Skol

Members
  • Content Count

    458
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

5 Neutral

About Skol

  • Rank
    Anarchist
  • Birthday 01/01/1974

Profile Information

  • Location
    Brest, Bretagne
  • Interests
    foredeck overboard expert. PBR can spinnaker pole construction. bailing water.

Recent Profile Visitors

1,911 profile views
  1. Skol

    Went to look at a Catalina 22....

    You're a natural born Ericson sailor, Sir! lol Those spreader plates are real similar to the kit I mentioned before. If you haven't posted the CAD pic and info already to EYO I'm betting you'll find a few appreciative folks. With Polish Girl and all the refitting, that's a very happy looking E-23. Nice work and thanks for updating the thread - really cool to see 'er out on the water w/ no regrets about the GOB route. Surely there is more photo documentation of Polish Girl bringing the gelcoat back to life? For purely technical interests. cheers
  2. Skol

    Went to look at a Catalina 22....

    Lark, my boat experience is all in-water, so I don't have direct experience for you. What I know is that the stuff that's marketed as "dux" is a lot more stiff than regular amsteel. it's not as stiff as wire but it shouldn't snag because of kinking while laying untensioned. A bonus for regular Amsteel I think would be keeping it neatly coiled on deck while the stick is down. I'm a little OCD so maybe that's just me. the WLL for amsteel, dux, and dyneema branded ropes are all so high that I wouldn't give a second thought to UV exposure and the 5 yrs of hard use. My first handling of amsteel was with jeeps and land rovers. winching 5k of truck through hub-deep mud filled with roots and rocks is a lot scarier to me than popping a shroud. broken winch cables have been known to slice through people. when synthetic pops it just falls to the ground. the couple times I've seen it fail there was damage to rig or tree from stored energy in kinetic straps, not the rope itself.
  3. Skol

    Went to look at a Catalina 22....

    Tempest, your rigger's prices seem super competitive (good) to me, and it makes me happy to see you addressing this now. The advantage to this route is that it gets done and gets you on the water sooner. The advantage to synthetic route is elitism and a stiffer boat for roughly the same cost. If you decide to convert in a couple years all those SS turnbuckles are still a good, reusable. investment. After you get the rigging and the spreaders done, I'd splash it. New sails will improve the boat 100%, but without a baseline to compare them with it won't be obvious on your first boat, never mind a new-to-you boat. run whatcha got, chill some cold ones and get 'er splashed!
  4. Skol

    Went to look at a Catalina 22....

    keep digging on the forums and you'll understand the issues a bit better. the rigging you've got is dead as a door nail for sure. So - 5mm Sk75 dyneema is a bit over $1 /ft and plenty UV resistant for a trailered boat. this stuff is what the fishing industry uses offshore in conditions we can't even dream of in our worst nightmares if we tried. 30 ft stick comes out to roughly 175ft total for lowers, uppers, stays. so less than 200 bucks. the big costs are hardware. Colligo Marine's prices seem to have crept up a bit since I last looked, but you'll need the spreader tangs, dead eyes, and new turnbuckles (which you'll want same as wire, anyway). So it comes down to the swaging costs + material from the rigger compared to the sexy hard parts from colligo. I wouldn't trust swaged terminals of my own doing, and the sta-loc bits are $$$. a feller with a SJ 24 came to the same conclusions as I did - more on his blog here: http://restore24.blogspot.fr/2013/04/colligo-dux-standing-rigging.html he made his own hw parts and the cost came out to be less than wire. not many folks have gone this route because it seems like a break from the tried and true, but I think the synthetic is better in every way. I recall reading somewhere that losing 1lb aloft is like adding 6lbs in the keel. you're getting back a lot of righting moment which means a stiffer boat. re: spreaders - you're not looking to go offshore or do a lot of racing, so normal spreader replacement kit and riveted brackets will work fine. I don't see a dimple like I had on mine. new hw here will likely still set you back ~200 - 400. EYO is the best place to find exact details. on the round vs. foil spreader debate, I'd go with what's economical for your purposes (round). I agree with Jim - that bulkhead doesn't look so good as the core is clearly delaminated at the top. You've got your work cut out for you there. I'd worry about the gelcoat and cosmetic stuff last. The bow looks about like mine did, right down to the ugly anchor setup. Lots of good info to be had online for using West system to fill and redrill holes. But don't remove a single screw until you're ready to do the whole job! If you caulk the crap out of it you can keep enough water out for this season to delay it until next year (epoxy likes heat to cure). Not sure about the deck on the 23. My 27 was balsa. also I agree 100% with Lark about the bottom. no need for ablative paint on a trailer boat. sand the bottom, fair it, then roll 'n tip with a hard paint for easy cleaning.
  5. Skol

