A Class Sailor

Members
  • Content count

    933
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

130 F'n Saint

About A Class Sailor

  • Rank
    Anarchist

Profile Information

  • Location
    On the water
  • Interests
    Sex, drugs and rock and roll.

Recent Profile Visitors

1,109 profile views
  1. A Class Sailor

    The new sailing twin skin setup

    I haven't got any pictures of either. The Moth rig was some time ago, but the A Class rig was this year. 2 were built by Advanced Wing Systems, the company i am pretty sure that gave ETNZ the idea of the soft wing.They have made soft wings for some time and even now with the AC teams looking at the problem they still probably have more knowledge on this than anybody else. The issue of developing new rigs for classes like the Moth and A Class is that the current rigs are very highly developed and efficient. They particularly suit the type of boat they are used on. It makes gains from new rigs hard.
  2. A Class Sailor

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    Can you please give us your definition of "amateur", because to me, if you are paid to sail, you are not an amateur and all of these guys are paid by their national association. They get interest free loans for their boats and their shipping costs paid. They don't pay for their sailing from their own funds.
  3. A Class Sailor

    The new sailing twin skin setup

    It's been done on Moths and A Class and there has already been a fair amount of development done. To date, it hasn't been quicker in those classes than their standard rig, probably because the standard rigs are so highly developed.
  4. A Class Sailor

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    Don't think you are right on this one. Sailing an Olympic class is a step up from other classes. You only have to look at how often Olympians go into other classes on a fairly one off basis and clean up. That's because it's so much easier. Take my class. At the upcoming worlds, there are probably only 5 or 6 people who are capable of winning a race, never mind the event. At the Olympics, most of the fleet is capable of winning a race. In a non Olympic class, only about 10% are really good on the starts. In an Olympic class just about everybody is. In every aspect of the racing, this same principal arises. Look at Stevie Brewin, who is one of the favorites to win the A's but who couldn't even get into the top 20 of the Nacra 17's. He's the second most successful A Class sailor ever, the only person to have always pushed Glenn Ashby over the last 20 years but it looks like he hasn't got that extra small percentage needed in Olympic classes. The other really important factor is that you only have 1 chance every 4 years to win an Olympic gold. Think about that. In the time it takes to do 3 Olympic cycles, somebody with have 12 chances of winning a world titles in another class. Other than winning the AC, there is little if anything harder in sailing than winning an Olympic gold (Vende Globe?). Olympic medalists are a step above the rest.
  5. A Class Sailor

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    I can't be bothered to find the "proof", but Oracle made no secret that they did learn some things from watching how ETNZ sailed, particularly how to tack the boat. This was down to their coach Philippe Presti who did loads of video analysis of sailing technique. It made some difference, but other factors led to the biggest gains.
  6. A Class Sailor

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    That's pretty simple. There were 2 options. You could do what Oracle did and outsource the rule development, because you can be sure that there are others outside of ETNZ capable of doing it. I personally would have preferred them to involve a team of people including those outside of ETNZ, that they hold design seminars and show others the research behind the ideas so as to get feedback. Then they could have taken that feedback and research and given it to an independent design team to write a rule. I wouldn't have minded if they had even written the rule themselves after the consultation period, although getting an independent to do it would have been fairer. The problem with how they did it, in isolation and without sharing anything, can be best illustrated by what was said when they announced the design rule. They made performance predictions, which is only possible if they had already been modelling the design and its performance. To do that analysis they would have needed to adopt their existing design and predictive software for the new concept. Do you really believe that this doesn't give a huge advantage? They gave themselves a significant head start. It will be interesting to see if they manage to maintain that lead.
  7. A Class Sailor

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    On reflection, we are both a bit off. Oracle did choose the idea of a 72 foot winged cat, but it is how they went about it and what they told other teams that is important. Before they even began to develop rules, they held a meeting of (IIRC) 19 designersto get opinions from. They presented the idea of the cat and of a monohull. After that meeting, they commissioned 2 independent teams of designers to come up with rules for the 2 options. Those designers were not employees. they worked independently of the team. Oracle did not provide design research input to the designers. If they decided to do some design research while the rules were being written, that option was also open to other teams. I believe that following the designers meeting, JuanK did do some design work on both concepts. Did Oracle influence the rule? Maybe. After all, they then chose which type of boat to go for. Because of the way the rule was researched and developed, did they have an advantage? If they did it was because they knew which concept they were going to choose a little before the other teams, but they gained no advantage from the writing of the rule. ETNZ wrote the new rule themselves. To do that, they ran loads of computer models and tests to find what worked and what did not, because you simply cannot develop something so radical without knowing it's going to work. Anybody who thinks that ETNZ didn't have a significant lead in the design research for AC75 is dreaming. They even tested the soft wing before it was announced, never mind all the research they had done before building it. As for the rest of what you have written, that doesn't change or excuse this. I agree that RNZYS is a fair club, but they didn't develop or write the rule, although you need to take the NYYC statement in light of the situation - they believed that the last 2 defenders weren't fair and couldn't be worked with. It was a direct dig at Bertarelli and Ellison and their clubs.
  8. A Class Sailor

