Chainlocker

Members
  • Content count

    1,252
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

3 Neutral

About Chainlocker

  • Rank
    Super Anarchist
  • Birthday 03/08/1956

Profile Information

  • Location
    Virginia Beach, Virginia
  • Interests
    Single handed racing, dinghy racing (Buccaneer 18), disabled sailing, King Krimson, extreme residential swimming pool design.

Recent Profile Visitors

2,144 profile views
  1. Chainlocker

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    There are many disciplines in yachting. The current selection of Olympic Classes are a more "youth orientated" type of boat. The Soling was a replacement for the 3 person Dragon and 5.5 (I sailed Dragon and other classes), the Star a 2 person keel boat. Each requires a different skill set. My point is there are a lot of International Classes, some ex-Olympic, some not, that require not only a high degree of skill to sail competitively, but also have top class sailors who are not Olympic Gold Medalists. I would not expect an E22 World Champion to beat an Olympic Medalist in their class, just as I would not expect the opposite. When placed in boats that they do not sail regularly, the scales become more balanced. This is the scenerio that I refer to when I say that I have known World and "Continental" (non-Olympic Class) Champions who could (and have) beat Olympic Champions.
  2. Chainlocker

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    While I do not know of any sailor boasting he can "sail the shorts off any Olympic Gold Metalist", I did say I knew a few in my lifetime. What the hell makes a Laser or a 470 a prestige or top tier boat? Even in the Olympics; Star, Flying Dutchman and Finn were the "big events" for many years, now they have been dropped from the competition. Don't tell me the 49er is the "better boat", it is just different. There are a lot of major International Class boats that have been sailed for years that have major prestige within the sport, with World Class sailors that do not spend time in Olympic Classes. Yes, the people who compete on a top level in the Olympic Classes are good, and they should be with the support, coaching and time on water they receive. But there are sailors in other classes that are just as good. And the fact that they do not receive the special attention of the "Olympians" makes me respect them that much more.
  3. Chainlocker

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    And they are, but the Finn is no longer an Olympic Class, just like the Star. Many Olympic and World Champion Finn and Star sailors have been recognized as "the best", but these sailors will no longer be able to compete in the Olympics, there is no boat that is available to their body type to sail. Like I said, the Olympics is simply the best of the "Olympic Classes" and that is it.
  4. Chainlocker

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    An Olympic Gold Metal is the top of the Laser, 470, Nacra and 49er class boats (men's and women's divisions) along with the boards and kites. The fact that many do not sail in these classes does not religate them to some second tier designation.
  5. Chainlocker

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    I am sorry, but I cannot hold Olympic sailing in the ranks of "World's Greatest Amateurs". They may be "the best" in the class boat chosen for the Olympics that year. There are many different one design and development design boats being sailed around the world, and there are many outstanding sailors who compete in those classes who do not have the opportunity to sail in the Olympics, many can sail the shorts off of Olympic Champions. Even the America's Cup cannot be deemed "World's Greatest" execpt in the class of boat used in that cycle, limited to the match race discipline. Even then, you would have to include designers and management, as all have to work together at the top of their game to win The Cup.
  6. Chainlocker

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    SailGP Facebook page has more images plus states United States Team and China Team finished their practice sessions, but no release as to who is on China Team.
  7. Chainlocker

    Team NYYC

    But could an AC72 or even an AC50 (well yea, but just at its limit) foil in a breeze that light? There does not seem to be enough breeze to sustain the ride through the jibe, but with more time on the foils, they will nail it.
  8. Chainlocker

    Team NYYC

    It is so obvious when looking at the START of the clip. Feeling quite stupid at this point.
  9. Chainlocker

    Team NYYC

    It is hard to tell, but yes, the starboard foil is just barely visible in the upright position. It blends in with the black hull. The foils are positioned quite forward of where past renderings show on the AC75 or on T5.
  10. Chainlocker

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    SailGP Simulator https://www.sailgp.com/news/simulating-success
  11. Chainlocker

    Team NYYC

    Yes, exactly. I don't know what day this was, but I sailed for years up the island out of Portsmouth. The water looks like the wind is quite light, less that 10 Kts. They seem to be doing just fine. This should be a very competitive and interesting Cup. I cannot wait for the first AC75 to hit the water and some fleet races this time next year!!
  12. Chainlocker

    Team NYYC

    What was the wind range? That is the question. Looks like they are learning the boat, first week out. Lots of time to refine technique and equipment. But looks like a good start!
  13. Chainlocker

    Team NYYC

    From what I was told, it was seen foiling. The team press release for the Airbus sponsorship says they have been working together on foil design for several months.
  14. Chainlocker

    Team NYYC

    They are not using a double skin main and the rig is not from the original boat from what I understand.
  15. Chainlocker

    Team NYYC

    I was thinking the same thing on both wing tips and rudder foil.