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Miles.Abrams

Stamford - Vineyard Race 2010

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Why dont you whiny bitches STFU? Earl is a cunt hair away from a Cat 5 according to 2300 report. Most likely a 1000 Sat start will still see 40kts plus at times. And WHO THE FUCK KNOWS WHAT WE GET THIS IS THE GOVT TELLING US WHAT MOTHER NATURE MAY PROVIDE.

 

'I dont have a launch to get to my boat!' 'Ihave a bbq my wife wants me at on Sunday night!' BOO FUCKING HOO! STFU! IT AINT ANYONE ELSE'S PROBLEM!

 

Rigs start falling down in WLIS races at 25 knots. GUARANTEED.

 

So put yourself in the place of the RC with such a wild forecast which even Mark M wont guarantee, and think about the guy who is deciding where to send you and your 5 knot shitbox which hasnthad a rig inspection in 5 years. Plus half (no, 75 pct) of you cunts would drop out in a race that returned you on Monday, because your wife would cut you off for 2 weeks if you didnt. But yet you bitch if they dont give you a full course that will probably return you Monday. Assholes.

 

In 2006 five boats made it to Block Island Sound BEFORE anyone saw 40 knots EASTERLY. FIVE FUCKING BOATS OUT OF ALL THE STARTERS!

 

Commmit the weekend to doing the race, or go jack off at Grandmas BBQ. This isnt a fucking guaranteed science where you pussys get 8-12 knot Swesterly or you decide to go bowling 2 days before the race.

 

Arthur Fucking Knapp is spinning in his grave if he has internet and can read this mindless shit.

 

Have a prepared boat and crew ready for anything, and show up for the race or don't. Do your best. Otherwise EAT MY FUCK! :angry:

 

 

 

lighten up, Francis. Or don't post when you're shit-faced. Looks to me like this thread is about a bunch of thoughtful sailors trying to make sound decisions based on incomplete information.

 

 

 

 

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Why dont you whiny bitches STFU? Earl is a cunt hair away from a Cat 5 according to 2300 report. Most likely a 1000 Sat start will still see 40kts plus at times. And WHO THE FUCK KNOWS WHAT WE GET THIS IS THE GOVT TELLING US WHAT MOTHER NATURE MAY PROVIDE.

 

'I dont have a launch to get to my boat!' 'Ihave a bbq my wife wants me at on Sunday night!' BOO FUCKING HOO! STFU! IT AINT ANYONE ELSE'S PROBLEM!

 

Rigs start falling down in WLIS races at 25 knots. GUARANTEED.

 

So put yourself in the place of the RC with such a wild forecast which even Mark M wont guarantee, and think about the guy who is deciding where to send you and your 5 knot shitbox which hasnthad a rig inspection in 5 years. Plus half (no, 75 pct) of you cunts would drop out in a race that returned you on Monday, because your wife would cut you off for 2 weeks if you didnt. But yet you bitch if they dont give you a full course that will probably return you Monday. Assholes.

 

In 2006 five boats made it to Block Island Sound BEFORE anyone saw 40 knots EASTERLY. FIVE FUCKING BOATS OUT OF ALL THE STARTERS!

 

Commmit the weekend to doing the race, or go jack off at Grandmas BBQ. This isnt a fucking guaranteed science where you pussys get 8-12 knot Swesterly or you decide to go bowling 2 days before the race.

 

Arthur Fucking Knapp is spinning in his grave if he has internet and can read this mindless shit.

 

Have a prepared boat and crew ready for anything, and show up for the race or don't. Do your best. Otherwise EAT MY FUCK! :angry:

 

Greate poste!

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Have a prepared boat and crew ready for anything, and show up for the race or don't. Do your best.

+1. The postponement gives us an opportunity to spend more time getting the boat prepped.

 

We'll be disappointed to see a shortened course.

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Why dont you whiny bitches STFU? Earl is a cunt hair away from a Cat 5 according to 2300 report. Most likely a 1000 Sat start will still see 40kts plus at times. And WHO THE FUCK KNOWS WHAT WE GET THIS IS THE GOVT TELLING US WHAT MOTHER NATURE MAY PROVIDE.

 

'I dont have a launch to get to my boat!' 'Ihave a bbq my wife wants me at on Sunday night!' BOO FUCKING HOO! STFU! IT AINT ANYONE ELSE'S PROBLEM!

 

Rigs start falling down in WLIS races at 25 knots. GUARANTEED.

 

So put yourself in the place of the RC with such a wild forecast which even Mark M wont guarantee, and think about the guy who is deciding where to send you and your 5 knot shitbox which hasnthad a rig inspection in 5 years. Plus half (no, 75 pct) of you cunts would drop out in a race that returned you on Monday, because your wife would cut you off for 2 weeks if you didnt. But yet you bitch if they dont give you a full course that will probably return you Monday. Assholes.

 

In 2006 five boats made it to Block Island Sound BEFORE anyone saw 40 knots EASTERLY. FIVE FUCKING BOATS OUT OF ALL THE STARTERS!

 

Commmit the weekend to doing the race, or go jack off at Grandmas BBQ. This isnt a fucking guaranteed science where you pussys get 8-12 knot Swesterly or you decide to go bowling 2 days before the race.

 

Arthur Fucking Knapp is spinning in his grave if he has internet and can read this mindless shit.

 

Have a prepared boat and crew ready for anything, and show up for the race or don't. Do your best. Otherwise EAT MY FUCK! :angry:

 

 

 

lighten up, Francis. Or don't post when you're shit-faced. Looks to me like this thread is about a bunch of thoughtful sailors trying to make sound decisions based on incomplete information.

This is a thread about scared sailors hoping the RC makes the decisions for them.

 

LI Sound: LD race + breeze + big waves = bring out the skirts.

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Not sure what you guys are misinterpreting but, other than X-Yachter on AG, we still want the long course-yeah, wife is pissed off that we won't be having a Labor Day barbecue-shit happens. Folks who had important stuff to do on Monday, well, see you next year.

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Why dont you whiny bitches STFU? Earl is a cunt hair away from a Cat 5 according to 2300 report. Most likely a 1000 Sat start will still see 40kts plus at times. And WHO THE FUCK KNOWS WHAT WE GET THIS IS THE GOVT TELLING US WHAT MOTHER NATURE MAY PROVIDE.

 

'I dont have a launch to get to my boat!' 'Ihave a bbq my wife wants me at on Sunday night!' BOO FUCKING HOO! STFU! IT AINT ANYONE ELSE'S PROBLEM!

