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Donovan GP26 starts production in Turkey

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Have heard that the GP26 starts at STC Annapolis were 5min in front of the CC30s but that the GP26s maintained the separation over the course.

True?

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I was on Rattle for the STC regatta and can say that the C&C was slightly faster upwind but did not point as high and they were slightly slower off the wind and sailed much lower, but our higher angles downwind netted much better VMG and we were able to pass a boat or two in the distance race. Close reaching we were about the same. The only boat that we thought was faster than us downwind was Extreme 2. The GP planes at a much lower wind speed than the C&C also

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I was on Rattle for the STC regatta and can say that the C&C was slightly faster upwind but did not point as high and they were slightly slower off the wind and sailed much lower, but our higher angles downwind netted much better VMG and we were able to pass a boat or two in the distance race. Close reaching we were about the same. The only boat that we thought was faster than us downwind was Extreme 2. The GP planes at a much lower wind speed than the C&C also

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2610 relocated to New Orleans and named Lucy. She is getting ready to sail in Sugar Bowl Regatta.

Congratulations to Team Lucy scoring second in PHRF A in Southern Yacht Club's Allstate Sugar Bowl Regatta December 03-04, 2016 in her first race...

The results are here

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Is LUCY configured with a fat head or pin head main?

How are owners feeling about the lack of uniformity in the "Class"?

Weren't these boats intended to fit an ORC box rule?

So, what's happened?

The price of admission is a positive but potential buyers must be left wondering what the future holds

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Is LUCY configured with a fat head or pin head main?

How are owners feeling about the lack of uniformity in the "Class"?

Weren't these boats intended to fit an ORC box rule?

So, what's happened?

The price of admission is a positive but potential buyers must be left wondering what the future holds

TBone, Lucy is configured for Square top.

There has been only one Class Race Start and that was in Charleston in 2016. Jim Designed the boat for the Box rule, but the boats have been optimised for best performance in their local PHRF fleets.

And it was important in the beginning without much class racing to show the boats potential... Particularly this was the case in KW in ORC2 against F28, FE28... Results are here

The boat is much better performer with bigger sail area than class legal and class legal crew weight.

In Charleston we used ORC rating and it worked fine. We have discussions with the owners for going one design and/or Class racing with limiting sail sizes...

Better owners reply to their feeling about the non-uniformity, some are active in SA from time to time...

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Is LUCY configured with a fat head or pin head main?

How are owners feeling about the lack of uniformity in the "Class"?

Weren't these boats intended to fit an ORC box rule?

So, what's happened?

The price of admission is a positive but potential buyers must be left wondering what the future holds

 

Yes, darling, the design was originally envisioned as a box-rule boat and as such some design limitations were imposed. The box rule is poorly understood by the average sailor so box-rule fleets have not taken off here. In the meantime owners race their boats under some handicap system and are free to modify their boats to extract more performance from them with the expectation or at least the possibility of changing them back to conform to class rules when and if a class develops. Quotation marks? Really? Sales of the boat have not yet reached a critical mass where numbers justify forming a class, but they are getting there. In the meantime present owners are having fun sailing them and are not too concerned what the future holds. The design is not about what happened, it's a work in progress.

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Is LUCY configured with a fat head or pin head main?

How are owners feeling about the lack of uniformity in the "Class"?

Weren't these boats intended to fit an ORC box rule?

So, what's happened?

The price of admission is a positive but potential buyers must be left wondering what the future holds

Yes, darling, the design was originally envisioned as a box-rule boat and as such some design limitations were imposed. The box rule is poorly understood by the average sailor so box-rule fleets have not taken off here. In the meantime owners race their boats under some handicap system and are free to modify their boats to extract more performance from them with the expectation or at least the possibility of changing them back to conform to class rules when and if a class develops. Quotation marks? Really? Sales of the boat have not yet reached a critical mass where numbers justify forming a class, but they are getting there. In the meantime present owners are having fun sailing them and are not too concerned what the future holds. The design is not about what happened, it's a work in progress.

Safe to presume you are an owner, YD?

Where does Mr Donovan stand on what you call "a work in progress"?

And the Builder?

Owners are certainly at liberty to evolve the boat configurations to their liking as you suggest, but for those on the outside of the fleet it appears as though there may be little continuity from one boat to the next.

