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hhn92

little AMERICA'S CUP

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Since this has been discussed on a couple of threads, but there is not a dedicated one yet (that I could find) let's have one where we can discuss the event, coverage by OTWA, updates, and how it relates to the big AC.

 

I believe this can be a lead-in for how the multi-hull concept would work in an AC match-race, especially with JS in on the competition, and a lot to be learned. I have followed the little AC from a distance, but have never seen details on how the matches went. Mostly it seemed like the big AC, that one boat was faster and generally swept the match, partially due to the diversity between the boats, more like the DoG match we just witnessed.

 

So, let's live and learn.

 

 

 

 

(BTW, if I missed a dedicated thread, my apologies in advance)

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Of course, now due to a lead from an SR post I find that there is a thread.

 

I'll lead with the story, if we want to discuss it here and how it relates to AC43 we can, it may be good to discuss this side of the story here instead of loading-up their thread with our usual rantings.

 

 

Or we can just let this one die a slow death off the AC Anarchy front screen............................

 

 

pump up the cup

 

 

While the mainstream media and even the sailing world remain more or less blissfully unaware of what will be the most exciting and engrossing sailing race of 2010, we keep trucking with our promotion of next month's Little America's Cup in the awesome wing-sailed C-Class catamaran. We frankly cannot understand how those so-called "Cup Journalists" can be so moronic and clueless, with only a few of them even mentioning it now, just 6 weeks from the first start. Perhaps we shouldn't be surprised, but with worldwide excitement in hard sails peaking just a few months ago in Valencia, the very real prospect of the 34th America's Cup being sailed in 70 foot versions of this very boat, and the chance for people to see exactly what it is that so many establishment players say is inappropriate - match racing in super-fast multihulls - isn't it time for the same Cup writers at the Times, the Independent, the Herald-Tribune, the Post, the Free Press to wake the hell up?

 

To hell with 'em. Sailing Anarchy has been THE place to go for C-Class info for a long, long time, and it's about to get a hell of a lot more interesting. We learned a secret this weekend that's been itching to come out, and maybe that will make the difference.

 

America's Cup winning helmsman Jimmy Spithill has confirmed that he will be competing in the 2010 Little America's Cup in Newport, Rhode Island, along with perhaps the winningest cat sailor in history, Glenn Ashby, fresh off his 7th World Championship victory in the A-Class. Gashby and Spittie make up the ultimate Aussie team for a match-racing multihull event, and they'll be competing aboard one of current Little AC Defender Fred Eaton's rides - obviously, not the fastest one! This move - Fredo giving one of his babies to guys the likes of the Aussie super-duo - is an example of why we are so in love with this class; it is ALL about love and passion for these incredible machines, with egos checked at the door. And it's been this way since the very beginning.

 

Brains vs Brawn

Given the likelihood of Fredo's platform being his fastest, the LAC will provide a stellar opportunity for sailing fans to learn not only what match racing in super-fast multihulls can be (the format is fleet races to determine match race seeds, then match races for the Cup), but we'll also be able to figure out just how important the design competition is compared to the skill of the sailors. None of the C-Class guys has the kind of winning record that Gashby has (and we don't think any of them would claim to be the cat racer he is), and none will claim to be even on the same planet as Spithill when it comes to match racing. So, assuming that the Canadians and Aussies make it to the final, expect Eaton and Clarke to run away and rely on a faster boat just as they explained they did in 2007 while the Aussies engage as aggressively as they can...will it be enough? Of course we're leaving out Steve Clark, who, despite claiming that his LAC contender is just evolution, could easily have found a silver bullet to once again leapfrog the design curve as Cogito did enroute to a decade-long domination of the Class. And then there are the wild cards; the Pommies on Invictus, the Canadian B-Team, and a few more surprises...

 

One thing is for sure; those of you who love catamarans, those of you who love speed, and those of you who agree that this stuff is the future will get as much Little America's Cup as you want during On-The-Water Anarchy's live coveage of the week long event from August 22-28th. We've got a sick team of expert commentators, videographers, photographers, and bikini babes slated to attend, and we expect upwards of a million views of our live feed, if not more. Stay tuned to the thread for breaking news, and look for more of it coming soon

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I do hope the the I4C or LAC gets the coverage it deserves. This is going to be a great event. When you look at the list of all of those who are entered, you truly have some great sailors. Those like Steve and Fred with many years in the C-Class as well as Lars who has done his share of sailing on C's as well as A's, Tornados and many other classes as well. Then you bring in the British, French and Aussie teams as well as more Canadians. Looks like at least 6-7 different boats in the fleet racing prior to the match racing conclusion. I will be there for some of the event, hopefully on the water, but will see it as close as I can.

 

 

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I'll lead with the story, if we want to discuss it here and how it relates to AC34 we can, it may be good to discuss this side of the story here instead of loading-up their thread with our usual rantings.

