  15. SemiSalt

    When good designers produce ugly boats.

    Dick Carter claims to have brought separated rudders to the RORC with Rabbit in 1965. That's not to say they were unknown before that.