There are people racing more-costly boats who are interested in these boats for their "bang-for-the-buck" ROI, but are put off by the apparent inconsistencies.

So while you're off racing in whatever configuration you prefer, the marketability of the boat may be suffering.

It would seem that someone needs to determine how the boats will be Class-configured and soon.

Otherwise these neat little boats are likely to be unable to gain traction because potential owners don't know what next week might bring.

As it is, it would seem as though there may be some orphans, pin head or fat head, near term.

Not everyone is likely to be interested in reconfiguring the rig.

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Is LUCY configured with a fat head or pin head main?

How are owners feeling about the lack of uniformity in the "Class"?

Weren't these boats intended to fit an ORC box rule?

So, what's happened?

The price of admission is a positive but potential buyers must be left wondering what the future holds

Yes, darling, the design was originally envisioned as a box-rule boat and as such some design limitations were imposed. The box rule is poorly understood by the average sailor so box-rule fleets have not taken off here. In the meantime owners race their boats under some handicap system and are free to modify their boats to extract more performance from them with the expectation or at least the possibility of changing them back to conform to class rules when and if a class develops. Quotation marks? Really? Sales of the boat have not yet reached a critical mass where numbers justify forming a class, but they are getting there. In the meantime present owners are having fun sailing them and are not too concerned what the future holds. The design is not about what happened, it's a work in progress.

Safe to presume you are an owner, YD?

Where does Mr Donovan stand on what you call "a work in progress"?

And the Builder?

Owners are certainly at liberty to evolve the boat configurations to their liking as you suggest, but for those on the outside of the fleet it appears as though there may be little continuity from one boat to the next.

There are people racing more-costly boats who are interested in these boats for their "bang-for-the-buck" ROI, but are put off by the apparent inconsistencies.

So while you're off racing in whatever configuration you prefer, the marketability of the boat may be suffering.

It would seem that someone needs to determine how the boats will be Class-configured and soon.

Otherwise these neat little boats are likely to be unable to gain traction because potential owners don't know what next week might bring.

As it is, it would seem as though there may be some orphans, pin head or fat head, near term.

Not everyone is likely to be interested in reconfiguring the rig.

 

 

I am an owner. Jim and Windseeker Yachts can speak for themselves.

 

What is your interest? More to the point, what is your intent? What are you trying to do?

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Is LUCY configured with a fat head or pin head main?

How are owners feeling about the lack of uniformity in the "Class"?

Weren't these boats intended to fit an ORC box rule?

So, what's happened?

The price of admission is a positive but potential buyers must be left wondering what the future holds

Yes, darling, the design was originally envisioned as a box-rule boat and as such some design limitations were imposed. The box rule is poorly understood by the average sailor so box-rule fleets have not taken off here. In the meantime owners race their boats under some handicap system and are free to modify their boats to extract more performance from them with the expectation or at least the possibility of changing them back to conform to class rules when and if a class develops. Quotation marks? Really? Sales of the boat have not yet reached a critical mass where numbers justify forming a class, but they are getting there. In the meantime present owners are having fun sailing them and are not too concerned what the future holds. The design is not about what happened, it's a work in progress.

Safe to presume you are an owner, YD?

Where does Mr Donovan stand on what you call "a work in progress"?

And the Builder?

Owners are certainly at liberty to evolve the boat configurations to their liking as you suggest, but for those on the outside of the fleet it appears as though there may be little continuity from one boat to the next.

There are people racing more-costly boats who are interested in these boats for their "bang-for-the-buck" ROI, but are put off by the apparent inconsistencies.

So while you're off racing in whatever configuration you prefer, the marketability of the boat may be suffering.

It would seem that someone needs to determine how the boats will be Class-configured and soon.

Otherwise these neat little boats are likely to be unable to gain traction because potential owners don't know what next week might bring.

As it is, it would seem as though there may be some orphans, pin head or fat head, near term.

Not everyone is likely to be interested in reconfiguring the rig.

 

TBone, why must every boat be "Class-configured"? To have a successful OD class you need to sell hundreds of boats (a la the J/70) or at least lots of boats in one area (J/88). But there is no reason a boat can't be successful as a raceboat and not race in a class/OD configuration. What's wrong with optimizing a boat for what ever rule is in place were you want to race it...most of the sailing world can't support multiple OD fleets, they are lucky to have maybe one or two, and many have none.

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Is LUCY configured with a fat head or pin head main?

