TheBSJ

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About TheBSJ

  • Rank
    Newbie

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  • Location
    Chichester Harbour, UK
  • Interests
    Sailing, Rowing, Cycling, etc...
  1. TheBSJ

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    It had better not take 90%, we have been at this project for four years. I was hoping to be on the water in spring... It took ten days to plank our hull... Only a week to build and fair the decks... The interior structure was fine... Fitting the engine and sail drive was four days including building the engine beds... But finding the right light fitting/mooring eye/table hinge/etc took days all by themselves! And I have fitted a Mastervolt bus system for all the electrics. That took me a while to upgrade my electronics knowledge to cope with. Final fit out definitely takes far longer than I imagined. Still, it's only the second boat I have built and the other had virtually no systems at all, so it's all experience for the next one! Oh, and it might have taken far longer than I hoped, but my word it was fun!
  2. TheBSJ

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    Absolutely brilliant to see some shots of her from a distance, it really lets you see her shape a bit better. And she is beautiful! Fabulous work by all, I can't wait to see her on the water... Just be prepared for the fact that the last 10% takes so much longer than the first 90! And I'll add my thanks too, it is a joy and education to read this thread!
  3. TheBSJ

    Uglyboat Admiration Society Hang Out

    it is not emmo, it's nelson piquet. and, by popular demand, i give you "pilar rossi" To me that just looks like 3 or 4 boats all moored really close together... Is it really supposed to be one? How many designers worked on it? 'cos they all had different ideas...
  4. TheBSJ

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    Ooops, sorry folks, I've been hard at work... The product I have used is Flexiteek. http://www.flexiteek.com/. I looked at samples from 3 or 4 local fitters, all using different products, as well as getting prices for teak and kebony. Kebony is a chemically treated hardwood that then behaves pretty much like teak. THe Flexiteek seemed the most realistic to me, and I chose the standard finish, they also do weathered/grey/brushed/etc with various different caulking. The grain is added with 80 grit sandpaper, and can go in any direction, so if you have someone do it for you, make sure they know how timber works and how a wooden deck is done, otherwise you could end up with a bit of plank 8' wide... Which'll look odd! I just did a quick weight test with a section that is going on a hatch. A 920x550x6mm pattern, with the caulking in weighed in at about 2.75kgs, by my maths, that gives you 905kg/m3 I found Burma teak as 740 and african teak as 980kg/m3 So it's pretty close. It's applied with sika or similar to stick it down. It's relatively flexible, so the decks must be really fair, and it should be well rolled out to get any air bubbles out. I had it templated, made up and fitted cheaper than I could by the timber for the same job. They colour should remain the same for many years, and that was one of the reasons I chose it. The rest of the boat is very modern and sparkly, so I want the decks to remain looking fresh and new, rather than going silver with age. I also have toe rails in this stuff too. They do a 1.5" by 1" section with a biased taper on it, as you would expect on a teak toe rail. It comes in long smooth lengths. You cut it too length, and then hit it with 80 grit to get the finish. This is the bit I weighed... The underside, and yes, very flexible. The grooves on the bottom are actually "T" shaped, giving a really good bond with Sika. A bit of offcut toerail, I just used some old 40 grit on it, so the grain is a bit harsh, but you can see the effect. Tom R, I'll not chuck too many pictures in Kim's thread, so have a look here http://www.arboryachts.co.uk to see more in the blog. I was a bit worried about it being "fake" to start with. I was a great traditionalist, and my own boat is a 1947 Hillyard, so I was a bit horrified in some ways. But actually, I have built this boat with strip plank cedar, timber veneers, plywood, foam cores, epoxy, glass and carbon. When it comes down to it, I am using what I believe to be the right material for the job to give the performance, aesthetics and ease of maintenance that I want. For the decks, for this boat, the answer was this stuff.
  5. TheBSJ

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    We have just laid a plastic deck that looks like teak. After a decade or so restoring classic yachts, that hurt to start with, then I remembered that whilst we have a wooden hull, the decks, cabin and cockpit are a foam core sandwiched in glass and epoxy. Teak was very expensive. Kebony was fairly expensive, other timber options came out expensive. All would age, bleach, stain, etc. The "fake teak" or decorative plastic is about the same weight, maybe cheaper, won't fade, is comfy and grippy underfoot, won't stain, and what's more, I like the way it looks. I had it templated, made up and fitted cheaper than I could buy the raw materials in timber. Oh, and it looks so convincing that when our yacht designer came to see the launch, he had a good look, and felt it, and still thought it was timber. It's not for everyone, but it is a damn good option in some cases. It's just whether you can get over the "fake" bit...
  6. TheBSJ

