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mr_ryano

Groupama Jules Verne

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Franck and crew are off, much speculation that this was the last possible time for the Groupama team to have a go. Currently 120 miles behind the pace, but hoping to hook into better weather soon. Website. Facebook

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 Even again with Orange 2 ghost, they should arrive at the equator with 24h. advantage according to plan.

 

After that, I'm afraid they have no plan and that's why BP5 did not start: they want a plan till entering the Indic. Which is asking for a lot I think.

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I think they just really want to go before BP5 does, because if those two set off together it wouldn't be a contest, B{5 is the quicker boat

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Big hole forming in 18 hours at 22 degrees. Be interesting to see if they jibe towards the coast soon to stay away from it and pick up the good breeze inside the Verdes in 36 hours. Looks like they should be able to stay ahead of the Orange Ghost.

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 I bet they go west of Verde islands, there will be more wind between the islands and the african coast, but it seems just a quick way to go to a stop. The wind will be in the west by then.

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Well, they just jibed in that big lift. My money is on following the Orange Ghost through the islands for a little wind boost. Looks pretty light at 36 hours out no matter where they are.

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Nope.

 

West again and bleeding miles at the same pace they recovered before.

 

 

Going south and crossing Cap Vert islands ddw did not look that bad to me as an option ...

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Current position as of February 3, 2010 (22:00:00 UTC):

Ahead/behind record: +87.6 nm

Speed (avg) over past 24 hours: 19.2 knots

Distance over past 24 hours: 459.8 nm

data

tracker

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Yeah, I'm surprised they aren't soaking down a little to the west. But the South Atlantic looks pretty good once they cross the equator.

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 Equator crossed in less than 6 days, but did not better their own record of 5d 15h.

 

Looks good till 20º S, maybe 2 days and some hours, but there after is not that clear.

 

 

I think BP5 wanted that part to be clear ?

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Vid

 

How the doldrums can offer a good shower but close the tap a little early ...... ;)

 

 

From the french blurb: Wind came back before they could rinse the soap off: back to the pedestals.

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 A nice shower, clean clothes, and straight to Rio for some party :)

 

Or are they planing to turn the Antartida looking for sunsets ?

 

It will be long to re-cross the Atlantic and go east ...

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"Des conditions idéales ! Mer plate, beau ciel étoilé et grosse chaleur, ce qui nous permet de naviguer en T-shirt la nuit sans même se faire mouiller... On avance bien : on était même « sur une patte » avec la coque centrale à lécher la surface de l'eau."

 

 

Frédéric Le Peutrec, lors de la vacation radio 

 

-->

 

 

Ideal conditions ! Flat sea, starry blue sky, and quite hot, so we can sail in t-shirt during night time without even getting splashed ... We make good progress: we were even <<on one foot>>, with the central hull just licking the water surface.

 

 

 

 

Now I'm sure, they are going to Rio :)

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Hope Jess is keeping a watch to the rear, looks like their tracks are going to be close as Groupama comes screaming up from behind! now THAT would be a photo!

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They jibed right on the tail of that weather system, and the models show it moving ~580 knots in the next 24 hours, strengthening and organizing. Time to keep the hammer down (doing 32 knots right now!). If they can hang onto it for the next 6-12 hours they should get a nice ride for a few days. Although it looks like it will keep them from going as far South as they'd like and could make the cape tricky. May have to just slow down and follow it around, or get smacked in the washing machine.

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2010/02/09-17h13 Previous report, the "Tropical Dilemma" 

 

(http://www.cammas-groupama.com/en/courses/jules_verne_trophy/news_2009/news_jules_verne_83.jsp)

 

" We've managed to maintain our lead over the reference time, but we're going to lose a little ground over the coming days. Nonetheless, we hope to reach the longitude of the Cape of Good Hope with a deficit of less than half a day in relation to Orange 2" 

 

 

After lots of jibes to stay with the wind (see last report on site) it seems it's still possible.

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Crap, they missed the train by less than 6 hours. It would have been a good ride too, with the 36 hour forecast showing it as a real nice wave at the cape. Now it looks like the next one is leaving the station without them too and they'll be lucky to catch the third wave. Oh well, this makes things more interesting I guess. If they'd caught the first one they'd have been 2 days ahead of the Orange Ghost.

