Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

estarzinger

Alessandro Di Benedetto

Recommended Posts

Alessandro Di Benedetto, is attempting to round the world solo non-stop without assistance, on a sailing boat of 6.5 (mini transat boat).

 

He departed Les Sables d'Olonne on 26/10/2009. Today he has completed roughly 10,000 nm and is at Lat. 52 ° 21 '50 "S Long. 78 ° 42' 47" E, approaching Australia.

 

Unlike the various ‘youngest’ attempts, this has been recognized by the World Sailing Speed Record Council (WSSRC) as a first world record attempt for first boat under 32 ft to RTW non-stop (solo).

 

This sounds like a crazy venture, except:

 

1. He has already been very successful with other such ventures. When we first met Alessandro in 2006 he had just sailed from Japan to San Francisco on a 20’ catermaran (with no cabin). This was recognized by the WSSRC. And he has also done an Atlantic crossing on the 20’ cat, also recognized by the WSSRC.

 

2. He is doing quite well, with 10,00nm of the voyage complete, including putting Cape Hope and the Kerguelen islands behind him.

 

3. When you meet him he is not crazy at all. He is a very sensible guy, just an excellent seaman off quietly doing adventurous voyages.

 

His website is www.alessandrodibenedetto.net/web/ . He does not have any sort of shore PR machine, so it's a quite low key effort.

 

post-8534-1265017972_thumb.jpgpost-8534-1265017983_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3. When you meet him he is not crazy at all. He is a very sensible guy, just an excellent seaman off quietly doing adventurous voyages.

 

 

this is what makes him interesting. Some of the other would-be (and maybe will-be) circumnavigators would be far more convincing if they backed off on the PR prior to completing the voyages.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh come. Regardless of how well prepared, however sensible they seem when you speak to them, anyone and everyone that attempts to sail round the world on their own is as mad as a box of frogs at the very least.

 

Especially if they're doing it in a little boat.

 

But good luck to him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Real Anarchist right there.

 

+1 - CLEAN / ED - get an innerview with this dude when he gets back!

 

Some serious q's about how he's getting this done - where the feck is he storing his provisions? could he even get below at the beginning of the trip with it all wedged in? how funded? what target time? etc etc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Real Anarchist right there.

 

+1 - CLEAN / ED - get an innerview with this dude when he gets back!

 

Some serious q's about how he's getting this done - where the feck is he storing his provisions? could he even get below at the beginning of the trip with it all wedged in? how funded? what target time? etc etc

 

 

 

good questions . . . just guessing here that he wants to be around the horn by end of march and at the finish line end of may. So 7 months.

 

Notice the low freeboard/high waterline. This little boat is absolutely full of food. Notice also the stern deck modification to create more interior volume, and which I presume would also make the boat roll back up more easily.

 

post-8534-1265029077_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bah...that boat is much too small..I think that deck mod was to add diesel tankage so he could keep his batteries topped off, chat with his FB friends & watch movies while enroute. :lol:

 

In all seriousness, yes, a real anarchist! Good Luck on the rest of your voyage there Alessandro..thanks Estar for posting this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Picture of the cat he took from Japan to San Francisico (something like 62 days if I remember).

post-8534-1265039146_thumb.jpg

 

Picture of the cat he crossed the Atlantic in (28 days).

post-8534-1265039158_thumb.jpg

 

I don't actually know who currently holds the 'RTW smallest boat, solo, non-stop, unassisted" record. Anyone?

 

Serge Testa has the record for sailing around the world in the smallest vessel – only 11 foot and 10 inches, but that was with stops (and via panama).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh come. Regardless of how well prepared, however sensible they seem when you speak to them, anyone and everyone that attempts to sail round the world on their own is as mad as a box of frogs at the very least.

 

Especially if they're doing it in a little boat.

 

But good luck to him.

 

How can anyone let this phrase go unnoticed. It's a keeper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not sure, but it looks like this is the previous 'smallest non-stop' record that Alessandro is trying to break:

25. Singlehanded Around the World

Alain Maignan FRA

Schouten. 10.6m Monohull (Jeanneau Sun Rise!?)

7th October 2006 to the 11th April 2007

185 days 22 hours 2 minutes

 

Looks like a palace compared to the mini:

 

post-8534-1265053783_thumb.jpgpost-8534-1265053790_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am not sure, but it looks like this is the previous 'smallest non-stop' record that Alessandro is trying to break:

25. Singlehanded Around the World

Alain Maignan FRA

Schouten. 10.6m Monohull (Jeanneau Sun Rise!?)

