Mozzy Sails

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Mozzy Sails last won the day on August 12 2019

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About Mozzy Sails

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    United Kingdom
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    Sailing, cycling, squash

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  1. Mozzy Sails

    INEOS Team GB

    Yeah, I get that rudder is a brake. But, you either use a smaller amount of rudder for longer, or a larger amount of rudder for shorter. So the penalty adds up the same. Using too much rudder becomes an issue when you stall it, which is very draggy. On heavy dinghies and yachts if you use too much rudder this happens, you end up not turning quickly, but just stalling and dragging the rudder. After all, you have a hull that wants to go straight working against a rudder that is trying to turn the boat. But it's close to what I am saying above skidding out. If you turning to quickly, the rudder could stall, This would cause drag, and you would stop turning. Or if the main foil loses grip you again get lots of drag, and you skid sideways. So I think they might be limited by how quickly their foils let go (just like a racing car losing grip in a turn). I also think it's about co-oridnating control too. No point the helm spinning the wheel supper fast if the foil can't be dropped and flaps then trimmed to provide lift as the weight is transferred to the outside of the turn. Or the main trimmer can takes 2-3 second to invert the main.. etc Potentially some issue are limited by structural loading on the boat and foils? But, if your systems are good enough, your foils don't stall, and the boat can take the load, then from a performance point of view the less time you spend off VMG the better.
  2. Mozzy Sails

    INEOS Team GB

    There's a reason the optimum VMG angle is the optimum VMG angle. Every moment you spend off it is a negative. The boats are relatively light for their rig size. As soon as they exit the power zone those big rigs are pure drag and being light they won't have the moment to avoid quick deceleration. Plus, with the hull out of the water, there won't be the same drag penalty of 'twisting' a straight hull through a turn. Even with skiffs, it's always better to do a quick turn. And that's still with dragging a fat arse through the water. The only limit of how fast you turn is your ability to move yourself at the same time.... which these boats don't have. The holding momentum for VMG gain on heavier boats is a bit of a red herring. It's never a VMG gain, but just less of loss as you have smaller sails (less drag head to wind) and more momentum relatively to maintain forward movement. So, I'd say the shortest time between VMG on one tack or gybe to other the better. The limit will be the foils 'skidding' out and stalling with the increased side loading of the turn, and of course how quickly they can get the new foil down and set to 'catch' the boat on the new tack (plus how quickly they can invert the main).
  3. Mozzy Sails

    Emirates Team New Zealand.

    I post a bit back commenting on cut outs in the pods where the traveller goes in. You can't see those in this boat construction video. Did they make a mod just before roll out to extend the traveller track into the pods to give greater range? That could have meant cutting a chunk out of the top of the pod and reinforcing against the outer skin. Or is the second picture just a a protective pad for the pod against the mainsheet when the traveller is all the way down and amin eased?
  4. Mozzy Sails

    INEOS Team GB

    Oh, then I guess it's even stranger. A poor showing in cagliari coupled with NZL modelling well in their sim would be a good explanation from their divergence from the original concept. I think the second boat was probably decided upon before much (or any?) sailing in cagliari.
  5. Mozzy Sails

    Emirates Team New Zealand.

    Not wanting to start another 'there be lines on the hull' debate. But looks like the where the main tracks go in to the pod the cover above doesn't quite sit flush. Do you think these could pop up to allow a greater range of traveller? Holding leach and foot tension out to wider sheeting angles. Something INEOS seemed to struggle with on their boomless set up. Once you get to the end of that track, it becomes very hard to ease the sheeting angle without dumping loads of depth in to the main at the same time.
  6. Mozzy Sails

    Emirates Team New Zealand.

    okay. Could be. The previous set of structures were running more along the foot, rather than diagonal, i thought. But I could have been looking at different lines on the sails. Those lines to the mast look like the 'spanner' systems. Or linked to it. INEOS are rotating the mast with the boom. I think Luna Rosa were using that big plate on the mast foot we saw on the old mast. God know what they are doing now.
  7. Mozzy Sails

    Emirates Team New Zealand.

