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Explain to me about having the sail area to go fast dw. 130 squares not that large, certainly nothing to write home about. Likely makes for reasonable performance nothing more. Or am I missing the boat?

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Explain to me about having the sail area to go fast dw. 130 squares not that large, certainly nothing to write home about. Likely makes for reasonable performance nothing more. Or am I missing the boat?

Well compared to my J/109 that is 10 m2 of additional sail area with 2,000 fewer lbs. of displacement. So it should go faster DW then my current ride. Of course the J/122 has a 155 m2 kite (so an extra 35 m2 of chute) but displaces 4,000 lbs. more than I do.

 

So maybe the J/122 will get to the windward mark first, but the J/111 will make up much of that spread on the DW leg?

 

At any rate, I would LOVE to see the 109/111/122 all out racing at the same time. That would be kinda cool...heck, throw in a 133 for shits and giggles...

 

Z

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Explain to me about having the sail area to go fast dw. 130 squares not that large, certainly nothing to write home about. Likely makes for reasonable performance nothing more. Or am I missing the boat?

Well compared to my J/109 that is 10 m2 of additional sail area with 2,000 fewer lbs. of displacement. So it should go faster DW then my current ride. Of course the J/122 has a 155 m2 kite (so an extra 35 m2 of chute) but displaces 4,000 lbs. more than I do.

 

So maybe the J/122 will get to the windward mark first, but the J/111 will make up much of that spread on the DW leg?

 

At any rate, I would LOVE to see the 109/111/122 all out racing at the same time. That would be kinda cool...heck, throw in a 133 for shits and giggles...

 

Z

 

The J/122 should gain upwind, but give it all back down wind. It is not just sail area and displacement. They really tried to get the rig and hull shape as efficient as possible for down wind speed. When the boat breaks loose on a plane, it won't be close. You need about 18 kts. of breeze for that from what I've been told. We can pretty much count on that and more every day here in the summer.

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Explain to me about having the sail area to go fast dw. 130 squares not that large, certainly nothing to write home about. Likely makes for reasonable performance nothing more. Or am I missing the boat?

Well compared to my J/109 that is 10 m2 of additional sail area with 2,000 fewer lbs. of displacement. So it should go faster DW then my current ride. Of course the J/122 has a 155 m2 kite (so an extra 35 m2 of chute) but displaces 4,000 lbs. more than I do.

 

So maybe the J/122 will get to the windward mark first, but the J/111 will make up much of that spread on the DW leg?

 

At any rate, I would LOVE to see the 109/111/122 all out racing at the same time. That would be kinda cool...heck, throw in a 133 for shits and giggles...

 

Z

 

The J/122 should gain upwind, but give it all back down wind. It is not just sail area and displacement. They really tried to get the rig and hull shape as efficient as possible for down wind speed. When the boat breaks loose on a plane, it won't be close. You need about 18 kts. of breeze for that from what I've been told. We can pretty much count on that and more every day here in the summer.

 

I think we've seen 18 knots of true MAYBE twice this whole summer. I am jealous! We just pray that maybe with a seabreeze we will get close to double-digits...of windspeed that is. It takes 18 knots of true to get the BOAT into double-digits!!!

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Explain to me about having the sail area to go fast dw. 130 squares not that large, certainly nothing to write home about. Likely makes for reasonable performance nothing more. Or am I missing the boat?

Well compared to my J/109 that is 10 m2 of additional sail area with 2,000 fewer lbs. of displacement. So it should go faster DW then my current ride. Of course the J/122 has a 155 m2 kite (so an extra 35 m2 of chute) but displaces 4,000 lbs. more than I do.

 

So maybe the J/122 will get to the windward mark first, but the J/111 will make up much of that spread on the DW leg?

 

At any rate, I would LOVE to see the 109/111/122 all out racing at the same time. That would be kinda cool...heck, throw in a 133 for shits and giggles...

 

Z

 

Yes my J120 as a 165m chute but is 5,000lbs heavier and a much lower aspect Rig. This thing should get up and go downwind in a breeze. Nor a sportboat by any means but still good performance on a fairly comfortable platform.

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Explain to me about having the sail area to go fast dw. 130 squares not that large, certainly nothing to write home about. Likely makes for reasonable performance nothing more. Or am I missing the boat?

Well compared to my J/109 that is 10 m2 of additional sail area with 2,000 fewer lbs. of displacement. So it should go faster DW then my current ride. Of course the J/122 has a 155 m2 kite (so an extra 35 m2 of chute) but displaces 4,000 lbs. more than I do.

 

So maybe the J/122 will get to the windward mark first, but the J/111 will make up much of that spread on the DW leg?

 

At any rate, I would LOVE to see the 109/111/122 all out racing at the same time. That would be kinda cool...heck, throw in a 133 for shits and giggles...

 

Z

 

The J/122 should gain upwind, but give it all back down wind. It is not just sail area and displacement. They really tried to get the rig and hull shape as efficient as possible for down wind speed. When the boat breaks loose on a plane, it won't be close. You need about 18 kts. of breeze for that from what I've been told. We can pretty much count on that and more every day here in the summer.

 

Exactly, this boat was built up a lot for it's downwind performance, but I have yet to see any video/pics of it doing exactly that. Right now we are still speculating. I know J Boats has been successful in the past, but in this day in age the average consumer needs instant gratification. Are we still waiting on more hulls to be launched before we see a better marketing effort?

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Exactly, this boat was built up a lot for it's downwind performance, but I have yet to see any video/pics of it doing exactly that. Right now we are still speculating. I know J Boats has been successful in the past, but in this day in age the average consumer needs instant gratification. Are we still waiting on more hulls to be launched before we see a better marketing effort?

 

Hey, it's a family operation ;-) Marketing can always be better, more professional but as everybody here know, it's all about the boat. The boat proves istelf on the water, it will take off regardless of marketing. You can also overhype a boat - as with the SC37 - and then disappoint. J boats has an amazing repeat buyer audience. Little bit like Porsche that way who sell something like 80% of their cars to those who have bought them before. I have owned a J before as well.

 

JB posted on FB that they had done a delivery of the J/111 and covered 16 NM in 1.5 hrs. in reaching conditions ranging from 10-22 kts.

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I think we've seen 18 knots of true MAYBE twice this whole summer. I am jealous! We just pray that maybe with a seabreeze we will get close to double-digits...of windspeed that is. It takes 18 knots of true to get the BOAT into double-digits!!!

Ya should have come down for BBR instead of farting around in some local race where the only ripples on the water were from the sewage outflow :) . We had two days of breeze in the mid- to high double digits.