 

 

 

Small typo.....................................

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We've got a sick team of expert commentators, videographers, photographers, and bikini babes slated to attend, and we expect upwards of a million views of our live feed, if not more. Stay tuned to the thread for breaking news, and look for more of it coming soon

I'll be one of the million viewers. Good to know that Clean's on the case. Still, I gotta wonder if Harbour Court and the red pants brigade is ready for the sick team and the bikini babes!

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Try looking in Multihull Anarchy. You might find some interesting info (hint - look at the thread "Fred is in so much trouble")

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Try looking in Multihull Anarchy. You might find some interesting info (hint - look at the thread "Fred is in so much trouble")

 

Uhhhhhhh...............................see post 2 of this thread.

 

 

Also, it may be good for the multi guys if we keep our rantings here, as it relates to the AC.

 

 

I'm sure they have their own rantings to keep them busy enough without adding ours to it............................ wink.gif

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Since this has been discussed on a couple of threads, but there is not a dedicated one yet (that I could find) let's have one where we can discuss the event, coverage by OTWA, updates, and how it relates to the big AC.

 

I believe this can be a lead-in for how the multi-hull concept would work in an AC match-race, especially with JS in on the competition, and a lot to be learned. I have followed the little AC from a distance, but have never seen details on how the matches went. Mostly it seemed like the big AC, that one boat was faster and generally swept the match, partially due to the diversity between the boats, more like the DoG match we just witnessed.

 

So, let's live and learn.

 

 

 

 

(BTW, if I missed a dedicated thread, my apologies in advance)

 

The LAC is the ultimate event for people who want to design, build and race their own boats (the great sailing dream, and probably the true test of the ultimate sailor). It is not a true match racing event, as most people understand a match racing event. I would be surprised if they were using the ISAF Call Book for instance.

 

Having seen one LAC it was a great sailing event, but not a great match racing event - the second placed boat in the regatta only crossed in front of the winner once in five races.

 

If the America's Cup organisers genuinely wanted to go down this path, then they should be looking at open multihulls with a maximum LWL of 90ft, only one boat allowed per team, and no limits - aside from a wind limit of 30kts.

 

Whether this is a practical regatta is, of course, another matter.

 

RG

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Since this has been discussed on a couple of threads, but there is not a dedicated one yet (that I could find) let's have one where we can discuss the event, coverage by OTWA, updates, and how it relates to the big AC.

 

I believe this can be a lead-in for how the multi-hull concept would work in an AC match-race, especially with JS in on the competition, and a lot to be learned. I have followed the little AC from a distance, but have never seen details on how the matches went. Mostly it seemed like the big AC, that one boat was faster and generally swept the match, partially due to the diversity between the boats, more like the DoG match we just witnessed.

 

So, let's live and learn.

 

 

 

 

(BTW, if I missed a dedicated thread, my apologies in advance)

 

The LAC is the ultimate event for people who want to design, build and race their own boats (the great sailing dream, and probably the true test of the ultimate sailor). It is not a true match racing event, as most people understand a match racing event. I would be surprised if they were using the ISAF Call Book for instance.

 

Having seen one LAC it was a great sailing event, but not a great match racing event - the second placed boat in the regatta only crossed in front of the winner once in five races.

 

If the America's Cup organisers genuinely wanted to go down this path, then they should be looking at open multihulls with a maximum LWL of 90ft, only one boat allowed per team, and no limits - aside from a wind limit of 30kts.

 

Whether this is a practical regatta is, of course, another matter.

 

RG

 

Try again, full match racing in play. Fleet racing seeds the match racing, 9 races, then 9 races. So yes you should be surprised.

 

M

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The same format as used for the Acts prior to the 2007 America's Cup? Don't think it worked that well actually, aside from the fleet racing being a real spectacle.

 

RG

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The same format as used for the Acts prior to the 2007 America's Cup? Don't think it worked that well actually, aside from the fleet racing being a real spectacle.

 

RG

So how do you think they should seed the boats and create the draw? And BTW, its how it was done last time for the LAC and did seem to work rather well.

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103368.jpg

That is the finish of the last race of the 1991 cup.

Officially a 1 second margin & there were something like 40 tacks on the last leg!

Thats not representative of the normal state of racing though.

 

As pointed out in the Multihull Anarchy thread, this time should have the most C class boats since the 70's & a bunch of them are new so it should be pretty competitive.

Good chance of Spithill either blitzing the field or making a spectacular exit racing Orion with its low volume bows.

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Glenn and Jimmy are sailing Alpha,the 2007 winner.

 

Robbie Paterson gets Orion, with the 2006 Wing.

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I've lost track of boats, what with the speed C's are being built in Toronto!

 

Who are the likely entries in August?

