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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

jr15457

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About jr15457

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  • Location
    Midlands, England, UK
  • Interests
    Sailing, mountain biking, skiing
  1. The winning foils

    Not quite the winning foils, but foils nonetheless... http://segelreporter.com/regatta/big-pictures-die-geheimnisvollen-tragflaechen-vom-oracle-team-usa/
  2. Oracle Team USA

    Saw these on facebook earlier, but can't seem to find them again. However, they've cropped up on a German site: http://segelreporter.com/regatta/big-pictures-die-geheimnisvollen-tragflaechen-vom-oracle-team-usa/
  3. Starboard tack after finish

    From the explanation, seems it was not 'reasonably possible' to keep clear - being swept into the committee boat is a situation no-one wins from. I had taken the comment of shooting the line to then be finished, at which point the possibility of keeping clear takes precedence. Obviously boat type/wind/tide are large factors, so the starboard boat in this case it seems rightfully wins the protest
  4. Fair enough. Wasn't accusing, just wondering. Your explanation of a leeward/reaching finish makes much more sense than the windward finish I was imagining. Thanks for the explanation. It seems sad that you've encountered a seemingly unwelcoming bunch of sailors, though at least some others voted with their feet and left with you.
  5. Starboard tack after finish

    RRS 24.1: 'If reasonably possible, a boat not racing shall not interfere with a boat that is racing.' That, to me, means that even if you are the right of way boat, there should have been some effort made by you to give way to the boat finishing if they are still racing. Perhaps, tacking after the line shoot to ensure you are fully clearing the finish area?
  6. How can you pin someone out at the finish in a windward/leeward? Mark room rules apply at the finish line, you have to give room if you are leeward boat... Care to explain? I can only speak for club dinghy racing here in the UK, but by and large people are friendly and welcoming. The lack of protesting does sometimes irritate, but how angry are you prepared to get on an evening race where everyone's priority is getting to the front of the food queue, rather than even hinting at time in a protest room?
  7. Agreed, really enjoyable watching. There was a short section where I couldn't tell if the guy who wasn't Clean's mic went down, but that's not your fault. Although, it is Frascari, not Francari as your co-commentator kept saying. That said, as enjoyable as the TP52 and 18fter coverage, if not more. On-board footage was a great addition. Boats look like they aren't perfect, and I have seen some concern on Facebook about different board tips (squared off vs rounded off) from factory, but as long as that's sorted and it's quick, tight one-design racing, I'm all for it from a spectator who occasionally enjoys foiling cats' point of view.
  8. 14' Stunt S9 Foiling Cat

    I believe this may be the system that A Class Sailor is referring to. If it's not, it's still an interesting way of solving the problem and something I'd look at putting on my A, if I sailed her more
  9. rs aero

    What about the updating of the sails for the 400 and 200? There was a deck mould update for the 800 and I believe the 200 too... Both thoroughly researched and with an aim of making minimal difference to performance, just ease of manufacture, use and 'modernising' the classes I think.
  10. 52 SUPER SERIES

    That is the crash the article is referencing - it was the first event of this season.
  11. Oracle Team USA

    Anyone notice that in the last 2 onboards OTUSA have put out, it's obvious that they still have a winch-operated mainsheet, only under the deck for aero reasons?
  12. do you think the melges 14 will catch on?