How are owners feeling about the lack of uniformity in the "Class"?

Weren't these boats intended to fit an ORC box rule?

So, what's happened?

The price of admission is a positive but potential buyers must be left wondering what the future holds

Yes, darling, the design was originally envisioned as a box-rule boat and as such some design limitations were imposed. The box rule is poorly understood by the average sailor so box-rule fleets have not taken off here. In the meantime owners race their boats under some handicap system and are free to modify their boats to extract more performance from them with the expectation or at least the possibility of changing them back to conform to class rules when and if a class develops. Quotation marks? Really? Sales of the boat have not yet reached a critical mass where numbers justify forming a class, but they are getting there. In the meantime present owners are having fun sailing them and are not too concerned what the future holds. The design is not about what happened, it's a work in progress.

Safe to presume you are an owner, YD?

Where does Mr Donovan stand on what you call "a work in progress"?

And the Builder?

Owners are certainly at liberty to evolve the boat configurations to their liking as you suggest, but for those on the outside of the fleet it appears as though there may be little continuity from one boat to the next.

There are people racing more-costly boats who are interested in these boats for their "bang-for-the-buck" ROI, but are put off by the apparent inconsistencies.

So while you're off racing in whatever configuration you prefer, the marketability of the boat may be suffering.

It would seem that someone needs to determine how the boats will be Class-configured and soon.

Otherwise these neat little boats are likely to be unable to gain traction because potential owners don't know what next week might bring.

As it is, it would seem as though there may be some orphans, pin head or fat head, near term.

Not everyone is likely to be interested in reconfiguring the rig.

TBone, why must every boat be "Class-configured"? To have a successful OD class you need to sell hundreds of boats (a la the J/70) or at least lots of boats in one area (J/88). But there is no reason a boat can't be successful as a raceboat and not race in a class/OD configuration. What's wrong with optimizing a boat for what ever rule is in place were you want to race it...most of the sailing world can't support multiple OD fleets, they are lucky to have maybe one or two, and many have none.

There is no requirement that these boats need be "Class-configured" as the current fleet demonstrates rather succinctly.

Optimize them to whatever degree you choose, but recognize that those outside the fleet, including potential owners, may well perceive the variability as chaotic and off-putting.

Fat head main? What's next?

Taller mast? Deeper keel? Longer prod? Lighter bulb?

The box rule provided some flexibility within the design guidelines and Donovan worked within those parameters.

But it may be that the boat would benefit from greater "optimization".

Where is he on this?

If there is to be movement beyond the box rule will it be controlled? or haphazard, as it appears?

Forget OD; this is after all a box rule boat.

The TP52s might provide a better model.

There may be more people watching...and waiting...than you are aware.

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TBone: As a partner with YD in hull 9 I can tell you there is some variability in sail sizing. The boat does like sail area, but the actual areas are closer than you might think. In Annapolis we need a couple more folks to jump in we will have a fleet start. For the moment we are trying out sail sizes and developing consensus about what works best.

 

YD and I looked at the US sportboat landscape in the 26 - 30 foot range for quite a while before deciding on the Donovan 26 and this boat does not disappoint.

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Is LUCY configured with a fat head or pin head main?

How are owners feeling about the lack of uniformity in the "Class"?

Weren't these boats intended to fit an ORC box rule?

So, what's happened?

The price of admission is a positive but potential buyers must be left wondering what the future holds

Yes, darling, the design was originally envisioned as a box-rule boat and as such some design limitations were imposed. The box rule is poorly understood by the average sailor so box-rule fleets have not taken off here. In the meantime owners race their boats under some handicap system and are free to modify their boats to extract more performance from them with the expectation or at least the possibility of changing them back to conform to class rules when and if a class develops. Quotation marks? Really? Sales of the boat have not yet reached a critical mass where numbers justify forming a class, but they are getting there. In the meantime present owners are having fun sailing them and are not too concerned what the future holds. The design is not about what happened, it's a work in progress.

Safe to presume you are an owner, YD?

Where does Mr Donovan stand on what you call "a work in progress"?

And the Builder?

Owners are certainly at liberty to evolve the boat configurations to their liking as you suggest, but for those on the outside of the fleet it appears as though there may be little continuity from one boat to the next.

There are people racing more-costly boats who are interested in these boats for their "bang-for-the-buck" ROI, but are put off by the apparent inconsistencies.