 

Rigs start falling down in WLIS races at 25 knots. GUARANTEED.

 

So put yourself in the place of the RC with such a wild forecast which even Mark M wont guarantee, and think about the guy who is deciding where to send you and your 5 knot shitbox which hasnthad a rig inspection in 5 years. Plus half (no, 75 pct) of you cunts would drop out in a race that returned you on Monday, because your wife would cut you off for 2 weeks if you didnt. But yet you bitch if they dont give you a full course that will probably return you Monday. Assholes.

 

In 2006 five boats made it to Block Island Sound BEFORE anyone saw 40 knots EASTERLY. FIVE FUCKING BOATS OUT OF ALL THE STARTERS!

 

Commmit the weekend to doing the race, or go jack off at Grandmas BBQ. This isnt a fucking guaranteed science where you pussys get 8-12 knot Swesterly or you decide to go bowling 2 days before the race.

 

Arthur Fucking Knapp is spinning in his grave if he has internet and can read this mindless shit.

 

Have a prepared boat and crew ready for anything, and show up for the race or don't. Do your best. Otherwise EAT MY FUCK! :angry:

 

Maybe more fiber in your diet would help?

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noon GFS gribs has Earl moving away faster but sea state likely to be pretty gnarly cuz of wind backing 180 degrees over previous 18 hours plus the usual LIS tidal and geographic influences

 

post-22603-045065700 1283454609_thumb.jpg

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According to twitter everyone is doing the shortcourse due to the sea state out past BI.

 

Here's the twitter linky.

 

If this is true, It must be to get everyone in by Monday night when the wind craps out behind this storm. How can you call a sea state from 40 hours out? Why not decide on Sat morning what course to run?

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Exactly Moondance, call it at the line, not now, with the current easterly track, dramatically different than before, and the projections now of breeze through the weekend, how can you make that decision....regardless of that, call it at the line, like last year.

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Exactly Moondance, call it at the line, not now, with the current easterly track, dramatically different than before, and the projections now of breeze through the weekend, how can you make that decision....regardless of that, call it at the line, like last year.

I wasnt there, but apparently a well known espn sailing commentator and a representative of a captain of industry with a big friggin boat were making a case about an excessive sea state on Saturday. Now true they will be out east well before the 7ktsb fleet will be because they'll be doing 20 kts on Saturday morning. But I dont see much to be overly concerned with on Sat nite and Sunday for the shitbox fleet. But I am sure they have better info and friends. I think SYC should make PI a mark of the long course and keep a boat anchored out there with an S flag so they can shorten on sat afternoon. That would be RC dedication!

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Where is the wind going to go after the storm? Good luck to all in light air + high seas.

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Posted · Hidden by PhilRizzuto, September 3, 2010 - .
Hidden by PhilRizzuto, September 3, 2010 - .

Where is the wind going to go after the storm? Good luck to all in light air + high seas.

 

Cincinatti

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News from the 2010 Vineyard Race event:

 

Attention all hands!

 

A decision has been made to keep all boats inside Long Island Sound. Therefore, All Vineyard Course classes will sail the Seaflower Reef Course.

 

We will be reviewing the starting sequence today and will likely move the Cornfield Point classes and the original Seaflower Reef classes to earlier starts.

 

Please be aware that, based on weather conditions, the 1000 First Signal may be an "AP." If at all possible, we will give you as much advanced notice (via this communication method) as we can.

 

Again, we thank you for your patience, your concerns, and your positive attitudes!

 

The 2010 Vineyard Race Committee

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Where is the wind going to go after the storm?

 

According to my proprietary model predicitons as of 0600 this morning there was 75 pct probability

that the wind will be going to Cincinatti after the storm. Apparently it has family there.

 

More as the situation develops.

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Remember, it is ALL about the party, just like the Ida Lewis this year..

 

Sail Safe!

Are they renaming this the 2nd annuals Stamford Seaflower LI Sound Regatta

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Remember, it is ALL about the party, just like the Ida Lewis this year..

 

Sail Safe!

Are they renaming this the 2nd annuals Stamford Seaflower LI Sound Regatta

 

You already have the Cornhole course, now Seaflower two years in a row. Maybe there should be Stratford Shoal twice around course. Make the long course Cows to middle bar stool at Dead Eye Dicks. Figawi style.

 

The real important questions are do these weenie races devalue the Buzzard Society? Should the winners get an asterisk after their name on the trophy? Do we still have to carry liferafts to go to a mark that's 2 miles offshore?

 

I wonder what the short course is for the Sydney Hobart, Fastnet, NPT BDA, and Transpac?

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It will be very interesting to watch the weather buoy data at:

 

http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/station_page.php?station=44097

 

And see what the conditions are like on Saturday out there. Every two years many in this fleet race to Bermuda, and pretty consistently people are surprised by the conditions in the Gulf Stream. And in the last two additions, there have been serious injuries on the return trip. The Vineyard Race is a good way to get a taste of open ocean while never being more than 15 miles from land. I count the 2006 Vineyard as one of the best learning experiences I've had during a distance race.

 

Maybe I'm wrong and there will be 30 foot waves and 30 knots in Block Island, but I don't there will be. Even if there we're, you stick you head out from the Race, push your limits until you decide you've had enough or you learn something about yourself, and reach into Newport if you can handle it.

 

Its sucks being out in rough conditions (a beat from the tower to Block in big swell would be rough), but that's how stories are made and that how we all improve as competent sailors who can safely handle natures conditions.

 

Postponing to avoid sailing towards a hurricane is no doubt sensible, but staying in the Sound when the storm is 300 miles away? I hope I'm proven wrong by some gnarly conditions in Block Island Sound.

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It will be very interesting to watch the weather buoy data at:

 

http://www.ndbc.noaa...p?station=44097

 

And see what the conditions are like on Saturday out there. Every two years many in this fleet race to Bermuda, and pretty consistently people are surprised by the conditions in the Gulf Stream. And in the last two additions, there have been serious injuries on the return trip. The Vineyard Race is a good way to get a taste of open ocean while never being more than 15 miles from land. I count the 2006 Vineyard as one of the best learning experiences I've had during a distance race.

 

Maybe I'm wrong and there will be 30 foot waves and 30 knots in Block Island, but I don't there will be. Even if there we're, you stick you head out from the Race, push your limits until you decide you've had enough or you learn something about yourself, and reach into Newport if you can handle it.

 

Its sucks being out in rough conditions (a beat from the tower to Block in big swell would be rough), but that's how stories are made and that how we all improve as competent sailors who can safely handle natures conditions.