 

But thanks for sharing Big J. with us on Friday and Sunday... that guy can trim a kite!

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Explain to me about having the sail area to go fast dw. 130 squares not that large, certainly nothing to write home about. Likely makes for reasonable performance nothing more. Or am I missing the boat?

Well compared to my J/109 that is 10 m2 of additional sail area with 2,000 fewer lbs. of displacement. So it should go faster DW then my current ride. Of course the J/122 has a 155 m2 kite (so an extra 35 m2 of chute) but displaces 4,000 lbs. more than I do.

 

So maybe the J/122 will get to the windward mark first, but the J/111 will make up much of that spread on the DW leg?

 

At any rate, I would LOVE to see the 109/111/122 all out racing at the same time. That would be kinda cool...heck, throw in a 133 for shits and giggles...

 

Z

 

The J/122 should gain upwind, but give it all back down wind. It is not just sail area and displacement. They really tried to get the rig and hull shape as efficient as possible for down wind speed. When the boat breaks loose on a plane, it won't be close. You need about 18 kts. of breeze for that from what I've been told. We can pretty much count on that and more every day here in the summer.

 

Exactly, this boat was built up a lot for it's downwind performance, but I have yet to see any video/pics of it doing exactly that. Right now we are still speculating. I know J Boats has been successful in the past, but in this day in age the average consumer needs instant gratification. Are we still waiting on more hulls to be launched before we see a better marketing effort?

 

The marketing seems to be just fine based on pre-orders. And as for instant gratification, hull #1 was only launched a few weeks ago, jeezez.

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Explain to me about having the sail area to go fast dw. 130 squares not that large, certainly nothing to write home about. Likely makes for reasonable performance nothing more. Or am I missing the boat?

Well compared to my J/109 that is 10 m2 of additional sail area with 2,000 fewer lbs. of displacement. So it should go faster DW then my current ride. Of course the J/122 has a 155 m2 kite (so an extra 35 m2 of chute) but displaces 4,000 lbs. more than I do.

 

So maybe the J/122 will get to the windward mark first, but the J/111 will make up much of that spread on the DW leg?

 

At any rate, I would LOVE to see the 109/111/122 all out racing at the same time. That would be kinda cool...heck, throw in a 133 for shits and giggles...

 

Z

 

 

I have a prospect that wants me to do exactly what you say! They want to sail all three boats back to back to figure out what they want! Should be interesting and fun! It won't happen until this winter, early spring-but we will do it!

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J/111 weighs the same as a J/105 (3800kg empty) - the 105 in Europe have 95sqm masthead and the j/111 has 130 - sounds pretty potent to me

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I think we've seen 18 knots of true MAYBE twice this whole summer. I am jealous! We just pray that maybe with a seabreeze we will get close to double-digits...of windspeed that is. It takes 18 knots of true to get the BOAT into double-digits!!!

Ya should have come down for BBR instead of farting around in some local race where the only ripples on the water were from the sewage outflow :) . We had two days of breeze in the mid- to high double digits.

 

But thanks for sharing Big J. with us on Friday and Sunday... that guy can trim a kite!

 

Hey, only ten more alimony payments to go and then I get 30% of my income back and we get to start doing AWAY regattas again!!! See you next August in Padanaram...

 

And yes, he certainly can!!!

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J-Boats rock.

 

 

 

I am really sorry to rain on anyones new boat release, BUT I Have to say that any GOOD FRIENDS DON'T LET THEIR GOOD FRIENDS SAIL ON J BOATS,

 

SORRY, But just had to go there

 

 

you see..., the thing about JBoats is that they are building boats for people who actually buy boats, and not for their "friends", who come along for the occasional ride, and then crap on the boats on internet forums.

 

 

 

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does anybody know which made this rollable horizontal buttons are? am very keen to know.......

Doyle (for one) makes jibs with flexible horizontal battens you can roll.

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I was out sailing on the new J-111.Fast is fun,and this boat is fasT.We were out with a sailmaker ,Stu Johnston and Rich Stearns the J boat dealer from Midwest, so we had good people on board ,the driver was a long time shipmate of mine that owns a J-105 and has some interet in the J-111.It has been blowing from the west ,North west in Chicago for the last two days and when we went out the breze was between 20 and I guess the highest I saw was 28(I was told that it was the most breese that a J-111 was in so far) .We were going down wind and the boat planes.We saw 15.7 speed in 22 knots wind.I am sure we could've got more out of it with some waves.When the boat offloads it just takes off.Up wind, the sailmaker was still tuning the rig, so we could not get it to her full potential I am sure, but I can tell you that the boat is happy at 7.5-7.8 in that breese and and the boat felt stable.

 

That is my $0.02 from Chicago

Fast is fun and the J-111 is fast

 

Dorin

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You getting one DC? Looks like a nice ride.

 

 

 

I was out sailing on the new J-111.Fast is fun,and this boat is fasT.We were out with a sailmaker ,Stu Johnston and Rich Stearns the J boat dealer from Midwest, so we had good people on board ,the driver was a long time shipmate of mine that owns a J-105 and has some interet in the J-111.It has been blowing from the west ,North west in Chicago for the last two days and when we went out the breze was between 20 and I guess the highest I saw was 28(I was told that it was the most breese that a J-111 was in so far) .We were going down wind and the boat planes.We saw 15.7 speed in 22 knots wind.I am sure we could've got more out of it with some waves.When the boat offloads it just takes off.Up wind, the sailmaker was still tuning the rig, so we could not get it to her full potential I am sure, but I can tell you that the boat is happy at 7.5-7.8 in that breese and and the boat felt stable.

 

That is my $0.02 from Chicago

Fast is fun and the J-111 is fast

 

Dorin

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You getting one DC? Looks like a nice ride.

 

 

 

I was out sailing on the new J-111.Fast is fun,and this boat is fasT.We were out with a sailmaker ,Stu Johnston and Rich Stearns the J boat dealer from Midwest, so we had good people on board ,the driver was a long time shipmate of mine that owns a J-105 and has some interet in the J-111.It has been blowing from the west ,North west in Chicago for the last two days and when we went out the breze was between 20 and I guess the highest I saw was 28(I was told that it was the most breese that a J-111 was in so far) .We were going down wind and the boat planes.We saw 15.7 speed in 22 knots wind.I am sure we could've got more out of it with some waves.When the boat offloads it just takes off.Up wind, the sailmaker was still tuning the rig, so we could not get it to her full potential I am sure, but I can tell you that the boat is happy at 7.5-7.8 in that breese and and the boat felt stable.