    Went to look at a Catalina 22....

    He's gonna get bored of Pond sailing real quick when he's got the strait of Georgia in his back yard And Hell yeah! Synthetic is so much nicer than wire and I think splicing rope for DIY guys is better than swaging terminals. Once you add up all the hard parts for terminals and bottle screws or turnbuckles for wire, changing over to synthetic just isn't that much more expensive on a small boat. Also - soft sail hanks on a synthetic forestay will make handling genoas a lot easier. Lastly, since this is a ramp launched boat it's going to be easier with synthetic. Fair bottom, good rigging, a strong spar and spreaders, and crisp sails are the important parts. Strip everything inside to the hull, replace any thruhulls with marlon and worry about the rest over the winter.
  6. Skol

    Went to look at a Catalina 22....

    Since you're an SA'er first and we love to spend other people's money, it's time to talk about what kind of rigging. On your E-23 you can probably easily shave 20-30lbs of weight aloft if you go synthetic on the standing rigging: colligo dux, new england ropes HSR heat set stuff, or since this is a trailer sailer, regular dyneema would be just fine assuming the shrouds and stays are stored out of the sun. Rig a ground anchor somewhere and use your diesel truck to pre-stretch the shrouds and set your splices. ditto on all the halyards.upgrade the sheaves for rope (as they are surely v-sheaves for wire), and use soft shackles on everything - no hard parts. L-36.com has loads of good info here. few other items - Ericson glassed the chainplates into the hull. It's rare for them to pull out but not unheard of. People have different philosophies on repair. my vote is for a hole through the hull and chainplate, SS thru-bolt + loads of exoxy. Some swap over to external chainplates but this kills your sheeting angles on the jib, and you need all the help you can get. Since you're single and don't have kids, I'd seal off the stanchion holes and ditch the lifelines unless you plan racing, in which case rip it all out and reseal it anyway with epoxy, then drill new holes and use G10 backing plates where you're able. synthetic on the lifelines is also nicer than the plastic covered wire. at the bow, you're going to want to carefully un-fuck any and everything that's been bolted to it - nav lights, ill-advised anchor fittings, cleats, and the pulpit. pull it all out, dig out the core a bit in the holes and epoxy the shit out of everything, then redrill and re-install. it's a biggish job but straight forward.
  7. Skol

    Went to look at a Catalina 22....

    Ericson are indeed the champagne of 70's production plastic classics, some with more cork damage than others. Much has been written about plastic liner boats, most rooted in misinformation and contempt. My first sailboat was an ericson 27 and I loved it, but I didn't have the cash to finish a refit before having to move. Some of my plight is recorded here in SA and on EYO under the same user name. The spar repair kit was about 700 usd including new spreaders and brackets, iirc. What happens is that one or both of the cast metal spreader brackets develops a crack and breaks, giving the spreader room to wiggle under load. As a result a dimple forms in the mast. Check yours - you might be lucky and not need it but it's a known weak point. Once the stick and rigging are upgraded, fear no winds nor seas. The bulbous and odd shapes of the ericson boats love breeze - and a lot of it. They are tender when first meeting the wind but stiffen up as it piles on. The rudder will lose grip before you can dunk the rail. Also - the slug keel will point higher than you might guess. Not fast boats but not complete slugs, either, and every one I've helmed up to 35 are a real joy to sail. Looking forward to your progress.
  8. Skol

