A Class Sailor

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About A Class Sailor

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  1. A Class Sailor

    trickle down

    It depends on your interpretation. GM states that the rule was not written to discourage foiling. He says that they knew from the start the boats would be able to foil and that this was discussed while writing the rule. There was a conscious decision made to leave the rule flexible enough to allow foiling which counters Terry's claim that the rule turned out to be more flexible than intended. The question i would ask is why leave in all the elements you need to promote flight unless you were specifically considering that? The most obvious evidence for foiling being specifically considered was the rudder winglets. Back then, the only reason why they would have considered them was to promote flight. Morrelli also does a pretty good job of disproving Dalton's claim. The facts are pretty simple. The rule writers knew that the boats could fly and they left the rules flexible enough so that it would be possible. When writing the rule they knew there were still issues to be resolved to get stable flight, but isn't that what a development rule is all about? Morrelli also states that the ETNZ AC72 was designed as a foiler from the start. There have been enough stories told about the SL33 testing and the design of the V style foils to tell us that Dalton wasn't telling the whole story in the above interview. To call him a liar is probably a stretch too far, but he has a strong record of "disinformation" and this is another example of it. Or are you suggesting the designers are lying......
  2. A Class Sailor

    trickle down

    Here is an interview with Pete Melvin's partner Gino Morrelli published in Sailing World in 2013. It kills off a number of myths, such as the rule was designed to prevent foiling.
  3. A Class Sailor

    trickle down

    That counters what Pete has said on many occasions. The day i start believing Dalton is the day i believe Elvis has been spotted on the moon
  4. A Class Sailor

    trickle down

    Pete Melvin has said on many occasions that he specifically wrote the rule so as not to ban foiling. Despite Nav not liking facts, Melvin was very much aware of the ability to create foiling cats because of the work done with the A Class looking at that very issue. They concluded back in 2009 that getting a cat to foil was pretty easy and that is why the A's passed a rule accordingly. The technical committee was made up of AC designers, the analysis was done at a pretty technical level and if anything, they under estimated how easy it was to get a cat to foil. It is inconceivable that somebody who had been involved in researching foiling on the A's and who help to write a rule that was intended to prevent foiling would have ignored that possibility for the AC boats. From the get go, ETNZ designed a foiler and that was Pete Melvin's doing. It would seem really strange that he wrote a rule without considering foiling and then immediately started to look at the possibility of the boat foiling. Adding it all up and including what Melvin has said makes it pretty clear that having enough flexibility in the AC72 rule that foiling was possible was not an accident. Unlike ETNZ, Oracle had very little input into the rule. They gave Melvin some perimeters around size and wanting a wing but Melvin was given a free hand and did not show anybody the rule until it was finished. It was one of the things that the Oracle fanboys used to contrast their team's approach to that of Alinghi. In a further attempt to prove they were whiter than pure snow, Oracle didn't even offer Melvin a job after writing the rule. What a false dawn that turned out to be.
  5. A Class Sailor

    trickle down

    It's impossible to say. The way technology gets adopted tends to follow the path we have seen in foiling, with slow adoption over an extended period followed by a steep upward curve of adoption. Did the AC contribute? Possibly but it was a 2 way street. ETNZ didn't just have a "eureka" moment and invent foiling. The designers were familiar with the concept from boats like the Moth and in cats, the A. They were very well aware of the attempt by the A's to come up with a rule that was intended to stop the A foiling. I believe that Pete Melvin was involved in the writing of the rule with other AC designers such as Luc Debuis. Before ETNZ launched, there were people like Martin Fischer attempting to design foiling A's with various degrees of success. I personally think the debate on foiling trickle down is a bit pointless and is probably a bit of the "chicken and egg" debate. What is true undeniable is that it was a period of great innovation. ETNZ made a contribution to that innovation that cannot be forgotten, but it also needs to be remembered that Pete Melvin wrote the rule and specifically made the rule flexible enough so as not to exclude foiling. Add the success of the Moth and the emergence of foiling in other boats, we ended up with the "perfect storm". Take out any of the main elements and maybe foiling would not be growing like it is now, but to credit any one factor as decisive is probably wrong. Let's not forget that was forced on them by the rules. The chances are without that restriction, we would have seen very different foils.
  6. A Class Sailor

    Luna Rossa Challenge. AC 36

    I have no issue accepting that as a “get you home” measure for an inshore boat but a big offshore foiler, in the middle of the Atlantic or Pacific, it will not get you home. Keel down mode is for stability, not for proper sailing.
  7. A Class Sailor

    Luna Rossa Challenge. AC 36

    No it won't. You would never do that with the AC75 set up. That's an ocean going boat and you would be a complete idiot to try ocean passages with the AC75 set up. Imagine if you hit something at speed with either foil and break it, as has happened to at least one foiling tri. With the AC75 set up, you would not get home. It's that simple. The AC75 configuratioon will never be used offshore.
  8. A Class Sailor