So while you're off racing in whatever configuration you prefer, the marketability of the boat may be suffering.

It would seem that someone needs to determine how the boats will be Class-configured and soon.

Otherwise these neat little boats are likely to be unable to gain traction because potential owners don't know what next week might bring.

As it is, it would seem as though there may be some orphans, pin head or fat head, near term.

Not everyone is likely to be interested in reconfiguring the rig.

TBone, why must every boat be "Class-configured"? To have a successful OD class you need to sell hundreds of boats (a la the J/70) or at least lots of boats in one area (J/88). But there is no reason a boat can't be successful as a raceboat and not race in a class/OD configuration. What's wrong with optimizing a boat for what ever rule is in place were you want to race it...most of the sailing world can't support multiple OD fleets, they are lucky to have maybe one or two, and many have none.

There is no requirement that these boats need be "Class-configured" as the current fleet demonstrates rather succinctly.

Optimize them to whatever degree you choose, but recognize that those outside the fleet, including potential owners, may well perceive the variability as chaotic and off-putting.

Fat head main? What's next?

Taller mast? Deeper keel? Longer prod? Lighter bulb?

The box rule provided some flexibility within the design guidelines and Donovan worked within those parameters.

But it may be that the boat would benefit from greater "optimization".

Where is he on this?

If there is to be movement beyond the box rule will it be controlled? or haphazard, as it appears?

Forget OD; this is after all a box rule boat.

The TP52s might provide a better model.

There may be more people watching...and waiting...than you are aware.

 

The GP26 most definitely needs a generous squaretop main unless you sail it in a consistently windy location. I don't have a dog in this tempest in a teapot but I think you are being a bit melodramatic

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I sail a fat-head main against other 26s with square tops under a box rule that specifies a pin head. That may seem chaotic to you, but for the time being I sail in handicap fleets and it's just not a big deal. Once there are sufficient numbers of boats that want to sail together as a class we will draw up standards we can agree upon for sails and displacement, etc. There has already been some discussion in that regard and the boats are not that far apart. It will not take much to change to a pin head or square top or do anything else required to conform to a rule.

 

There are always people watching and waiting and you can join them if you want. I’ll be out on the water.

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What is the difference between these new Donovans and the Dees boat in the classifieds?

Dave, DonovanGP 26s are produced by Wraceboats (except Kevin Farrars hull0). We have 11 boats sailing around the World, 8 in Usa, 1 in Norway, 2 in Hong Kong. These are semi-production boats... Details at www.wraceboats.com

Brooks Dees GP26 is another design of the same box rule. one off production.

GP26 is like TP52 box rule...

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The owner's of the current boats appear to prefer the ability to configure their boats to suit their local sailing conditions and crew abilities; and in regattas where the boats race together, the ORC rule handicaps the boats in their different configurations very effectively. Without the constraints of a strict class rule, the owner's have been at liberty to explore various sail sizes, which has allowed a clearer path towards optimizing the boats than if they had been constrained by the GP 26 Class Rule.

 

The result of this experimentation has delivered a faster boat; that's a good thing.

Spinnaker development has been very beneficial, and I think we have found the "sweet spot" in these sail sizes.

 

I did get a message from a sailor aboard a C&C 30 at the STC regatta voicing a similar concern about the boat's identity:

 

". . . the 26 came out of that weekend looking good and seeming pretty hard to beat in today's sportboat market. But the boat seems to have a bit of an identity crisis. Is it a one design or is it a box rule? Square top mains vs. pin top mains? Lift keel vs. fixed keel? I think the C&C 30 owner might have bought a 26 after the STC regatta if the answers to these questions were a bit clearer."

My opinion:

 

It would be great for the owner's of the boats, and potential new owner's to start communicating about the probable class that will develop.

I am happy to act as the conduit for this communication, although I believe it is very important that the class is lead by an owner's association.

 

My intention, and to my knowledge, most of the boats would be able to compete as a "GP 26" with GP 26 Class Rule sails. We have one boat with an inboard diesel that makes the boat too heavy, and some added carbon in the hull/deck laminate; it would not qualify to race as a "GP 26" (these alterations were made per the owner's request).

