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frozenhawaiian

who's sailed on traditional vessels?

76 posts in this topic

Who has spent time sailing them and what boat? I sailed on Lynx, a 125ft square topsail schooner on the west coast and currently sailing on the schooner bowdoin here in Maine and a 45 foot wooden gaff rigged ketch called puritan. what about the rest of you?

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Who has spent time sailing them and what boat? I sailed on Lynx, a 125ft square topsail schooner on the west coast and currently sailing on the schooner bowdoin here in Maine and a 45 foot wooden gaff rigged ketch called puritan. what about the rest of you?

 

Sialed a Ensign, just locall stuff, no ocean saileing.

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I call that pirate ship sailing...usually an interesting sect of the sailing society that sails them, all good sailors though just an interesting breed. I sailed on the schooner America for awhile. Awesome boat. But not exactly the Lynx by any means.

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crewed on the schooner "Ranger" in the Ensenada race '84 & '85... also a few times on schooners Lady Ada and Diosa Del Mar.. they were all based in Long Beach in the early to mid 80's. fun boats to sail on

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My summer job is on the 81' Schooner Argia, two-masted gaff-rigged.

I've also done bouts on the Amistad replica, the Mystic Whaler, and the Tall Ship Mystic.

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I've sailed on several gaff-rigged sloops, ketches and schooners. Nothing with square sails st across masts. I find the boats and the traditional arts useful and interesting.

 

However, a lot of the people who over-romanticize so-called "tall ships" give me a rash. If they dress like pirates I get very nervous. If they talk like pirates I get the fuck out of there, pronto.

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Sailed a think it was a Dutch ketch on Lake Travis in '97 during the Governor's Cup. Nice boat, crew was a different story. Tiller was the size of a 4 x 6.

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Does dredging oysters under sail on Skipjacks count? Also, put in many miles on Log Canoes.

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Learned to sail on a sprit-sailed dory that was painted with tar to stop it leaking. Also sailed on Bluenose II. Hardening that bad boy up from a run, I was amazed at the amount of mainsheet and how many of us it took to pull it in. No wonder there aren't a lot of photos around of those old gaffers on a run.

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Who has spent time sailing them and what boat? I sailed on Lynx, a 125ft square topsail schooner on the west coast and currently sailing on the schooner bowdoin here in Maine and a 45 foot wooden gaff rigged ketch called puritan. what about the rest of you?

 

Scows are traditional, right?

 

Sneakboxes are definitely traditional, although back when I raced them they were nowhere near as antiquated as they are now. Lightnings are traditional too, they go all the way back to the previous Great Depression.

 

How about skipjacks? I've sailed on a couple of them, notably on the Rebecca T. Ruark. I've never raced log canoes though.

 

Ensigns? yeah. How about S-boats? They are superbly traditional but I've never sailed one, definitely would accept a ride there.

 

Big square riggers? Let's see, Niagra & Maryland Dove & Elizabeth II... dunno if Pride of Baltimore counts because she didn't have her square topsail set the time I sailed her... and none of those vessels are BIG by square-reigger standards... anybody here who was aboard Balclutha last time she went out?

 

Definitely a different game!

 

FB- Doug

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I've sailed on several gaff-rigged sloops, ketches and schooners. Nothing with square sails st across masts. I find the boats and the traditional arts useful and interesting.

 

However, a lot of the people who over-romanticize so-called "tall ships" give me a rash. If they dress like pirates I get very nervous. If they talk like pirates I get the fuck out of there, pronto.

 

yeah the pirate reencator types can be a real pain in the ass, we found that best way to shut them up once they were on the boat was put them to work, the "pirate captains" tend not no yell and yar quite so much once he's been handed a halyard to haul.

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Depends on what you mean by traditional. I have if a 1938, 89 ft S&S yawl counts.

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Crewed JK3 'Shamrock V' in the early 90's for a few seasons. Pretty awesome vessel considering it was built in the 1930.

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Marblehead Town Class, wood. Mast canted way forward to get a more neutral helm. Even so we all carried a spare tiller.

 

And a couple of wooden schooners, 50-foot range. But this was back in the day, when some wood still being built.

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Who has spent time sailing them and what boat? I sailed on Lynx, a 125ft square topsail schooner on the west coast and currently sailing on the schooner bowdoin here in Maine and a 45 foot wooden gaff rigged ketch called puritan. what about the rest of you?