 

That is my $0.02 from Chicago

Fast is fun and the J-111 is fast

 

Dorin

Of course ,for the beer can races at CCYC...:-) At this time I still like my boat and the best thing about my 105 is that it is PAID for.If I was in the market for a $250 K plus boat I would strongly consider it.Fast is fun

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I was out sailing on the new J-111.Fast is fun,and this boat is fasT.We were out with a sailmaker ,Stu Johnston and Rich Stearns the J boat dealer from Midwest, so we had good people on board ,the driver was a long time shipmate of mine that owns a J-105 and has some interet in the J-111.It has been blowing from the west ,North west in Chicago for the last two days and when we went out the breze was between 20 and I guess the highest I saw was 28(I was told that it was the most breese that a J-111 was in so far) .We were going down wind and the boat planes.We saw 15.7 speed in 22 knots wind.I am sure we could've got more out of it with some waves.When the boat offloads it just takes off.Up wind, the sailmaker was still tuning the rig, so we could not get it to her full potential I am sure, but I can tell you that the boat is happy at 7.5-7.8 in that breese and and the boat felt stable.

 

That is my $0.02 from Chicago

Fast is fun and the J-111 is fast

 

Dorin

 

Hi DC,

Thanks for your impressions of the J-111 from the Windy City. Fantastic!

We are on the list for a J-111 in San Franciso Bay (eta next spring). As 20-28 knots of breeze is standard fare here in the summer, I am hoping you could provide further thoughts and impressoins on how the 111 went to weather in those wind conditions.

I do have some experience on a J-105 so that is a good reference point. Your comments on stiffness, heeling angle, sail trim and overall feel compared to your 105 in similar conditions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Jim

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I was out sailing on the new J-111.Fast is fun,and this boat is fasT.We were out with a sailmaker ,Stu Johnston and Rich Stearns the J boat dealer from Midwest, so we had good people on board ,the driver was a long time shipmate of mine that owns a J-105 and has some interet in the J-111.It has been blowing from the west ,North west in Chicago for the last two days and when we went out the breze was between 20 and I guess the highest I saw was 28(I was told that it was the most breese that a J-111 was in so far) .We were going down wind and the boat planes.We saw 15.7 speed in 22 knots wind.I am sure we could've got more out of it with some waves.When the boat offloads it just takes off.Up wind, the sailmaker was still tuning the rig, so we could not get it to her full potential I am sure, but I can tell you that the boat is happy at 7.5-7.8 in that breese and and the boat felt stable.

 

That is my $0.02 from Chicago

Fast is fun and the J-111 is fast

 

Dorin

 

Hi DC,

Thanks for your impressions of the J-111 from the Windy City. Fantastic!

We are on the list for a J-111 in San Franciso Bay (eta next spring). As 20-28 knots of breeze is standard fare here in the summer, I am hoping you could provide further thoughts and impressoins on how the 111 went to weather in those wind conditions.

I do have some experience on a J-105 so that is a good reference point. Your comments on stiffness, heeling angle, sail trim and overall feel compared to your 105 in similar conditions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Jim

Jim, I sent you a private message

Dorin

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I was out sailing on the new J-111.Fast is fun,and this boat is fasT.We were out with a sailmaker ,Stu Johnston and Rich Stearns the J boat dealer from Midwest, so we had good people on board ,the driver was a long time shipmate of mine that owns a J-105 and has some interet in the J-111.It has been blowing from the west ,North west in Chicago for the last two days and when we went out the breze was between 20 and I guess the highest I saw was 28(I was told that it was the most breese that a J-111 was in so far) .We were going down wind and the boat planes.We saw 15.7 speed in 22 knots wind.I am sure we could've got more out of it with some waves.When the boat offloads it just takes off.Up wind, the sailmaker was still tuning the rig, so we could not get it to her full potential I am sure, but I can tell you that the boat is happy at 7.5-7.8 in that breese and and the boat felt stable.

 

That is my $0.02 from Chicago

Fast is fun and the J-111 is fast

 

Dorin

 

are you sure the instruments were properly calibrated? 7.5-7.8 kts upwind is pretty fast for a 36 footer of that type of boat

 

that makes it a bit quicker than an A40 which it will rate close to on IRC.......so great news if true!! it might have some legs in IRC as well.

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I was out sailing on the new J-111.Fast is fun,and this boat is fasT.We were out with a sailmaker ,Stu Johnston and Rich Stearns the J boat dealer from Midwest, so we had good people on board ,the driver was a long time shipmate of mine that owns a J-105 and has some interet in the J-111.It has been blowing from the west ,North west in Chicago for the last two days and when we went out the breze was between 20 and I guess the highest I saw was 28(I was told that it was the most breese that a J-111 was in so far) .We were going down wind and the boat planes.We saw 15.7 speed in 22 knots wind.I am sure we could've got more out of it with some waves.When the boat offloads it just takes off.Up wind, the sailmaker was still tuning the rig, so we could not get it to her full potential I am sure, but I can tell you that the boat is happy at 7.5-7.8 in that breese and and the boat felt stable.

 

That is my $0.02 from Chicago

Fast is fun and the J-111 is fast

 

 

Dorin

 

are you sure the instruments were properly calibrated? 7.5-7.8 kts upwind is pretty fast for a 36 footer of that type of boat

 

that makes it a bit quicker than an A40 which it will rate close to on IRC.......so great news if true!! it might have some legs in IRC as well.

Could not be sure on the calibration ,that is what I saw when I turned to look at the instruments.Calibrated or not it would be known how fast it is when next to other boats.

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I've been told by a reliable source it will be 36.

Seriously? It will be just six seconds a mile slower than the J/122?? A couple feet shorter but a lot lighter with a better SA/DSPL ration I suppose. Hmmmm, very interesting...

 

 

They raced in the Around Jametown race yesterday. The rating was 42. Looks like Jeff J. was driving. Sorry no pics, did not have my camera.

The wind was around 20 most of the day.

 

http://www.conanicutyachtclub.org/files/CYC%20ATI%202010%20Results.pdf

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Mid / high 7's upwind are the targets for a Mumm 30 I recall - so don't seem excessive. DC thanks for the notes very interesting.

 

Instruments over-reading on a demo boat - who'd have thought it !

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Mid / high 7's upwind are the targets for a Mumm 30 I recall - so don't seem excessive. DC thanks for the notes very interesting.

 

Instruments over-reading on a demo boat - who'd have thought it !

 

I think you mean mid/high 6's for a mumm 30, see link below. an extra knot over and above the Mumm is alot methinks.

 

http://www.blur.se/polar/mumm30_farr_performance_prediction.pdf

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Mid / high 7's upwind are the targets for a Mumm 30 I recall - so don't seem excessive. DC thanks for the notes very interesting.