7th October 2006 to the 11th April 2007

185 days 22 hours 2 minutes

 

Looks like a palace compared to the mini:

 

post-8534-1265053783_thumb.jpgpost-8534-1265053790_thumb.jpg

 

 

yup he just rates mad as a few frogs in a decent sized crate.

 

by definition anyone sailing round the world solo went a stop beyond west ham, so really its just a matter of degree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those short of a phrase or two, Bill McLaren would never disappoint (RIP). He's best on video:

 

They're as cunning as a bag o weasels, those prop forwards...

 

He's as slippery as a baggie up a border burn...

 

He looked as if he kicked about three pounds of haggis that time

 

All arms and legs, he's like a mad octopus when he goes like that

 

A great bullock of a man, this

 

He's like a mad giraffe,

 

Y'know, he's like a mad water buffalo he is

 

And he's so solid - as soon as he gets the feet apart, you'd need dynamite and the Highland Light Infantry to shift him.

 

And many many more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't actually know who currently holds the 'RTW smallest boat, solo, non-stop, unassisted" record. Anyone?

 

 

Kinechi Horie (spelling?) from Japan did it non-stop, East to West in a 28 footer in the mid/ late 1970's. Whether he complied to all the various requirements of "unassisted" and correct point of departure I cannot tell.

 

Interestingly, it is easy to forget that Robin K-Johnston's Suhaili was a mere 9.725 meters (32ft 5 inches) lenght on deck. The bowsprit and bumpkin took it up to 13.2 meters LOA. That's a tiny boat. (the bit in the water)

RKJ says in his book on his journey that the size of the boat was just too small. He felt it fitted neatly into the bottom between two waves and just could not keep going when things got rough.

 

I often wonder what he makes of today's high tech sailors who give up so quickly when the smallest thing goes wrong. Remember, he sailed most of the way with no comms, no electrical power etc. In the early stages of his voyage he did running repairs under water to fix a serious leak, lost his self steering of the Cape of Good Hope and lived on rainwater for a large part of the voyage. He was, and still is, the true seaman and sailor.

 

Have fun,

Regards,

Multisail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kinechi Horie (spelling?) from Japan did it non-stop, East to West in a 28 footer in the mid/ late 1970's. Whether he complied to all the various requirements of "unassisted" and correct point of departure I cannot tell.

 

Interestingly, it is easy to forget that Robin K-Johnston's Suhaili was a mere 9.725 meters (32ft 5 inches) lenght on deck. I often wonder what he makes of today's high tech sailors who give up so quickly when the smallest thing goes wrong.

 

Looks like it's normally translated as "Kenichi Horie". Thanks for that - very interesting voyages and seaman I had never heard of before.

 

The Japanese sailors seem to specialize in doing extraordinary things quietly, just for their own satisfaction.

 

I know what you mean about RKJ. I have always been a little surprised he has not spoken out a bit about today's 'seamanship', but I suspect he just thinks that times change and one must keep up and move on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GO ABBY!!!

 

Oops!! I meant, GO ALE (pronounced, in Italian, "Ah-lay")!!! :lol: :lol: As in, GO ALESSANDRO!

 

Serious respect from me for that! Now that you mention him, I do remember reading about his Atlantic catamaran voyage, and being impressed at the time.

 

Alessandro Di Benedetto, is attempting to round the world solo non-stop without assistance, on a sailing boat of 6.5 (mini transat boat).

 

He departed Les Sables d'Olonne on 26/10/2009. Today he has completed roughly 10,000 nm and is at Lat. 52 ° 21 '50 "S Long. 78 ° 42' 47" E, approaching Australia.

 

Unlike the various ‘youngest’ attempts, this has been recognized by the World Sailing Speed Record Council (WSSRC) as a first world record attempt for first boat under 32 ft to RTW non-stop (solo).

 

This sounds like a crazy venture, except:

 

1. He has already been very successful with other such ventures. When we first met Alessandro in 2006 he had just sailed from Japan to San Francisco on a 20’ catermaran (with no cabin). This was recognized by the WSSRC. And he has also done an Atlantic crossing on the 20’ cat, also recognized by the WSSRC.