 

Postponing to avoid sailing towards a hurricane is no doubt sensible, but staying in the Sound when the storm is 300 miles away? I hope I'm proven wrong by some gnarly conditions in Block Island Sound.

 

 

 

+1

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There is a reason Rule 4 exists. How did it become policy to only sail a race as planned if there are ideal conditions . This is yacht racing, sometimes there's a lot of wind and sometimes there is very little and boats should be prepared for both of those eventualities.

 

In brief, the Stamford Yacht Club RC needs to harden the fuck up.

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In brief, the Stamford Yacht Club RC needs to harden the fuck up.

 

Agreed

 

 

But, you gotta figure, somewhere (everywhere?) in the whole debate of "should we or shouldn't we" discussions were lawyer(s) and thoughts of liability. Sad, but that's the world we live in today.

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so... (this is not directed at Spencer) which of you tough guys raced the Vineyard in 2006?

and who completed the race?

and if you did not complete the race, why?

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so... (this is not directed at Spencer) which of you tough guys raced the Vineyard in 2006?

and who completed the race?

and if you did not complete the race, why?

 

IIRC, only 3 boats actually finished, Blue Yankee, Snow Lion, & Lora Ann

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Buzzard pal of mine sent this out this am-

 

Back when I was a kid, there used to be a race called The Vineyard. My first, in 1972, took something like 40 hours, beating in 30+ knots of breeze with a number 3 and double reefed main, just to get to the tower. We set a kite as we rounded, a real Chicken Chute. We had to take it down as we approached the back side of Block as the wind got up to the mid-high 40s with pops into the 50s. We set the number 3, got the main down and averaged 10 knots back to the finish. The boat was a C&C 35, just like Snow Goose. The weather was being generated by a hurricane just a bit outside of Nantucket, similar to Earl this year. It was a real thrill for a 14 year old, left a memorable mark and taught him several lessons he would carry through out his life. The next year or maybe is was two years on, we were in Block Island Sound, had rounded the tower Saturday late night, perhaps it was Sunday morning before daybreak and the sea was still as glass. Boats around us were dropping out, it was noon on Monday. Another C&C 35 named Tern II motored up to us, wished us luck and gave us some ice and garbage bags as they went by. We finally bagged at 8 o'clock at night so folks could get home for work Tuesday. Now-a-days it seems everyone has this expectation that a race like the Vineyard, in a 35-40 foot boat should last between 30-40 hours, it should be sailed in ideal conditions with a perfect breeze. If it is not going to be contested under such circumstances, we either demand a shortened course or quit halfway through or don't sail at all. Damn shame really. There used to be a race called The Vineyard.

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so... (this is not directed at Spencer) which of you tough guys raced the Vineyard in 2006?

and who completed the race?

and if you did not complete the race, why?

 

IIRC, only 3 boats actually finished, Blue Yankee, Snow Lion, & Lora Ann

 

 

exactly

(never mind all the bravado on the internet, in a sailing anarchy forum)

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Yes, but they were given the option to go out there and race.

 

I don't begrudge the RC for delaying the start, but to shorten the course so far out from the start of the race makes it seem if there are ulterior motives at work.

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so... (this is not directed at Spencer) which of you tough guys raced the Vineyard in 2006?

and who completed the race?

and if you did not complete the race, why?

 

IIRC, only 3 boats actually finished, Blue Yankee, Snow Lion, & Lora Ann

 

Ill see you all out there on Snow Lion.

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Whether you finished 2006 or not, it was still a lesson on what it takes to prepare for a distance race.

 

Never had to deal with multiple seasick crew members? Now you know to encourage everyone to drug if there is a chance they need it.

 

Never saw the clew of your main tear off? Now you know how to douse that main, and what a main for offshore should look like.

 

Never set a trysail except in 10 knots? Now you know how to set one in anger. Lora Ann sailed most of the way to the tower with a Trysail.

 

To be able to have these experiences only 15 miles from land rather than 300 in the Gulf Stream is priceless. Dumbing down the sport only makes it more dangerous.

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hey Spencer, I agree...good points.

 

we'll be out in mystic bouncing around Fisher's in the left over slop!!

 

good luck everybody and stay on the fucking boat!!

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I too was let down when I read of the shortened course, but then I was reminded of my own past experiences in race management. As competitors, we have a tendency to be hyper critical of race management decisions. Ultimately we are fortunate to have a team of volunteers to produce our weekend of sailboat racing. Those people are balancing a number of priorities and responsibilities. Yes, that does often require being sensitive to commitments made to sponsors.

 

I completely agree with Spencer's points, they were spot on and constructively presented. I do believe that people who are un-constructively critical of race management decisions should think about how many regattas they have produced lately.

 

-Matt Kreuzkamp.

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so... (this is not directed at Spencer) which of you tough guys raced the Vineyard in 2006?

and who completed the race?

and if you did not complete the race, why?

 

IIRC, only 3 boats actually finished, Blue Yankee, Snow Lion, & Lora Ann

 

 

exactly

(never mind all the bravado on the internet, in a sailing anarchy forum)

 

2006 was a bit different. It was an unpredicted building gale (easterly), not a predicted dying storm (westerly). Many people decided not to continue because of the uncertainty. Its not very bright to voluntarily leave the Sound when wind is steadily building (and eventually hit 60 knots). Many others did because they knew their limitations or weren't having any fun. We dropped out after blowing the clew out of our No4 in BI Sound. Most of the crew had been sick all night (including some old salts), and the 12 hour beat out to the tower just seemed to stupid to do for the fun ride back and pickle dish. In hindsight we wish we would have finished but probably would have broken more stuff. Two of the boats that finished were banged up pretty good. The sea state I thnk will not even be comparable. We had 10 footers in LIS on Saturday in 2006, and thats not even called for outside the Sound this year.

 

Earl seems liks its going to be a great spin ride out and a beat home in moderating conditions in blue skies and sunshine. I think it was 2002 we had a 30 knot easterly and 10 foot seas and one of the fastest, best spin rides we've ever had once we got out there. Surfing down the rollers from the Tower around Block in the middle of the night was unbelievably fun. Similar to BTBOTFA's friend its a great memory. Obviously there is a qualified group that wants to do the long course and they should just accomodate them. Nobody sees this as anything close to survival conditions. If its a RC thing, just let them call in their time at the breakwater. I;d rather be on the water Monday still doing the race then at an awards party. In fact they should just do the awards later in the year and take the pressure of having a party off. This is and Block are the only two decent races we have where you can get out in the ocean and stretch your legs (I am not counting ALIR midsummer driftfest). Calling the short course last night is once again not a weather issue. But maybe that is what the majority of the lobbyists were asking for.