 

Instruments over-reading on a demo boat - who'd have thought it !

 

I think you mean mid/high 6's for a mumm 30, see link below. an extra knot over and above the Mumm is alot methinks.

 

http://www.blur.se/p..._prediction.pdf

 

I think he meant Mumm 36 ?

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We did mid 6's in the J92 and even the SB3 is 6.4, J105 would be 6.8 in those conditions, it is from memory but I do recall the mumm being in the 7's upwind (edit: could be instrument calibration but also note there has been comment on SA about how much faster Farr 40s are than the VPP predictions due to sail refinement and the fact that VPP is just a model)

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Mid / high 7's upwind are the targets for a Mumm 30 I recall - so don't seem excessive.

 

Not even for Farr 40! http://wcsailing.blogspot.com/2008_10_01_archive.html

 

Swan 45 is mid&high 7's:

http://www.sailmaker.org/files/Technical_Data/SPECS.%20AND%20TUNING%20GUIDES/Swan/Swan%2045/North%20Swan45TG2005.pdf?u=

Do you think J/111 or Mumm 30 is as fast upwind?

 

Also 6.8 sounds a bit high for J/105. I would think 6.4-6.6 would be more normal for a boat like that and these seem to agree:

http://www.j105fleet3.org/files/knowledge/Quantum%20Targets.pdf

http://www.j105fleet3.org/files/knowledge/Quantum%20Targets.pdf

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I've been told by a reliable source it will be 36.

Seriously? It will be just six seconds a mile slower than the J/122?? A couple feet shorter but a lot lighter with a better SA/DSPL ration I suppose. Hmmmm, very interesting...

 

 

They raced in the Around Jametown race yesterday. The rating was 42. Looks like Jeff J. was driving. Sorry no pics, did not have my camera.

The wind was around 20 most of the day.

 

http://www.conanicutyachtclub.org/files/CYC%20ATI%202010%20Results.pdf

Interesting numbers: the 111 rates higher than a 40.7 which is usually about 1.070 in IRC (or thereabouts). The 111's elapsed time of 2:29:04 was not far off the J44's (6mins) nor the IMX 45's (3mins), and they're both heavy boats which do well in a blow so this thing is fast, non? It corrected out 27th overall and better than all the big boats including a Swan 42. I'll assume the 111 was well sailed given who some said were aboard. But that's heavy air, I'd hate to go against a 40.7 in a whispy 5 knots with a crappy tidal chop against me, when the 40.7 has a 155% genny up...

 

The most interesting thing is the 111 vs Summit 35 handicaps - if only that boat was out there. I also think 7.8kts is fast, the Farr/Corel 45 I sail on with meticulously maintained instruments goes upwind at 7.8 in 12/13 kts and up. That's pretty much out top speed, only footing do we get up to 8kts. The fastest J we race against is a 133 and the F45 generally pisses all over those, they're not even in the same start. Interesting claims. I think the instruments were over-reading...

 

I still love it that the J35, a boat I have lots of positive experiences on, rates faster than a 36.7, a nice cruiser but 10+ years newer. I also love that a B32 and a Swan 44 on the same rating can sail within 20 seconds of each other over 2.5 hours. How cool is that? Handicap is never great sailing but that's a positive story.

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the boat is happy at 7.5-7.8 in that breese and and the boat felt stable.

I'm sure it trucks along quite well, but someone needs to calibrate the Nexus system :)

 

Below are some rough targets in +20 knots, tuned boat, full crew hiking hard...

 

J/109 = 6.85

FF36 Club = 7.00

Mumm 36 = 7.20

Corby 36 = 7.40

IMX-40 = 7.40

Pacer 376 = 7.50

King 40 = 7.60

First 40 = 7.60

CS42 = 7.70

 

I would be happy to see 7.3-7.4, since we'll beat most of those boats downwind anyways...

 

Looking at the results from the race, comparing with the J/109 (1.032) and the CS42 (1.180), my guess for a "not so good" IRC TCC of ~1.100 seems pretty close :lol:

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Results from the Bi-state with a twist and the Michgan City Chicago Race.

 

To start with the J/111 has a preliminary PHRF gift of 48 (J/120's have a rating of 48, J/109s are att 66) she was racing in section II PHRF The scratch boat was Eagle's Wings with a rating of 21.

 

On Sunday, on the race over, In a 31 mile race, she won boat for boat. It looked like Rich Sterns, Perry Lewis and two Johnstones were on board plus six others

On Monday, she lost to an old J/120 by 90 seconds (Boat for boat) Looked like the same crew from Sunday. Defenitely Rich and Perry were on board. The J/120 Elusive, Crewed by a bunch of white haired old guys and three cute women, average age of the boat somewhere around 60, were able to catch and pass the J/111 and hold the lead for the win...

 

Rumor has it that it was Tom Edmon on the helm (an old J/30 and J/105 sailor) who wavied his sandwich from the helm on passing Rich and Perry.

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I've been told by a reliable source it will be 36.

Seriously? It will be just six seconds a mile slower than the J/122?? A couple feet shorter but a lot lighter with a better SA/DSPL ration I suppose. Hmmmm, very interesting...

 

 

They raced in the Around Jametown race yesterday. The rating was 42. Looks like Jeff J. was driving. Sorry no pics, did not have my camera.

The wind was around 20 most of the day.

 

http://www.conanicut...0%20Results.pdf

Interesting numbers: the 111 rates higher than a 40.7 which is usually about 1.070 in IRC (or thereabouts). The 111's elapsed time of 2:29:04 was not far off the J44's (6mins) nor the IMX 45's (3mins), and they're both heavy boats which do well in a blow so this thing is fast, non? It corrected out 27th overall and better than all the big boats including a Swan 42. I'll assume the 111 was well sailed given who some said were aboard. But that's heavy air, I'd hate to go against a 40.7 in a whispy 5 knots with a crappy tidal chop against me, when the 40.7 has a 155% genny up...

 

The most interesting thing is the 111 vs Summit 35 handicaps - if only that boat was out there. I also think 7.8kts is fast, the Farr/Corel 45 I sail on with meticulously maintained instruments goes upwind at 7.8 in 12/13 kts and up. That's pretty much out top speed, only footing do we get up to 8kts. The fastest J we race against is a 133 and the F45 generally pisses all over those, they're not even in the same start. Interesting claims. I think the instruments were over-reading...

 

I still love it that the J35, a boat I have lots of positive experiences on, rates faster than a 36.7, a nice cruiser but 10+ years newer. I also love that a B32 and a Swan 44 on the same rating can sail within 20 seconds of each other over 2.5 hours. How cool is that? Handicap is never great sailing but that's a positive story.