 

CAN 1 - Alpha - 2007 Winner - Jimmy Spithill, Glenn Ashby

CAN 2 - Orion - Wave piercing, built 2010? - Robbie Paterson, ?

CAN 3 - Cannan - 2010 build - Fred Eaton, Magnus Clarke

CAN 4 - Rocker - 2007 Foiler - Sailing?

 

FRA 1 - Patient Lady VI - Defender 1985 - Antoine Koch, Jean Baptiste Levaillant

 

USA 1 - Cogito - Winner 1996, 2004 - ?

USA 2 - April Fool - 2010 build - Steve Clark

 

GBR 1 - Invictus - Paul Larsen, Gordon Kaiser

 

Apologies for any inaccuracies or misspellings.

 

Minimum of 6, potential for more?

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I've lost track of boats, what with the speed C's are being built in Toronto!

 

Who are the likely entries in August?

 

CAN 1 - Alpha - 2007 Winner - Jimmy Spithill, Glenn Ashby

CAN 2 - Orion - Wave piercing, built 2010? - Robbie Paterson, ?

CAN 3 - Cannan - 2010 build - Fred Eaton, Magnus Clarke

CAN 4 - Rocker - 2007 Foiler - Sailing?

 

FRA 1 - Patient Lady VI - Defender 1985 - Antoine Koch, Jean Baptiste Levaillant

 

USA 1 - Cogito - Winner 1996, 2004 - Lars Guck, Andrew Gaynor

USA 2 - Tsurugi- 2010 build - Steve Clark, Oliver Moore

 

GBR 1 - Invictus - Paul Larsen, Gordon Kaiser

 

Apologies for any inaccuracies or misspellings.

 

Minimum of 6, potential for more?

Though I am not sure that Steve has choosen the sailing teams, boats configurations, I believe that those are the names

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To Gladwell's point. The format was devised to make for more sailing and racing by all the teams.

The single challenger format is fine, but when you got right down to it you can spend a lot of time and money for very little racing. Look at the teams that are eliminated from the LV series after one or two rounds.

This way everyone can count on a week of racing. We would like to do more, but the teams just aren't there to make it viable.

The match race finals is traditional for the pinnacle C Class event so it seemed a good idea to keep this aspect of the regatta.

Match racing in catamarans is different than match racing in lead mines.

SHC

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To Gladwell's point. The format was devised to make for more sailing and racing by all the teams.

The single challenger format is fine, but when you got right down to it you can spend a lot of time and money for very little racing. Look at the teams that are eliminated from the LV series after one or two rounds.

This way everyone can count on a week of racing. We would like to do more, but the teams just aren't there to make it viable.

The match race finals is traditional for the pinnacle C Class event so it seemed a good idea to keep this aspect of the regatta.

Match racing in catamarans is different than match racing in lead mines.

SHC

 

Personnally, I like the current format. I do think that the fleet racing does add to the event.

Is it the best two after the fleet racing or is there a match racing format that leads up to the finals?

Thanks,

Tom

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Glenn and Jimmy are sailing Alpha,the 2007 winner.

Robbie Paterson gets Orion, with the 2006 Wing.

My bad, remembered it wrong & failed to confirm it on the other thread :o

 

The format was devised to make for more sailing and racing by all the teams.
This is good.

What courses are you using? Just WLs? How many times around?

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To Gladwell's point. The format was devised to make for more sailing and racing by all the teams.

The single challenger format is fine, but when you got right down to it you can spend a lot of time and money for very little racing. Look at the teams that are eliminated from the LV series after one or two rounds.

This way everyone can count on a week of racing. We would like to do more, but the teams just aren't there to make it viable.

The match race finals is traditional for the pinnacle C Class event so it seemed a good idea to keep this aspect of the regatta.

Match racing in catamarans is different than match racing in lead mines.

SHC

 

I just don't think you can say that the fleet/match racing idea is great for the LAC therefore let's use it in the America's Cup.

 

Great to give everyone a week's racing. Eliminating LV challengers after two rounds of a round robin is not bright - and better for them not to turn up at the main event - and get all the exposure in the build up - which is what is planned.

 

Match racing in multihulls in the AC should eliminate all the interminable rule interpretation meetings that are part and parcel of monohull use. But two penalties penalties in two races was not a good look in the 33rd AC, either

 

RG

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Steve's new boat has been launched. You will find pictures on the "Fred is in so much trouble" thread. The name is Aethon. The platform looks soo sweet.

 

 

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Front_Page_Story

it may be good to discuss this side of the story here instead of loading-up their thread with our usual rantings.

 

With 48,000 views of 450-ish posts given mostly by the competitors themselves, that thread represents the best signal to noise ratio of any thread on SA bar none. By all means let's keep this thread alive and keep that thread clean.

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Front_Page_Story

it may be good to discuss this side of the story here instead of loading-up their thread with our usual rantings.