 

The boat definitely uses the power available in a square top mainsail very effectively, and I have always promoted allowing both mainsails aboard the boat. A "race" square top and "pin top" mainsail that would be used for beer can racing, practicing and could be used for class racing above 23 TWS". The same adjusters work for gybing and single topmast backstays, and the only changes to get to a single topmast is plugging in a flicker and shifting the backstay onto the crane.

 

The GP 26 Class Rules have some "issues" that will not work for a proper one design class, and I set up the foundation for the Donovan Design GP26 Class Rule, that will address these boats built to this design, and give the class tighter constraints on rig, keel and sail configurations.

 

Note that the lift and fixed keels use the same fin and frame; the first 4 boats had slightly different fins/keel frames.

The differences are very slight and have no affect on the boats performance.

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I received this email from Mike Beasely, skipper/owner of Hull 4 "Rattle N' Rum".

Mike has been the most successful at extracting the performance from his boat, and he has verified all my expectations for this design:

 

 

Compliments of the season to you all.

 

I will keep this as brief and as simple as possible and will endeavor to explain more about how we sail Rattle and some comparisons against the boats we have sailed against. I just want you to know that I am not a salesman for this boat, only here to help on the technical aspect of the boat but these boats truly rock. They are so much fun and very quick!

 

Upwind; Target boat speed upwind 6.30kts above 8kts TWS. A Farr 30 and C and C shoot for around 6.50kts. We can point much higher now that we have added in-haulers. The foils have no trouble handling the higher angles. We let the in-haulers off above 14kts TWS and drop to the transverse track but still hard against the coach roof. We Vang sheet and whale on the runners! Traveler at plus 1 all day in breeze and all the way up in the light. Generally upwind when we race against larger boats we sail smart upwind keeping our lanes and then pounce on them downwind. In medium breeze I have one person behind me (generally one of the girls that sails with us) taking on the new runner through a tack. You definitely don't want any more weight further aft as you start to have turbulent water hanging around the transom. Always have a clean exit of water! I trim my own Main so I am the only one with legs in which should be the case all the time.

 

As for weight, we sail with 4 when it's less than 8kts, 5 people, 8-14kts, 6 people for anything above that. To be honest 5 average men (400-450kgs) would be a pretty good number for most conditions unless it's nuking. Downwind speeds are definitely compromised if you are overweight.

 

Reaching; The boat has no speed limitations when you crack sheets. I am completely blown away by how fast Rattle will go when you crack sheets in any breeze. During the recent Storm Trysail event distance race at the top mark after an hour of beating the C and C's had put 4 mins on us and then on the tight two sail reach we pulled away from them. We have just purchased a FR0 to cover that gap from 70-120TWA for reaching legs. The water on the Bay is relatively flat so we don't get to go surfing much. The last day of KW last year it was blowing 38kts and we came in the channel sitting on 20kts with just a Main up!

 

Downwind; Sail hot like a skiff! Put the bow up and send it, don't waffle around trying to VMG. Weight AFT quickly in breeze and get the chine and keel working for you. Clean up somewhere on the run but you do 12-14kts with your eyes shut but the extra speed comes easily when you wick it up. We passed all but one of the C and C's in the distance race downwind in the STC event. In flat water and 20-22kts TWS we were sitting on 16-17kts. Any wave action 20kts is easily achievable. Charleston was flat water and more breeze and I think we hit 18 or 19kts. In the last Wednesday night race we went around the top mark 20 secs behind a Tripp 33 and 2 miles later we finished 4:51 ahead of them and 40 seconds faster around the track than the World Champion Farr 30, Ramrod. In KW we were either ahead or just behind the Farr 280's and then blew them out of the water going downwind. They would beat us around the track of we had an average beat but we would smoke them by sailing hotter angles downwind.

 

Sails; Jib, max it out.

 

Main; I swear by the Square Top. We just bought a new Main that is 25% of E and I love it. The speed difference over the pin head is knots faster downwind, not tenths of a knot.

 

Spinnaker; A2; 85m2 is too big, need higher clew boxes and maybe closer to 80m2. Gybing is painful, need to be able to skiff gybe like a Melges 24 which we can't do at present. Huge gains to be made in this area!

A1; Sailmakers call.

 

Overall, we are still learning but have a learnt a shit load over the past year. Not sure how you can improve IRC ratings but obviously a head can be installed in the owners cabin (down the hall way on the left) and any other items that may gain you a few seconds but keeping the boat light is absolutely paramount. I pulled all the wind instruments and crap out of the rig and only race with a Velocitek now although a simple B and G (speed/depth/temp) maybe advantageous for where you race.