 

 

One thing to remember. The race had no downwind leg.

Started upwind, turned the corner at the bottom then up the backside on tight reach, wind backed, turned to a tight broad reach. Turned then at the top of the island and it was a 1 legged beat to the finish.

I am not sure if the 111 ever put up a chute the whole day.

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I was on the J-111 for the Bi-state with a twist weekend and just wanted to set some facts straight. Rich Stearns, Perry Lewis and Stu Johnstone were indeed on the boat for the race over and Stu and Rich on the ride back. Perry was not with us for the return race. All I can say that boat is FAST and hugely fun to sail. The sail over was beam reach, we consistently saw 8-9 kts and a few times made it over 10. We calibrated with our GPS and the speedo was actually slower than what the GPS was showing us. The return leg was a very tight jib reach up until about two miles from the finish. Our speeds coming back were consistently around 8+ kts also hitting 10 a few times. Yes, we were beaten by a J/120 (happy it was another J/boat). Monday's weather was perfect for the 120 maybe not the best point of sail for the 111.

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I was on the J-111 for the Bi-state with a twist weekend and just wanted to set some facts straight. Rich Stearns, Perry Lewis and Stu Johnstone were indeed on the boat for the race over and Stu and Rich on the ride back. Perry was not with us for the return race. All I can say that boat is FAST and hugely fun to sail. The sail over was beam reach, we consistently saw 8-9 kts and a few times made it over 10. We calibrated with our GPS and the speedo was actually slower than what the GPS was showing us. The return leg was a very tight jib reach up until about two miles from the finish. Our speeds coming back were consistently around 8+ kts also hitting 10 a few times. Yes, we were beaten by a J/120 (happy it was another J/boat). Monday's weather was perfect for the 120 maybe not the best point of sail for the 111.

 

 

What were the wind speeds?

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Seems like I was hallucinating on those upwind speeds, must be the tropical Singapore air ! The Mumm's do point better and are faster than the 105 which in 20 knots we'd look to do about 6.7-6.8 (I did 2 spi ouest regattas on the 105 against them sharing the same start)

 

I would think a 120 would pass a 111 on a fetch - it's about waterline length - on a W/L you'd think the 111 would probably take the 120 on balance. I wouldn't read too much into this "data point"

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I was on the J-111 for the Bi-state with a twist weekend and just wanted to set some facts straight. Rich Stearns, Perry Lewis and Stu Johnstone were indeed on the boat for the race over and Stu and Rich on the ride back. Perry was not with us for the return race. All I can say that boat is FAST and hugely fun to sail. The sail over was beam reach, we consistently saw 8-9 kts and a few times made it over 10. We calibrated with our GPS and the speedo was actually slower than what the GPS was showing us. The return leg was a very tight jib reach up until about two miles from the finish. Our speeds coming back were consistently around 8+ kts also hitting 10 a few times. Yes, we were beaten by a J/120 (happy it was another J/boat). Monday's weather was perfect for the 120 maybe not the best point of sail for the 111.

 

 

What were the wind speeds?

 

 

First race wind ranged from 5-12 kts, more at the beginning and faded at the end. On the return race we saw between 11-17 kts, mostly in the 12-13 kt range.

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I wouldn't read too much into this "data point"

 

Agreed. It's about the type of conditions and race course. The J/90's rating (also 48) was biased to its planing performance in reaching conditions. If we didn't get that, we'd get clobbered by a lot of boats with water line on us. If we did get it, we'd do a horizon job on them over the line, but still tight on rating. Ratings are based on hybrid performance.

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The return leg was a very tight jib reach up until about two miles from the finish.

 

What's a "Jib Reach"?

I was going to ask what a "felch" is? or was it fetch...? Dems olden times mariner terms, bye.

 

I reckon a jib reach is like reaching with a jib, rather than reaching with a spi. Have you heard of a spinnaker reach?

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The return leg was a very tight jib reach up until about two miles from the finish.

 

What's a "Jib Reach"?

I was going to ask what a "felch" is? or was it fetch...? Dems olden times mariner terms, bye.

 

I reckon a jib reach is like reaching with a jib, rather than reaching with a spi. Have you heard of a spinnaker reach?

 

A very tight jib reach asymptotically approaches a fetch but never gets there.

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The return leg was a very tight jib reach up until about two miles from the finish.

 

What's a "Jib Reach"?

I was going to ask what a "felch" is? or was it fetch...? Dems olden times mariner terms, bye.

 

I reckon a jib reach is like reaching with a jib, rather than reaching with a spi. Have you heard of a spinnaker reach?

We do a lot of "spinnaker reaching" on my boat. I figure when you gybe through 260 degrees it must be a reach when you come out the other side, right?

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The return leg was a very tight jib reach up until about two miles from the finish.

 

What's a "Jib Reach"?

I was going to ask what a "felch" is? or was it fetch...? Dems olden times mariner terms, bye.

 

I reckon a jib reach is like reaching with a jib, rather than reaching with a spi. Have you heard of a spinnaker reach?

We do a lot of "spinnaker reaching" on my boat. I figure when you gybe through 260 degrees it must be a reach when you come out the other side, right?

 

We could call it a "Reaching Fetch" or a "Fetching Reach" or better yet a "felching retch"

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Hey PitGirl - How did the J/111 do in the Beer can Last night? 8-10knts the course was a beat, a close reach, and a run....

 

We kept them behind on the first leg (with a 5 min head start on a 105) but after rounding the Crib... boy that boat had legs.

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Hey PitGirl - How did the J/111 do in the Beer can Last night? 8-10knts the course was a beat, a close reach, and a run....

 

We kept them behind on the first leg (with a 5 min head start on a 105) but after rounding the Crib... boy that boat had legs.

 

What 12345 said. We were a little slow upwind, but I suspect due to the face our Jib clew was cut WAY too low and we really couldn't trim properly (getting it fixed so it's ready for the Sheldon Clark). The reach was tough with the weird wave action and current, but still maintained good speed. The boat launches downwind...we beat the Farr 40, Beneteau 40.7 and one other boat (this was for CYC, not sure where we would have placed against the Columbia boats).

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Interesting to understand the relative performance vs Farr and Bene on absolute basis - upwind vs reach vs downwind - my gut is upwind order is Farr 111 Bene, kite reaching 111 Farr and downwind could be close between Farr and 111 with Farr sailing deep and 111 going faster but gybing more

 

Apprecaite it's only a single race and early days (not entirely sure how sailmaker gets jib so wrong)

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Love the looks of the boat, can't wait till one shows up at Sail California here in Alameda. I'm sure all you armchair experts are aware that these first results are with first generation sails. Kinda stupid to try and compare against boats that are into thier 5th or 6th generation of refinement. (Farr 40, Bene) Just sayin.