 

2. He is doing quite well, with 10,00nm of the voyage complete, including putting Cape Hope and the Kerguelen islands behind him.

 

3. When you meet him he is not crazy at all. He is a very sensible guy, just an excellent seaman off quietly doing adventurous voyages.

 

His website is www.alessandrodibenedetto.net/web/ . He does not have any sort of shore PR machine, so it's a quite low key effort.

 

post-8534-1265017972_thumb.jpgpost-8534-1265017983_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
He actually has a day shape for engine-on. I'm impressed.

 

Damn! Good eye! I've seen that symbol before, and once learned it, but had forgotten what it is.

 

So, what the hell?! He's motoring around the world?! :lol: :lol:

 

Seems like he "knows his way around" boats. Damn impressive sailing undertaking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am not sure, but it looks like this is the previous 'smallest non-stop' record that Alessandro is trying to break:

Alain Maignan FRA

Schouten. 10.6m Monohull (Jeanneau Sun Rise!?)

7th October 2006 to the 11th April 2007

185 days 22 hours 2 minutes

 

Kinechi Horie (spelling?) from Japan did it non-stop, East to West in a 28 footer in the mid/ late 1970's. Whether he complied to all the various requirements of "unassisted" and correct point of departure I cannot tell.

 

Interestingly, it is easy to forget that Robin K-Johnston's Suhaili was a mere 9.725 meters (32ft 5 inches) lenght on deck. The bowsprit and bumpkin took it up to 13.2 meters LOA. That's a tiny boat. (the bit in the water)

 

I was going to say that Jesse Martin's S&S 34 Lionheart might be smaller than Maignan's Schouten (10.6 meters), depending on just how long an S&S 34 is (34 feet = 10.36 meters), but yeah, Suhali's length on deck is smaller still, and Kenichi Horie's boat beats even that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenichi Horie's boat beats even that.

 

Kenichi Horie:

 

  • 1962 Solo Pacific crossing Nishinomiya/Japan - San Francisco/USA
  • 1974 Solo nonstop round -world voyage (west wards), the first Japanese, the world's fourth person, and smallest vessel (28'10"X9'3") to succeed in the voyage
  • 1978-1982 North -South round -world voyage (North and South America)
  • 1985 Solo voyage by solor boat(Hawaii-Chichijima)
  • 1989 Smallest yacht solo Pacific crossing (San Francisco-Nishinomiya)
  • 1992-1993 Solo voyage by pedal -powered boat (Hawaii-Okinawa)
  • 1996 Solo Pacific crossing by recycled aluminum can solar boat (Ecuador-Tokyo)
  • 1999 Solo Pacific crossing by beer barrel boat (San Francisco-Akashi Channel Bridge)

post-8534-1265192381_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
by definition anyone sailing round the world solo went a stop beyond west ham, so really its just a matter of degree.

Reckon most of 'em won't get that- mindyou, it's four stops on the underground services.

 

Plus, given the other things he's done, I reckon he's gone all the way to Upminster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
by definition anyone sailing round the world solo went a stop beyond west ham, so really its just a matter of degree.

I reckon he's gone all the way to Upminster.

 

That's kid's stuff - RTW in a mini puts you at Shoeburyness at least :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This one is not non-stop, but . . .

 

Erden Eruc who is on a human powered circumnavigation of the globe has concluded his 33-day Coral Sea crossing in a rowboat from Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea to near Thursday Island, Australia. On January 28 he left off from where he stopped near Thursday Island and is now sea-kayaking to Cooktown.

 

post-8534-1265311197_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This one is not non-stop, but . . .

 

Erden Eruc who is on a human powered circumnavigation of the globe has concluded his 33-day Coral Sea crossing in a rowboat from Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea to near Thursday Island, Australia. On January 28 he left off from where he stopped near Thursday Island and is now sea-kayaking to Cooktown.

Just for the record, the first human-powered circumnavigation of the world was completed a few years ago. Click here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alessandro is at Lat. 52 ° 21 '50 "S Long. 78 ° 42' 47" E, he has put the Indian ocean behind him and is approaching the bottom of Tasmania.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alessandro has just passed Tasmania. That's three of the Capes done, with two more left.

 

 

Please excuse my ignorance, but, 5 capes? I honestly thought that in terms of circumnavigation, that only 2 were considered, the Cape of Good Hope and Cape Horn. I didn't know that Tasmania was considered a "cape rounding". What are the other 2?