 

Last year a northerly was predicted to fill in which did and Sunday was one of the best sailing days you could ask for. It was a real shame we only went to Seaflower.

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Last year a northerly was predicted to fill in which did and Sunday was one of the best sailing days you could ask for. It was a real shame we only went to Seaflower.

 

The funniest part about last year was the boat (I forget who) that posted here on SA during the race that they were closing in on 1BI, only to be told by another member they were sailing the wrong course! Priceless.

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My ride just had to pull the plug... unfortunately I already made it down here... anyone know of a boat that could use one more crew? Good experience on LI sound races along with offshore racing in general. I sailed the Vineyard and Ida Lewis on the Cone (R/P super 30) in the past. PM me please!

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Last year a northerly was predicted to fill in which did and Sunday was one of the best sailing days you could ask for. It was a real shame we only went to Seaflower.

 

The funniest part about last year was the boat (I forget who) that posted here on SA during the race that they were closing in on 1BI, only to be told by another member they were sailing the wrong course! Priceless.

 

 

And we all know who that was!

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24 knots at the tower with 9.5 foot waves. Not to bad.............yet.

 

If you go back into LIS, the NOAA Buoy off The Thimbles shows winds to be 9.7 with gusts just 13.6 kts. Wave height is but 1.6 feet.

 

Yea 8 PM it was still south of 40 deg N.

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Out on my deck, 5 miles north of Fairfield Beach, Winds calm, no rain yet, wave heights in the pond 0.0

 

Lots of crickets.

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Out on my deck, 5 miles north of Fairfield Beach, Winds calm, no rain yet, wave heights in the pond 0.0

 

Lots of crickets.

a beautiful morning here is SW Connecticut - not a sign of Earl all night despite Commanders forecast for 30-35 knots.

 

Think the RC may catch it for shortening the course so early - looks like good breeze all weekend thru Monday.

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Its basically calmed down enough to include the long course for the bigger boats so hopefully the RC will do the right thing.

 

Winds at the Buzzards Bay Tower(0800 hrs)are about 21 kts with wave heights under 5 ft.

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Juste back, Ist beutiful out their, 16-20 outof the west with touche of norht, youl'll be moving like fraitrains. Hoppe it holdes,I'n jelous!

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Last year a northerly was predicted to fill in which did and Sunday was one of the best sailing days you could ask for. It was a real shame we only went to Seaflower.

 

The funniest part about last year was the boat (I forget who) that posted here on SA during the race that they were closing in on 1BI, only to be told by another member they were sailing the wrong course! Priceless.

 

I believe it was Dragon/Rail Meat. :P Great stuff.

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Looks like an awesome day for sailing out there.........boats started are trucking at 9kts with the chutes up.

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To be able to have these experiences only 15 miles from land rather than 300 in the Gulf Stream is priceless. Dumbing down the sport only makes it more dangerous.

 

Having watched the start, I would say there are plenty of boats in the fleet for whom today's conditions are pretty challenging.

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To be able to have these experiences only 15 miles from land rather than 300 in the Gulf Stream is priceless. Dumbing down the sport only makes it more dangerous.

 

Having watched the start, I would say there are plenty of boats in the fleet for whom today's conditions are pretty challenging.

 

I have to agree. We live nextdoor to the Old Field Point Lighthouse and watched them sail by fast, very fast.

The winds are a steady 20 with gusts close to 30. Add the usual sundown increase to that in the next hour or so.

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on kattack I see Thin Man so far out in front that it looks like they turned around....either they have trouble or they might finish this year....

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Posted · Hidden by Essex, September 4, 2010 - xxx
Hidden by Essex, September 4, 2010 - xxx

turn tracking on & you'll see they turned around.

Leverage - Schock 40 looks to have had a great race - not sure how the numbers will work out for them.

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Posted · Hidden by Essex, September 4, 2010 - xxx
Hidden by Essex, September 4, 2010 - xxx

oops. guess I should follow my own advice ! track shows leverage also turned around.

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turn tracking on & you'll see they turned around.

Leverage - Schock 40 looks to have had a great race - not sure how the numbers will work out for them.

 

 

tracking is on....good race Random Sailor...

 

Shooting Star is leading in IRC 30 as well, but Ripple is on their ass....don't lettem in front girls. Almost time to bash your way home.

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you caught me before I could delete, trying to figure out who is doing what course -

Thin man doing cornfield ? is that where the made the turn I guess ?

OTOH maybe leverage has some trouble.

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Anybody else think Kattack tracking is about the worst thing they ever saw?

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you caught me before I could delete, trying to figure out who is doing what course -

Thin man doing cornfield ? is that where the made the turn I guess ?

OTOH maybe leverage has some trouble.

 

 

Leverage dismasted unfortunately. Towed back into Westbrook now.

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you caught me before I could delete, trying to figure out who is doing what course -

Thin man doing cornfield ? is that where the made the turn I guess ?

OTOH maybe leverage has some trouble.

 

 

Leverage dismasted unfortunately. Towed back into Westbrook now.

 

 

that sucks...hope all are ok.

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Spoke to the guys on Leverage, They were going 25 knots and the back stay parted and the mast folded at the first spreader. All are okay, a little disheartened, no injuries.

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Anybody else think Kattack tracking is about the worst thing they ever saw?

 

+1

 

Sat in my backyard much of the afternoon thinking how much fun it probably was out there.

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Spoke to the guys on Leverage, They were going 25 knots and the back stay parted and the mast folded at the first spreader. All are okay, a little disheartened, no injuries.

 

Holy Macaroni!

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Spoke to the guys on Leverage, They were going 25 knots and the back stay parted and the mast folded at the first spreader. All are okay, a little disheartened, no injuries.

 

I'm hoping a bunch of boats were carrying GoPro cameras - there should be some really fun footage. Glad everyone on Leverage is Ok.

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Update on Thinman?

 

 

kattack says they're still in Smithtowm Bay.....

 

edit...but Yachtscoring has them finishing at 6:30 this morning. Way to go Thin Man, you rounded the buoy on the correct side this year

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We aee dueling wih Vamp about 4 miles from the finish.

We saw LOTS of spins shredded yday. Were having fun. Yday regularly surfing to 16-17 knots, Levergae shot by us doing well over 20. A real thrash of a beat coming home.typical square LIS 4-5 footers spaced about 50 feet apart. Lots of banging all the way home. Looked like Galadriel and Carina had a real duel to seaflowe,then looked back and Carina was bareheaded. Looks like lots of the big boats didn't come out.