 

As I mentioned earlier I love the boat and sail with guys that race on the TP52 circuit (Greg Gendell) and on the C and C 30s (Will Van Cleef, Joe Gibson and Jason Currie) and they also love the boat and are very impressed by its capabilities.

 

 

post-3763-0-20628600-1481390623_thumb.jpg

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I dont want to rain on anyone's parade and think the GP26 is tremendous value for the money and a very cool little boat in its own regard but I also think that some of the comments above are very egregious in comparing the boats performance to the C&C 30's.

 

I will for sure say that Beasley and his group obviously sail the boat very well and I was very impressed in particular with how quickly they sailed the boat in Annapolis. As was stated above the boat seemed very well suited for the conditions we all sailed in during the distance race and was quite happily surprised with how well they could hang on during the two long jib reaches. Even on Sunday while sailing 2 mile W/L course's I would still say the 26's performed well but to be 100% fair they started 5 min in front of us and from memory we always finished either in the mix or just in front of both of the 26's.

 

I am not bagging on the 26 in anyway and the only reason I stumbled across this is because I was just cruising around and wanted to read up on how these boats are developing since I do think they are a lot of bang for the buck, but just like I would have a hard time comparing the C&C 30 to a boat 15% larger and over twice the cost I dont think its exactly fair or accurate to compare 26's performance to the 30.

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Wang,

it sounds like he recognizes that on the W/L he's faster than the Farr 280s, but comparable to the C&Cs only when reaching or DW. nobody'd knocking the C&C here ;)

 

Sounds like going to the square top has complicated the boat a bit with runners.

 

Jim (or Mike) - how complex are the runners? do they need their own winches or are they just multi-purchase or what? How hard to go back to box-rule sailing?

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Some members from the local club travelled to Hong Kong recently to sail Magics but after some issues during the delivery one of the boats was unable to compete. Luckily they were able to find alternative rides, one Magic and one GP26.

 

I have heard a lot about the GP26 so it must have impressed.

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Ryley,

 

Forgot the other part of of your question. To go back to box-rule just put on a suit of box rule sails.

 

Our designer thought that the rig dimensions could handle a larger chute 82 sq. m. and bigger jibs. So our light medium is running a fair amount of roach.

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thanks gone. love the boat. keep up the good work. btw, your comment about forgetting about vmg and just making the boat go fast? Exactly what I told another owner based on my E770 experiences. There is a crossover point, but it's got to be nuking I think to get there in that boat. Keeping the boat speed up seems like the right way to go. Interesting that you're running inhaulers as well as the perpendicular track, but inhaulers have definitely helped my columbia.

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Some members from the local club travelled to Hong Kong recently to sail Magics but after some issues during the delivery one of the boats was unable to compete. Luckily they were able to find alternative rides, one Magic and one GP26.

 

I have heard a lot about the GP26 so it must have impressed.

It must be Round the Island Race

Havoc 2611 finished 4th/54 in ATI results are here. behind a 49er and 2 Trapeze Magic26s.

Havoc was also 3rd in Sportboat Class. results are here

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Some members from the local club travelled to Hong Kong recently to sail Magics but after some issues during the delivery one of the boats was unable to compete. Luckily they were able to find alternative rides, one Magic and one GP26.

I have heard a lot about the GP26 so it must have impressed.

 

It must be Round the Island Race

Havoc 2611 finished 4th/54 in ATI results are here. behind a 49er and 2 Trapeze Magic26s.

Havoc was also 3rd in Sportboat Class. results are here

That would be the one. (Magic 25 not 26)

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Some members from the local club travelled to Hong Kong recently to sail Magics but after some issues during the delivery one of the boats was unable to compete. Luckily they were able to find alternative rides, one Magic and one GP26.

I have heard a lot about the GP26 so it must have impressed.

It must be Round the Island Race

Havoc 2611 finished 4th/54 in ATI results are here. behind a 49er and 2 Trapeze Magic26s.

Havoc was also 3rd in Sportboat Class. results are here

That would be the one. (Magic 25 not 26)

 

on the contrary, it was the Wraceboats GP26 that impressed...

Racing boat to boat with trapezed Magics is not that logical in the first hand but Team Havoc is learning and getting faster with more time on boat, they can already beat some Magics except the top 2 in Magic class...