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Next hours will be key, if they lose next train I think that they will not be able to catch with Orange 2 ghost till they are again in the Atlantic going north.

Bruno had a bad day 10ºS and another 15ºN 

 

 

But if they can pass under Africa only 12 hours behind, maybe G3 can recover before Cape horn ... without breaking. 

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Is their top speed not higher than Orange? If so, is there any chance they can work through a system from back to front? They look like they may be late for the one directly below them now. I don't think they missed much with the one in front of them that Jessica Watson is feeling, it fuses with the one below them at the Cape. But given their problems last time maybe they are not willing to push that hard.

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That depends on the system's speed :)

I remember Thomas Coville in the last attempt keeping just ahead of a system and actually slowing down because he was faster, but I guess you need a reasonable sea state to do this, and I wonder what has the previous low left behind.

As I see it they must do 400 miles in the next 18 hours heading 150º as they are or they will lose it.

Lets hope I'm wrong because this looks difficult.

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That depends on the system's speed :)

I remember Thomas Coville in the last attempt keeping just ahead of a system and actually slowing down because he was faster, but I guess you need a reasonable sea state to do this, and I wonder what has the previous low left behind.

As I see it they must do 400 miles in the next 18 hours heading 150º as they are or they will lose it.

Lets hope I'm wrong because this looks difficult.

 

blog says they are expecting to be a half day ahead at the cape (optimistic?)....orange had a very good run through the same section.

 

they didn't look for the strongest winds last time either. positioning was very much about sea state iirc

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 Last report from the site:

 

The first low of the Southern Ocean has been a long time coming, but the pace should finally enable the giant trimaran to enter into the Indian Ocean as the weekend draws to a close.
 

 

 

Previous one:

 

Already Franck Cammas and his men know they're going to have their work cut out to round the Cape of Good Hope as fast as Bruno Peyron in 2005 (14d 08h 19'). However, as long as they're only a few hours behind on entering the Indian Ocean, it'll be game on once again!

 

It looks optimistic to me now. They will have to push it hard once they get the wind.

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At least another 12, maybe 18 hours before they get into the pressure from the next system, sailing at ~10 knots, slightly west (187 degrees now). Then it's game on and ~12 hours behind the ghost. Tough sailing, should be fun to watch.

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While G3 is catching up speed and pointing easter, after the Orange 2 ghost, BP5 enters orange code and prepares for a Sunday start on Jules Verne.

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Hauling ass again. Wouldn't be surprised to see them log 800 in the next 24 hours. What's the record? And is there an easy link to sea state with a forecast?

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 For the wheather I just follow up on their tracking

 

http://cammas-groupama.geovoile.com/julesv...index.asp?lg=fr

 

 

The 24 hours record belongs to BP5 while crossing the north Atlantic at 37.8 kn: 908 nm !!

 

G3 "only" could make 857.5 nm during his attempt at the same time (they started some hours earlier than PB5 and finished after them, it's difficult to find anything about this in groupama website, but there's information here: 

 

http://www.grands-records.com/index.php/arrivees-groupees

 

)

 

I don't know the speeds attained in the south ...

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The forecast on their site at 36 hours out is weird. It shows the system they are riding slowing down and running into another with NE winds?? Looks like they will need to get south whenever possible.

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The forecast on their site at 36 hours out is weird. It shows the system they are riding slowing down and running into another with NE winds?? Looks like they will need to get south whenever possible.

 

 

"The front to the West of Groupama 3 is dishing out between 32 and 36 knots as it tracks East and Franck Cammas and his crew are managing to maintain the right separation from it and hence sail in 20 to 25 knots of breeze along a very efficient trajectory. The front will nevertheless close on them imperceptibly until Sunday evening, at which point its progress will slow as it evacuates towards the Antarctic on Monday morning" analysed Sylvain Mondon from Météo France.

 

 

JPS is right....as are you most likely. They will probably go south then??

 

long way north of the 60S they will likely get to at some point

 

this stuff leaves the AC for dead.....and when BP V get's going it's really on

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 We have a saying here:

 

"Better is the enemy of the good."

 

 

It seems they are letting pass good enough windows waiting for better ones.

 

But they are running out of stand-by time ...

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The wave train from the NE winds coming down the east coast of Africa is going to make for some nasty sea state conditions in the next few days. Could get ugly.