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Sitting on the beach off CT river , MAN - nice wipe out !

Blue and white kite, spin all out of control for like 5 minutes.

Any of you see anything bad near fisher's island with that race.

See New London Day.

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Update on Thinman?

 

 

kattack says they're still in Smithtowm Bay.....

 

edit...but Yachtscoring has them finishing at 6:30 this morning. Way to go Thin Man, you rounded the buoy on the correct side this year

Yeah they had some pretty tough competition, did anyone they were racing against have anything but dacron roller furling sails?

They can't even beat Fantasy Girl on Wed nites. Pathetic

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Update on Thinman?

 

 

kattack says they're still in Smithtowm Bay.....

 

edit...but Yachtscoring has them finishing at 6:30 this morning. Way to go Thin Man, you rounded the buoy on the correct side this year

Yeah they had some pretty tough competition, did anyone they were racing against have anything but dacron roller furling sails?

They can't even beat Fantasy Girl on Wed nites. Pathetic

 

I think what's pathetic is the lack of boats racing. What's with that???

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Well that was a fun ride, the boat was absolutely flying. Its weird when 13 kts of boatspeed is going to slow. Started out with a reef in and when we realized we were only as fast as the Ker50s we shook it out 15 min after the start and went down the road. The boat was actually pretty stable, the hard part was not plowing into the back of the wave you were overtaking and declarating to hard loading up the boat as the period was so shot and steep. We had 2 big wipes with the A2 one where the mast was horizontal whe we broke the tiller extension off either before or after, tough to tell. Broke a brace for the stern pulpit during that one as everyone was hanging vertical from it. An old repair on the A2 wasnt looking to good so up went the A5, which meant more speed but hotter angles as it is more of a reaching kite. Spent most of the afternoon averaging 20 -23 with everyone but a guy on the vang the spin trimmer and a grinder stacked in the back of the bus. We were out in front of the fleet and Aurora and Vela Veloce had just passed us about 3 mi west of the gut when a block on the backstay cascade failed and the rig came down as I was holding on to it. It was actually not that violent, snapped at the first set of spreaders and went over the port side, kite went over the starboard.

 

After making sure everyone was still on board and not injured the first thing was get the rest of it on the boat so we wouldnt put a hole in the boat. kite halyards rigging were all wrapped under the boat and in all 3 foils. Took 45 min - 1 hr to try and clear everything back on deck, at this point the fleet started to catch back up. The engine was fried by all the water that was washing over the deck, looked like videos from the VO70s. So we called Sea Tow and brought the boat to Saybrook. Sorted everything out on the dock and took a limo back to Stamford were some of the guys had cars. The limo was the only thing we could get that could fit all 10 people and all our gear. Got back home and hit the diner for some hot food.

 

Its amazing how physically and mentally tough it was to sail at those speeds for so long. Everything is moving at different angles very fast, you cant let your guard down for a second. Still it was the most fun most of us had ever had on a boat, ear to ear smiles on everyone even after the rig came down and the shock had worn off. Talking with the race committee back at Stamford the told us the Kattack tracker had our top speed clocked at 26.8 kts which is going to be tough to top, if we had flat water it would have easily been faster.

 

Heres a shot of us after bobbing of the Gut. Sorry no video, no one wanted to go forward to get a camera that would probably have gotten killed by the waves.

 

post-10466-002994500 1283694483_thumb.jpg

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mega kudos to all the doublehanded boats racing in these conditions, especially to my friends on "Strider" !!!!!!!!!! Get some well deserved sleep guys!

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NY Jboat,

well written story, thank you, made me feel like I was there (as i have many times bofore in my life!).

 

And the limo was a great idea too, kept the crew together for stories, and hopefully a couple beers! :)

 

ID

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Hell of a race. I'm actually kind of glad now that they kept us on the short course. We were fully crewed on Soulmate, but had a lack of helmsmen and much of the driving was done by myself and the skipper, with others driving in the (relatively) calmer parts. I am beat.

 

We totally cocked up the start, intending to be on port at the pin and winding up on starboard at the boat and having to duck everyone so we could gybe over to port and set the chute as we had intended. But we finally got things sorted out, got the chute the right way up and went on our way.

 

Within the first hour and a half we were already in sight of Bridgeport, and barely two hours had elapsed when we passed Stratford Shoal. That's when things got exciting. The breeze was picking up into the 30's and we had a couple of rather spectacular wipe outs, not counting the ones we had every time we gybed. Our first really good wipeout came as we (on port) were on a converging course with Partnership (on starboard) at about 16 knots.

 

I was at the helm. Our skipper thought we were going to cross, and indeed, for a few short moments as we were surfing at about 18 knots it appeared that we were. Conveniently, we fell off the back of the wave just as Partnership picked one up and had we both held our course, there would have been some really nasty crunching. At the last minute, with no other choice, I threw the wheel over and rounded up. That one took us a while to recover from, but recover we did.

 

Our best one came a little while after that when a wave and a puff teamed up to push the stern sideways out from underneath me. Some members of the crew swear that the spreaders took a bath on that one.

 

Each gybe was accompanied by its own clusterfuck, generally in the form of a twisted chute unwrapping suddenly to fill with air and round us up nicely.

 

Our worst gybe resulted in wrapping the chute up around the forestay nearly from top to bottom, while at the same time, the mainsheet decided that just then and there was a good enough time to go ahead and break. So there we were, three of us trying to wrestle the chute down, and three others improvising a new mainsheet. About this time, the skipper reminded us that we were supposed to be sailing the Vineyard Race, not the Gearbuster.

 

After sorting that one out, we decided to set a smaller, heavier chute for the last few miles to the turning mark. We lamented the loss of speed, but felt better about being more in control. Amazingly, the 14-year-old 3/4 oz chute we had been flying up to that point managed to hold together for one more race, escaping with just a couple of holes.

 

Somewhere in between turning all the corners on two wheels and wondering whether this next gybe would be the last for the chute, I managed to set the boatspeed record for the day at 21.9 knots in a 36 knot puff and the perfect wave. About this time, we were regularly seeing speeds between 18-20 knots, passing a couple 45-footers and almost keeping pace with Aurora as she went by. I've never gone that fast on a sailboat before, let alone while driving one. It's one experience I'll never forget, feeling the wind power up the boat as the wave lifted up the stern and just launched us. Truly butt-puckering and life-validating at the same time.