    Went to look at a Catalina 22....

    congrats, and cool! - the Ericson 23 is a sharp little boat when spruced up, and plenty tough for beating around the strait. EYO is a great site. All the mindshare you could ask for is there, including suppliers and refit info. The hull dent looks a bit of a bummer but can be corrected with enough elbow grease. you may need some kind of internal form to push it out, and depending on depth of the shallow fill, glass, and fair it. welcome to the Bruce King club. btw - ballenger spars down in cali has a great kit to reinforce the mast at the spreaders. just call 'em up. spendy but beefy.
  9. Skol

    Went to look at a Catalina 22....

    Brewing beer and kicking around boats. ah, PNW! makes me homesick but thanks for the pic and egging me on. Long before I bought my first boat in GRP, I had a mag subscription to Wooden Boat and dreamed of restoring something. T-Birds, Kings Cruiser, and Folkboats had my attention at first, then in SF I discovered the Bear Boats and the Bird Boats. I wanted to rescue a Bear Boat real bad but I ended up moving. WB features more modern stuff, too - like this little mini 6.5 shaped micro-cruiser. http://www.woodenboat.com/blacktip If you're open to little tubs like the Wight Potter, have a look-see on Cruising Anarchy's own Dylan Winter and his Keep Turning Left series. That guy has covered more miles than most and is an ardent defender of pudgy little cruisers. I don't have to remind you, but you're smack dab in the middle of one of the world's most premier sailing and cruising destinations. Scooting across and over to Nanaimo and Victoria, or up north through into passage is easily done. Setting a hook down overnight in a cove with a small boat is easy and a real joy. Somebody could spend the rest of their days exploring what's right there in your back yard with a small boat. https://www.youtube.com/user/KeepTurningLeft
  10. Skol

    Went to look at a Catalina 22....

    now there's some real old man porn right there. would ya just look at all those skylights and the shelves galore and saws and nice air tank. oh, the boat's pretty nice, too!
  11. Skol

    CrazyProa. The flame suit is on.

    ZTH - do a google for "water tribe" and you'll see what I saw. I just tried it with no space and I see the org, now. Looks cool. we're the same age (I'm 43) and this kind of thing seems infinitely more fun to me these days than W/L racing, handicap or od. As far as GFM page goes, without a link to the Org there to investigate, the reader is left with their own impressions. Even with a link it's likely to distract from the goal. Cast a wide net and convert! I came back to SA to get some feedback about large dinghy / open-boat designs. Somebody turned me onto the Strike 18 tri and I'm pretty sure this is going to be my next boat. I've seen your posts off an on for those 10 years you've been here. I've done a lot of lurking, and posted under 2 different IDs that I lost pwds to. The average yearly income in Brittany - home of Pogo yachts, Tabarlay, Kersauson, VOR team HQs, record smashing multi-hull demons, and resting place of Moitessier - is 19k a year. Not exactly a hot-bed for local racing. There's very little, in fact. All the famous french names you read about are revered like NFL athletes in the US. That level of sailing is out of reach for the vast majority, including me. But if you look up Crozon peninsula on a map, you'll see perfect waters for this emerging trend for sail/row craft like CrazyR is building. When I first encountered this post, I was intrigued but it made me angry. There is no doubt that SA can present itself at times as a little microcosm of American exceptionalism. There are a lot of people who would gladly trade CrazyR's place in the FL keys with a 28' liveaboard for their shitty 20 m^2 apartment. People here face 10% unemployment, which is a lie given how France records this stat - it's more like 20~30%. Farmers are going bankrupt because the government sets the price of food staples. The famous public health system is in need of a big reboot, and people are afraid of losing their health benefits under the next President. All the cars here are the shittiest you've ever seen. Tiny little things, all diesel, because fuel is well over $5 a gallon. People really live in a state of perpetual poverty, and ask for very little in return. That mentality has affected me, too. So when I see someone digitally panhandling on the 'net and then getting combative when poking holes in his story, it makes me wonder why they think they deserve to have an easy way out. I think the motivation behind the caustic, mean spirited posts here is a wholesale rejection of the notion that we have to pretend to have high estrogen levels to interact with each other on our most base of instincts, or that we have to be friends just because we happen to be browsing the same place on the web. Like Jack London Square must've been in the 70's, it's a nasty little corner of the water. But we stick around after taking the abuse, dishing it back out, and learning that people probably aren't half the douchebags they pretend to be while connected to a keyboard. I've never met another SA'er in person. At my old club nobody ever admitted to posting here. Even slumming for a ride at Sloop Tavern in Seattle didn't turn up the SA sekrut handshake (tits or GTFO). Pity, I had a nice pic or 2 on my mobile to show as a joke. At any rate, CrazyR is gonna get his mojo back and finish his fucking boat hell or high water. And after it's done, he's going to remember the weird, wonderful shitstorm his thread turned into here on SA - and I hope it's kick in the nuts he needed to make it happen. All bullshit aside, it's looks like a really cool project.
  12. Skol