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 capes?

 

To get around, before the canals, you absolutely had to round two: Cape Horn and Cape Hope (although Cape Agulhas is actually further south than Hope)

 

But typically boats went south of Australia, so they had to also round Cape Leeuwin.

 

Often these three are referred to as the great capes.

 

For boats going west about, before the canals, these were the capes where you had to buck into the westerlies to round, and after you rounded you could finally bear off. So, they were major milestones.

 

Then if you are doing a complete southern ocean route you have to round Tasmania and Stewart Islands. They both have South West Capes.

 

I notice that Alessandro himself viewed the Kerguelen Islands as another important rounding milestone.

 

Our own experience suggests The Horn is in a class by itself and is The Great Cape, and the others are all secondary. Hope is quite low latitude (about the same as Auckland) and quite well mannered the two times we have been by - Stewart and Tasmania were more challenging.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 capes?

 

To get around, before the canals, you absolutely had to round two: Cape Horn and Cape Hope (although Cape Agulhas is actually further south than Hope)

 

But typically boats went south of Australia, so they had to also round Cape Leeuwin.

 

Often these three are referred to as the great capes.

 

For boats going west about, before the canals, these were the capes where you had to buck into the westerlies to round, and after you rounded you could finally bear off. So, they were major milestones.

 

Then if you are doing a complete southern ocean route you have to round Tasmania and Stewart Islands. They both have South West Capes.

 

I notice that Alessandro himself viewed the Kerguelen Islands as another important rounding milestone.

 

Our own experience suggests The Horn is in a class by itself and is The Great Cape, and the others are all secondary. Hope is quite low latitude (about the same as Auckland) and quite well mannered the two times we have been by - Stewart and Tasmania were more challenging.

 

 

Thanks for the clarification - much appreciated!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He has just passed stewart island, sailing in a gale. wind NW 35-40 knots, wave NW 5-6 mt - perfect mini sailing conditions :)

 

Only one more cape to go, but it's The Cape.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good for him. Sounds like a hell of a sailor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting within striking distance of the horn

 

 

Looks like Alessandro and Abby may reach the horn in proximity. Alessandro has a bit further distance, but his mini must be much lighter than it was at the beginning, therefor better handling. Looks like he's going to get some tough going in another day or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alessandro's weather: The routing program takes him north of the GS. He gets a little strong breeze on the 21st but nothing terrible. The only bad thing in the forecast at several days of headwinds at the end near the horn, but that is far away and the forecast is not at all trustworthy.

 

post-8534-126891047959_thumb.jpg

"Optimal" route: post-8534-126891048808_thumb.jpg

Great circle route:post-8534-126891049735_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately Alessandro was dismasted on the 30th according to his italian language website.

Apparently he and the hull are ok and he is working out a jury rig to get him to Chile to make repairs.

Please cross fingers for him. Where he is is a difficult place for an injured boat, but he is a seaman. Hopefully good news soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

damn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alessandro's website now says he's repaired the mast. It doesn't sound like just a jury-rig, he's back on course for the Horn and then les Sables! Great news if true.

 

Go Allessandro!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alessandro's website now says he's repaired the mast. It doesn't sound like just a jury-rig, he's back on course for the Horn and then les Sables! Great news if true.

 

Its a little fuzzy - the web site info I found make comments about fitting his main to his new mast and finding it in an easter egg.

Not sure whats going on there.

 

link here:

http://www.alessandrodibenedetto.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=83%3Apasqua-nel-sud-pacifico&catid=37%3Anews&Itemid=50〈=en

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the comment in italian says that he was able to somehow repair the old mast. The stick is now 6.37 meters high, and allow him to carry the main with two reefs in and the jib. He might be able to flight a kite as well. He's planning to continue the navigation to sable d'olonne.

 

He metaphorically said that he found the new mast inside an easter egg (last weekend was easter sunday. It's an italian tradition that kids do find chocolate eggs with a gift inside the morning of easter. I guess his easter egg was about 7 mt high... :)

 

Cazza

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As CazzaRanda wrote, Alessandro repaired a piece of the mast and, to do it, he built something to use as a hoven for curing epoxy at 32°C, and then re-rigged. He seems to be resolute to reach Les Sables d'Olonne, where he left on 10/26, with provisions for a 9 months trip - so, food shouldn't be an issue. The new rig already overcame the test of a gale.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As CazzaRanda wrote, Alessandro repaired a piece of the mast and, to do it, he built something to use as a hoven for curing epoxy at 32°C, and then re-rigged. He seems to be resolute to reach Les Sables d'Olonne, where he left on 10/26, with provisions for a 9 months trip - so, food shouldn't be an issue. The new rig already overcame the test of a gale.