 

I've sailed on Lynx once in the Bay, and did a Master Mariner's on the Alma, a gaff-rigged barge schooner. Oh yeah did this really cool Delta trip on a little 16' wooden gaff rig, with 20 or so other little traditional boats. What a trip that was....

Can't remember what else...it's pretty much blurred together.

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I sailed as a cadet on the USCG Bark Eagle. I was Main Royal Captain. The view was great. First up and last down.

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Crewed JK3 'Shamrock V' in the early 90's for a few seasons. Pretty awesome vessel considering it was built in the 1930.

 

that's awesome the J-class boats are amazing.

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grew up as a teenager working on, crewing on, racing and delivering gaff rigged wooded schooners back in the 70's. I use to have a poor view of fiberglass boats, and some friends still do. Wouldn't own a wood boat now, unless I hit the megabucks....

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Sailed on two Brigantine schooners, a Colin Archer gaff ketch, a number of clinker gunter-gaff whalers as a kid in Sea Scouts, and did some island cruising in HK in a Cantonese junk.

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Schooner, Robertson II , here in the gulf islands..... "The Robby" :)

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Schooner, Robertson II , here in the gulf islands..... "The Robby" :)

 

 

The late great Robby. I have been by Mink Reef a few times since. What a sad sight.

 

On a happier note, I have sailed on "Duen." She is 1939 Norwegian fishing boat that was used to ferry freedom fighters to the Hebrides during WWII. She is currently on the West Coast doing charters, etc..

 

vancouver.jpg

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Tops'l schooner Bill of Rights, and the brigantines Exy and Irving Johnson.

Also, by now, I'm sure Cal 20s are considered "traditional".

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Sailed on the 125' Gloucester Schooner Lettie G. Howard for a few years - and will be taking the Summerwind on her first training cruise as the KP flagship this weekend.

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I have spent the past 2 years sailing NY30 #16, Nautilus and will be sailing #15, Banzai this summer. They were built in 1905 and I am convinced there is nothing better in life than sailing then to windward in 22 knots of breeze and long swell (or at least as long as the swell can get in Long Island Sound) with full sails.

 

I think I was born about 100 years too late.

 

Bam Miller

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I have spent the past 2 years sailing NY30 #16, Nautilus and will be sailing #15, Banzai this summer. They were built in 1905 and I am convinced there is nothing better in life than sailing then to windward in 22 knots of breeze and long swell (or at least as long as the swell can get in Long Island Sound) with full sails.

 

I think I was born about 100 years too late.

 

Bam Miller

 

nicE!

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I spent 6 weeks of my life on board the USCGC Eagle. We called it the "Dirty Bird" for a reason.

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Bowdoin is a beautiful ship, you're lucky.

 

I spent a lot of time in Penobscot Bay on the schooner Stephen Taber which was owned by the second wife of my great grandfather. Fun, fast and beautiful.

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Bowdoin is a beautiful ship, you're lucky.

 

I spent a lot of time in Penobscot Bay on the schooner Stephen Taber which was owned by the second wife of my great grandfather. Fun, fast and beautiful.

 

taber is a cool boat, I love bowdoin, loved sailing on her from my first day at maine maritime and with every winter maintenance season as more of my time effort and I'll admit love goes into her I feel more attached, I'm gonna miss that schooner when I leave. the piece of shit training ship on the other hand....

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I sailed on HMS Rose from NYC to Baltimore before she became the Surprise. Just for a week and I was paying, but that didn't making it any less fun hemling her under sail through the Key Bridge up to Fells Point where I now live.

 

Also some other stiff like Brilliant ou of Mystic, a yacht/fishing smack on the east coast of England, day cruise on Pride II.

 

I love the old stuff, especially the smell of pitch.

 

Too funny on the pirates thing. We have the Privateer Festival every spring in Fells Point, and pirate-types come out in droves. There's a lot of buxom ladies showing amazing acres of cleavage. I call it "Fat Chicks are Hot Day". Figure everyone should have at least one day a year, right?

 

It's coming up, so maybe I'll try to get some pics.

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If traditional means the best damn thing society could come up with at the time, I have ridden on a number of such vessels.

 

if you mean old out moded relics that we keep alive as museum peices...The Flagship Niagra in the mid seventies was my last ride and a whole hell of a lot of work and danger that was well worth it at the time but except for being part of the national celebration of the 200th anniversary of the US Declaration of Independence a rather wasteful and silly exercize. .