    There is less halyard stretch, although most dinghy sail designs have a softer luff than the stretch in a typical modern line used as a halyard so I expect it is imperceptible in a dinghy of this size with a dacron sail. The mast compression is the same whether you locate the halyard cleat at the bottom of the mast, half way up the mast or at the top of the mast. As one naval architect explained to us......."Hold up a broomstick in your left hand with a 40lb weight tied to a line going through a sheeve at the top of the broom stick.....if you tie the line off by the sheeve or at the bottom of the broomstick, the compression is still 40lbs.......compression is affected by the tension on the main and the equal and opposing force provided by the mast, not where you tie off the halyard" Another trick to prove this......apply max luff tension with the halyard and the mast lock off.....so the mast is pre-bent under compression. Lock the mast lock so the halyard is locked... release the halyard. The mast will not spring back up to vertical under less compression. Old wives/Etchell sailors lore. The definition of mast compression decides whether you think the compression changes. I agree that halyard cleat location does not effect compression at the bast of the mast - that is provided by mainsail forces, standing rigging (not applicable here) etc. However, the mast will be compressed between the head of the sail and the location of the cleat by the halyard tension and any cunningham tension applied to the sail. Having a halyard lock, or cleat at the top, ensures that this compression is only experienced by the very top of the mast, which is the definition being applied here. With an Aero, the halyard cleat is external to the mast, so with the amount that the rig bends it must cleat at the top. Otherwise, the distance between mast tip and where a mast base cleat would be would shorten too much as the rig bends, reducing halyard tension and allowing the sail to sag. If the halyard tension is kept high enough to ensure a tight luff when the rig bends with a mast base cleat, you would, as Amati states, simply create a bow. The definition of mast compression is the down force being applied through the walls of the mast which is equal and opposing to the up force exerted through the halyard (lifting against the sail) and shrouds (lifting against the deck). When you tighten your shrouds, you will create a similar "bow" effect , even though the shrouds are effectively "locked" at the top of the mast. Next time you are going out on your Aero, apply aggressive halyard tension with the halyard lock off ...sufficient to apply prebend to the rig.....then lock the halyard...et voila, the prebend is unchanged. Now agreed that if you stand at transom and pull halyard, you are creating an additional force which is not compression , which will bend the mast. There are a variety of forces that the controls of a sail boat can apply to the mast. Some create compression. Some do not. Its all fun to figure out. Force can turn a corner. The outhaul on a boom is similar. The compression along the boom is the same whether you cleat at aft of boom or at front of boom. Not quite... Due to the sheave at the top, the force the sail pulls downward with is doubled on the top of the rig. With the cleat at the very top of the rig, as on an Aero, this doubling in force is only acting on the top 1 or 2 inches of rig. If the halyard was cleated at the bottom of the rig, as in many other dinghies, this 2:1 action acts over almost the entirety of the rig - from the sheave to the cleat point. Any bit of rig below the cleat point is unaffected by this, and only affected by shroud tension, rig forces etc. This is the reason big boats spend thousands on 2:1 halyards (halving compression between the top of the rig and the cleat point) and halyard locks (eliminating halyard-caused compression forces). This enables them to use lighter rigs, lighter halyards, less hull structure...
  13. do you think the melges 14 will catch on?

    There is less halyard stretch, although most dinghy sail designs have a softer luff than the stretch in a typical modern line used as a halyard so I expect it is imperceptible in a dinghy of this size with a dacron sail. The mast compression is the same whether you locate the halyard cleat at the bottom of the mast, half way up the mast or at the top of the mast. As one naval architect explained to us......."Hold up a broomstick in your left hand with a 40lb weight tied to a line going through a sheeve at the top of the broom stick.....if you tie the line off by the sheeve or at the bottom of the broomstick, the compression is still 40lbs.......compression is affected by the tension on the main and the equal and opposing force provided by the mast, not where you tie off the halyard" Another trick to prove this......apply max luff tension with the halyard and the mast lock off.....so the mast is pre-bent under compression. Lock the mast lock so the halyard is locked... release the halyard. The mast will not spring back up to vertical under less compression. Old wives/Etchell sailors lore. The definition of mast compression decides whether you think the compression changes. I agree that halyard cleat location does not effect compression at the bast of the mast - that is provided by mainsail forces, standing rigging (not applicable here) etc. However, the mast will be compressed between the head of the sail and the location of the cleat by the halyard tension and any cunningham tension applied to the sail. Having a halyard lock, or cleat at the top, ensures that this compression is only experienced by the very top of the mast, which is the definition being applied here. With an Aero, the halyard cleat is external to the mast, so with the amount that the rig bends it must cleat at the top. Otherwise, the distance between mast tip and where a mast base cleat would be would shorten too much as the rig bends, reducing halyard tension and allowing the sail to sag. If the halyard tension is kept high enough to ensure a tight luff when the rig bends with a mast base cleat, you would, as Amati states, simply create a bow.
  14. Funniest Lines Heard While Racing

    I've heard a variant of this: "Starboard" "Aluminium" Sailed extensively on a 12m, had one like it against a Daring (half our length, fibreglass) in the solent: "Starboard!!" "24 tonnes..."
  15. Fast 40+ RORC Easter Regatta

    Congrats Bill! Was out there on a JPK 10.80, watching the 40s on the runs was incredible. Hope you go on to have a good season and are made to feel welcome in the Solent