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Maybe that's why they have just turned right to go south now :)

 

I wonder whether they aren't doing some gybes to gain some SE but not going to go too deep till they need to...say 24 hours or so?

 

going to hazard a rough guess that they'll pass through about 46-47S 26-27E?

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Back on track after two quick gybes, now they really need pedal to the metal to stay in front of the front. What a ride.

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had a quick look around their site to see if the 2008 track was still about. it was for a while. anyone have a link to it?

 

very many turns for orange through this next section.

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Down to 22 knots and a light patch for the next 6 hours. Sure hope they don't fall off the backside of this wave. If they can hang on for 18 hours they get a nice strong northerly component that will make for a nice straight trajectory south.

 

Evo, they missed your waypoint. May not get that far south until 35 E now!

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Evo, they missed your waypoint. May not get that far south until 35 E now!

 

 

as they probably will for every prediction i make...hehe

 

crikey...they did 42kts yesterday. mind boggling

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Sure hope they don't fall off the backside of this wave.

Looks to me like they just fell off the back of the Northerly and had to gybe for the lighter w-sw pressure. Wind looks quite variable for the next 18-30hrs, before the next system comes through... I reckon they may be putting in a few more gybes.

 

Great stuff.

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Bummer, 18 and 24 hour forecasts, if accurate, make it very unlikely to catch the pressure. Will cost them almost a full day before the next system fills in. I wish we could get a news feed directly from Stan Honey r.e. his routing decisions, and especially his local interpretation of the weather forecast, how accurate the gribs really are etc.

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Speed down to 8 knots as they try to crawl across the ridge into the pressure. Web site says the front is slowing down for a while and they expect to catch it. Seems unlikely to me unless it goes a little retrograde, but if they make it across the ridge they'll start flying again.

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their meteo is certainly suggesting the front stalls and they should make it if what they are seeing is correct this time. changed quite a bit of late

 

if

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Nice work fighting their way across that ridge: 36.6 knots at 106 degrees now. Must feel good getting back on the train. Now the trick is to not get rolled by the following depression, which is overtaking the one they just caught. Confused seas and lots of black arrows chasing them, classic. Go Groupama!

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I should expect they will put in some serious miles over the next 36hrs - maybe as many as 1200nm. Looks like they should stay ahead of the front / depression in the NW breeze. If they go too fast, looks like they may end up in more of a light Westerly - may need to heat up and go NE - which doesn't look optimal...

 

Great to watch. Would love to know more about their routing advice.

 

My guess is on them passing Cape Leeuwin (115 08') at ~46deg S at 0000 GMT on Monday if they keep with the systems. Any other guesses?

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I should expect they will put in some serious miles over the next 36hrs - maybe as many as 1200nm. Looks like they should stay ahead of the front / depression in the NW breeze. If they go too fast, looks like they may end up in more of a light Westerly - may need to heat up and go NE - which doesn't look optimal...

 

Great to watch. Would love to know more about their routing advice.

 

My guess is on them passing Cape Leeuwin (115 08') at ~46deg S at 0000 GMT on Monday if they keep with the systems. Any other guesses?

cher-oncle-stan

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Great story about Stan and his participation on this trip around the globe. Perhaps one of our good francophones here could translate, that is beyond my basic abilities.

 

Incredible to watch the progress of this boat. Having spent many cruising days where 200 miles was fast, it was hard, but possible to understand 400 and even 500 mile days. Now you need 700 or 800 mile days to be fast. This has changed in just the last 20 years, while I have been sailing. Of course, this is obvious, but awesome.

 

Sub 50 days looks possible. I hope the boat holds together this time!

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Great sailing instructions - "going fast effortlessly". They will need to keep doing that to stay in front of the front, which is speeding up the next 36 hours. Meanwhile they will blast by under Berrimilla which will be stuck in high pressure for a day or two.

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wednesday Aus time will be interesting for them as it's certainly a south sitting high. their low looks like it's decaying a bit then and they have to catch it on the reform east of NZ by friday.

 

they'd be under cape leeuwin about now. flyin

 

all that said and not wanting to take anything from G3...how good does this make FJ's lap look yet again?

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wednesday Aus time will be interesting for them as it's certainly a south sitting high. their low looks like it's decaying a bit then and they have to catch it on the reform east of NZ by friday.