 

 

Ah ha, that's what he means by the Easter Egg!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look at Di Benedetto keep going around the horn. Incredible. Thanks to Cazza for a native speaker's impression of the story. This effort by Di Benedetto to re-rig in the southern ocean is truly Corinthian. This is why I follow these stories. It is great that we get his story on line. I can't tell whether I am more partial to Leo V's lament about the inappropriate weight and strain on this poor mini to make it go around the world, or the other comment that it is surprising that the boat still sails with Di Benedetto's balls on it. While there aren't many words on this web site, the positions tell a real story. This is a great adventure tale happening now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look at Di Benedetto keep going around the horn. Incredible...

 

21 hours ago he was 159 nm away from the horn.

"speed 5.4 knots, wind NW 25-30 knots, wave W 6-7 m"

 

So should be rounding soon. - Best wishes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<snip>

it is surprising that the boat still sails with Di Benedetto's balls on it. While there aren't many words on this web site, the positions tell a real story. This is a great adventure tale happening now.

 

No kidding...truly a great adventure! He is likely dragging his balls behind him like a sea anchor they are so huge!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got to love this effort. He's the one acting like the 16 year old who should know better but says, "WTF. Let's go for the Horn."

 

Only other real options he had when he lost the stick were to send out a distress call (and eventually abandon his boat) or limp for a place like Lima, Guayaquil, or even Panama if he wanted to keep his boat. Once around the Horn he's got a lot more options.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a truly terrific effort - and great seamanship.

 

Was it Yves Parlier who fixed his mast at Stewart island and then ate seaweed, in order to finish the Vendee without assistance?

 

This is the kind of independent resourcefulness in the face of difficulty that I really admire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a truly terrific effort - and great seamanship.

 

Was it Yves Parlier who fixed his mast at Stewart island and then ate seaweed, in order to finish the Vendee without assistance?

 

This is the kind of independent resourcefulness in the face of difficulty that I really admire.

 

It was Parlier who baked a mast in the mudbanks and Alessandro has eclipsed or at least equalled that feat. Wow, make it home safely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Estar, good to see you back.

 

Great to hear A is past "the Horn" - I may only be so lucky to see it someday.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Horn was left behind today at 00:58 UTC.

 

Fantastic effort! Alessandro is a hero. May he make it all the way home.smile.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Estar, good to see you back.

 

Great to hear A is past "the Horn" - I may only be so lucky to see it someday.

 

I have been up in the woods in Vermont with really limited bandwidth. Heading down to annapolis shortly to get our boat recommissioned. In CT right now exploring two business opportunities.

 

I think it is grand this is so un-commercialize/PRed but ironically also a bit sad that really no-one has heard of Alessandro. We only know him becase we happened to be docked up in SF when he came in to complete his Japan to SF record. Beth was down in Annapolis giving a seminar last weekend and everyone had heard of (and had an opinion about) the two girls but no-one even knew Alessandro was out there. This voyage sets a standard in what we should all expect for seamanship and self-reliance, in the fashion of Parlier, RKJ and the Smeetons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just about crossed his track in the atlantic.

 

post-8534-127360993431_thumb.jpg

 

Absolutely amazing! Hopefully in another 6-8wks or so he celebrates tying the knot at the ends. With all the talk/controversy surrounding Jessica/Abby, AB's trip is what real heroes are all about. A suggested title of his book (which I will buy) is: "What the fuck was I thinking." Let's hope his problems are behind him and he makes port in one piece.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hats off to this guy. SA should be there to meet him when he arrives. He embodies all the best aspects of sailing, balls, ingenuity and perseverance rather than the whininess we so often hear around here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This guy is a god... What he is accomplishing absolutely puts into perspective all the other pretenders we have seen recently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A suggested title of his book (which I will buy) is: "What the fuck was I thinking."

 

laugh.giflaugh.gif Love it!

 

I'll line up to buy it as well. Fair winds to the finish Alessandro.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome.

 

Geologist by trade. He took some stones with him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Allessandro continues to make good progress - his achievement is amazing

SA has been a great supporter of the Minis.