 

But just as all good things must come to an end, so did our joyride to the turning mark, and we hoisted the #3, tucked in a reef and dropped the chute in preparation for the dreaded beat back home. Nevertheless, we were glad to be pointing back towards the finish. The wind had fortuitously dropped from 35 down to 25, but the tide was turning and we had to cross the Race.

 

Driving across the Race to the next mark was some of the most difficult driving I've done. The sun was down, the waves were probably in the 6-8 foot range and coming from every direction imaginable. Spray was constantly in our faces as the bow burrowed itself into every wave it could find. It's amazing we made any forward progress at all. It seemed to take hours to get to the next mark, and by the time we did, I was tapped out. I passed off the helm to the skipper and went below for a nap. However, sleep was hard to come by as we slogged and pounded our way back to the CT shore, and all too soon it seemed, I was called on deck again for a sail change. As we neared the shore, the wind began to decrease below 20 knots, and then down to 12-13. We shook out the reef, and prepared to swap jibs from the #3 to the AP #1. As I was improvising a system for tacking on two jibs to the head stay, I began to feel the deck heeling a bit more as the wind picked back up. Lucky it did just then, otherwise we might have had to make two jib changes instead of just aborting the first attempt.

 

As we got further and further into the middle of the sound on starboard tack, the irregular wave patterns caused several crew members to succumb to seasickness and/or the cold wetness accumulated from bashing through so many waves. Eventually it became my turn to drive again. I was cold, wet, barely awake and I could hardly read the instruments. The odd rogue wave slapped me in the face with seawater and kept me going but an hour or so of that was all I could take. I passed off the helm again at about 4:00AM, stumbled down the companionway ladder and curled up on the galley floor, dead to the world.

 

I woke up just as the sun was rising, with the finish line just a couple of hours away. With the sun up and drying things off, we began to get our second wind. I took another turn on the helm and got us within sight of the Cows when we heard Partnership radio in their rounding of the Cows. Up until then, we had only heard big boats like Cannonball, Gracie and Snow Lion radio in, and we figured we were doing pretty damn well. Nothing like hearing your competition radio in ahead of you to bring you crashing back to reality.

 

We finally crossed the line at 0944, tired, beaten, but glad to have finished. Congrats to Partnership for coming back and kicking our ass on that beat. Well sailed. We'll get you next time!

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Nice job KRC. I was on PShip. We were a little concerned about what your gameplan was on that crossing! You guys horizoned us with that big chute. Much more boat speed, but I guess it was a little bit of a tortoise and hare situation. The one with the least wipeouts wins! Everytime we thought about a sail change a long series of gusts would show up. And then we figured a J120 would be tough in a hard beat ooming home. And it was a hard beat and a long, wet, cold night for the railmeat. I feel like I went 10 rounds with Mike Tyson :o . Curious as to why so many boats went to LI side on the way back, with reduced sea state and always a righty if anything predicted in CT. Congrats to all the finishers and also the folks that came out and gave it a go.

 

Anyone know about the protests with Vamp and Elvis?

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Well that was a fun ride, the boat was absolutely flying. Its weird when 13 kts of boatspeed is going to slow. Started out with a reef in and when we realized we were only as fast as the Ker50s we shook it out 15 min after the start and went down the road. The boat was actually pretty stable, the hard part was not plowing into the back of the wave you were overtaking and declarating to hard loading up the boat as the period was so shot and steep. We had 2 big wipes with the A2 one where the mast was horizontal whe we broke the tiller extension off either before or after, tough to tell. Broke a brace for the stern pulpit during that one as everyone was hanging vertical from it. An old repair on the A2 wasnt looking to good so up went the A5, which meant more speed but hotter angles as it is more of a reaching kite. Spent most of the afternoon averaging 20 -23 with everyone but a guy on the vang the spin trimmer and a grinder stacked in the back of the bus. We were out in front of the fleet and Aurora and Vela Veloce had just passed us about 3 mi west of the gut when a block on the backstay cascade failed and the rig came down as I was holding on to it. It was actually not that violent, snapped at the first set of spreaders and went over the port side, kite went over the starboard.

 

After making sure everyone was still on board and not injured the first thing was get the rest of it on the boat so we wouldnt put a hole in the boat. kite halyards rigging were all wrapped under the boat and in all 3 foils. Took 45 min - 1 hr to try and clear everything back on deck, at this point the fleet started to catch back up. The engine was fried by all the water that was washing over the deck, looked like videos from the VO70s. So we called Sea Tow and brought the boat to Saybrook. Sorted everything out on the dock and took a limo back to Stamford were some of the guys had cars. The limo was the only thing we could get that could fit all 10 people and all our gear. Got back home and hit the diner for some hot food.

 

Its amazing how physically and mentally tough it was to sail at those speeds for so long. Everything is moving at different angles very fast, you cant let your guard down for a second. Still it was the most fun most of us had ever had on a boat, ear to ear smiles on everyone even after the rig came down and the shock had worn off. Talking with the race committee back at Stamford the told us the Kattack tracker had our top speed clocked at 26.8 kts which is going to be tough to top, if we had flat water it would have easily been faster.

 

Heres a shot of us after bobbing of the Gut. Sorry no video, no one wanted to go forward to get a camera that would probably have gotten killed by the waves.

 

post-10466-002994500 1283694483_thumb.jpg

 

But... what a wild until then!!!! Loved every minute of it!

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on kattack I see Thin Man so far out in front that it looks like they turned around....either they have trouble or they might finish this year....

 

Followed the instructions from Kattack, attached the transponder to the outside of the stern pulpit. It just happened to be a very, very wet spot. When they opened the box at SYC after the race, the equipment inside was swimming. :wacko:

 

What an epic downhill sleigh ride! Top speed was 19.2kts, and it only cost us two spinnakers. We had to limp the last 8 miles to Long Sand Shoal with jib and main. We only wiped out about a dozen times on the outbound. Uphill was painful, but it went quicker than expected.

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Curious as to why so many boats went to LI side on the way back, with reduced sea state and always a righty if anything predicted in CT. Congrats to all the finishers and also the folks that came out and gave it a go.

I was on Soulmate as well.....don't know about anyone else but it was always our plan to do just like you did and hug the CT shoreline. The difference in seas between there and the middle of the Sound was pretty obvious. But we tacked away from CT and then got a nice lift that got us just about on the rhumb line for the Cows. Hey, this is wonderful, we thought, if this holds we can just stay on this tack the whole way. And it didn't hold, obviously, and we got such a slow gradual header back to the south, not that we didn't notice it, but we kept on figuring that was the favored tack and didn't want to tack back on some new course that would take us nowhere. (Hmmm, you think the "gradual header" had anything to with the fact that we were tracking back into the teeth of the wind and seas in the middle? naahhh, couldn't be.) Would have been nice to stay in the 3-4 foot seas and not have to cross the 5-6 foot seas.....twice.