 

they'd be under cape leeuwin about now. flyin

 

all that said and not wanting to take anything from G3...how good does this make FJ's lap look yet again?

 

F.J. Amazing stuff...... :D

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Not wishing them anything but success, but my early prediction is that they are going to fall short by 2- 3 days. Peryon had a fantastic run up the Atlantic - hardly slowed down all the way home. Would be hard to emulate. I think Cammas was hoping to be further ahead at this time.

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wednesday Aus time will be interesting for them as it's certainly a south sitting high. their low looks like it's decaying a bit then and they have to catch it on the reform east of NZ by friday.

 

they'd be under cape leeuwin about now. flyin

 

all that said and not wanting to take anything from G3...how good does this make FJ's lap look yet again?

 

Yep ! just one day ahead of FJ at Leeuwin !

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Not wishing them anything but success, but my early prediction is that they are going to fall short by 2- 3 days. Peryon had a fantastic run up the Atlantic - hardly slowed down all the way home. Would be hard to emulate. I think Cammas was hoping to be further ahead at this time.

 

I think Cammas did go because that was his only possible time frame , before other commitments, so they are just taking what comes to them.

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Rough guess is that they'll gain more than 12 hours vs Orange in the next 2 days. Let's play the guessing game for the expected lead at 160 degrees.

My guess: 11 hours ahead of O by 160 degrees.

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Looking at some Gribs it looks like they'll be heading through some strong Low's as they pass under E Aus and NZ, they should make some solid ground on Orange's 2005 track....they are kicking ass at the moment.

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Up to 77 miles now with a steady 32 knots of boat speed and the blog says that 28 feels slow. Amazing run. O's ghost starts picking up speed over the next few days but it looks like G3 will be ~9 hours ahead at 160 now.

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New record ...... Indian ocean crossing... www.cammas-groupama.com/en/index.jsp :lol:

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Up to 77 miles now with a steady 32 knots of boat speed and the blog says that 28 feels slow. Amazing run. O's ghost starts picking up speed over the next few days but it looks like G3 will be ~9 hours ahead at 160 now.

 

 

I think your original call was closest KD...looks like 12 plus before O gets to 160.

 

and they're now backing off on G3 for boat preservation...wow.

 

stay together green thing. huey please be kind

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They passsed 160 a few hours ago but I'm too lazy to download the data so here's a quick estimate of their lead:

283 miles ahead now and Orange was doing 26 knots, so it's a 10.7 hour lead. I win :-) Funny how the rule makers usually win their own games.

 

Cranked the vitesse back up to 32.9 knots now so I guess the cross seas must have abated a bit. They've got good winds and a nice dip into the south going so should put some serious time on O for the next few days. Seems like a 24 hour lead at the cape would make the Atlantic run home pretty interesting given O's speed home.

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isn't it their philosophy that they feel they can easily take oranges time back up the atlantic? the boats opted for those legs more than the southern ocean stuff i think??

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couple of monster days being reeled off right now....again. wow

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couple of monster days being reeled off right now....again. wow

 

Yeah, Think I may have to revise my guess for 160 :D Oops, too late!

 

Going well

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Tracker's back up: 29.6 knots and 378 ahead. Weather looks sweet for the next few days with a Northerly veer coming in ~18 hours. They can get South for a while and then jibe on the leading edge of it with a good sea state. Should be another few monster days.

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With the pressure moving around too the West and increasing in the next 12/18 hours it looks the hammer will really go down! Even more!!!

 

Its hard to believe that less than 2 weeks ago they were off the bottom of Africa and maybe America in only 1 more!

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I have nothing to add other than to say this is fantastic to follow and my “my read coffee break every morning”

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I have nothing to add other than to say this is fantastic to follow and my "my read coffee break every morning"

 

Damn right.

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Water is 8C and Stan Honey says they won't be traversing any ice fields, although they are going south of a few that they're tracking on satellite. Looks like they'll be jibing a few times in the next days with the wind due West. It would be cool to see some video of jibing at 30 knots. Yikes. What an amazing run.

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It would be cool to see some video of jibing at 30 knots. Yikes. What an amazing run.

 

 

 

This might seem like an extremely stupid question to a lot of you but here I go….

 

From what I understand they are doing 30+/- knts in 25 +/- knts TWS so I have to assume that the AWD is at or forward of the beam in these conditions how do you jibe the boat? Slow down enough to bring the wind astern? Chicken jibe and actually tack?