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What's the saying "Pics or it didn't happen"

Not having the fortune to sail on them ;but lucky enough to have shot most of the west coast ones mentioned(plus 2 )

 

So hope they bring back memories for those who sailed on them!

 

cheers Dal

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Sorry to say, no experience on the grand old ladies. But I was lucky enough to see the 1976 bicentennial in New York from the 30th floor of the WTC. Absolutely awesome experience.

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I sailed on the Spirit of Dana Point (when she was still the Pilgrim of Newport), went to Catalina and back. Took the helm for quite a while coming home on a nice reach with wind in the upper teens, lots of fun!

 

spirit2_lg.jpg

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Sorry to say, no experience on the grand old ladies. But I was lucky enough to see the 1976 bicentennial in New York from the 30th floor of the WTC. Absolutely awesome experience.

 

Hey, I was there too, I was in Battery Park.

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My brother was crewing abord the Californian when they took a turn into their slip a little wide and hit a few docked boats. His job was to say "Sorry about that" as they ground their way past :o

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awesome shot of the eagle dal, friend of mine just got off the eagle a few days ago. beautiful vessel.

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Sorry to say, no experience on the grand old ladies. But I was lucky enough to see the 1976 bicentennial in New York from the 30th floor of the WTC. Absolutely awesome experience.

 

Hey, I was there too, I was in Battery Park.

 

Fifteeth floor. I think.

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My first offshore sailing experience was aboard the 1929 Cayman Schooner Goldfield. Departed Seattle for Mexico, July 13, 1983. 105 ft overall. Broke the 50 foot main boom off Pt. Conception. Layed at anchor in Newport Harbor, after stopping in Long Beach and buying a telephone pole to shape and refit. Hell of an experience. Biggest boat I had sailed prior was my Ranger 23.

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Sailed the replica of the Golden Hind from Liverpool to Jersey. Don't know about traditional, rather just fucking old school. Didn't use a motor, couldn't point and rolled like a pig. Jeeze it was fun.

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Sorry to say, no experience on the grand old ladies. But I was lucky enough to see the 1976 bicentennial in New York from the 30th floor of the WTC. Absolutely awesome experience.

 

Hey, I was there too, I was in Battery Park.

 

Fifteeth floor. I think.

Out in the harbor in something big and chartered. Don't remember much about that day.

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Sailed on this in the late '80's and early '90's.

 

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An Faoileán ( ahn FWAY-lawn) is a gleoiteóg (GLOW-chug) a small Galway Hooker. No engine.

 

Many many hairy moments sailing to an alongside berth on the small piers of West Cork: "Mind the bowsprit!!!!!!

 

A bit of history:

 

The Galway Hooker An Faoileán, which (was) part of the Glenans Irish Sailing Club fleet at Baltimore (County Cork), has a long and interesting history.

In 1914 Anthony Nee (Tonaí An Fhaoileáin) of Rossmuck, Co. Galway, sailed to Galway in a turf boat, to order a 26ft Púcán. Oak and Larch from Barna wood was to provide the raw materials for the craft. The boat builder John O'Donnell who lived at Long Wall was the man approached to build the boat, and he accompanied Tonaí to the forest to select trees which were converted in McDonaghs Sawmills in Galway.

 

Sometime later, Anthony Nee got a message that his boat was ready for collection. Included with the boat were the spars and the anchor at a total cost of £16. An Faoileán, which is now gaff rigged (gaff mainsaill, staysail and jib), was originally púcán rigged, (dipping lug and jib). The púcán rig was considered more efficient on the wind and required less rigging than the gaff rig.

 

On her early voyages Faoileán was engaged in turf running to Aran as well as fishing. She takes her name from her first owner, known locally as 'Tonaí An Faoileán'. The owner's father Maitias was pet-named An Faoileán, and it became a family tradition to name their boats 'An Faoileán'. The boat remained in the Nee family for a quarter of a century before being sold in 1939 to Beartla ó Congaile, Ard West, Carna, Co. Galway. The new owner changed the rig to the more versatile gaff rig. No longer engaged in turf running she now fished herring and mackerel commercially.

 

The next owner was Patrick Madden, Feenish Island, Carna, who used her for fishing, scallop dredging, and for transporting cattle and turf to and from the mainland. Faoileán was sold again in the late 50's to Paraic Barrett, Carna. Now de-rigged and fitted with a diesel inboard engine she was used for lobster fishing.