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PHRF?

Rating?

Bone,

 

What do you sail now?

 

YD

Have liked these boats since the Farrar-build thread.

Still hoping the Class will find some commonality.

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PHRF?

Rating?

Bone,

 

What do you sail now?

 

YD

Have liked these boats since the Farrar-build thread.

Still hoping the Class will find some commonality.

 

 

what do you sail now?

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Probably a loaded question, but what would be the technical rationale for the GP 26 rating 18 seconds/mile faster than an Antrim 27? The specs seem to suggest they would be much closer.

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Probably a loaded question, but what would be the technical rationale for the GP 26 rating 18 seconds/mile faster than an Antrim 27? The specs seem to suggest they would be much closer.

 

Probably depends a lot on the conditions/location. In sf bay, Antrim 27 has a 75 PHRF.

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Probably a loaded question, but what would be the technical rationale for the GP 26 rating 18 seconds/mile faster than an Antrim 27? The specs seem to suggest they would be much closer.

 

Its newer and therefore "must" be faster? Until proven otherwise? :blink:

 

PHRF, for better or worse, does tend to try to protect the existing fleet, sometimes (many times?) at the expense of the new kid on the block

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Probably a loaded question, but what would be the technical rationale for the GP 26 rating 18 seconds/mile faster than an Antrim 27? The specs seem to suggest they would be much closer.

Its newer and therefore "must" be faster? Until proven otherwise? :blink:

 

PHRF, for better or worse, does tend to try to protect the existing fleet, sometimes (many times?) at the expense of the new kid on the block

And people wonder why the marinas are full of old funky boats and the boat building industry is dead.

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If only that were the case. If a change to PHRF could change the boat building industry, I'd bet Rod J, and Buddy M, and a whole bunch of other guys would have laid out a much stronger case to the PHRF guys...

 

The plain fact is (and I've owned a new J/109 - and loved that boat), that new boats today are not inexpensive. A new J/97 is about $250k on the line. A nice S 2 9.1, which can provide almost everything the J/97 can (except maybe outright boat speed), can be had for $15-20k. All other related expenses are largely the same (sails, moorage, etc). Yes, there is more maintenance and repair likely required on the 9.1, but he out of pocket difference in cost is close to $700 - $800 a month (assuming a loan on the 97).

 

Its not really a great mystery to me...

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Congratulations to USA2604 Michael Beasley and Team Rattle and Rum winning the Charleston Race week 2017 ORC C with a comfortable margin.

the results are here

 

From what I hear our other GP26's had their good races, (and not so good races) as well...But all had a good time...

Overall, the ORC rating system seemed to work well... More often only a few seconds were the deciding factor between the corrected times...

 

ORC C was a very competitive fleet with 9 boats, SR33, Melges 32, Melges 30, Heno 30, 2X Farest28Rs, and 3GP26s

The overall award for the best performance in an ORC Class went also to Mike Beasley and his Annapolis-based crew of Joe Gibson, Ted and Joanna Harland, Scott Gibbs and Ty Van Dalen...

Beasley and his crew were awarded the prestigious and historic Palmetto Cup for winning the tightest class in the handicap divisions.

 

Click Here for limited time special offer on a new Wraceboats GP26

 

photocredit: CharlestonRaceWeek; TimWilkes Photography

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post-46969-0-23912400-1493031513_thumb.jpg

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After 950 posts, and 10 pages build-project updates, news, information, pictures, race results etc, it is now time to close this tread.

I am happy to announce that WraceBoats GP26 will now be marketed with One Design configuration with a very reputable and one design specialist sales agent Glabally.

Official announcement coming soon on the new tread...

Time to move to a new tread...

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7 hours ago, windseekeryachts said:

After 950 posts, and 10 pages build-project updates, news, information, pictures, race results etc, it is now time to close this tread.

I am happy to announce that WraceBoats GP26 will now be marketed with One Design configuration with a very reputable and one design specialist sales agent Glabally.

Official announcement coming soon on the new tread...

Time to move to a new tread...

Please post a link here when you create the new thread!

And, uh, this is ANARCHY! No one gets to just decide what threads will live and die.

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4 hours ago, nroose said:

Please post a link here when you create the new thread!

And, uh, this is ANARCHY! No one gets to just decide what threads will live and die.

i.e. Rimas 

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