    Aren't these diagonals in a completely different place to the last set of battens you saw? Pretty sure they are creases!
  8. Mozzy Sails

    INEOS Team GB

    My concern with INEOS is that there wasn't much time between B1 launching and B2 build being signed off. I think the skeg could have been added after (and probably was post Italy design choice and maybe not even in the mould). If you take the wide skeg off Rita 2, then it looks very similar to NZL B1. The chat I got before christmas was that NZL B1 tested best in the simulator of all the boats and I don't think they gained much more confidence in some of their design concepts out in Italy, but B2 had already been signed off by then. So, my concern for INEOS would be if they got distracted by how fast NZL (and ITA) were going, and instead focused the models on improving those design philosophies, rather than developing what they had. For me, NZL looks like a progression from INEOS B1. The bow is quite different, with a higher sheer line, suggesting more air being pushed to the sides and down on NZL B2. But, the trench is similar, just taken to the next level with the pods. NZL boomless set up is similar, but just more adjustments and looks far better for it. And the squared off transom is the next level of 'square'. Both teams must be slightly uneasy that the other has stepped back from a few key design features. The area of agreement seems to the be wide skeg.
  9. Mozzy Sails

    Emirates Team New Zealand.

    I don't see that boom, just a clew adjustment. The double take off they are talking about it vertical displacement of the two take off points, not one for each skin. So you can change the sheeting angle dramatically. I highlighted on the other page the difference in the clew control in comparison the INEOS set up for their boomless sail.
  10. Mozzy Sails

    Emirates Team New Zealand.

    Don't they swap side after the manoeuvre? Isn't the first 'tell' the windward foil drop. The AC50s had the post manoeuvre helmsman cross first, but that was when they had no one too leeward. On the AC75s there's already someone on the other side. So no need to send anyone ahead of the turn. I do think having those few second it takes to cross, hand over controls then get back in the rhythm isn't ideal though. Plus, the guy grabbing the stick presumably isn't doing whatever they were previously doing. Is the view from the windward side that much better that it pays to have two helmsmen though? I would have thought having the tactician, flight controller, main trimmer all pretty near would help too. Just so they're seeing and hearing the same things. In which case how may of those swap sides too? Or is the communication system good enough that they can be anywhere? After all, you can't duplicate all these rolls on both side surely? Someone needs to be grinding?!
  11. Mozzy Sails

    American Magic has a "Bat Wing" main now

    this is all in the NYYC thread. And yes, the measurement arbitration put out the adjudication that this is exactly what they do. Is the width of the AC logo specified anywhere? Perhaps that is sized so it would fit he min head girth?
  12. Mozzy Sails

    Emirates Team New Zealand.

    @Horn Rock I'm not sure. Just saying what I see. But, in a system that is working well I don't think creases are unlikely. Upwind you want to pull hard along the foot to flatten the sail. So any excess cloth will bunch in creases. And you will be sheeting hard on the leech to for power so the clew (and foot of the sail) pulled down in to the deck. It was quite breezy upwind sailing in this video. I'd expect them to drop out downwind when they sail with a fuller sail. In ineos final boomless set up they had a a similar skirting line along the foot to neaten up below the clew (you can see below). But I don't think they had enough range of movement on the clew board for the mainsheet attachment. It also looks like NZL have two skirting lines.
  13. Mozzy Sails

    Emirates Team New Zealand.

    This is what I see. Red is traveller. Blue is mainsheet. Green is an adjustable clew board for sheeting angle / twist. Pink are 'skirting' lines just to neaten up the shape below the clew board. Then there is a couple of creases where excess cloth is folding under tension and being brought down in to the deck. Downwind when the clew lifts these might drop out to maintain a tight fit against the deck. But I don't see any evidence of super thick battens 'pushing' camber out of the foot.
  14. Mozzy Sails

    Emirates Team New Zealand.

    I can't seen any particularly big battens? There's a couple of tension creases in the sail.
  15. Mozzy Sails

    Emirates Team New Zealand.

    This what happens when you try to use battens to 'push' camber out of a sail. I think this was as good as the INEOS boomless set up got.Not too dissimilar to what the Kiwis have noe. But looking at teh huge cutout NZL has is does look like they have more range in their sheeting angle.