The revival of interest in Galway Hookers, as pleasure boats in the mid 70's, saw Faoileán being bought by Jim Ryan, a marine biologist working in Carna. The engine was removed and she was rigged to compete in the big gleoiteóg class.

 

In the mid 80's An Faoileán was purchased by Glenans Irish Sailing Club. She was used by the club for sail-training at Baltimore and Bere Island.

In the late '90's the boat was in need of considerable renovationa and was sold to Hegarty's Boatyard in Oldcourt, Skibbereen. She then passed into the ownership of a Crosshaven sailor.

 

The Galway Hookers

The origin of these ancient workboats is shrouded in mystery. Some commentators suggest possible Dutch, Norse or even Spanish influences, but no direct evidence exists to support these theories. While the hookers hardly developed in total isolation, they should be seen primarily as products of their environment and the temperament of the men who built and sailed them.

Since Galway hookers have no close counterpart elsewhere, we can reasonably claim them as unique Irish sailing craft, tailor-made for the treacherous waters off the Galway and Connemara coast. There is nothing delicate or unnecessary in their construction. Form follows function. Their most characteristic feature is the massive wooden hull.

High rounded bows over a sharp, clean entry give buoyancy forward (essential to keep her head up in stormy western seas). Full buoyant sections mould into great tumblehome, sweeping into a broad raked transom. Tumblehome keeps the rail clear of the water when lying on the ground or drying out alongside.

For quickness in stays, the rudder is hung at 35º-40º to the waterline, depending on the builder. Mast rake of as much as 4º aft is quite common. The rig is kept well within working needs. As a rule of thumb the mast is the same length as the hull, but considerable boom overhang and a high peaked gaff, mean that the mainsail is large. It is carried loose-footed and always laced to the mast, therefore raising or dropping it even off the wind, is a simple task.

Two headsails are carried; a staysail and a jib set on a bowsprit, which extends outboard - rule of thumb - the length of the beam. The cut of the jib varies from very low to medium- high footed, and tradition specifies the luff length to be, the same length as the distance from the outboard tip of the bowsprit to the mast.

Galway hookers fall into four broad classifications;

 

*Bád Mór (big boat), pronounced 'bawd moor' 35' to 44' overall hull length.

*Leath Bhád (half boat), pronounced 'la wawd' 32' to35' hull length.

*Gleoiteóg, pronounced 'glowchug '24' to 28'.

*Púcán, pronounced 'pookaun' similar to the gleoiteóg but rigged with dipping lug and jib.

 

The bad mór, leith bhád and the gleoiteóg, are similar in all respects, differing only in size. All are gaff cutters. However the púcán, in hull form and size similar to the gleoitóg, is invariably an open boat, rigged with a dipping lug mainsail and a jib set on a bowsprit.

 

Some consider the púcán a better sailing craft, especially on the wind, but handling one on a good breeze is a skilled job. When going about, the mainsail tack has to be swung around the mast and made fast again at the stem.

 

An Faoileán, having started life as a púcán, is now a gleoitóg. The name is believed to derive from the gaelic word "gleoite" which means pretty. Though their hull features and rigging are exactly the same as their larger sisters, they are considered to be sweeter looking models, possibly because of their size.

In her trading days she would have been a maid of all work. Fishing or carrying small cargoes on short passages. Unusually, An Faoileán is decked fore and aft.

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Sailed on this out of Beaufort for the Sail America event in 2006. At the start the wind was coming across the line from the pin end, so we set up way above the pin and drove down on the fleet, sailing wing on wing on wing, to get a pin end windward position for the start. Other ships set up for a timed run, except one other boat that did the same as us but much farther away from the line and a quarter mile ahead of us. As we all approached the start line we could hear a leeward boat yelling for rights. It was incredible to watch these two boats acting like dinghies. The middle boat gybed to the start line above the leeward boat and from our position it looked a little close but could have been a hundred yards. We waited a little then gybed and ran for the line, the gun sounded while we were about 50 yards or less from the line. Looking to leeward the other two closest boats were right at the line for the start also, it was very cool to be a part of. Thanks Alliance.

 

Winever.

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Sailing and maintenance crew, barque Star of India, 1986 - 1999.

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Tops'l schooner Bill of Rights, and the brigantines Exy and Irving Johnson.

Also, by now, I'm sure Cal 20s are considered "traditional".

 

Got a bit purple heartwood from the keelstone from those boats and carved my wife a purple heart with a diamond in it. We watched them being built when we lived down south.

The launching ceremony was cool.