 

Between last year and this year, next time anyone suggests approaching the LI side and get away from the CT side I'm throwing them overboard!

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Epic ride down. I didn't know a J boat could go that fast!! 19.6?!?! Seriously? That's my first "cruiser/racer boat". Nice. The ride back..way tougher. I think I drank about a gallon of seawater on the rail. The ride down was worth it though. Anyone else still feeling the rocking and the rolling?

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Sounds like some fun stuff! I'm glad to not hear about any serious injuries.What happened to the PHRF guys?

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Sounds like some fun stuff! I'm glad to not hear about any serious injuries.What happened to the PHRF guys?

 

No serious injuries reported in the Vineyard Race but there was a fatality in the Fisher's Island Race run in the same vicnity as the Vineyard Race turning mark. Main thread on the Fisher's Island Race tragedy is here.

 

Condolences to the Wilkinson family.

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Nice job KRC. I was on PShip. We were a little concerned about what your gameplan was on that crossing! You guys horizoned us with that big chute. Much more boat speed, but I guess it was a little bit of a tortoise and hare situation. The one with the least wipeouts wins! Everytime we thought about a sail change a long series of gusts would show up. And then we figured a J120 would be tough in a hard beat ooming home. And it was a hard beat and a long, wet, cold night for the railmeat. I feel like I went 10 rounds with Mike Tyson :o . Curious as to why so many boats went to LI side on the way back, with reduced sea state and always a righty if anything predicted in CT. Congrats to all the finishers and also the folks that came out and gave it a go.

 

Anyone know about the protests with Vamp and Elvis?

I admit, it was a deer-in-headlights situation for me on that crossing. Our skipper was watching from down below and kept telling me that we were going to cross, but he was the only one who thought so. In hindsight, we definitely shouldn't have come that close, and even if we could have crossed, it would have been prudent as the give-way boat to start ducking well before we did. It's a long race after all, and plenty of time to make up a couple of boat lengths.

 

As coyotepup mentioned everyone on board was 100% in favor of playing the north shore, but it in our tired, groggy state of mind it didn't make sense to tack away from rhumbline. The other reason is that no one was really watching the chart plotter, and we didn't think we were that far away from Connecticut until we looked to our left and...whoa! there's Long Island! Shit.

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Hell of a race. .....

Nice job, Kevin! GRINGO chickened out and took the spi down after the first major wipeout with 2 crew swimming. Poled out jib worked almost as well and we figured better angle and less wipeouts would be the same. Still got the boat surfing from time to time with max speed at 15.8kn, woohoo! But what a long night going back up in those waves, good grief. I had the helm for more than 4 hrs, that was quite a job to keep the boat moving and at the same time keep pointing upwind. Turned out that for us the CT shore was slower, less wind but more shifty and almost the same waves. In the end we got 3rd in our division. Very memorable race. And God, I'm sore today :-)

Cheers

Paul

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So here's the tale-you all know the weather story, and Terry's Michigan cold front showed up after Earl went to Nova Scotia, we were expecting plenty of breeze and plenty of build through the day. Motored up with Mainsail up, bagels etc. start was a little confusing with couple of classes lumped in and a 5 minute postponement, got it sorted out, decent start, up with the 3/4 oz.-great pics of the kite set at the start in the flickr photos on the vineyard site, Bingo and Will at the mast look like the marines at Iwo Jima. Boat is flying along, following sea, 20 to 25 average breeze, things start to build, bigger waves bigger sea, Cain takes the crew through a couple of chinese jibes, boat laying in the water, kite wrapped on the headstay, get it sorted out and pull down the 3/4, back up with a no. 4-still flying at 8 knots, JT calls for Big Red, smaller shoulders makes sense to the addled guy at the helm, hoist it up, pole halfway to the headstay real low and real tight, the fucker is perfect, much more controllable and the breeze keeps building. JT calls for the helm, thank god says the skipper, and Kyle, that bullrider from Texas and he take SS on a ride to Seaflower that was spectacular-wiped out one more time but considering the big breeze, saw it up to 37 or so and the bigger waves building in, and the number of wipeouts we saw from some very impressive sailors, including Carina going bareheaded, blowing up chutes, wrapping headstays for 1/2 an hour, dismasted Shock 40's and at least 5 other exploded kites, we all done good. Everything was so intense as the boat was moving so fast, saw over 15 actual boat speed, not just speed over ground, that there was no relaxation anywhere. We duct-taped a funnel and a length of tubing to JT's leg so he wouldn't have to leave the helm to take a leak. Past Stratford Shoals in two hours, made it to the turning mark at Seaflower at 7:18-baked ziti and meatballs were cooked up, eaten and put away beforehand cause we knew the upcoming beat was gonna be misery. We rounded with Galadriel, Carina, Vamp, Partnership -all big, well-sailed boats who we saw with various levels of distress and pain. Felt like we were crawling with the 4 as we went past the mouth of the Race, went to the 3 with a double-reef, got around PI, the second turning mark and the beat back began in earnest. Cain back on the helm, Walter and then Jared get hit with the mal de mer, current turning now against the breeze and felt like we were back on the Bermuda delivery, waves crashing over the boat, can't see a fucking thing in the moonless darkness, port tack running between the waves is nice, starboard puts you square into them, then they get bigger and winds are climbing back over 30, JT calls for a tack at 6 Mile reef, only three up, now with bodies below trying to sleep, Walt in the fetal position rolling around the cockpit, we go over and one of the big reef waves just picks the boat up, slams her down up the hottub in the cockpit and autotacks us back into the waves-at this point, Cain on the helm, looking at over 6 speed on the rhumbline and figuring the enemy he knows is in front of him, rather than the other tack with the enemy coming out of the darkness unannounced on the beam is the lesser of two evils-JT figures Cain is a lost cause and goes to bed, we plow on, actually making some decent speed with the big breeze but hard work, hard work, get the next watch, as it were, up at 2 a.m., a few extra hands and the wind and waves have quieted a bit, on the other side of the reef now, so we finally tack over and head for CT, west of Falkner's however, not East. This, of course, all looks like the fatal blunder, keeping the boat out there in the worst of it rather than getting over to CT, gave up some hours to the fleet but who knows. Kyle on the helm for a bit lets me actually close my eyes for, I dunno, 30 minutes, and boat keeps moving along, tacking between CT shore and midpoint of our rhumblines on Expedition, wind calming down a bit, shake one reef. 6 oclock bodies roll up, amazing to see bodies sleeping on the rail with all the motion of the boat flipping them around but completely gone to the world. Tack tack tack, JT comes back to life and back on the helm, tack tack tack, shake the next reef, wind bouncing anywhere from 12 to 25, waves down to little 1 to 3 footers , lots of boats around but we know from the racetracker that Ripple has climbed ahead of us, very disappointing. Meanwhile, we check yachtscoring to see who has finished and I see SS listed as DNS! Email race committee, text message Ray Redniss and both get back to me within minutes, paperwork error, Shooting Star next to Siren Song on the list, S Star got checked instead of S Song-error fixed, crew exhales, finish the race, cocktails, lunch etc. cruise back on a glorious day, bit of boat cleanup -slept like death. Finish boat cleanup at 3 today and then go pick up a second place pickledish, when we had the fucking Vineyard trophy sitting there ripe for plucking-Vamp Carina Partnership Galadriel are like 3,4,5,6 in the fleet so if we had hung in, should have corrected out over them huge. Mea culpa, self-flagellation, wtf. Yacht racing. Thanks to all who made it happen Great race though, 24 hours Exhilaration, Excruciation,Exhalation, Exhaustion.