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Love the looks of the boat, can't wait till one shows up at Sail California here in Alameda. I'm sure all you armchair experts are aware that these first results are with first generation sails. Kinda stupid to try and compare against boats that are into thier 5th or 6th generation of refinement. (Farr 40, Bene) Just sayin.

 

Hull #4 should be here in the Bay Area early next month, sailing later in the month hopefully.

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Love the looks of the boat, can't wait till one shows up at Sail California here in Alameda. I'm sure all you armchair experts are aware that these first results are with first generation sails. Kinda stupid to try and compare against boats that are into thier 5th or 6th generation of refinement. (Farr 40, Bene) Just sayin.

 

Hull #4 should be here in the Bay Area early next month, sailing later in the month hopefully.

The Hamble rumour-mill told me that boat #3 (hopefully more than a hull) is UK-bound as early as October or if not, certainly the boat show (whenever that is). Money is still a bit stupid: £240-280k! final figures to be nailed down. Given a new 109 (if they exist) is £180k then this will be a serious premium over that.

 

One design potential? i.e. will we get 5/6/7 quarter-of-a-million boats by year 3? Who knows. They built ~70 J122s and they're scattered to the winds. The more expensive but more offshore-oriented 133 outnumbers 122s in the UK by a wide margin.

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Money is still a bit stupid: £240-280k! final figures to be nailed down. Given a new 109 (if they exist) is £180k then this will be a serious premium over that.

 

 

These numbers sound high with pound sterling at 1.54. Not sure how J Boats representation works in Europe, you may have uplifted international pricing. Depending on how trick you get with sail inventory and electronics, the cost is likely to peg in the high 200s. I will get over that with #4 but those are my own choices on fit out. I much agree for OD, pricing needs to stay in check. That said, the 111 probably deserves a premium over the 109.

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Money is still a bit stupid: £240-280k! final figures to be nailed down. Given a new 109 (if they exist) is £180k then this will be a serious premium over that.

 

 

These numbers sound high with pound sterling at 1.54. Not sure how J Boats representation works in Europe, you may have uplifted international pricing. Depending on how trick you get with sail inventory and electronics, the cost is likely to peg in the high 200s. I will get over that with #4 but those are my own choices on fit out. I much agree for OD, pricing needs to stay in check. That said, the 111 probably deserves a premium over the 109.

 

I asked a local J dealer - he said expect $350k to take a J111 home compared to $300k for the J109.

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I asked a local J dealer - he said expect $350k to take a J111 home compared to $300k for the J109.

 

With sales tax approaching 10% in Alameda, you get their quicker.

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Thanks Mustang. I'll see it at Annapolis but thats still a month out and I am curious to see how it turned out....

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Love the looks of the boat, can't wait till one shows up at Sail California here in Alameda. I'm sure all you armchair experts are aware that these first results are with first generation sails. Kinda stupid to try and compare against boats that are into thier 5th or 6th generation of refinement. (Farr 40, Bene) Just sayin.

 

Hull #4 should be here in the Bay Area early next month, sailing later in the month hopefully.

The Hamble rumour-mill told me that boat #3 (hopefully more than a hull) is UK-bound as early as October or if not, certainly the boat show (whenever that is). Money is still a bit stupid: £240-280k! final figures to be nailed down. Given a new 109 (if they exist) is £180k then this will be a serious premium over that.

 

One design potential? i.e. will we get 5/6/7 quarter-of-a-million boats by year 3? Who knows. They built ~70 J122s and they're scattered to the winds. The more expensive but more offshore-oriented 133 outnumbers 122s in the UK by a wide margin.

 

If those prices are right - ouch ! UK VAT is going from 17.5% to 20% so that has to be factored in. I would suspect J-UK will have a boat on the water as soon as they can, whether that's been sold to a customer or not.

 

European J pricing is competitive with the US for boats built in Europe, US built boats are pricey as you have the shipping

 

A nice used J122 is low 200's, you can buy the new Ker 40 for around 300. Does the 133 outnumber the 122 ? Plenty 122 around they are raced offshore and short handed mostly rather than inshore/class.

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Also a new Archambault M34 will be max GBP 175 on the water with a good specification for electronics and sails (less if you buy it in a company and thus pay no VAT). If you were looking for a Eurropean OD this would be a very strong candidate.. Very good charter income from Tour Voile if you wish.

 

No interior to speak of, no headroom so a different boat but a compelling alternative.

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Left Hook - thanks, for me everything !

 

Deck Layout - roller furler, jib tracks, mast/boom rigging (halyards, reef lines), cockpit layout, winches and sheet leads, mainsheet system, traveller, backstay. Cockpit lockers, stern locker/dock box.

 

Interior Layout, quarter berths/storage, engine access, battery location and access. Saloon seating and berths, chart table, electronics access. Heads. Forepeak, bowsprit arranngement, ability for spinnaker squirrel. Bilges / Keel bolts.

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Left Hook - thanks, for me everything !

 

Deck Layout - roller furler, jib tracks, mast/boom rigging (halyards, reef lines), cockpit layout, winches and sheet leads, mainsheet system, traveller, backstay. Cockpit lockers, stern locker/dock box.

 

Interior Layout, quarter berths/storage, engine access, battery location and access. Saloon seating and berths, chart table, electronics access. Heads. Forepeak, bowsprit arranngement, ability for spinnaker squirrel. Bilges / Keel bolts.

Good list I'll echo the traveller, main gross/fine, backstay. I suppose the outhaul will be at the gooseneck like the 105/109.

 

I really want to see a picture of a nice new 3DL {well-designed, talk to Rich B.} main in 12-14 knots and a medium chop if you can organize that with some CGI :-)

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J/111 TriState Race Debut

 

(Chicago, IL)- With great anticipation a crowd gathered around the dock at Chicago YC on Friday afternoon September 6th to take their first peek at the recently arrived J/111. Like a powerful stallion pulling at its reins in nervous anticipation of a quick trip around the race track, the J/111 was waiting to gives its crew a fast flight across the fresh water of Lake Michigan.