    Trapeze harness recommendation

    Asking for trapeze harness recommendations is like asking which sneakers are the most comfortable. It is totally personal and depends on your shape, fitness, type of sailing, any back issues and more. For example, some years ago I bought a Bigfoot and can honestly say it was the most uncomfortable harness I have ever used but some people swear by them. The harness that seems to suit the most people is the Zhik. You might be able to find something that suits you better but you are least likely to be disappointed by it.
  9. A Class Sailor

    14' Stunt S9 Foiling Cat

    6:1 is crazy on a main like that. The A Class main is the same size and we use 10:1. The main is such a critical control on foiling cats. I suspect you would see a big improvement with a better mainsheet system.
  10. A Class Sailor

    How to Fix RS CAT 14 Crossbar "In The Field"

    A screw will hold the UJ far better than a rivet does. While some people will put a bolt right through, I always use a screw and have never had it fail. You simply need to make sure you only drill a pilot hole so that the screw grips the rubber of the UJ and can be tightened so that there can be no movement. A bolt would be OK if you prefer, so long as you carry tools to be able to undo it so you can change UJ if there is a problem.
  11. A Class Sailor

    How to Fix RS CAT 14 Crossbar "In The Field"

    It's an interesting problem. One question you need to ask is what would have happened if the fitting had not pulled out. Sometimes, you improve the strength of one part of a system only to have another fail. While this weakness may not have been deliberate, it might have saved a more major failure. I also think this is unlikely to be a common problem, so carrying a spare cross bar is probably overkill. The set up is very common on cats, although I am not sure about the sue of rivets. I would drill out the rivets and replace them with short screws that only go in the same amount as the rivets. That should allow the fitting to pull out with about the same load. Then all you need to do is carry a spare Universal Joint (this is the name for the fitting you describe) and a screw driver, which you should be carrying anyway. It would seem a good idea to carry a spare joint anyway, because I suspect that there are 3 on the boat (the 2 cross bar ends and the tiller extension). You should also have been carrying enough spares to have handled this repair without needing to get bits from others. Besides a multi-tool (leatherman or similar) you should carry short lengths of various sized rope and a piece of shock cord, shackles, clevis pins and split rings, tape. The further you are going, the more you need to take. I am sure others will have ideas of what else you should carry. Maybe start another thread. BTW, why do you keep posting in dinghy anarchy with cat questions?
  12. A Class Sailor

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    Try reading again. I am not blaming Dalton. I am saying that would be just as stupid as blaming Ellison. Other AC skippers who have sailed A's are Jimmy Spithill who even bought a boat for the upcoming worlds but now cannot do them and Dean Barker. Pete Buring and Blair Tuke will be sailing the A Class worlds. It's interesting that the ETNZ guys think it's still something worth doing. Glenn I can understand but I doubt Pete and Blair would be doing it if it was irrelevant. I suspect that without a clash with the F50 trials, the RC44 event and getting trapped by the nationality clause for the AC, we would probably have seen between 5 and 8 AC sailors at the event who now won't be there. One year at the A Class Nationals here in Australia we had something like 12 AC sailors competing.
  13. A Class Sailor

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    Why do you think I would know that? All I know is that I made an inquiry to buy an A from somebody who bought a boat for the worlds and now cannot do the event. He said it was because of testing of the 50's in NZ. I did ask why it couldn't be done at another time because there were a number of people who would miss the worlds and was told the boats wouldn't be ready before hand and that there were a number of reasons why it could not be done after the worlds, including one skipper not being able to attend due to his wife ebing due to give birth. Reading some other comments above, I laugh at how pure hatred drives some really stupid comments. Some of you need to read the international sailing calendar and see when pro events are. For instance, the RC44 series also clashes with the A Class worlds and that prevents a number of sailors from sailing A's because A's don't pay anything while the RC44's do. It's a fact that pro sailing for these guys comes before sailing for yourself. If anybody thinks the organisers of pro sailing consider something like the A Class Worlds when setting dates for their events, you are being stupid. When asking a few pros whether they would be doing the A Class Worlds (such as Outteridge, Slingsby, Spitthill) the response was always the same - they would like to but it depended on what else was going on in the professional sailing world. If you are going to blame Ellison for people not being able to attend the worlds, I blame Dalton for Spitthill not coming because he needs to be in Italy for residency reasons. I believe he isn't the only one in that situation. That would be a crazy thing to do, just like blaming Ellison.
  14. A Class Sailor

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    What are you on about? Are you really so bitter and deluded that you think that the date has anything to do with LE. The timetable is driven by when the boats will be ready and having enough time to make changes before the Christmas/New Year break so the boats can be packed up to be shipped in time for the first event.
  15. A Class Sailor

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    Just learnt that trials of the mofified boats will take place during November in NZ. A number of AC sailors from various teams from AC35 had bought A’s for our worlds but they are now unable to compete. It also means there are some good A’s either for sale or charter.