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    Looks like he will do a fab job. I'm just making our tiller. I did one for a friend as a bit of practice and to experiment, Ours will have a swan neck curve to it, but you get the general idea... Made up the square section in white oak, then cut a wavy line down the middle, laminated in mahogany/carbon cloth/mahogany, then rounded it off. Means the line on the surface swoops in and out from the centreline as it goes up and down. I was pretty pleased...
  7. Crowhursts boat actually sailed as well - for years afterwards. And it is still kind of in one piece... I think the story of Crowhurst's trip might be one of the most haunting things I have ever read. Terrifying how many little steps can take you so very far...
  8. Where can you see how many warnings you have??? Go to your profile and look to the left, beneath your avatar picture...
  9. TheBSJ

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    You would fall in. And then the boat would look great again! You do start to wonder whether the fore and aft stays are there to support the mast or to stop the overhangs drooping...
  10. TheBSJ

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    "Now what are we going to do with the cutouts? There must be some clever use we can come up with for them." That oval looks about the right size for a drinks tray. Give it to a student as a minor project. Timber trim, a veneer on the top, and 3 recesses cut into the surface, one for the bottle of your choice, and then a tumbler either side. Should work out quite nicely...
  11. TheBSJ

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    Will you need an extra generator for the underwater lighting? Also, those big flappy things in the air would be ideal for a projector screen. will you have full surround sound for the outdoor cinema?
  12. TheBSJ

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    Damn you all, you buggers! It's Thursday today. So 24 hours until Friday morning and my "pastry day"! I'm the only one in the shed on a Friday, so the morning consists of catching up on some of the paperwork and ordering all the bits and bobs we will be feeding to the boat next week to keep her moving forward. I love the bustle during the week of machinery, jobs getting done, the boat changing constantly, balancing a dozen jobs at once; but Friday mornings have also become a bit of a favourite time to sit back and think about what we are aiming for, do some background reading and surfing on product design and generally get a grip. Those hours are accompanied by good coffee, my own music choice and two pastries from the selection at the local bakery on my walk to work. It's gonna feel like a long wait for tomorrow morning.
  13. TheBSJ

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    Some of those blocks you are using for fairing seem really small. What did you use for the large areas of the hull? Have you used plastic pipe? We ended up with a couple of 8ft pipes about 50mm in diameter, and covered in Velcro hook. Then we could use Velcro backed sandpaper and swap new sheets on really easily. We used 3 people on the pipe at a time, usually with one or two rotating on and off. As long as the pipe is used in any direction except along it's length, you get excellent fairing over complex curves without any corners digging in. Shorted pipes of a metre or so make a good one man tool. Definitely worth a try if you haven't used them before. Thanks for the tip - I'll keep that in mind for next time. what did you do for handles on the pipe? seems like 50mm would be tough to keep hold of through a long day of fairing. Was the velcro hook just peel-n-stick adhesive-backed ? Yep, just sticky backed Velcro. It worked really well. There are no handles on the pipe, as it bends and rotates in use. You need a decent pair of gloves, as gripping 40grit cuts through your hands pretty damn quick. We've done two hulls in the last two years, a 30' and a 27' We used ply boards too, and some flexible 1metre purpose made fairing boards, but very little machinery on the woodwork. Took us about a week both times with 3-5 people a day. I think I would consider getting a team in to do anything much bigger. The Sliver must have taken some serious man hours. Serious respect to all of you. It's great to see handskills being used on a build of this size rather than just some lathe cutting out mold plugs for a plastic layup.
  14. TheBSJ

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    Some of those blocks you are using for fairing seem really small. What did you use for the large areas of the hull? Have you used plastic pipe? We ended up with a couple of 8ft pipes about 50mm in diameter, and covered in Velcro hook. Then we could use Velcro backed sandpaper and swap new sheets on really easily. We used 3 people on the pipe at a time, usually with one or two rotating on and off. As long as the pipe is used in any direction except along it's length, you get excellent fairing over complex curves without any corners digging in. Shorted pipes of a metre or so make a good one man tool. Definitely worth a try if you haven't used them before.
  15. TheBSJ

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    Not quite Benny Hill, and it's a different boat, but the effect is pretty close! :-)