    CrazyProa. The flame suit is on.

    @woody, @ZTH. I'm self employed. hours are long, pay sucks, and of course I have to do everything myself. "Some people have souls, but I work in advertising." --Don Draper I'm still tangentially linked to ad-tech, unfortunately, but a lot of what I do is marketing consulting to startups. So a few marketing lessons here and bullet points to turn this thread around: * unless it's cancer, nobody wants to donate to a sad personal story. Keep your campaign messaging positive, goal oriented, and on point: this project is about: - finishing the R&D effort on the boat - sea trialing in preparation for first challenge / race - acquiring materials, covering costs Tales of intrigue and combative signs of anguish are not helping your cause. * "water tribe circle: nobody knows what the fuck this is, and anybody over the age of about 35 is going to assume it's some kind of club for Millennials to stay angry at their parents while dodging college or gainful employment. At least, that's exactly what I thought when I read your gofundme page. It didn't help that I couldn't stop laughing yesterday about this group of dimwits stuck at #fyrefestival. Circulate the link to your water tribe hippie friends with a personal note, but leave references to it off of your primary page. * project structure: you're doing this all by yourself. why? make a team name that you can use to market this effort and attract supporters. Proas are crazy enough on their own, so doubling down with "CrazyProa" isn't helping. People don't want to invest in crazy. Let the Vestas Sailrocket project be your template. Also, you don't need to "defend" your ideas. The product is (or isn't) it's own validation of your ideas. Market the product, not your ideas. You need someone to help you with PR and project management. * Attracting investment is about selling a positive image of yourself, the project, and why you're going to accomplish your objectives. * Say what you're doing with the money and be specific. A line item to cover living expenses while working on the project is 100% legitimate. Leaving it vague and calling it a donation is a neon sign that reads "give me party money". * If the project is successful, what's next? People like the sense that a project has momentum. If your proa meets its design objectives and has a good race, do you intend to build more of them? work with a naval architect and sell plans? where do you want this to go? * There is not one damned thing wrong with fund raising. If you have feelings of guilt or inadequacy about that, get over it right now. If you want this project to support you then you have to start treating it like a business, and do your best to project professionalism to move it from personal plea -> legitimate effort. What's clear is that people are noticing your work and defending you here. Other's will follow if you lead. Keep your chin up and patch the flamesuit. It never gets easier.
  13. Skol

    Went to look at a Catalina 22....

    you mean middle of mountain biking & backpacking country! banks lake is nice, too, and not much further from chelan. great pubs / breweries to be found there in twisp, winthrop. boat looks relatively tidy, & freshwater sailed. as classic plastics go, you could do a lot worse!
  14. Skol

    CrazyProa. The flame suit is on.

    And you know me like you can tell your ass from a hole in the ground. So how about this: how can we help him get a web site setup, construction blog, video channel, and solicit some local assistance to help CrazyR formulate some kind of realistic plan for achieving his goals? Bring it you meatsickles. -Skol out.