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So here's the tale-you all know the weather story, and Terry's Michigan cold front showed up after Earl went to Nova Scotia, we were expecting plenty of breeze and plenty of build through the day. Motored up with Mainsail up, bagels etc. start was a little confusing with couple of classes lumped in and a 5 minute postponement, got it sorted out, decent start, up with the 3/4 oz.-great pics of the kite set at the start in the flickr photos on the vineyard site, Bingo and Will at the mast look like the marines at Iwo Jima. Boat is flying along, following sea, 20 to 25 average breeze, things start to build, bigger waves bigger sea, Cain takes the crew through a couple of chinese jibes, boat laying in the water, kite wrapped on the headstay, get it sorted out and pull down the 3/4, back up with a no. 4-still flying at 8 knots, JT calls for Big Red, smaller shoulders makes sense to the addled guy at the helm, hoist it up, pole halfway to the headstay real low and real tight, the fucker is perfect, much more controllable and the breeze keeps building. JT calls for the helm, thank god says the skipper, and Kyle, that bullrider from Texas and he take SS on a ride to Seaflower that was spectacular-wiped out one more time but considering the big breeze, saw it up to 37 or so and the bigger waves building in, and the number of wipeouts we saw from some very impressive sailors, including Carina going bareheaded, blowing up chutes, wrapping headstays for 1/2 an hour, dismasted Shock 40's and at least 5 other exploded kites, we all done good. Everything was so intense as the boat was moving so fast, saw over 15 actual boat speed, not just speed over ground, that there was no relaxation anywhere. We duct-taped a funnel and a length of tubing to JT's leg so he wouldn't have to leave the helm to take a leak. Past Stratford Shoals in two hours, made it to the turning mark at Seaflower at 7:18-baked ziti and meatballs were cooked up, eaten and put away beforehand cause we knew the upcoming beat was gonna be misery. We rounded with Galadriel, Carina, Vamp, Partnership -all big, well-sailed boats who we saw with various levels of distress and pain. Felt like we were crawling with the 4 as we went past the mouth of the Race, went to the 3 with a double-reef, got around PI, the second turning mark and the beat back began in earnest. Cain back on the helm, Walter and then Jared get hit with the mal de mer, current turning now against the breeze and felt like we were back on the Bermuda delivery, waves crashing over the boat, can't see a fucking thing in the moonless darkness, port tack running between the waves is nice, starboard puts you square into them, then they get bigger and winds are climbing back over 30, JT calls for a tack at 6 Mile reef, only three up, now with bodies below trying to sleep, Walt in the fetal position rolling around the cockpit, we go over and one of the big reef waves just picks the boat up, slams her down up the hottub in the cockpit and autotacks us back into the waves-at this point, Cain on the helm, looking at over 6 speed on the rhumbline and figuring the enemy he knows is in front of him, rather than the other tack with the enemy coming out of the darkness unannounced on the beam is the lesser of two evils-JT figures Cain is a lost cause and goes to bed, we plow on, actually making some decent speed with the big breeze but hard work, hard work, get the next watch, as it were, up at 2 a.m., a few extra hands and the wind and waves have quieted a bit, on the other side of the reef now, so we finally tack over and head for CT, west of Falkner's however, not East. This, of course, all looks like the fatal blunder, keeping the boat out there in the worst of it rather than getting over to CT, gave up some hours to the fleet but who knows. Kyle on the helm for a bit lets me actually close my eyes for, I dunno, 30 minutes, and boat keeps moving along, tacking between CT shore and midpoint of our rhumblines on Expedition, wind calming down a bit, shake one reef. 6 oclock bodies roll up, amazing to see bodies sleeping on the rail with all the motion of the boat flipping them around but completely gone to the world. Tack tack tack, JT comes back to life and back on the helm, tack tack tack, shake the next reef, wind bouncing anywhere from 12 to 25, waves down to little 1 to 3 footers , lots of boats around but we know from the racetracker that Ripple has climbed ahead of us, very disappointing. Meanwhile, we check yachtscoring to see who has finished and I see SS listed as DNS! Email race committee, text message Ray Redniss and both get back to me within minutes, paperwork error, Shooting Star next to Siren Song on the list, S Star got checked instead of S Song-error fixed, crew exhales, finish the race, cocktails, lunch etc. cruise back on a glorious day, bit of boat cleanup -slept like death. Finish boat cleanup at 3 today and then go pick up a second place pickledish, when we had the fucking Vineyard trophy sitting there ripe for plucking-Vamp Carina Partnership Galadriel are like 3,4,5,6 in the fleet so if we had hung in, should have corrected out over them huge. Mea culpa, self-flagellation, wtf. Yacht racing. Thanks to all who made it happen Great race though, 24 hours Exhilaration, Excruciation,Exhalation, Exhaustion.

 

Great recap! One thing we should have done different was made sure the hot meal was served before Seaflower....big mistake. Figured I could hand up the meal in bowls and crew eat on the rail like we normally do....not! Thank goodness we had plenty of sandwich meat/cheese/bread and lots of protein snacks. Body sore as hell today but incredibly my post race workout at the gym was easy...go figure.

 

Be at awards tonite...I'll have JT introduce us.

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