celphtaught

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About celphtaught

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    Super Anarchist
  • Birthday March 3

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    CrAzDSaILoR
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  • Location
    wherever there is water. and beer.
  • Interests
    the great blue yonder. and random bits of string

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  1. celphtaught

    "Sailing" v "Yachting"

    For god sake you STILL don't get what I'm saying. FOR ADULT ATHLETIC COMPETITIVE SAILING TO BE A THING IN THE US AGAIN IT NEEDS TO HAPPEN FROM THE YOUTH STANDPOINT FIRST. YOU WILL NOT GET JOHN DOE DOING MAIN ON A J111 TO JUST COME OUT AND START SAILING AN A-CAT. THE ONLY WAY TO CHANGE THE TREND IS TO GET THE YOUNGER CROWD INTERESTED. THAT INVOLVES GETTING KIDS INTERESTED. AND KEEPING THEM INTERESTED.
  2. celphtaught

    "Sailing" v "Yachting"

    Actually if you look at data from skiing or snowboarding, which is a comparable sport for several reasons, you notice a completely different trend. Both sports are seen as leisure first activities. A very small percentage of each sport actually races. Far more people ski for leisure than race, same as sailing, you have a much larger number of people who are out to sail for fun than they are to race. In sailing you see a maximum "saturation" of participants around age 8-10. This is when you are reaching the largest group of individuals with youth sailing classes. Around 11-13 you have a 66% decline in participation. This number continues to decline until about mid 30s when you have a small uptick again but overall you've lost more than 60% of your potential participants. Snowsports on the other hand don't reach full saturation until late 20s-early 30s, and the trend line is constantly up until you get to late 50s early 60s.
  3. celphtaught

    "Sailing" v "Yachting"

    I think that Americans would care about that end of the sport if they had the ability to access it at a young age like Aussies do. It again all comes down to finding a way to fund this. Just saying "this is how they do it in Australia, why can't we do it this way in America" is like trying to apply Scandinavian socialism to American political structure. They are very different countries and therefore we need to find different ways of doing it. OAKCLIFF is doing the BEST job of anyone in America of helping to promote all of these ideals. Their model has been working great so far. How do they do it? Several very wealthy donors who wish to see this side of the sport furthered. How can we replicate what Oakcliff is doing? One way would be to find other wealthy donors. Chris I'm not fighting you. I'm merely pointing out that the root of your frustration lies in a slightly different place than you have presented. It is a cultural difference and simply applying what works one place to another is not the solution. Also, have you seen the price tag on a new Nacra 17 foiler recently? I would hardly call it chump change compared to an 18 footer.
  4. celphtaught

    "Sailing" v "Yachting"

    I'd also like to point out, the cost to own and run a 49er or Nacra 17 is insane, no public access boating club is ever going to take on that kind of risk or expense without an independently wealthy backer.
  5. celphtaught

    "Sailing" v "Yachting"

    The reason why so many posts are concentrating on boats available for youth sailors is that exposing more youth sailors to these boats is potentially a way to get more adults interested in them, sailing them, and financing them
  6. celphtaught

    "Sailing" v "Yachting"

    I don't disagree, but I think you do have to give US Sailing credit for looking into why the transition from Opti to Adult has had such terrible returns, and the fact of the matter is that price point is a huge part of it. I've done plenty of sailing in 18' skiffs and other high performance boats and the main reason why I don't own one myself is the price point. I think that the cost of entry for your average Opti kid to get into a 29er and then into an i14 or 18footer as an adult is prohibitive. Find a way to lower the cost of entry, OR create a generation of sailors who don't care about the cost of entry and are willing to find ways to fund themselves. The latter is made by helping those Opti kids fall in love with the sport and want to do whatever it takes to keep doing it.
  7. celphtaught

    "Sailing" v "Yachting"

    I agree with Chris' main thesis. HOWEVER I strongly disagree with several of the points. 1). Optis are the best trainer for youth sailing BECAUSE: Largest one design fleet in the world Largest one design fleet in the world Largest one design fleet in the world Provides a simple vehicle for youth sailors to learn the basics of sailing without any distraction from other things going on. It is easy to balance, you can put two tykes in one no problem and they are able to learn about sail trim and wind basics easily. They are cheap, easy to fix and widely available 2). 29er and Nacra 15 are NOT the correct boat to be sending inexperienced Opti kids into Both are inherently difficult boats to sail As a youth sailing professional, I have witnessed a multitude of kids get into high performance classes TOO EARLY and miss out on VITAL development in a doublehanded boat They are expensive and fragile Fleets are few and far between. You need to be able to ship your boat around the country to participate in a regatta with more than 20 boats. 3). Chris clearly hasn't been paying attention to what US Sailing is attempting to do at the youth level. The US Sailing ODP program has been influenced by the creation of programs such as the GCYRA which you now see coming to fruition in product like Charlotte Rose. USS is stepping up to provide more youth training programs in high performance boats for those sailors WHO ARE READY to make that jump. I posit that Chris has the correct idea, however is looking at it in the wrong way. The way that we need to be expanding the sport, especially at the top, is to be creating more accessible ways for kids to fall in love with the sport. We lose 66% of kids between ages 11-14. What we need is more opportunities, not in high performance boats necessarily, to get kids on the water and figure out what they want to do. The MAIN issue with modern youth sailing is the COST. It is EXPENSIVE as all hell for someone to compete on a national or international scale, which realistically is how you are going to get better as a youth racer. It is boats like the 29er, Nacra and i420 that help drive up this price point. If we could figure out a way for your average club junior sailor to get to national level competition I think you would see a larger group wanting to go towards these high performance boats, at which point we then need to find a way to lower the cost of entry for the boat. As with any problem, often times the solution lies in the foundation, not the end goals. Getting a larger base of kids to stick with the sport for longer will push the demand for more affordable high performance sailing. I believe that programs like Oakcliff are the answer. We just need more Oakcliffs. And more old money to start supporting like programs.
  8. celphtaught