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I've sailed on a 1928 John Alden Schooner named Charm III out of Anguilla, B.W.I. Additionally my cousin owns a 50 ft, gaff rigged Carriacou sloop named Tradition. She was built in 1978 for inter island commerce and is now gonna be running charters out of Anguilla. She's a beauty to sail, no winches on board it's all block and tackle - I think her name is well suited!

 

http://sailtradition.com/

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You mean "traditional" like the ones moored here.

 

I've sailed on gaff-rigged catboats. No square riggers.

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Most are mentioning big boats, but the first boat I sailed on was a 1918 Alden 19 'sloop- the Biddeford Pool class (back when every little NE harbor could have its own class). My grandfather was learning to sail from HA Callahan's "Learning To Sail", and at age 5, I was his designated crew.

 

Best part was he went sailing every day during his two weeks in Maine, so I learned as a tyke that sailing was fun to do every day, no matter the weather. I've been grateful for that a time or two.

 

At age 13 I was master of that little vessel, and decided to set the spinnaker- read the book and put it up in stops. Tried to get rotten marlin as the book said, but just ended up with regular stuff, and this on a tiny spinnaker on a 19 foot gaff rigged boat- chute probably 16' on the hoist if that, and stops every foot or so. No way that chute was going to bust those stops, especially in the light breeze I'd selected for the adventure, so, in for a penny in for a pound, I set 'er flying and pulled it off, master indeed.

 

I still have that spinnaker- Ratsey & Lapthorn egyptian cotton gazillion threads to the inch, all hand worked grommets, etc, they don't make them like that anymore, and a lovely bronze bilge pump from Wilcox & Crittenden that will still out pump any modern plastic pump with ease.

 

What I really have is a thanks to my grandfather, great memories, and the foundation for the composite multihull I sail now- go figure.

 

Try and tell that to kids nowadays, forty two of us living in a shoebox in the middle of the road, well it was a house to us . . . . . . .

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I used to sail on the Spike Africa. A beautiful boat built by Bob Sloan. (RIP)

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Sailing and maintenance crew, barque Star of India, 1986 - 1999.

 

You might like this one then , that I took of "Star" on her last trip out!

cheers Dal

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Man you guys are are bunch of crusty old salts. Cool reading the thread though! I'm a converted water skiier didn't start sailing till the mid 90's and I'm pretty sure the oldest boat I've sailed on was a sub 100 J/24 :lol:

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I stood on the deck of the Discovery at Jamestown with the wind blowing through my hair. Does that count? :P

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Bermuda Fitted Dinghy rules haven't changed much (at all?) in 150 years, the Jubilee cup pre-dates the AC

 

14' long, crewed by 6, neither tack has right of way over the other, don't need to finish the race with the same # of crew as started - what could possibly go wrong?

 

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Drive the Lay Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain from time to time. Also sailed on the Californian, the Talofa back when she was in Santa Cruz and The Clearwater in New York.

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In the Netherlands it almost seemed to be an integral part of growing up learning to sail on a traditional open keelboat of about 20', the 16m2 class - fun and easy to sail on the lakes and canals, and in the evening great camping under the boom tent ! Extra enjoyable when rafted up with a few other boats enjoying dinner and a few beers...

 

Also did a couple of trips on the Bristol Channel Pilot Cutter Alpha, on the West Coast of Scotland - Awesome boat, awesome sailing waters...

 

 

Biggest was a 2 month trip on the barque Europa, leaving Argentina, to Antarctica, then to South Africa by way of South Georgia and Tristan da Cunha - trip of a lifetime ! picture doesn't want to upload - check her out at www.barkeuropa.nl

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Bermuda Fitted Dinghy rules haven't changed much (at all?) in 150 years, the Jubilee cup pre-dates the AC

 

14' long, crewed by 6, neither tack has right of way over the other, don't need to finish the race with the same # of crew as started - what could possibly go wrong?

 

17546.jpg

 

A little short on sail area, I'd thinkohmy.gif

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We also race on the Anguilla racing sloops, 28 feet long... lot's of sail area

 

 

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I have spent the past 2 years sailing NY30 #16, Nautilus and will be sailing #15, Banzai this summer. They were built in 1905 and I am convinced there is nothing better in life than sailing then to windward in 22 knots of breeze and long swell (or at least as long as the swell can get in Long Island Sound) with full sails.

 

I think I was born about 100 years too late.

 

Bam Miller

 

Got to sail on Alera, NY 30 #1 two years ago.