 

Expectations were not unfounded. After the first leg of the Tri-State Offshore race was canceled due to gale force winds, the J/111 instead went sailing on Saturday with a number of prospective 111 one-design fleet owners. In the puffy westerly winds blowing 10-22 knots and a large swell running in a southerly direction, the stage was set to test the performance of the 111 in Lake Michigan's notorious chop. The boat left the dock, set the smaller 111m2 asymmetric spinnaker and took off on a couple of 18+ knot puffs. By the afternoon, with a number of skeptics on board loaded with handheld GPS's, there was no question the 111 was easily planing off the wind and hitting 16+ knots in 22 knots of wind. One owner was told by a crewmember that he better wipe the smile off his face or it would kill him!

 

Sunday's racing dawned with a forecast for 10-20 knot winds from the S-SW for the 35 mile leg from Chicago to Michigan City, IN-- basically a drag race under spinnaker headed at Michigan City's power plant stacks. The 111 started with the large 130m2 kite, sailed off below its competitors and established a lead less than three miles after the start over a Grand Soleil 44 IMS/IRC racer, Mumm/Farr 36s, J/120s, J/109s and a Sydney 38. The wind varied from 85 to 110 apparent with the large A-sail for half the race. The wind moved further south and increased slightly in velocity into the 15+ knot range, moving the apparent wind to 65-90 degrees, necessitating a change to the smaller 111m2 kite. The tighter reach also proved to the liking of the boat and by race end, the J/111 crossed the line 4th boat for boat, behind a RP 66, a TP 52 and an RP 46 and winning on corrected time.

 

Labor Day Monday dawned grey and cool with a brisk breeze blowing in from the S-SW 10-20 knots with a short, steep nasty chop. Like the day before, the forecast suggested a rhumbline route, a drag race for 35 miles pointing at Chicago's Sears Tower from the Michigan City's starting line just off the long jetty. The leg was a 32 mile "power beat" with jib just inside or just over the lifelines. Only in the last 3 miles did the bigger boats have the wind temporarily free-up to set code zero's or spinnakers. The 111 started at the RC boat end, to leeward of all competitors. Stacked to windward basically dead even were the two J/120s, two Mumm/Farr 36s, the Grand Soleil 44 and the Sydney 38. What surprised everyone was the fact that the 111 managed to just stay ahead of the 36-41 footers in these conditions, slicing into the waves, accelerating rapidly off wave-tops and rarely ever pounding. Even in these conditions, the 111 was hitting 7.7 to 8.5 knots "power beating". The GS-44 is a powerful boat and as expected, powered away from the fleet to win boat-for-boat on what was essentially a "waterline" race. With good management of their sail selection and better playing of the wind shift, the J/120 and the Sydney 38 caught the 111 in the last five miles of the race. As a result, the 111 finished 4th on elapsed and 2nd on corrected, the J/120 winning the class on this leg. Overall, the J/111's 1-2 for the weekend meant that she "unofficially" won her class for the shortened "Bi-State Race".

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I took a few interior photos with my cell phone and uploaded them to my Facebook page. I made them available for viewing to the public. To see them go to Facebook.com and search for Chris Dowling and then look at the J/111 photos. I will be taking better pictures and shooting a video today and will post tonight.

 

Over all I am impressed with the boat.

 

Chris

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I always love Don Finkle's reports...

 

 

J/111 Test Sail, by Don Finkle: This past Monday I spent 3 hours in Newport, RI on the new J/111. I had seen the boat several times previously during stages of production, but this was my first time aboard the finished product. She was on a mooring in the harbor off the NYYC, and the first impression was very positive as I walked down the dock to the launch and saw her floating there. The 36 foot 111 looked awesome, fast, sleek and modern, just waiting to be taken for a spin. You know how some boats "just look right"? Well, the J/111 is one of those, the proportions are balanced, the freeboard not too high, the rig tall, the lines clean, and the whole package just seeming to be in harmony.

 

Once we hopped off the launch and stepped aboard the quality and proper placement of the deck hardware and rigging was readily apparent. This is a boat designed by sailors, for sailors. Clearly much of the cost of building this boat has been put into making it sail well and to be easily controlled. When we put up the sails and cast off we put this observation to the test. Yes, they got it right when it came to all the running rigging, sail controls, adjustments, etc. The carbon rig is by Hall Spars using new nano-technology resin for lighter weight and improved performance. I am a big fan of everything Hall does, their work is really clean, functional and sturdy. The shrouds are stainless rod, the backstay Dyneema, and the Genoa furler is a way- cool new Facnor tape-drive unit. This furler has a much smaller drum that is normal, and it sits much closer to the deck. This new model has the benefits of a below-deck furling unit but with much less weight and friction. I am a fan for sure.

 

The J/111 has outboard shrouds on swept-back spreaders that allow for a just over 100% LP headsail. Like most modern race boats the sail area is distributed vertically, with higher aspect sails that derive their power from longer luff length as opposed to overlap. Naturally the smaller headsails make for much easier tacking and visibility forward. The jib cars are adjustable fore and aft with proper tackles and also sport in-haulers. The winches are sizable, the new Harken model that uses ribs on the drum to grab the sheets without chewing them up. Stoppers were Lewmar, with the newest vertical models for main and jib halyards. I had not seen these before and they were fine-tuning them. The idea is to grab the line so tightly that the halyards do not creep as they typically do. They seemed to be working when I was aboard. The running rigging all looked to be high-quality low-stretch stuff.

 

The spinnaker is flown from the masthead and set on a carbon sprit that is 8 feet long, 7 feet from the headstay (the latter is set back 1 foot from the bow). Once you put that baby up the boat literally takes off. I guess it is time to talk about how she sails. The answer is the J/111 met or exceeded my expectations in all respects. The boat is 36 feet long, virtually all waterline, yet weighs just over 9,000 lbs on a slender hull with narrow waterline beam. There is very little to hold her back, and the first thing you notice is the acceleration. When you sheet in she goes. After each tack or jibe she gets back up to speed very quickly. I was a bit concerned about how she would sail I very light air, which we get a lot of around here as we know all too well. We started out in about 4-5 knots of breeze, and in that light stuff I was weaving in and around boats in the crowded harbor seemingly effortlessly. I was surprised at just how quick she went uphill in that little bit of wind. Certainly this boat will perform in our conditions. We quickly ran out of air altogether and went outside to search for wind.

 

On the ride out to the Ocean we powered at 8 knots with the 20HP diesel, certainly no lack of power here. The saildrive is very smooth, there is no perceptible vibration on the wheel whatsoever from the propwash. While we waited on glassy seas for a bit we looked over the rest of the boat. I should point out the helm station, which is one of the strong points of the 111. There is a molded pedestal that is situated for easy foot-bracing, either with one or both feet. I found I could sit in a number of positions, each one comfortable: with both feet aft of the wheel, or astride the wheel with one foot forward, one aft, or in front of the wheel, with one or both feet on the angled pedestal. There are also molded footrests on the cockpit sole. The traveler in mounted on the sole, with course tune aft of the traveler, fine tune forward. Both sheets and travelr lines are close at hand.