 

With 48,000 views of 450-ish posts given mostly by the competitors themselves, that thread represents the best signal to noise ratio of any thread on SA bar none. By all means let's keep this thread alive and keep that thread clean.

 

 

 

I agree whole-heartedly.......................................but then again, I started this thread.

 

 

We can hash the relationship of the LAC to AC34 here, and let the merits of the LAC stay in the 'Fred's' thread.

 

 

Poetry, Clean, and AC all in one post...........................................scary. ph34r.gif

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Signal:

 

post-1634-1279286591_thumb.jpg

 

Noise:

 

post-1634-127928665921_thumb.jpg

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from the intro to a nice piece in today's TD$:

--

http://www.thedailysail.com/dinghy/10/56086/team-invictus-update

With BMW Oracle Racing still pondering whether or not the 34th America’s Cup should be held in monohulls (the popular choice with teams) or multihulls (the technically progressive choice), so an unpredicted amount of focus is set to be placed on the Little America’s Cup, taking place in Newport, Rhode Island over 22-28 August. For as it says on the tin, this is lining up to be a '33rd America’s Cup-lite' in the smaller 25ft long, 14ft wide C-Class catamarans, although unlike this spring’s event in Valencia there are to be six or seven boats. There is also the significant design parameter difference in that C-Class cats are limited to a maximum of 300sqft of sail area. This limit means firstly that they don’t use headsails or kites, but also that their solid wingsails are more complex than the towering wing we saw on the BMW Oracle Racing tri. In short they are the most efficient sailing machines on the water.

 

Perhaps it heralds multihulls’ coming of age, but there is another feature of this event, almost unimaginable 10 years ago: It is being hosted by the New York Yacht Club. This is like the Royal Yacht Squadron staging the next Moth World Championship.

 

continued

 

--

 

 

 

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from the intro to a nice piece in today's TD$:

--

http://www.thedailys...invictus-update

With BMW Oracle Racing still pondering whether or not the 34th America's Cup should be held in monohulls (the popular choice with teams) or multihulls (the technically progressive choice), so an unpredicted amount of focus is set to be placed on the Little America's Cup, taking place in Newport, Rhode Island over 22-28 August. For as it says on the tin, this is lining up to be a '33rd America's Cup-lite' in the smaller 25ft long, 14ft wide C-Class catamarans, although unlike this spring's event in Valencia there are to be six or seven boats. There is also the significant design parameter difference in that C-Class cats are limited to a maximum of 300sqft of sail area. This limit means firstly that they don't use headsails or kites, but also that their solid wingsails are more complex than the towering wing we saw on the BMW Oracle Racing tri. In short they are the most efficient sailing machines on the water.

 

Perhaps it heralds multihulls' coming of age, but there is another feature of this event, almost unimaginable 10 years ago: It is being hosted by the New York Yacht Club. This is like the Royal Yacht Squadron staging the next Moth World Championship.

 

continued

 

--

 

 

 

 

 

I did not know the yacht club was hosting this event. Any idea how this came about? blink.gif

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I may be wrong but I belive Steve simply asked if they would. if memory serves he is a member there. Fredo is also a member there.

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Not quite as simple as Magnus suggests, but almost.

There is a protocol for proposing regattas at NYYC.

I am a member and made the proposal. We held several meetings and the Sailing Committee resolved that it would be a good event for the club to host. So they are.

I certainly did not find any deep rooted prejudice against our class or the idea of hosting the event. From the very start, the Sailing Committee was very encouraging and our discussions have always been positive.

It certainly is closer to center stage than we been in the past. I hope it will be a great event and that we will get a chance to show off how remarkable our boats are.

SHC

 

P.S. Got a phone call from Fred Eaton this morning. They intend to repair the damaged wing in time for the regatta. So we are back to 7 boats.

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Not quite as simple as Magnus suggests, but almost.

There is a protocol for proposing regattas at NYYC.

I am a member and made the proposal. We held several meetings and the Sailing Committee resolved that it would be a good event for the club to host. So they are.

I certainly did not find any deep rooted prejudice against our class or the idea of hosting the event. From the very start, the Sailing Committee was very encouraging and our discussions have always been positive.

It certainly is closer to center stage than we been in the past. I hope it will be a great event and that we will get a chance to show off how remarkable our boats are.

SHC

 

P.S. Got a phone call from Fred Eaton this morning. They intend to repair the damaged wing in time for the regatta. So we are back to 7 boats.

 

 

Excellent news.

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Especially if the America's Cup goes to multihulls, then I hope the NYYC supports a very formidable defender syndicate.

 

When Halsey H saw DZ for the first time in SD, he told me while we were standing on board that he was 'shocked' how impressive the engineering had become.

 

When 'Old School' is smart enough to recognize the future, then there is good hope for that future.

