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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

Innocent Bystander

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About Innocent Bystander

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  • Birthday 08/19/1954

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  1. Yep. Capital One is good about reversing fraudulent charges but you can inadvertently trigger their fraud protection cutoff if you appear to change your habits too quickly. Good about emailing you to contact them but you better have that email on a mobile device. I've been caught out once or twice. Embarrassing to have your card denied at a good restaurant because you have been in 3 cities in 2 countries in 2 days buying expensive stuff and missed the "was this you" email. Quick phone call sorta it out but still embarrassing.
  2. 2-3. Depends on how new the nonskid is and how slippery the deck. Having taken more than a few "free rides" at night on a slippery deck, I appreciate anything they can do to keep it level.
  3. What he said. Marginal for 8" oak limbs. Pretty useless beyond that. I have an "everyday" 18" stihl, a 24" big ass tree came down stihl and an 18" Poulon that is painful but won't completely die. I use it when working on trees and branches that fall into the creek and I may have to cut with the bar in the water. Follow up with a fresh water rinse and generous lubrication. I use professional chains on the 2 Stihls and keep all chains sharp. Cut up 18 fully grown hardwoods after Irene with that setup and helped friends clean up as well.
  4. Everything, including primary distribution or substation to end user lines? Cost of below ground is about 10x above ground as is cost of any repairs. In urban and suburban areas, new construction is below ground. In rural areas and for most main transmission (generating station to substations) lines are still above ground. When lines are replaced, loss experience is factored in. I'm the second last house on a 7 mile above ground run. 3 years ago, the power company went through a pole replacement cycle. About 1/4 from my house, the line follows an off road right of way so servicing required off road equipment. Base on a couple of tropical storms, one hurricane and a couple of ice storms, the cost to maintain that off road section was very high so they buried those lines for that last 1/4 mile and offered me a low cost shift to underground for that portion on my property.
  5. Given its the only aircraft aboard, its likely that it's a "retired" airplane stripped of engines and radar that is used to train the handling crew. Usually crane one or two aboard for post availability sea trials to give the yellow shirts something to use for practice.
  6. No problem. Perhaps California could break the deadlock and offer up a site for long term storage. Geologically, yucca mountain is fine except for the NIMBY factor. If California can overcome their own NIMBYs you'll solve a 50 year stalemate.
  7. For new fuel, supposedly reduces the amount and decay time dramatically. AFAIK, we would still have to deal with existing spent fuel. Of course, the chance of regulatory approval and population acceptance of any new nuclear plants is pretty slim.
  8. Full rudder turns at speed. Purpose is to verify rudder actuators are operating at full force. Doing that on Nimitz in 1994 cost me a favorite coffee cup. Left it on my desk when I went to one of my shops to verify we had our stuff all tied down. Missed getting back to the office in time by about 30 seconds. Really interestimg to be below decks when doing those maneuvers.
  9. Well, not exactly. Spent fuel is stored on site in sealed cask dry storage or in stainless lined pools, like every other nuclear power site. SCE's plan was to ship it to an operating plant in Arizona and make it their problem. Not surprisingly, the Arizona plant said no to that proposal. DOE has been trying for years (since the 70's) to identify long storage for spent fuel, mostly looking at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, adjacent to the Nevada Test site as geologically stable enough for long term (as in permanent) storage. 40 years of NIMBY for each proposed site have left plant operators with pool storage on site until the fuel is "cooled" (5-10 years) and then dry cask storage on site after that as the only option. Casks are something like 25cm thick so it would take a bit more than a few pounds of C-4 to make that a problem. Permanent safe storage of spent fuel is nuclear power's Achilles heel. 40 years after coming out of the reactor, you are down to .0.1% of the radioactivity but still radioactive enough to be dangerous. Ultimately, it has to go somewhere, essentially forever.
  10. That's the only explanation that makes any sense. didnt look like Max had any way out once Seb turned in.
  11. I'd argue that today Max was the meat is a reckless Ferrari sandwich. Hate to be in the next Ferrari team meeting. Wtf was Seb thinking?
  12. Problem with the 4 seat ragtops was mentioned above. Rear seats end up really small due to the top mechanism. Daughter had a different budget (25k or so) and tried them all from Infiniti, BMW, Audi and Lexus. She ended up deciding a 2 seat Abarth 124 Spider (the new one) was a better option. I've rented mustangs, solaras and the like and had the same small rear seat perception about those.
  13. With more 20 or so laps to go, you must watch the start of this race.
  14. Sorry, you have a 2 tier system. I'm paying for my pensioner SIL in Melbourne's private insurance today as the public system failed to provide the appropriate continuity of care for her long term mental health issues. Carefully chosen, the supplemental isn't that expensive. Jeff's "basic care" is a little severe for my tastes, but somehow limits will be placed on medical care to help control costs. An example in Aus is the Shingles Vaccine. Risk starts to climb at age 55. In the US, Medicare and many insurance companies will pay at age 60. In Australia, it isn't covered until age 70. In the US, some high dose cancer treatments using doxorubicin are done during inpatient stays as a continuous infusion to significantly lower the risk of heart damage. In Canada, "standard of care" is outpatient treatment at much higher infusion rates that will cause heart damage at a fairly low lifetime dose. Appears Canada has traded off the probable heart damage to provide lower cost treatments for those drugs. Limits on procedures and treatments are part an parcel of controlling costs. Private supplementals are a way for those who can afford it to go to the head of the line and/or circumvent those limits. Where the "standard of care line is drawn is an important discussion but there is a line.
  15. Sorry Dog. Don't agree. While some medical research in the US is state of the art, Germany, France, Australia and others are just as active and possibly more innovative. Medical research is mostly driven my government grants, not free market at all. Drug development is focused on high profit and protecting patents, not high impact treatments. Free market in health care is more about runaway profits than patient care. Outcomes don't support your presumption that we are "world class" in many ways.