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Southern Cross 39

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In our continuing search for "the" cruising boat we found a 39 for sale. From what I've read they are strudy, well built cruisers. Anybody have first hand, or second hand, experience.

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In our continuing search for "the" cruising boat we found a 39 for sale. From what I've read they are strudy, well built cruisers. Anybody have first hand, or second hand, experience.

 

 

Do you have a link to the boat in question?

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In our continuing search for "the" cruising boat we found a 39 for sale. From what I've read they are strudy, well built cruisers. Anybody have first hand, or second hand, experience.

 

Check out the results for the 2010 Vic-Maui.

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In our continuing search for "the" cruising boat we found a 39 for sale. From what I've read they are strudy, well built cruisers. Anybody have first hand, or second hand, experience.

 

 

Do you have a link to the boat in question?

 

 

http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/19462

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Looks like a nice boat. Not sure if they are a big Sister to the Southern Cross 31 or not? The 31 is supposed to be a brick shithouse.

 

If you like her and she passes survey, you should be able to get her for a fair price. (a LOT lower than the ad is asking)

 

Good luck.

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Built in Rhode Island, they were available as a kit boat so quality level may vary some. First produced in 1980 or '81, they are the big sister to the Southern Cross 31 and 35. A solid hull.

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I like the lines and layout but that draft is lousy for any kind of windward work.

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Built in Rhode Island, they were available as a kit boat so quality level may vary some. First produced in 1980 or '81, they are the big sister to the Southern Cross 31 and 35. A solid hull.

I believe that most of the hulls were Airex cored, decks balsa cored. Nothing wrong with that, of course, so long as you keep them dry. A survey will tell.

 

C.E. Ryder built good boats.

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A friend of mine has hull 3, factory finished and loves it. Construction is solid, particularly for a 30 year old boat that has had two tours to the South Pacific and is heading off again this fall. Factory interior is a little tight for me at over 6 ft but owner at 5' 7" loves it. Good luck

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I pretty much like every design that Tom Gilmer did. He had a good eye. Wonder if he is still alive.

Unfortunately not, he passed away last winter.

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Sailman:

Sorry to hear that.

Maybe I should do a Gilmer feature for GOB. He was one the first designers to really catch my eye when I was a kid. NEW MOON, FULL MOON? some kind of moon. Help me here. Half Moon?

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Blue Moon.

 

I don't know about the rest of the lines of the Southern Cross, but the bow is very like Gilmer's other cruising designs, including the famous Seawind ketch.

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Semi:

Old Tom was a bit ahead of his time with skeg hung rudders when others were saying it's the "kiss of death".

 

I will need some help here putting together a portfolio of his work.

Any help would be appreciated.

Maybe I'm getting worried about being forgotten myself but I am determnined to keep the legacy of some of these old designers alive.

If we don't know where we have come from it's hard to figure out where we are going.

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Semi:

Old Tom was a bit ahead of his time with skeg hung rudders when others were saying it's the "kiss of death".

 

I will need some help here putting together a portfolio of his work.

Any help would be appreciated.

Maybe I'm getting worried about being forgotten myself but I am determnined to keep the legacy of some of these old designers alive.

If we don't know where we have come from it's hard to figure out where we are going.

Sailboatdata.com has a little bit on him here.

He really had fun with his sheers!

 

There is one class site with some more info on Mr. Gilmer:

 

Privateer 26

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I wondered about searching for a Privateer 26 ketch for a while, but decided I needed a faster boat in the fleet I sail in.

 

Gilmer often used a ketch rig with a fairly small mizzen, I think about 1/3 the size of the main. I don't have experience with 2-masters, but from what I've read, lots of yawls have mizzens too small to do the yawl tricks like using a sheeted in mizzen to keep the boat head to wind. The Gilmer proportions with a bigger mizzen looked very practical to me, except for the fact they put the mizzen mast in a very inconvenient place - the middle of the cockpit.

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Can't comment on the 39 but I've owned my 35 for 15 years. Really nice boat to sail, faster than you would think, points reasonably well, DDW needs a chute. Send me an email and I'll give you my cell, we can discuss. I'm traveling for the next two weeks but I live 5 miles from the boat. I'll go have a look if you'd like.

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Thanks everybody. Hey Checkstay thanks for the offer, I'll let you know if we decide to pursue. If so maybe you could give it a quick look to see if it's worth a trip out.

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Maybe I'm getting worried about being forgotten myself

 

Ain't gonna happen Maestro.......

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This scan, and the next one (if all goes well) are from a booklet of study plans put out by Gilmer long ago.

 

post-5724-037089200 1283952082_thumb.jpg

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I believe that Wind and Wave preceded the Kenner Privateer. The similarity in appearance is obvious.

 

The reason that I chose this one to post is so I could add a little story. When the sailing mags were writing up the Privateer, they all referred to the "clipper bow." Gilmer was a teacher and historian of naval architecture, and in his mind, it really wasn't a clipper bow at all. When he had the chance to add write some notes, he made a point of the design's Chesapeake origins, and noted the bow was more like a skipjack or bugeye (I don't remember exactly). I think it's a beautiful boat.

 

post-5724-051208800 1283952244_thumb.jpg

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God, what a pretty boat - not that many of them around...

 

As far as getting it a lot less that what is being asked - I bet not by much - quality is always going to be a higher price - unless the owner is in a pickle, you might get 20% less than asking.

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Bob, Tom had not only an "eye" but the "heart" to go with it. He lived and worked here in Eastportorico for quite a while. Another notable and talented gentleman designer, much like Bill Crealock. Sadly, we lost them both within a few months time. We can raise a dram of Glenmorangie Quinta Ruban to them both! Bill would appreciate it.

 

I would venture a guess that the Naval Academy Museum might have some original stuff of Tom's. If you are out here for the Annapolis Show this fall it might be worth a stop to the "yard". I'll buy you a pint, or a dram or two.

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