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Well when I left the shop a few hours ago, the new wing was perhaps a few hours from being loaded into the trailer. So if we're lucky, perhaps be sailing with it within the next week. Tomorrow it heads over to the island for final assembly and do-dicking.

 

It looks bad ass, I love it, but still lots to figure out and the clock is indeed ticking for us. Excited to try it out ASAP.

 

Aetheon is looking good too, planing hull form looks nice downhill for sure, especially with those little spray rails on the last third of the boat.

 

It's going to be a royal shit fight on the race course. A good match all around.

 

MC

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Perhaps it heralds multihulls' coming of age, but there is another feature of this event, almost unimaginable 10 years ago: It is being hosted by the New York Yacht Club. This is like the Royal Yacht Squadron staging the next Moth World Championship.

 

Between the long standing "Little America's Cup" in winged cats and the AC33 in the monster multis, it seems every real objection to using the most technologically advanced, fastest possible boats has been answered. This little multihull is too small, this giant multihull is too big, this multihull is just right.

 

The competing yachts or vessels, if of one mast, shall be not less than forty-four feet nor more than ninety feet on the load water-line; if of more than one mast they shall be not less than eighty feet nor more than one hundred and fifteen feet on the load water-line.

Pick a length, 70 ft sounds good, and people can build whatever they want, since winged multihulls are the modern equivalent of America, that's what people will build to win.

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Something to chat about.

 

Now picture it at 144' tall, very nice it would be.

 

post-1634-128066779823_thumb.jpg

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Something to chat about.

 

Now picture it at 144' tall, very nice it would be.

 

post-1634-128066779823_thumb.jpg

Yea, would have been great to have a wing like this, but the other one did the job nicely.

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Something to chat about.

 

Now picture it at 144' tall, very nice it would be.

 

post-1634-128066779823_thumb.jpg

 

Is that the repaired wing??

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No it's the brand new wing

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No it's the brand new wing

That thing is beautiful!

 

This section, can you easily separate the elements at here? What's going on?

 

 

post-17804-128070054167_thumb.jpg

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Something to chat about.

Now picture it at 144' tall, very nice it would be.

post-1634-128066779823_thumb.jpg

 

Indeed it is beautiful, and a little bit brutal at the same time.

Magnificent.

Looks taller/slimmer than the previous wing incarnations and narrower at the bottom

Are the rudders under the hull? (tricky to tell from that angle).

If they are, I can't remember that being done before on a "small" cat.

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Are the rudders under the hull?

If they are, I can't remember that being done before on a "small" cat.

 

IIRC, Alex Kozloff's Aquariuses - the leading edge was swept back to avoid kelp getting entangled.

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If the America's Cup organisers genuinely wanted to go down this path, then they should be looking at open multihulls with a maximum LWL of 90ft, only one boat allowed per team, and no limits - aside from a wind limit of 30kts.

RG

 

 

Seems like the perfect way to go and completely in line with the spirit of the America's Cup with very open "box". 90 ft one mast, 115 ft two masts, bring whatever you think will win the race based on course and location.

 

What fun.

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Are the rudders under the hull?

If they are, I can't remember that being done before on a "small" cat.

 

IIRC, Alex Kozloff's Aquariuses - the leading edge was swept back to avoid kelp getting entangled.

 

Freedom's Wing also had the rudders under the hulls.

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If the America's Cup organisers genuinely wanted to go down this path, then they should be looking at open multihulls with a maximum LWL of 90ft, only one boat allowed per team, and no limits - aside from a wind limit of 30kts.

RG

 

 

Seems like the perfect way to go and completely in line with the spirit of the America's Cup with very open "box". 90 ft one mast, 115 ft two masts, bring whatever you think will win the race based on course and location.

 

What fun.

 

The problem with that scenario is us having to deal with the shocking prospect that KM might stay the heck out of it.

 

The Horror!

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A Little Video before and after kind of thing.

 

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=JRYZjE6dpJI

 

Interesting filming technique as it sure makes them look FAST. We see a lot of pissing and moaning from the monohullers that ALL sailing is slow so there's no point in using the fastest, highest technology boats in the America's Cup.

 

Filming fast boats from an accompanying RIB gives viewers excellent sense of speed.

 

Something for AC to think about in both the boat and the technique of presenting it to viewers.

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Is the wing on Canaan really higher aspect than the wing on USA 17 is/was?

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Interesting filming technique as it sure makes them look FAST. We see a lot of pissing and moaning from the monohullers that ALL sailing is slow so there's no point in using the fastest, highest technology boats in the America's Cup.

Filming fast boats from an accompanying RIB gives viewers excellent sense of speed.

Something for AC to think about in both the boat and the technique of presenting it to viewers.

 

One easy way to make the fast boats look fast is to make sure there are plenty of stationary or near staionary reference points in the water.

(I assume thats why dickheads on jetskis have to go as close as possibly to moored boats and any type of sailing craft).