 

That boat was amazing on a broad reach in 15. Lay down the waterline and just go.

 

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Did 3 weeks on this one back in the day, during a Baltic tall ships series. Kruzenstern (ex-Padua). 4,700 tons, and 36,000 ft² of sail. Fascinating experience, especially one moonless night sitting on the very end of the bowsprit ahead of the fore royal stay. About 50 feet off the water, ship invisible (and inaudible behind). Felt like flying.

 

She was a cast iron bitch to handle with even 12 officers, 20 POs and 200 cadets. Frightening to think she reguarly sailed the grain trade trips round the planet in the 30's with 3 officers, cook, sailmaker, chippy and two watches of twelve. I have no idea how they did it.

 

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I stood on the deck of the Discovery at Jamestown with the wind blowing through my hair. Does that count? :P

I got a Tallships ride on the Mexican Navy's Cuauhtemoc for a few hours in Tacoma. would have loved to toss in a hand but they wouldn't let us. As for "Pirate Sailors" Part of the event included a staged gun battle between Cuauhtemoc and the Russian ship

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Drive the Lay Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain from time to time. Also sailed on the Californian, the Talofa back when she was in Santa Cruz and The Clearwater in New York.

 

Shot the Lady Washington and Hawaiin Chieftain (also both together) in 2008 in san Diego

 

cheers Dal

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Topsail Schooner "Spirit of Adventure" and "HMS Bounty"

 

Bounty Festival of sail 2008

cheers Dal

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I just found out today that an old friend was on Pilgrim's delivery from Portugal to the Caribbean!

 

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I think that is 2nd "Most Traditional" (1st = HMS Bounty) in this thread.

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crewed on the schooner "Ranger" in the Ensenada race '84 & '85... also a few times on schooners Lady Ada and Diosa Del Mar.. they were all based in Long Beach in the early to mid 80's. fun boats to sail on

 

I ran that boat for two years as a sail training ship between San Diego and Panama with occasional pirate charter work - she was bought off Fast Eddie, the LB owner who had the whole schooner fleet back in the day. I still remember the Ancient Mariners schooner trophies in her shed in LB. Also sailed aboard Endeavour replica and Rose.

 

Some pics of Ranger.

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I used to work on an 80ft Alden schooner, Ellida

 

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Primarily a racing sailor, back in my youth I attended Tabor Academy in the 70s. My time there was spent messing about the waterfront. Mostly sailed Tempests,420s, set up their first Laser team, ran the Winter waterfront boatshop. Anyhow while I was not regular crew, the captain (Cap Glaeser, a larger than life character, sort of a cross between Dennis Conner and Joshua Slocum) of the Tabor Boy (130'on deck IIRC) used to invite me to sail on her for weekend excursions down to Newport or out to The Vineyard and the like. This was back when Tabor Boy had squares and fondly remember scurrying up the ratlines to set or furl the foretop and what not.

Recall one Sunday afternoon, hung over from a night of festivities and being summoned aloft to strike the Royals as the breeze piped up in Buzzards Bay. Standing on the jackline slung beneath the foretop spar, without safety harnesses (don't really know why that was, we never wore them that I can recall) 60 feet or more above deck as the boat heaved about below us is something I will never forget.

Also remember taking tricks on the wheel and the feel of driving such a bohemoth of a vessel under sail. I often think back about how fortunate I was to have experienced that in my life. Just a little glimpse back at centuries of sailing long since past, while a fleeting moment in my life it lends a connection to those from a bygone era. While we could never imagine the hardships square riggers endured, the priviledge of having gazed out over the horizon as sailors before us had done hundreds of years before is a memory I will always cherish.

Also have sailed on smaller fore and riggered schooners. One, and Alden some 50+ feet in length, also owned at the time by Tabor, named Landfall. She was a very sweet boat with a gentle soul. Also had opportunity to sail on the infamous Nina. Long after DeCoursey Fales owned her and certainly no longer in her heyday but a rush to sail on as my Grand Father and Dad had done when she was the boat to beat on the racing circut.

 

 

I went to Tabor too, albeit much more recently. I spent most of my time rowing but I was also a deckhand on Tabor Boy for two of my years there. Junior year I helped sail her back to MA from the USVI, a truly amazing experience for anyone, much less a high school student. I wonder how many other TA alum on are here? I'm sure more than a few. All-a-taut-o!

 

 

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I worked on this beastie for a year or so as engineer, we used more varnish then fuel.

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