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It would be cool to see some video of jibing at 30 knots. Yikes. What an amazing run.

 

 

 

This might seem like an extremely stupid question to a lot of you but here I go….

 

From what I understand they are doing 30+/- knts in 25 +/- knts TWS so I have to assume that the AWD is at or forward of the beam in these conditions how do you jibe the boat? Slow down enough to bring the wind astern? Chicken jibe and actually tack?

 

 

only know about skiffs and smaller tri's personally but think this is the same on a giant scale and therefore fraught with danger but it's just a matter of turning the boat with as much pace as you can....big ease then crank em on as the boat reaccelerates. yer off

 

or as is the case here...flying....on foils

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This might seem like an extremely stupid question to a lot of you but here I go….

 

From what I understand they are doing 30+/- knts in 25 +/- knts TWS so I have to assume that the AWD is at or forward of the beam in these conditions how do you jibe the boat? Slow down enough to bring the wind astern? Chicken jibe and actually tack?

 

A Groupama jibe probably doesn't look like beach cat jibes, but here's what I know from the little cats. The wind is forward of beam, but jibe is the same. You can stall out by intentionally going too deep to make the jibe easier. Once you start going really slow, slower than the wind, you are ready for a 'multi-hull chicken jibe'. Then take your time, haul in the main to center line, ease the helm over slowly and bring the jib around. I'd imagine Groupama would do that. I would worry about the need to keep the foils working to keep the big tri's bow up, especially when DDW, but I have no idea about their forward buoyancy or how the loads go with a boat that big. When racing beach cats you don't stall the boat, keep sheet on as much as you dare, let the traveler run as much as you dare, turn fairly quick, but not so hard the apparent wind comes up too fast and flips the boat before you are hiked out. RTW, I doubt you need to maneuver so fast with such risk to the boat.

 

For one week solid, the boat has not dropped below a 27 knot average for 24 hours. In the last 4 hours they averaged 34 knots. These 10 sailors are really moving. Also, check out the

on the sail change.

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That's a great video clip, gives you a good idea of how much work goes into a sail change, on such a big scale, and at speed......... cool!

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That's a great video clip, gives you a good idea of how much work goes into a sail change, on such a big scale, and at speed......... cool!

 

Yes, great video. No motorised hydraulics for these guys !

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That's a great video clip, gives you a good idea of how much work goes into a sail change, on such a big scale, and at speed......... cool!

 

Yes, great video. No motorised hydraulics for these guys !

 

 

smile.gif

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the race is really on now.....not liking the westerlies methinks.....lost 100 miles in the last 18hrs. wonder whether they didn't get another wx surprise with the low reforming north of their intended route tomorrow

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Bummer, 18 and 24 hour forecasts, if accurate, make it very unlikely to catch the pressure. Will cost them almost a full day before the next system fills in. I wish we could get a news feed directly from Stan Honey r.e. his routing decisions, and especially his local interpretation of the weather forecast, how accurate the gribs really are etc.

 

 

The grib data is pretty good for 4 days or so, and broadly useful out to 6 days. Use mostly GFS and ECMWF/CEP. Now tangling with the low that we have been worried about for several days. The timing of the low is not great for us, forcing us to sail extra miles. Better if it slowed down a bit. Zonal flow makes these systems faster than ideal for us.

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Bummer, 18 and 24 hour forecasts, if accurate, make it very unlikely to catch the pressure. Will cost them almost a full day before the next system fills in. I wish we could get a news feed directly from Stan Honey r.e. his routing decisions, and especially his local interpretation of the weather forecast, how accurate the gribs really are etc.

 

 

The grib data is pretty good for 4 days or so, and broadly useful out to 6 days. Use mostly GFS and ECMWF/CEP. Now tangling with the low that we have been worried about for several days. The timing of the low is not great for us, forcing us to sail extra miles. Better if it slowed down a bit. Zonal flow makes these systems faster than ideal for us.

 

Whow !! Awesome post to find and read!

Thanks !

Makes the tracker "fix" even more exciting.

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We're presently hove-to about 180 nmi south of Cape Horn aboard the 280' research vessel Thomas G. Thompson in 50-60+ knot winds. Groupama, or any other sailing craft for that matter, does not want to tangle with conditions like we're experiencing.

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