    Drone question

    The 8ish month report on the mavic is that it is an excellent mobile drone platform. It has been across the US, to Italy, Bermuda, Miami, and beyond. I've flown it in 15* F and up to 120* F, in winds up to 25 knots. Average battery life is ~25 min, and with 3 batteries I can be aloft almost continuously. Easy to use and hand catch I primarily use it over water and to this point have had no problems. Recommendation is to buy the PolarPro filters for daylight filming to avoid getting too washed out. Only gripe is that I wish the camera platform were a little more robust; I am looking at the Inspire as my next platform for a bump in performance and camera platform.
  9. celphtaught

    2008 4Runner

    Replacing a 2006 Civic for need of a bigger vehicle and the civvy is a tired northern car with a lot of body rust. Engine is still good but I've been looking for a size upgrade for awhile now. Looking at a 2008 4Runner w/130k miles on it, clean CarFax and consistent maintenance records. Anyone have any insight?
  10. SHAMELESS PROMOTIONAL POST, BE WARNED Hey guys, haven't been on here in awhile but figured I'd post this here with the hopes of reaching more people. Many of you from New England will know who Travis is, but here is what I've written up for my fundraising page this year with background on Travis, his foundation and what they aim to achieve. TL:DR, I'm raising money for Spinal Cord Injury Research and you can donate HERE: http://events.travisroyfoundation.org/site/…/Events/General… October 20th, 1995. Walter Brown Arena. Travis Roy, a New England product of Tabor Academy, was set to live out his dream as a member of the BU Terriers Ice Hockey team. 11 seconds into his first shift, Roy went awkwardly into the boards, fracturing his C4 and paralyzing him from the neck down. After 2 months in the ICU, Roy wondered how his life would change, whether he would be a burden on his family and whether he would be able to live his life, any kind of life. Over the past 22 years, Roy has found his purpose. Roy was able to have 24 hour care for the first few years of his recovery, due partially to the generosity of complete strangers. He acknowledges though that this independence is not available to everyone. Many paraplegics cannot afford extensive care, leading to family and friends begrudgingly becoming caregivers; putting a strain on relationships. Roy's foundation, the Travis Roy Foundation, seeks to help those in need of care, as well as stimulate research into the repair of spinal cord injuries. What initially started as a small foundation able to give 5-6 grants a year, the Travis Roy Foundation (TRF) is now able to give over 150 grants annually. These grants help those who have been paralyzed get back to living an independent and fulfilling life, as Roy has over the past couple decades. From wheelchairs, to home modifications, the grants provided by the TRF take the financial and emotional stress out of a traumatic spinal cord injury. In addition to grants, the TRF has given several million dollars to research into the field of spinal cord injury repair. Partnering with organizations such as the Christopher Reeve Foundation, the TRF is working with researchers to find a way to reverse paralysis. Programs at Stanford and the Burke Medical Research Institute receive funding from the TRF as well. I have lost count of the number of years that we have participated in the TRF tournament. It has to be close to a decade now. We keep coming back. In those first years it was a handful of teams raising a few thousand dollars. In 2016 there were 32 teams on 3 fields raising over $600,000. We aim to break that in 2017. Every time you get out of bed, take a shower, stand up from your keyboard, you take for granted what you have in mobility. Your ability to read this post on your phone or computer without special assistance is more than what many paralyzed individuals can do. Please consider donating to my fundraising page, to give someone the gift of an independent life and one day, a cure. Give Hope.
  11. celphtaught

    Sail like a Girl

    I wonder if the author has heard of the Chix Only team race, or knows how many female college sailors there are, or knows how many schools recruit women regardless of sailing ability, and how many of those women have gone on to become all-american collegiate sailors... you're either ignorant or blind if you don't see the trend in youth sailing
  12. celphtaught

    Drone question

    bought the mavic. will report back.
  13. celphtaught

    Drone question

    Yeah I'm usually close enough to land so that I could theoretically set the "home" to the roof or the boat yard without much issue. i am so not a fan of your venue. especially when its blowing 25. like right now? 20 with puffs in the 30s currently. air temp 45.
  14. celphtaught

    Drone question

    Yeah I'm usually close enough to land so that I could theoretically set the "home" to the roof or the boat yard without much issue.
  15. celphtaught

    Drone question

    You hit on what I was going to say to Celphtaught in response to his "some coaching" use. I've got a Mavic Pro and love it, but it doesn't lend itself to hand catching the way the Phantom does. For boat use, I'd definitely go P3. The portability of the Mavic is pretty nice though! Some coaching means until I smoke batteries almost 300 days a year. Wouldn't use every day but most days. I'm not worried about hand catching, it would be nice to be able to set the home location to a point on land so I didn't have to do that. Would be nice to travel with the mavic but from what I'm hearing the P3 would be just fine. I like the price better too.