 

I came away from our afternoon sail wanting to do it again, the J/111 is so much fun that you beg for more. I loved the acceleration, the feel of the helm, the way it moved through the water. The sail controls were in the right place and easy to use. One impression I returned home with was just how little fuss was required to attain the speed we were going. This is a boat that should not demand a lot of effort.

 

The headsail is only very slightly overlapping but it is not small, being long on the luff. I did not feel at all underpowered when we started out in the light air. Once we got the spinnaker up after awhile the real power of the boat became apparent. I tried all different angles downwind, even deliberately sailing too tight with the large runner to see how it would handle on a tight reach. The rudder had plenty of bite and bearing off was no problem, and when heating up the boatspeed climbed very quickly. Clearly acceleration is one of the hallmarks of this design.

 

The J/111 was created as a sort of modern day version of the extremely successful J/35. Clearly there is little design similarity between the two, given the many years of evolution between the 35 and the 111, but the goal is the same. Make a fast, fun to sail boat that is very quick for its length yet has a usable interior and is not extreme. Extreme designs don't ever gain long-term popularity, nor do those that are too all-out racy. The 111 has 6 foot headroom, 6 large comfortable berths, a usable head, galley and nav station. While clearly this is a performance boat first and foremost, it is also useful for other purposes when desired. The cockpit seating is comfortable and the view forward is excellent.

 

What would the shortcomings be, after all no boat is perfect, right? While clearly there is so much more to rave about than find fault with, if pressed we would point out that this type of performance, equipment and technology does not come cheap. Obviously there will be less expensive alternatives out there, but I am struggling to find the name of one that would do exactly what the 111 does. High performance in anything, car or airplane or boat, comes at a price. But for those who can enjoy or expect that thoroughbred feel and get up and go, they will find the cost worth it. There are certainly more expensive boats too.

 

The storage below is limited. The guys at J/boats are looking into some ways to provide for more light weight interior storage options for those who feel they need it. There is an anchor well forward, and a nice locker in the aft end of the cockpit behind the wheel. The two cockpit seat lockers open into the quarterberths, and there is some thought of having a shallow liner in one or both for storage of small items.

 

The finish on the interior was certainly satisfactory to me, especially considering this boat was hull #1, in effect the prototype. In keeping with the goal of light weight there is no headliner, nor any hull liners fore and aft. This is just fine with me, the white rolled on finish is nice and you have ready access to any deck fitting, and the source of any leak will be immediately apparent. The joinery is fine as well, I've seen better on cruising boats where the woodwork is one of the main selling features, but the interior of this boat compares favorably to most race boats our there.

 

Finally, like all narrow boats I have sailed, at least those without canting keels, the J/111 will heel. This seems natural to me, monohulls heel, and the key is whether or not they steer and balance when they are at 20-25 degrees of heel angle. The J/111, without a wide stern, continues to track when she heels, and the helm stays light and balanced. The wake off the back of the boat is clean and quiet, no heavy gurgling that you get with most modern boats as the helm increases, when you dial in more rudder to compensate and keep the bow pointed straight ahead. The very clean run on the 111 stayed clean on each point of sail, whether heeled upwind or flat when we were downwind. It is just a very good sailboat! And that of course was the goal of the exercise.

 

Yes, I am high on the J/111 because I had so much fun sailing it. It won't appeal to everyone, because not everyone will value the performance of this boat enough to buy one. But the number of J/boat sailors out there numbers in the thousands, and for them what the 111 does is what they have come to expect and are looking for in their next boat. I predict it will be looked at someday as one of J/boats' best designs.

 

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EDIT: found results will back something out

 

Is there a link to the tri state results ? Would be easy to do some back of the envelope re-scoring under irc. I would hsve expected the J/111 to be very competitive on the kite leg and am presently surprised about the fetch especially against bigger boats (note a j105 won the last 100m roc offshore race in similar circumstances so it bodes well for the passage racing performance of the new boat and perhaps without the light air sluggishness of the older 105)

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Dude, so are you going to tell us which one of the 443 Chris Dowling's you are or is it a secret? I am beginning to believe that the rumours of this boat having an interior are in fact rumours... I am sure J/Boats has in fact done the impossible and built a boat without an interior. If you step down the companionway its in fact a black hole from which you never return - thats why there are no pictures of it???

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Thanks for photos

 

Quality looks good

 

Would have thought they would put a headlining in, suspect we'll see that in later boats Edit: there is a lining in forepeak

 

Forepeak looks snug, a little short or perhaps that's a hissing for the soi pole, on the 105/109 the berth is same length as pole

 

I'd prefer to see an oven too for the rumoured price

 

Wonder if they'll do an optional table which can be used below or in cockpit also.

 

Those lights looks like they'll get broken especially on a bumpy offshore race

 

Edit, soorry i'm blind What is they story re chart table ?

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Sorry but I'd want headlining for gbp 250+ grand - also all those bolt heads will be dangerous and will have to be very well finished to avoid razor sharp burrs where bolts are cut to length

 

Edit: I suppose I am showing my preferenes, my list of options for the next Jambaya includes used J120 / 122 and Grand Soleil 37 ! For stripped out racing I'll do that in a sporty 20

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I'll try to get better pictures of the ceilings today. Headliner is too heavy and cost prohibitive. It also drops the standing headroom by an inch.

 

Best to save the weight and maintenance and not have it. I heard the french guys sailing the Figaro's would remove the headliners, wrap them up and stack them on the windward side. Class rules called for all standard equipment to be "carried aboard"!

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Wonder why they have not run the pole outhaul line through the inside of the saloon handrail like on he French boats? Such a neat solution... Also some of the finish on the reverse side of the front bunk bulkhead looks pretty rough in the NA Sailor pics. Agree with Jambalaya, the foam backed vinyl lining on the EU J/105 is siply stuck onto the underside of the deck. 5mm thick and not much weight at all. I would be fine without it but then expect a really good finish on the underside of the deck. Some of the backing plates under the winches and stanchions look a little "rough"?

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Sorry but I'd want headlining for gbp 250+ grand

 

I have to agree. This price is not OK for something that is not especially high tech nor with a good interior. A well made interior is probably the most expensive part of a boat, thus it should show in the price as well. You could get a Finn Flyer 36 for the same price. Sure it may be a bit slower, but so much more value for cruising and second hand for areas that will not get an OD fleet, if there ever will be one.

 

http://www.finnyachts.fi/en/products/finnflyer36_club

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