In this case just have the two multies start on short courses with a fleet of mono's (mobile chicanes! :)).

Plenty of chance for even the uninitiated viewer to get a feel for the relative speeds.

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One easy way to make the fast boats look fast is to make sure there are plenty of stationary or near staionary reference points in the water.

 

 

Or moving objects, the cat goes screaming past a poking along monohull sailer in the video, an unintended editorial.

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A Little Video before and after kind of thing.

 

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=JRYZjE6dpJI

 

Interesting filming technique as it sure makes them look FAST. We see a lot of pissing and moaning from the monohullers that ALL sailing is slow so there's no point in using the fastest, highest technology boats in the America's Cup.

 

Filming fast boats from an accompanying RIB gives viewers excellent sense of speed.

 

Something for AC to think about in both the boat and the technique of presenting it to viewers.

 

You could see the speed of the 'Zilla's in VLC when the chasing ribs were shown in the shots. The mulri's looked like they were just gliding along, but when you saw the ribs giving chase at hgh speed and bouncing on the waves, then you realized how fast they were really going.

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Nice video, good music too!

You are always sailing with the windward daggerboard all the way up, is there a line construction there to quickly lower/raise it or do you do it by hand every tack?

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Great vid and sweet ride :)

 

You guys look right at home in the office

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^

At 4:15 it's a huge speed rush with the shot from the masthead(? ) I've not had that sort of a sailing rush since my IOR days in a blow off the wind with the chute up.

 

The POV of the wing looking down on the office is awesome but brings more questions of how you guys judge the camber from the office.......electronics, sight and feel. Understand if no NDA's are available ;) Sheeting looks like a snap.

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^

At 4:15 it's a huge speed rush with the shot from the masthead(? ) I've not had that sort of a sailing rush since my IOR days in a blow off the wind with the chute up.

 

The POV of the wing looking down on the office is awesome but brings more questions of how you guys judge the camber from the office.......electronics, sight and feel. Understand if no NDA's are available ;) Sheeting looks like a snap.

 

We have a repeater system built into the bottom of the wing, it indicates, front twist, flap twist, and camber and two other things as well. It's very complex, it's made of 5 grams of carbon, about 30' of .8mm dyneema, 6' of shock cord and a few of my daughters arts and crafts beads (She wouldn't let me take the pink ones).

 

Oh and of course 6 peices of tape as well. It's very flash. It does however do the job, can be seen from all over the boat and never seems to need to be re-booted or charged up. (There's no way a challenger could pull off a system of this quality, reliability and accuracy in three years, they should give up now)

 

Sheeting is straight forward but as the breeze comes up you can be carrying around 60-80 lbs load on the sheet. I don't opt for more purchase bc that slows response time, which I deem to be rather important to the overall health and welfare of the boat.

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There's no way a challenger could pull off a system of this quality, reliability and accuracy in three years, they should give up now

 

Shh ... Or Team Origin might take this as ~ yet another ~ example of insurmountable head start :lol:

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They say Cayard and Dalton are among those in Newport, at TDS

 

And in the Multihulls forum thread (which is downright excellent) someone posted they have seen Juan K, Farr, and possibly RV too.

 

Something new

--

 

Sail Boats with Wings

In 2004, I had the privilege of visiting some Airbus aerospace engineers in Bristol, UK to see their latest project: a sail boat named Invictus. They had designed the catamaran with a rigid sail–it looked and acted like an airplane wing–to compete in the international C-Class catamaran championships. It was quite a sight, seeing a sail that looked like it had been lopped off a jet and propped upright on a double-hulled boat.

 

contd

--

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Alpha in an absolute photo-finish over Canaan, what an incredible freekin' race! Gashby is completely fearless, wow!

 

There may be another coming up, but with maybe just the 3 (4?) boats who survived it.

 

SHC could be in trouble - dangit, hope he can be back for tomorrow.

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In the first race today it was blowing like hell and after a lot of lead changes Glen and Jimmy on Alpha (AUS crewed, but CAN-built) barely nailed the win over Freddo and Magnus (CAN) on Canaan, by just a boat length, doing at least 25 knots on a very wild downwind leg where both went full-out.

 

Missed seeing the second race, but Glen and JS got that win too, still in heavier air.

 

The third race was lighter and some in the main thread (multihulls forum) are saying that the newer wing is what enabled Canaan to win in those conditions, by 1:28. And are saying that in the heavier air maybe sailing talent prevailed (ability to control and spill power, plus aggression at how hard to push the edge), whereas in the lighter race 3 the newer, more high-aspect, more powerful wing counted for more. But it was hard to tell, because in race 3 the boats did split on the last run and Glen may have been the victim of a big header.

 

Invictus (GBR) had a variety of problems. As examples, OCS in race 1 (?) and then getting wrapped around the start bouy in R2 (was it?), and losing a board in R3 - and they are assym's so they couldn't switch the remaining board to the other side after tacking like you can a typical F18. And so the jury is still out on their wing, which has a lot more chord thickness than any other wing there. Tough day for them, it's a big program that I figured would be a real contender. Maybe they can do better tomorrow?

 

Patient Lady VI (FRA) made it around the course but seemed well off the leaders pace, think they even got lapped in R3.

 

SHC's Aethon (USA) is the crying shame, capsized in R1 before even tacking, broke the wing (his Cogito one), this after he already had to abandon his newest wing last week. I hope he can make it out tomorrow, no word so far the prognosis.

 

I think USA and AUS have seven 'LAC' wins each so far. With the fleet racing a bit of a runaway now, two boats at 4 points (AUS) and 5 points (CAN) and the remainder quite far back, there is a good chance these two will be match racing for this year's title. And in a match race we are less likely to see the big splits, so depending the conditions the wings could really come into play, or the match racing tactics, or the boat handling, or probably all the above.

 

Anyway - Great stuff - Especially Race 1 - And extremely cool boats, I encourage people to tune in tomorrow. There must have been 500 viewers at times on Justin.tv

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Fantasic stuff!

Hope the "Mulitis can't match race" crowd watch that first race (despite it being a fleet race, only two competetive).

How many lead changes?

Match racing is simply spectacular at 25 knots.

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Fantasic stuff!

Hope the "Mulitis can't match race" crowd watch that first race (despite it being a fleet race, only two competetive).

How many lead changes?

Match racing is simply spectacular at 25 knots.

 

Mate, you can match race any boats as long as they are reasonably close in speed, which is what happened in the first race. The next two races, not so close.

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Fantasic stuff!

Hope the "Mulitis can't match race" crowd watch that first race (despite it being a fleet race, only two competetive).

How many lead changes?

Match racing is simply spectacular at 25 knots.

There sure were a bunch of them in that first race. How many come from behind wins do you suppose they had during racing in Cartegena today? I doubt they had any, or will have many all week. This one was wild!

 

I think that the high speed of them makes the relative speeds that much more variable. It was obvious when a boat was truly hot, versus not. Even the mark roundings, when they can keep a hull flying it can be a big gainer.

 

The BOR blog, while focused of course on GA and JS, is one of the better accounts of today that I've seen.

 

Spithill, Ashby grab early lead in C Class cats

 

There is a 'LAC Panel' video at Justin.tv somewhere, and embedded in at about page 53 of the multihull thread, that is definitely worth a watch if you can spare the 25 minutes. Steve C starts it (this was filmed after his crushing disaster), and then Duncan Maclane and Freddo follow, it's very good.

 

There is also a two-part interview with Dave Hubbard, who is also excellent, and he tells an anecdote of how Maclane told him that EB, after AC Race 2, graciously put his arm around Maclane's back and told him: "You were right. We should have built that wing.''

 

Hubbard, of course, helped design both the '88 S&S wing and the USA 17 wing (and I think it is he who mentions Tom Speers), and has been in C-Cats for 50 years, and is known as The DogFather of the class. He also touches on the possible AC wing evolution path, should they go the multihulls path for AC 34 and then presumably AC 35.

 

Terrific stuff.

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Hubbard Pt 1

 

Hubbard Pt 2

 

JS

 

Not sure where that Panel one is, may not be on Youtube.

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Fantasic stuff!

Hope the "Mulitis can't match race" crowd watch that first race (despite it being a fleet race, only two competetive).

How many lead changes?

Match racing is simply spectacular at 25 knots.

 

Mate, you can match race any boats as long as they are reasonably close in speed, which is what happened in the first race. The next two races, not so close.

 

Um... you do realize that the "next two races" were won by different boats, right? The finish deltas in those two races didn't seem a whole lot different than what we saw in the pre-DoG AC matches. Not that the comparison in finish delta's makes a whole lot of difference, since the "not so close" was accomplished by different boats!

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I think there were four lead changes in the first race, which was three times around. And some of them were big swaps.

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Fantasic stuff!

Hope the "Mulitis can't match race" crowd watch that first race (despite it being a fleet race, only two competetive).

How many lead changes?

Match racing is simply spectacular at 25 knots.

 

Mate, you can match race any boats as long as they are reasonably close in speed, which is what happened in the first race. The next two races, not so close.

 

Um... you do realize that the "next two races" were won by different boats, right? The finish deltas in those two races didn't seem a whole lot different than what we saw in the pre-DoG AC matches. Not that the comparison in finish delta's makes a whole lot of difference, since the "not so close" was accomplished by different boats!

 

And how many lead changes were there?

 

It's pretty clear that Ashby and Spithill are sailing well in a breeze, but that Canaan is probably a quicker boat once the breeze drops.

 

So yes, so far we've had one good match race and two processions.

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Just tried to watch othwa/lac.

 

A well produced thirty second commercial, what was the product? I forget. Followed by 2 minutes of unclear audio, and video of a cloud.

 

In a word, pitiful. Consistent with what I have experienced on the prior occasions I tuned in...

 

And the "racing"...also disappointing. Kind of like watching that video, where the contestants build a "flying machine" and jump off the pier.

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Just tried to watch othwa/lac.

 

A well produced thirty second commercial, what was the product? I forget. Followed by 2 minutes of unclear audio, and video of a cloud.

 

In a word, pitiful. Consistent with what I have experienced on the prior occasions I tuned in...

 

And the "racing"...also disappointing. Kind of like watching that video, where the contestants build a "flying machine" and jump off the pier.

 

It is live now and mostly working well

http://www.justin.tv/onthewateranarchy/popout

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A Jimmy Spithill interview at Red Bull, think it is new, he takes a few nationality questions. "The ultimate would have been to win the Cup for Australia. But really my goal has been just to win the Cup."

 

--

 

 

James Spithill: America's Cup Winner

America's Cup winner James Spithill gives us his thoughts on being the youngest skipper to ever win the event and what his life is like away from sailing.

 

 

 

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from a piece about the first Orma 60 in NZ

--

 

Yachting: Don't knock it till you tri it, baby

...

"I think having the last America's Cup in multihulls has certainly helped the whole multihull image, equally there's talk about the next America's Cup being in multihulls as well, so it's all going to be fascinating."

 

Hull said in the short time he has had his trimaran in the country he has already noticed the yachting community have started to take multihulls more seriously.

 

"Now people have begun seeing the speed differential between these and [the monohulls] sailed in New Zealand, people are starting to talk more fondly of them."

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One of the things the AC community should take away from this event is ..............SPORTSMANSHIP!

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Whacky, I wonder how this is going to turn out?

--

Follow me as I record the making of my Documentary, 'An interview with the man who smashed the America's cup'.

 

A fresh update... basically..

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImdIdrohyyc

 

edit: in case it was not clear already, THIS IS THE GUY who smashed the America's Cup with a hammer, and did jail time for it. He is apparently making a film 'documentary' about that event. I think he already produced a one-man stage show a couple years back, also titled 'An interview with the man who smashed the America's Cup.' Maybe this accidentally fell into a thread with an appropriate title..

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Is it me or does DZ Final Version look interesting similar to a LAC Cat flying a hull compared to when DZs up on her ama?

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Posted · Hidden by Stingray, August 31, 2010 - No reason given
Hidden by Stingray, August 31, 2010 - No reason given

Is it me or does DZ Final Version look interesting similar to a LAC Cat flying a hull compared to when DZs up on her ama?

Umm.. I think it is you, yes.

 

Care to parse that sentence better? Yikes! :)

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Pretty clearly this turned out to be a boatspeed/development contest, which probably should be no surprise. All those AC types didn't show up to check out the contest but rather the rigs. The better sailors can in second...

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The LAC has been one of the purest developmental amature class championships of our time. Canaan clearly powered up and slid more efficiently than Alpha. Jimmy & Glenn were able to press Alpha in the breeze much harder than Fred & Magnuss were willing to in the first two races. Part of it was lack of forward bouancy for Canaan and the taller rig. But, a large part was experience that the pro's brought to an amature event. Once Canaan was in under 13 knots of breeze the design advancement and Fred and Magnuss upping their game gave them the wins in the remaining races. For the little time that Athean was racing, they looked really fast and I'm sure they could have made the rest of the series a lot more interesting.

 

You can't put AC expectations on the LAC. I believe the range of possible conditions on SF Bay and the ability to accellerate, decelerate and reverse in the hands of multiple teams of pros will make for some very interesting tactics.

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Sea to Shining Sea

By kimball | Published: August 31, 2010

 

Is it not deliciously ironic that the Little America's Cup should emerge as the coolest act of the summer of '10 and a likely precursor to announcements now promised for September 13 regarding boat type (bet on multihulls), year (bet on 2014) and protocol—everything except the venue of America's Cup 34. Anyone who was even halfway paying attention noticed that there was some serious match racing going on recently in wicked-fast, wing-sailed multihulls at the Newport, RI station of the New York Yacht Club, the institution whose schooner America long ago won a trophy that now bears her name. And who kept that trophy for 132 years. And who, at one time, personified the phrase "hide-bound tradition." Apparently, no longer. On its web site, NYYC reports: "The high speeds and almost instant acceleration of cambered foils had members of America's Cup syndicates, top designers and all sailors in awe."

 

Now it's time to see the America's Cup dragged kicking and screaming into the 21st century. Old Man Herreshoff—he built a catamaran in 1876 that kicked the pants off the New York fleet and then was summarily banned—oh, he's out there chuckling somewhere.

 

 

 

 

 

Continued

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