    A-Class foiling sailors

    Do you sail an A? I doubt it, because this is how the top guys sail downwind. or The last photo is Glen Ashby who trapezes lower than anybody else. Most top guys are like Mischa in the top photo, or higher. Note the wide stance and bent legs. Yes, flyinggorilla is maybe a little higher but that is a trend at the moment, because while you give away some righting moment, the boat is far easier to sail and push. Because most don't use adjustable trapezes because they want to keep things simple, the further back you go, the higher you trapeze due to simple geometry. The lower you are the harder it is to stay on the side of the boat. I know lots of sailors who tried adjustable systems to try sailing lower on the trapeze when back and who have now removed them. Bent legs, feet well apart and being slightly higher is the correct thing for most to do. When watching the top guys, it seems to me that they are trapezing higher than they used to, except maybe for Glenn Ashby and I believe this is because it is harder to stay on the side. When you used to sail with a little heel, you could trapeze very low but now the boats are sailed flat or even heeled to windward a bit, it is much harder to stay on the side, so trapeze heights have gone up. My advise to flyinggorilla is to stay high until you feel comfortable to go lower, but not to go too low. Keep you legs wide apart and don't worry about the bent legs.
  9. A Class Sailor

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    Our dear friend, Mr mfluder or is it Mr Clark, is either too stupid to understand, so blinded by his heroes that he doesn't want to understand or is a troll. Everybody knows that the Oracle design team had experience of wings. Nobody is arguing otherwise. It is also a fact that some of their designers from 2010 ended up in other teams, plus others (including TNZ) employed leading wing designers. What Oracle didn't do is spend close to 9 months designing and researching a new concept and then writing the rule based on that research. Oracle had the same amount of information as everybody else had about what the new rule might be. It was well known that they were having 2 rules written by independent designers and that they didn't know which they were going to choose. They even told a meeting of 19 potential teams exactly what was going on and asked for their feedback. There was no asymmetry of information, where the defender knew more about the boat that was going to be chosen and which would have allowed the defender to start designing ahead of other teams. ETNZ wrote a new rule based on a new concept. They did this by doing a lot of design research into the platform, foils and rig, research no other team could do. They even built a rig to test the concept of a "soft wing". They gave themselves a 6-9 month head start over every other team. That has never happened before. Alinghi tried to do the same thing after 2007 and was called out for it, not least by Grant Dalton. Everybody objected to Alinghi writing a new rule and having a 9 month head start over everybody else. Existing teams always have an advantage over new teams if any element of the previous boat is used in the next cycle. There is nothing you can do about that. That is completely different from a defender having a significant head start over every other team because of research done while writing a new rule, research other teams could not undertake.
  10. A Class Sailor

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    I never said that, but when has the truth got in the way of your comments. M&M developed the AC72 rule without reference to the Oracle design team. ETNZ wrote the rule based on research and development they did to specifically investigate the rule they were writing. If you bothered to try to understand, you would know that Oracle's biggest advantage was knowing how to handle large wings when rigging and moving the boats, because the 2010 wing was very different from the 2013 wing. The 2010 wing was seriously crude. For 2013 they brought in additional wing design people. Oracle also shared their wing handling experience. They also created the AC45 so as to get the other teams up to speed with wings. We haven't seen ETNZ sharing any of their knowledge.
  11. A Class Sailor

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    You really are very ignorant. Ever heard of C Class cats? Their wings are way more complex and sophisticated than the wing seen in 2010 and were the basis of the wing ETNZ developed for 2013 which was simply a C Class wing increased in size. They used the same principals, the same controls and even, according to some reports, the same aerofoil section as the top C Class boat of the time. Oracle decided to go with a simpler, less complex wing in 2013 which proved to be the correct choice. The only thing you have right is the issue of size.
  12. A Class Sailor

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    ^ It's probably a good thing that nobody at TNZ would even listen to you, because you are clueless. Let's correct a bit of history first. In 2014 the TNZ guys used anything but standard gear. The J foils they used were "standard" when they were delivered, but they were modified significantly. They also bought different rudders from another manufacturer, developed their own mounts for those rudders and developed control systems. They did a great job which started a major change in the class. As for now, I think you are totally wrong in your assessment. I see this as an important stage in the team development. You might feel that there is little link between the A's (or GC32) and the 75's but as usual, you are wrong. All foilers share some distinct handling characteristics. The 75 is far closer to a cat than, say, it is to a Moth, because it has the foil set well off to leeward of the rig and the righting moment well to windward (cat characteristics). Many informed commontators see that it is a thinly disguised cat layout, but as it is clear you don't really understand the dynamics of sailing, that probably passed you by. What is going on with the TNZ team effort for the A Class worlds is that it gives the team a unique opportunity to start building the communications that are needed to develop boats. You have the 3 main sailors working with a coach and the design team. Pete and Blair are getting back into foiling at the same time and it is also really good team bonding. They simply couldn't get that with any other class or event (GC32 is one design). You think it has little relevance. I think it is the most relevant sailing they have done since the end of the last cup.
  13. A Class Sailor

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    That is a heap of bulls*t. As a team, they have had more people sailing at various Moth worlds but they never put a team effort in for those events. Glenn Ashby has been doing A Class events the whole time he has worked for TNZ and it was only in 2014 and now that they have made this effort. In 2014 it was very obvious why it was an important event for them, because it got a lot of team members sailing foiling cats. This time, they have also decided it is important, probably because they feel it is more relevant than you do. It is clear to all of us in the A's that TNZ is using the event as part of their overall effort. Why else divert design, boat building and coaching resources when they haven't for other events. Do you really believe there is nothing else those people could be doing?
  14. A Class Sailor

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    They are doing a fair bit more than just competing. It's interesting that unlike the Moths or 49ers, ETNZ is taking the A Class worlds seriously. Not only do they have the sailors doing it, but they have sent a coach over and they are designing and making foils just for their guys. I wonder if they think it is more relevant than you do?
  15. A Class Sailor

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    Are you for real or just trolling. Every team has other sponsors and partners. It would be stupid and show really poor professionalism to say anything negative about the boats. As for fairest for a long time, can you tell me the last time the defender wrote a class rule based on their own design team carrying out loads of research and testing themselves, giving them a significant head start over everybody else? I think it is the first time I know of in all the years i have followed the AC.