I hope the Ed will make sure Allesandro gets a SA annual Sailor of the Year award & how about giving him the first ever, honorary life membership in the SAYC?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Allessandro is approaching the Cape Verde Islands.

This has to be one of the greatest SH circumnavigations.

Round the Horn under jury rig in a Mini & on track to take the record.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Less than three pages of posts on this amazing voyage. 150 and counting for Abby and 45 Jessica. What's wrong with this picture?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Less than three pages of posts on this amazing voyage. 150 and counting for Abby and 45 Jessica. What's wrong with this picture?

 

My thoughts exactly and 6 mos ago 52 degree south

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Less than three pages of posts on this amazing voyage. 150 and counting for Abby and 45 Jessica. What's wrong with this picture?

 

I think the difference is that everyone is agreeable, this guy just has a huge set. No knockers about his accomplishment. Just got out there and got it done. Simple

One of the best showing of seamanship in quite a while. Re rig in the southern ocean on a mini WTF!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thumbs up for Alessandro : awesome project from the boat revamping to the new rigging in the south! A great sailor for sure and a very good hero for the new generation!!

I would like to be in les sables for his arrival!! i was there at Yves Parlier's arrival : so incredible!!

 

All the best for the end of you trip!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anybody know were you can find sources of his previous expeditions. Same as with Beto Pandiani, all his books seem to be in his native language. I want some info of the boats he used. Anyone sitting on some webresources?

 

You really get inspired doing your own "small" projects.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are there any pics of his jury rig? Or the Foss barge used to tow his nuts around? This guys trip sounds amazing, and if this were the kind of thing that was able to garner any media attention I'm sure it would provide q huge boost to the sport. This trip is an inspiration, Abby is an embaressment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taken from cargo vessel Anenoma JUne 3rd. That's one hell of a rig.

 

post-10158-12766795087_thumb.jpg

 

 

Sorry. Couldn't pull any more out of this but it gives a better idea of how much rig he has left.

 

post-10158-12766812589_thumb.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As others have said ... Why isn't this guy capturing the headlines, just an amazing effort. Inspiring!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As others have said ... Why isn't this guy capturing the headlines?

 

No stage parents?

 

He's not a little girl?

 

This isn't his way of making a living?

 

The whole box of frogs thing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Abby has around 25,000 Facebook fans and Alessandro has 56? What's wrong with this picture?

 

 

 

Pinchy, the fish and pasta sound yummy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And me.

Have you looked at that little video on the Facebook page of him about to set off? Just a few handshakes and then on to his boat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, he seems so unprepared -- pushing off from the dock without a book or TV deal in sight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sailing needed something like this. Finally, now when my son gets older and wants to learn about groundbreaking solo voyages I won't have to pull a book written in the 1950's or 60's anymore! (He is writing a book I hope!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sailing needed something like this. Finally, now when my son gets older and wants to learn about groundbreaking solo voyages I won't have to pull a book written in the 1950's or 60's anymore! (He is writing a book I hope!)

Major thumbs up.

 

He'll go largely unheralded in the public sphere/imagination, while Sunderland and Watson will steal the limelight. But, no matter --his is the larger accomplishment (but Watson is no slouch either; although hers was a very public and commercial voyage, she seriously prepared for it). But you gotta love Alessandro's love of and commitment to small boat adventure...his voyage across the Atlantic in a 20' cat was inspired! Hardcore seaman, though and through.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sailing needed something like this. Finally, now when my son gets older and wants to learn about groundbreaking solo voyages I won't have to pull a book written in the 1950's or 60's anymore! (He is writing a book I hope!)

Major thumbs up.

 

He'll go largely unheralded in the public sphere/imagination, while Sunderland and Watson will steal the limelight. But, no matter --his is the larger accomplishment (but Watson is no slouch either; although hers was a very public and commercial voyage, she seriously prepared for it). But you gotta love Alessandro's love of and commitment to small boat adventure...his voyage across the Atlantic in a 20' cat was inspired! Hardcore seaman, though and through.

Saw a presentation from him at the Toronto Boat Show a couple or three years ago about his Trans Pacific voyage in the 20' open cat. Quite a character. Very soft spoken. He goes on all serious about some part of the voyage/prep/boat then all of a sudden throw in some little joke and let out a huge laugh. Definately would attend again if possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites