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semelis

Route Du Rhum

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1978 was the year for the first edition of the RdR, created by the french -mainly- because the brits decided to put a limit on size in the (then called) OSTAR.

During the 3rd edition, in 1986, Caradec disappeared and his big catamaran Royale capsized (or the other way around), so it was decided to put also a 60 feet limit from then on.

Now after 5 limited editions, the RdR is back to the origins, probably because Ellen McArthur, Francis Joyon and Thomas Coville have made enough single-handed miles around the world in larger than 60' trimarans to prove that that limit was (no longer?) necessary. Maybe the debacle in the 60' trimarans in 2002 (they got really thought weather) has weighted somehow, I don't know.

So this is not the "first-ever " edition to allow giants, as the front page claims, but the 4rth.

 

And still 4 weeks to wait ...

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So, where are Sam Davies and Dee Caffari?

 

Who do you like in what class? I guess I will root for Pete Goss, he seems to be just about the only anglophone...

 

Who knows what about the "Rhum Class"? Is this the class for mere mortals??

 

Is there a sailing simulator game that goes with this race like with the VOR etc?

 

Finally, is there ANYTHING that you can't not like about an ocean race with RUM in the title???? :P

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Not many 60's are doing it as noted on front page, Dee Caffari has no sponsorship.

 

I believe the name Route du Rhum explicitly refers to the beverage and it's origins in the French Carribean - you will find all sorts of flavoured Rums in the sailing bars of Brittany, it's a big tradition.

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1978 was the year for the first edition of the RdR, created by the french -mainly- because the brits decided to put a limit on size in the (then called) OSTAR.

During the 3rd edition, in 1986, Caradec disappeared and his big catamaran Royale capsized (or the other way around), so it was decided to put also a 60 feet limit from then on.

Now after 5 limited editions, the RdR is back to the origins, probably because Ellen McArthur, Francis Joyon and Thomas Coville have made enough single-handed miles around the world in larger than 60' trimarans to prove that that limit was (no longer?) necessary. Maybe the debacle in the 60' trimarans in 2002 (they got really thought weather) has weighted somehow, I don't know.

So this is not the "first-ever " edition to allow giants, as the front page claims, but the 4rth.

 

And still 4 weeks to wait ...

 

My bad. Cheers and thanks for the correction.

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So, where are Sam Davies and Dee Caffari?

 

Who do you like in what class? I guess I will root for Pete Goss, he seems to be just about the only anglophone...

 

Who knows what about the "Rhum Class"? Is this the class for mere mortals??

 

Is there a sailing simulator game that goes with this race like with the VOR etc?

 

Finally, is there ANYTHING that you can't not like about an ocean race with RUM in the title???? :P

 

Potter would tell us more but AFAIK, Dee Caffari who had lost her sponsor his now preparing to race the BWR with a spanish girl under a spanish sponsor's (GAES) colours.

 

As for Sam Davies, with her sponsor reducing his budget and the boat sold, she is quoted saying that she works on a Vendée campaign and a 2nd hand boat purchase, having secured 50% of the funding and looking for the other half.

 

Rhum Class: any boat or contraption which is not an IMOCA, a Class 40, a Multi 50 or an "Ultimate" (defined as any multihull larger than 60')

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Dee's sponsor is Spanish and has no interest in the French market. The focus is on the BWR. There are currently 8 Spanish sponsored IMOCA 60s and not one of them will do the RduR. There are 3 IMOCA 60s doing both RduR and the BWR (Foncia, Virbac, Bel), but that is a big ask of any team.

 

But why are we not asking the question of all the other English Solo Sailors, after all there is only one Brit entered? Phil Sharp, Brian Thompson, Mike Golding, Alex Bennett...and so many others. The truth is mostly sponsorship (though Brian is back to saliing multis and will do the Jules Verne on Banque Pop)...there just isn't the taste for it in the UK with regard to races like the RduR. Mostly you need to look for a bigger picture with the RduR being a stepping stome along the way.

If you can find an UK sponsor with a foothold in France,or vice versa then you stand more of a chance.

 

THis is going to be a great event, bloody difficult for the 60s to get any press with the giant multis there, and even harder for the 40s

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Wow ! I made the front page !! :P

 

Back to the subject, I agree with what have been said, most IMOCA are thinking about the BWR and putting their efforts there, and despite the incredible attention the RdR attracts in France, it's only in France and about 2 weeks every 4 years (Lemonchois made it in 7 days last time in an ORMA 60, but for monos and more normal people it takes longer) , and sponsors do take this into account.

It was nicknamed "the french transat" at the beginning and sadly it still is.

 

For mere mortals (with a budget) there's also the Multi 50: there are a couple of private entries there (Delirium one of them, just take a look:o.)

 

The race will probably be virtually raced at Virtual Regatta, they appear in the page as one of the sponsors (or are paying an add which is about the same).

I wonder if Ellen's old tri will make it to the start: it appears still as pre-inscription and without name, does anyone have news on Monnet and or the project ?

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Anyone with a spare bed for a couple of sailing media folks near St. Malo from the 26th through the 1st...let me know!

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Sam Davies is Sidney Gavignets eyes and ears on shore as he races Oman Air Majan, the 105' trimaran across the pond.

Clean- if it's only a room you're after, send me a PM and we'll go from there.

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Jean Le Cam enters Mike Golding's "Soren Gold" ex Ecover in the Barcelona World Race, with a Spanish crew and TBA franco-spanish sponsor.

 

link

 

Obviously:

The Imocas make the BWR choice.

The BWR organisers are busy brokering deals.

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Jean Le Cam enters Mike Golding's "Soren Gold" ex Ecover in the Barcelona World Race, with a Spanish crew and TBA franco-spanish sponsor.

 

link

 

Obviously:

The Imocas make the BWR choice.

The BWR organisers are busy brokering deals.

 

Sort of a hijack, but I'm wondering if Mike Golding is still thinking about Vendee 2012.

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I think that the issue for a lot of the UK sailors is that the economy has been pretty much wrecked over the last two years, and that would cramp anyone's efforts to raise sponsorship.

 

I'm surprised as the number of Spanish sponsors in the BWR. Aren't there tax breaks available?

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Final Route du Rhum preparation for Marco Nannini and UniCredit by Oliver Dewar

 

On Sunday 31 October, Italian solo sailor and Global Ocean Race 2011-12 (GOR) entry, Marco Nannini, will cross the start line of the Route du Rhum - La Banque Postale on Class40 UniCredit. Nannini’s racing campaign has been impeccably planned and the 32 year-old skipper has successfully juggled his job at UniCredit Group in the City of London with corporate sailing in The Solent, a round of sponsorship commitments while constantly upgrading his boat and ensuring that he has maximum training-time on the water and top quality tuition.

 

1563362699.jpg

 

 

Although Nannini is already an experienced solo sailor with a Jester Class-win in the 2009 OSTAR racing the Sigma 36, British Beagle, his Route du Rhum 1,000 mile qualifier undertaken in late August was the first single-handed offshore voyage on a vastly more powerful Class40. Despite sailing UniCredit (then called SunGard Front Arena) to second place overall in the double-handed Shetland Round Britain & Ireland Race with co-skipper, Paul Peggs, the qualifier would teach Nannini many valuable lessons.

 

Typically, the sailing was upwind and uncomfortable for the majority of the passage from his yacht’s base in Haslar Marina, Portsmouth, on England’s South Coast out into the Atlantic: “I had the wind on the nose for almost 36 hours and the bumping and crashing was relentless,” he recalls. “Progress was OK, but far slower than I'd wanted it to be.” The first 300 miles of the qualifier were punishing and Nannini tried every trick to reduce the violent motion as he sailed passed the lighthouse at the western tip of the Isles of Scilly under cover of night: “I had winds of 15-18 knots True but with gusts well into the 20s,” he says. “I sailed past Bishop Rock in zero visibility, two reefs and staysail and kept leaping into the air and crashing into waves. There seemed to be no angle to the wind I could sail to prevent it other than turning around and going home.”

 

However, Nannini endured the repetitive, mind-numbing discomfort until reaching his pre-planned turning point 300 miles due west of Ushant and although the breeze dropped for a short period, a deep depression rolling east across the North Atlantic threatened as lively, Force 7-ride back into the English Channel. “The wind was steady between 32 and 36 knots and I had my share of fun as the conditions deteriorated,” admits Nannini. “I was merrily taking some video of the impressive following seas when a wave hit UniCredit sideways and spun the boat into the wind and onto the other tack... believe me it got messy!”

 

Having let the runner off to prevent total destruction of the mainsail battens, Nannini eased the staysail sheet too quickly and found there was no stop knot in either sheet. “Silly me! They both ran out before I even realised and the most violent of flogging ensued: like having a crazy witch on the bow having a fit.” He then blew the staysail halyard, but the wind strength kept the filled sail aloft rather than dropping it to the deck. “I went to the bow to manhandle it down and, meanwhile, the two sheets managed to flog themselves into the most elaborate of tight knots I've ever seen,” he continues. “Forget a Monkey's Fist, these knots were the result of decades of advanced engineering studies by a madman!”

 

As UniCredit approached the Channel, fatigue swept over Nannini: “Keeping awake was the hardest part,” he admits. “There was plenty of traffic around and the visibility was dreadful. The night was absolutely pitch black and at times I had ships one or two miles away which I could clearly see on the instruments, but were swallowed by the mist and low cloud making keeping watch somewhat of an academic exercise.” Despite the twin dangers of fatigue and increased shipping, UniCredit docked safely at Haslar Marina. However, with two months until the start of the Route du Rhum, Nannini launched into a busy, pre-race sailing and corporate schedule with further training – including an intense session with the French offshore coaching maestro, Tanguy Leglatin – an appearance at UniCredit Group’s annual sailing meeting on Lake Constance, Germany, and a visit to UniCredit’s leasing division at the Genoa Boatshow.

 

Meanwhile, further work has been undertaken on his three year-old Class40 which was relaunched at Endeavour Quay in Portsmouth on Friday. “The bottom has been done and a few other jobs to improve life on board,” Nannini confirms. “We’ve fitted a stacking system down below that works with pulleys. We’ve also replaced the bobstay which has already been round the world once on the Portimão Global Ocean Race and I think that’s quite enough!” he adds. The Italian skipper has also enlisted some heavy-hitting expertise in weather analysis and pre-race routing for the 3,600 mile course from Saint Malo to Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadaloupe. “I’ve been using Jean-Yves Bernot for my pre-race weather strategy,” he confirms and Bernot’s skill – successfully supplied in the past to offshore royalty including Michel Desjoyeaux, Francis Joyon, Franck Cammas and Ellen MacArthur – is a formidable tool for Nannini.

 

He is also experimenting with new routing software. “I got to know Christian Eddie Dost of Brainaid Ocean Racing through the OSTAR,” explains Nannini. “During the race there was an online game with about 1,000 boats and Christian won overall. I got in contact with him and it turns out he is currently developing routing software and he has offered to provide this pre-race service for me. He’ll come to St Malo and we’ll talk weather strategy in the days building to the race.”

 

With just two weeks until the start of the Route du Rhum on Sunday 31st October, Nannini’s thoughts are already focused on the North Atlantic: “The first 48 hours are going to be the hardest,” he admits. The prospect of 85 boats crossing the start line at midday on Sunday with only a few hours before nightfall is truly daunting with the huge fleet in close proximity crossing the busy shipping lanes in the English Channel, around Ushant and through the Bay of Biscay. “Then, the next hardest part is the first five to seven days until we get closer to the Azores High,” he continues. “We may well be facing really horrible winter weather.” Nannini’s concern is justifiable: last year, 24 Class40s started the double-handed La Solidaire du Chocolat from Saint Nazaire in the Bay of Biscay heading for Mexico on 18th October and, after 24 hours, a cold front hammered the fleet forcing five boats to retire with sail damage and structural issue and one boat heading into port for sail repairs. The fleet continued to be battered by a further six violent storms in the eastern Atlantic.

 

Nannini’s race strategy is realistic and sound and with ten new-generation Class40s in the fleet, he feels a podium place is beyond his grasp. “As I don’t think I’ll be a contender for the podium, my priority is to stay with the pack and make small gains in relative positioning,” he explains. Within the fleet there are five Akilarias of the same, 2007 vintage as UniCredit and further 2007-08 designs from Verdier, Rogers, Owen Clarke, Finot and Manuard to keep the main pack of the fleet highly-competitive. However, tactics and weather analysis are clearly crucial and could reduce any performance gain for the newer boats. “Without taking any fliers or isolating myself from the main boats in the race, I’m hoping for a mid-fleet finish,” adds Nannini.

 

 

Follow the Route du Rhum here and read Marco Nannini’s blogs from UniCredit here

 

http://globaloceanrace.com/?page=news&news_id=424〈=en

 

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Final Route du Rhum preparation for Marco Nannini and UniCredit by Oliver Dewar

 

On Sunday 31 October, Italian solo sailor and Global Ocean Race 2011-12 (GOR) entry, Marco Nannini, will cross the start line of the Route du Rhum - La Banque Postale on Class40 UniCredit. Nannini's racing campaign has been impeccably planned and the 32 year-old skipper has successfully juggled his job at UniCredit Group in the City of London with corporate sailing in The Solent, a round of sponsorship commitments while constantly upgrading his boat and ensuring that he has maximum training-time on the water and top quality tuition.

 

1563362699.jpg

 

 

Although Nannini is already an experienced solo sailor with a Jester Class-win in the 2009 OSTAR racing the Sigma 36, British Beagle, his Route du Rhum 1,000 mile qualifier undertaken in late August was the first single-handed offshore voyage on a vastly more powerful Class40. Despite sailing UniCredit (then called SunGard Front Arena) to second place overall in the double-handed Shetland Round Britain & Ireland Race with co-skipper, Paul Peggs, the qualifier would teach Nannini many valuable lessons.

 

Typically, the sailing was upwind and uncomfortable for the majority of the passage from his yacht's base in Haslar Marina, Portsmouth, on England's South Coast out into the Atlantic: "I had the wind on the nose for almost 36 hours and the bumping and crashing was relentless," he recalls. "Progress was OK, but far slower than I'd wanted it to be." The first 300 miles of the qualifier were punishing and Nannini tried every trick to reduce the violent motion as he sailed passed the lighthouse at the western tip of the Isles of Scilly under cover of night: "I had winds of 15-18 knots True but with gusts well into the 20s," he says. "I sailed past Bishop Rock in zero visibility, two reefs and staysail and kept leaping into the air and crashing into waves. There seemed to be no angle to the wind I could sail to prevent it other than turning around and going home."

 

However, Nannini endured the repetitive, mind-numbing discomfort until reaching his pre-planned turning point 300 miles due west of Ushant and although the breeze dropped for a short period, a deep depression rolling east across the North Atlantic threatened as lively, Force 7-ride back into the English Channel. "The wind was steady between 32 and 36 knots and I had my share of fun as the conditions deteriorated," admits Nannini. "I was merrily taking some video of the impressive following seas when a wave hit UniCredit sideways and spun the boat into the wind and onto the other tack... believe me it got messy!"

 

Having let the runner off to prevent total destruction of the mainsail battens, Nannini eased the staysail sheet too quickly and found there was no stop knot in either sheet. "Silly me! They both ran out before I even realised and the most violent of flogging ensued: like having a crazy witch on the bow having a fit." He then blew the staysail halyard, but the wind strength kept the filled sail aloft rather than dropping it to the deck. "I went to the bow to manhandle it down and, meanwhile, the two sheets managed to flog themselves into the most elaborate of tight knots I've ever seen," he continues. "Forget a Monkey's Fist, these knots were the result of decades of advanced engineering studies by a madman!"

 

As UniCredit approached the Channel, fatigue swept over Nannini: "Keeping awake was the hardest part," he admits. "There was plenty of traffic around and the visibility was dreadful. The night was absolutely pitch black and at times I had ships one or two miles away which I could clearly see on the instruments, but were swallowed by the mist and low cloud making keeping watch somewhat of an academic exercise." Despite the twin dangers of fatigue and increased shipping, UniCredit docked safely at Haslar Marina. However, with two months until the start of the Route du Rhum, Nannini launched into a busy, pre-race sailing and corporate schedule with further training – including an intense session with the French offshore coaching maestro, Tanguy Leglatin – an appearance at UniCredit Group's annual sailing meeting on Lake Constance, Germany, and a visit to UniCredit's leasing division at the Genoa Boatshow.

 

Meanwhile, further work has been undertaken on his three year-old Class40 which was relaunched at Endeavour Quay in Portsmouth on Friday. "The bottom has been done and a few other jobs to improve life on board," Nannini confirms. "We've fitted a stacking system down below that works with pulleys. We've also replaced the bobstay which has already been round the world once on the Portimão Global Ocean Race and I think that's quite enough!" he adds. The Italian skipper has also enlisted some heavy-hitting expertise in weather analysis and pre-race routing for the 3,600 mile course from Saint Malo to Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadaloupe. "I've been using Jean-Yves Bernot for my pre-race weather strategy," he confirms and Bernot's skill – successfully supplied in the past to offshore royalty including Michel Desjoyeaux, Francis Joyon, Franck Cammas and Ellen MacArthur – is a formidable tool for Nannini.

 

He is also experimenting with new routing software. "I got to know Christian Eddie Dost of Brainaid Ocean Racing through the OSTAR," explains Nannini. "During the race there was an online game with about 1,000 boats and Christian won overall. I got in contact with him and it turns out he is currently developing routing software and he has offered to provide this pre-race service for me. He'll come to St Malo and we'll talk weather strategy in the days building to the race."

 

With just two weeks until the start of the Route du Rhum on Sunday 31st October, Nannini's thoughts are already focused on the North Atlantic: "The first 48 hours are going to be the hardest," he admits. The prospect of 85 boats crossing the start line at midday on Sunday with only a few hours before nightfall is truly daunting with the huge fleet in close proximity crossing the busy shipping lanes in the English Channel, around Ushant and through the Bay of Biscay. "Then, the next hardest part is the first five to seven days until we get closer to the Azores High," he continues. "We may well be facing really horrible winter weather." Nannini's concern is justifiable: last year, 24 Class40s started the double-handed La Solidaire du Chocolat from Saint Nazaire in the Bay of Biscay heading for Mexico on 18th October and, after 24 hours, a cold front hammered the fleet forcing five boats to retire with sail damage and structural issue and one boat heading into port for sail repairs. The fleet continued to be battered by a further six violent storms in the eastern Atlantic.

 

Nannini's race strategy is realistic and sound and with ten new-generation Class40s in the fleet, he feels a podium place is beyond his grasp. "As I don't think I'll be a contender for the podium, my priority is to stay with the pack and make small gains in relative positioning," he explains. Within the fleet there are five Akilarias of the same, 2007 vintage as UniCredit and further 2007-08 designs from Verdier, Rogers, Owen Clarke, Finot and Manuard to keep the main pack of the fleet highly-competitive. However, tactics and weather analysis are clearly crucial and could reduce any performance gain for the newer boats. "Without taking any fliers or isolating myself from the main boats in the race, I'm hoping for a mid-fleet finish," adds Nannini.

 

 

Follow the Route du Rhum here and read Marco Nannini's blogs from UniCredit here

 

http://globaloceanrace.com/?page=news&news_id=424〈=en

 

 

+100 -- Go Marco, GO!

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Any locals know of a spare hotel/motel room available in St Malo for the Saturday and Sunday night? Can't find anything on the net and I suspect they have long booked out.

 

Cheers

Mojo

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Thomas Coville had something to say about his main rivals, but of course it was en french :rolleyes:

Not having found it translated I'll oblige, as I found it interesting:

 

Original here.

 

Franck Cammas on Groupama 3. « He's the one I know best, cause we did last winter a round the world record (Trophée Jules Verne). In multi, it's the most successful boat ever built, the one that piles more miles and budget. Franck Cammas has never beat me in solo, but he has gained confidence. He has a spirit of synthesis unbelievable. Franck progression is that of a compulsive eater (french expression ?) and always choses the most effective solutions . »

 

Francis Joyon on Idec. « Francis' boat looks like a Sodebo cousin. But he has pushed Idec's simplicity to the limit, even giving up systems like the hooks of the main sail or gennaker, which I could not go without. Francis prepares and conceives all by himself while my boat profits from the contribution of all people around me. The approach is different. I admire Francis a lot, he has been a source of inspiration unbelievable. »

 

Yann Guichard on Gitana 11. « Gitana XI is the most aesthetic, the most aerial, the only one developed specially for this Route du Rhum. I place her skipper in the top 10 of the multi helmsmen; athlete, strategist… I'm sure we are going to see him in the America's Cup ! Yann comes from the olympic field and I've never sailed with him. But I dream to helm his magnificent boat ! »

 

Sidney Gavignet on Oman Air Majan. « Our projects are cousins : our boats have the same plans and Sidney has sailed with us, last year (transatlantic La Trinité-New York). Also we are of same age; we have done the America's Cup together in 1995 and raced the Figaro at the same time. We both do like the Volvo Ocean Race and anglo-saxon crews. Today is the technique that set us apart as we have not make the same choices about the foils, the canting mast or automatic pilot. Sidney has not sailed as much as I have with his boat, but he will be freer from result's pressure than me, Franck, Francis or Yann, so he's going to enjoy the ride to the end. »

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Without a doubt this is the biggest and baddest collection of hot rod sailboats ever . The list of skippers is a who's who of offshore performance sailing . The monster muti race alone matches all the big record holders against each other . Joyon- Idec ,Camas- Groupama 3 , Colville-Sodebo . Can't wait to see what Dejoyeux does to the 60 fleet . The 40's sem to be strong as an offshore developmental fleet . This kind of sailing seems to be doing just fine .

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Anyone with a spare bed for a couple of sailing media folks near St. Malo from the 26th through the 1st...let me know!

 

Could have. I will be in St Malo from tomorrow morning till 12th Nov, and can probably help with beds.

 

PM me or call round to Marc Noel Voile on the Sablons and speak to Marc or me. Might even invite you all to a party there on Saturday.

Colin

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Any locals know of a spare hotel/motel room available in St Malo for the Saturday and Sunday night? Can't find anything on the net and I suspect they have long booked out.

 

Cheers

Mojo

 

PM me. I will know tomorrow how many I can cope with...

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In St Malo from tomorrow for 3 weeks, so anyone having trouble with accommodation or whatever, PM me or call in to Marc Noel Voile at the Sablons marina. We will do what we can. Up for meeting, gassing and drinking any time, plus we are having a launch bash for Boatshed France on Saturday early evening.

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Got shit tons of vid and some pics of St. Malo. Consider my mind blown.

 

Warned ya! Quite the scene, eh?

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Piece on Pete Goss on the site,

Really really hope he's competitive..

 

And clean, jealous isn't the word!

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And clean, jealous isn't the word!

 

+1. clean, i hate you i hate you i hate you. that place looks INSANE in that video. a race of that caliber with such an incredible fleet of boats and skippers. wow. the french have their priorities straight, that's for sure...

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i will be attending for the second time the RDR. Ill be there on friday night and saturday. I found a place on a charter boat for the start.

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Anyone with a spare bed for a couple of sailing media folks near St. Malo from the 26th through the 1st...let me know!

 

Could have. I will be in St Malo from tomorrow morning till 12th Nov, and can probably help with beds.

 

PM me or call round to Marc Noel Voile on the Sablons and speak to Marc or me. Might even invite you all to a party there on Saturday.

Colin

 

Thanks to Kairos/Veolia/Neutrogena logistics phenom Nicola Breymeier, we are all set. We arrive at around 7 AM on Saturday after an all-night drive from Hyeres, will look you up!

 

Feel free to call/text on 06 47 37 91 65, a toute a l'heure!

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Anyone with a spare bed for a couple of sailing media folks near St. Malo from the 26th through the 1st...let me know!

 

Could have. I will be in St Malo from tomorrow morning till 12th Nov, and can probably help with beds.

 

PM me or call round to Marc Noel Voile on the Sablons and speak to Marc or me. Might even invite you all to a party there on Saturday.

Colin

 

Thanks to Kairos/Veolia/Neutrogena logistics phenom Nicola Breymeier, we are all set. We arrive at around 7 AM on Saturday after an all-night drive from Hyeres, will look you up!

 

Feel free to call/text on 06 47 37 91 65, a toute a l'heure!

 

yo clean , ill try to find you in the ocean of people that will be there on saturday. I dont know if you will be able , but if you can go see the boat going thru the gates on sundau its an awesome moment. Last time there was a crew from VM materiaux and PRB chanting louder and louder to cover each others. I just cant fucking wait man!

 

ill be taking shots with my SLR all day saturday. I need a tripod quick!

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Thanks for the offer CMS, unfortunately I'll be working, so can't get there. Looks fucking amazing from the videos.

 

Cheers

Mojo

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Anyone seen any listing of the Classe 40's and what the boats are? The site has the skipper's and boat's names, but no info on designer/builder of the boats - it will be really interesting to see if any one designer's 40's come out on top (depending on the predominant conditions are), be nice to have an idea of which boats are what. 46 Classe 40's!! - wow...

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Anyone seen any listing of the Classe 40's and what the boats are? The site has the skipper's and boat's names, but no info on designer/builder of the boats - it will be really interesting to see if any one designer's 40's come out on top (depending on the predominant conditions are), be nice to have an idea of which boats are what. 46 Classe 40's!! - wow...

 

 

Here is what I can share...I think I have them all, sorted by boat type.

 

Last Name First Name Boat # Type Architect

BURTON Louis 2 Pogo40 Finot/Conq

BISSAINTE Willy 6 Pogo40 Finot/Conq

CHOLLET Gilbert 14 Pogo40 Finot/Conq

DREUX Jimmy 22 Pogo40 Finot/Conq

VAN WEYNBERGH Denis 40 Pogo40 Finot/Conq

DAVAL Arnaud 50 Pogo40 Finot/Conq

JOLY Marc 57 Pogo40 Finot/Conq

LAUTROU Pierre-Yves 68 Pogo40 S Finot/Conq

CONSORTE Davide 69 Pogo40 S Finot/Conq

CRIQUIOCHE Jean-Edouard 85 Pogo40 S² Finot/Conq

TROUSSEL Nicolas 95 Pogo40 S² Finot/Conq

GUILLEMOT Régis 96 Pogo40 S² Finot/Conq

GRIMONT Damien 100 Pogo40 S² Finot/Conq

GUILLONNEAU Bertrand 25 Ker40 J. Marin

COATNOAN Christophe 60 JPK J. Valer

BOUGARD Patrice 91 JPK J. Valer

BEHAGEL Marc 27 Akilaria Lombard

NANNINI Marco 41 Akilaria Lombard

GRASSI Olivier 42 Akilaria Lombard

AUGEIX David 45 Akilaria Lombard

GALMARD Eric 47 Akilaria Lombard

STRAUSS Axel 53 Akilaria Lombard

BOTIN Gonzalo 65 Proto Lombard

BAZIN Pierre-Marie 71 Akilaria Racing Lombard

AMEDEO Fabrice 81 Akilaria Racing Lombard

ROMPPANEN Jouni 82 Akilaria Racing Lombard

BOUCHARD Thierry 83 Akilaria RC II Lombard

SINGELIN Olivier 89 Akilaria Lombard

GOSS Pete 93 Akilaria RC II Lombard

FISTON Philippe 99 Akilaria RC II Lombard

MANUARD Sam 84 BM40 Manuard

ANGOULVANT François 18 Sabrosa 40 O. Gouard

BEAUVAIS Rémi 32 LNM 40 O. Philippot

AASBERG Rune 36 Express40 Owen Clarke Design

SWETS Hubert 38 CC40 Owen Clarke Design

RIECHERS Joerg 79 FS40 Owen Clarke Design

COLMAN Conrad 90 Jaz40 MkII Owen Clarke Design

DE LAMOTTE Tanguy 30 Rogers Class40 Rogers Yacht Design

SEGUIN Damien 52 Rogers Class40 Rogers Yacht Design

STAMM Bernard 59 Rogers Class40 Rogers Yacht Design

LEPESQUEUX Marc 26 Jumbo Rolland

TOPALOV Dimitar 92 ORCA T. Humphreys

TOLKEIN Richard ? ORCA T. Humphreys

NOBLET Yvan 55 Tyker40 Verdier

RUYANT Thomas 88 Tyker40 Verdier

DEFERT Eric 98 Tyker40 Verdier

 

edit: sorry, tried to format it into a table but it did not seem to work and I don't have time to fix it.

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Anyone with a spare bed for a couple of sailing media folks near St. Malo from the 26th through the 1st...let me know!

 

Could have. I will be in St Malo from tomorrow morning till 12th Nov, and can probably help with beds.

 

PM me or call round to Marc Noel Voile on the Sablons and speak to Marc or me. Might even invite you all to a party there on Saturday.

Colin

 

Thanks to Kairos/Veolia/Neutrogena logistics phenom Nicola Breymeier, we are all set. We arrive at around 7 AM on Saturday after an all-night drive from Hyeres, will look you up!

 

Feel free to call/text on 06 47 37 91 65, a toute a l'heure!

 

.....and we will be here to welcome you with bells on!

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I'll be arriving late Saturday. I finally found a hotel room but trains from Paris are completely sold out till late afternoon. Any chance of getting on a boat for the start? Get togethers on Sunday soir?

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Just about 200 of 1200 km up the road from hyeres as we begin our all-night road trip from the tip of France's Med coast to the tip of it's Atlantic Coast. It would be harder to travel further inside this country, and while it's not an easy drive especially with a week of nearly no sleep and then 8 hours of holding a camera today, it's still shorter than driving through Texas.

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Philippe Monnet got a sponsor and will be racing with Ellen's old tri !!

Another big one to follow :)

http://www.routedurhum-labanquepostale.com/fr/s03_news/s03p02_detail_actu.php?backup_mode=accueil&news=1529

 

Oman Sail's old tri to be more precise! I hope she doesn't beat Oman Air Majan- that would be embarrassing!

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Temps de commencer à parler merde:

Imoca top 3:

Fuzzy (who else), Guillemot, and the Veterinarian (JP Dick)

 

Classe 40: Really can anyone pick this shit fight? But here goes.

Stamm, De Lamotte, Pete Goss.

Surprised there aren't more Rosbifs but an RdR must be expensive. The Classe 40 needs to bring back the AZAB as a race on their calendar.

 

Multi50:

F. Y. Escoffier, Le Blevec, Lemonchois

Good to see some more new boats are getting built to the rule.

 

Les Ilimtees (Ultime):

Camas, Coville, Joyon

 

Classe Rhum (I'm picking by knowing the names here):

Capelle, Giroire

 

Based on what's going on this side (American) of the pond it could be interesting with such an active hurricane season.

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Classe 40: Really can anyone pick this shit fight? But here goes.

Stamm, De Lamotte, Pete Goss.

Surprised there aren't more Rosbifs but an RdR must be expensive. The Classe 40 needs to bring back the AZAB as a race on their calendar.

 

I am behind the first two, but Pete Goss? Not taking anything away from Pete, but I like Sam on his own design. Reichers will be a competitor too. Why is Soldini not racing?!

 

Les Ilimtees (Ultime):

Camas, Coville, Joyon

 

This race in the ultimates is just going to be too great! I like Idec in this one.

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does anyone know what the internet coverage is going to be like? i.e. can i get home from the bar on halloween and watch the start? is Clean planning any on the water shit or no?

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just to add to the class 40 predictions and discussion,

 

Phil Sharp, the 2006 RdR class 40 winner had this to say:

 

There are a group there taking it very seriously who are very well prepared. In particular I think Bernard Stamm who ticks all the boxes, has done well in the big races, the Route du Chocolat, speed testing over the last couple of months, is one of the best navigators in the race, as well as having a huge amount of ocean experience. Nicolas Troussel is probably the favourite. I would like to see a good battle between the two of them. I hope he does not walk away with it straight away, Nicolas Troussel. Then there is Yvann Noblet who now has a good boat. I rate him quite highly as a skipper and raced against him in the Mini, he has always raced wooden boats he has built himself, and now he has a good boat he could be a force. And then there is Tanguy (De Lamotte) who has done a huge amount of miles on his boat. I think it will also interesting to see Sam Manuard with his new boat, it could be make or break for him. If everything stays together he’ll be at the sharp end of the fleet.”

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does anyone know what the internet coverage is going to be like? i.e. can i get home from the bar on halloween and watch the start? is Clean planning any on the water shit or no?

 

Race coverage on the race website for the start (2 hours direct live).

 

Check also the regional french channel website :

 

http://route-du-rhum...ncetv.fr/videos => select sheet "les directs".

 

PS : 7h15 CET : internet TV live or lock exit of IMOCA & CLASS40.

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Will be on a RIB in the nastiest chop known to man - over 20 giant ferries moving around at 15 knots, and 500+ other boats doing whatever the hell they do. So no OTW, sorry. But I WILL be streaming the video that I shoot - from aboard the Veolia tender - when I get back from the water. And it will be special!

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Was supposed to go on the front page this morning.

 

Version:1.0 StartHTML:0000000167 EndHTML:0000006265 StartFragment:0000000487 EndFragment:0000006249 bon voyage

 

 

 

 

Our little Fiat has made it three quarters of the way, from sea to shining sea, near the end of our French journey, after an all-night drive from the Farr 30 Worlds in Hyères to the Route du Rhum start in St. Malo. It would be hard to drive further and still stay in this country, and our wallet knows it, having shelled out more than a hundred dollars on tolls alone. Ironically, fuel costs are tollerable, as the Fiat's 40 miles per gallon is two-and-a-halfs times as efficient as the SA Dodge Ram, while fuel costs two-and-a-half times as much as the gas-happy US of A.

 

 

 

 

And while we were bummed to miss the forecast big air on the final day of what turned out to be quite an exciting Farr 30 World Championship, it's hard not to get excited as we weave through miles of traffic clogging the road enroute to the Route du Rhum. It certainly helped pump us up to have been flipping through the radio stations, hearing near constant updates on radio stations, updating listeners on the RdR fleet, from the Côtes d'Azur to the Côte Breton. Michel Desjoyeux actually did an 8 minute interview with a Toulon top 40 station; the equivalant of a Trans-Pac skipper being called for a prime-time piece on WXRK in New York. Can you imagine?

 

 

 

 

We apologize for our delayed updates from the Farr 30 Worlds, and from the trip in general. While we were able to broadcast a fairly smooth and awesomely commentated live stream from Hyères (with the help of Sebastièn Destremeau and John Demourkas), we simply have crammed so much into this "vacation" (ha!) that most of the interviews, pictures and lessons we've learned will be trickling onto the front page over the next week.

 

 

 

 

In the meantime, you can follow the latest from St. Malo on the Route du Rhum thread, and go to the Farr 30 Facebook page for links to a bunch of great photos and archived race footage from Hyères.

 

 

 

 

And don't stray far from your computer tomorrow. We will have a delayed stream of interviews with one of France's best ocean racers (including info about Roland Jourdain's just-announced MOD-70 round-the-world project) as well as the start of one of the world's most famous races coming to you as soon as we can get it to you.

 

 

 

 

For the 99% of you who have never and will never get to be at this start, prepare to have your mind blown away. This race exemplifies what we're learning about the French and especially about the Breton. Sailing and the sea is not a religion for them. It's something more - an identity.

 

 

 

 

A huge thank you to Veolia, Kairos, Ryan and Nicola Breymeier, Ryan Finn Ocean Racing and Conrad Coleman for helping grease the skids for us here in St. Malo. And of course, to Magic Marine for providing us with some awesome gear to keep out Brittany's chill. And be sure to check out the Farr 30 Class website and the Velux5Oceans race if you appreciate the support of our coverage as we do.

 

 

 

 

edit: We're here. Enjoy some great shots of the crowds and more from Saturday afternoon. Meredith Block Photos.

 

 

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This is awesome clean, I've decided to give my support to Pete Goss, cause along with being one hell of a sailor, he's an absolute hero!

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As the crepe said: Whaou! Amazing footage and incredible live streaming considering the logistics, especially when you consider that Virtual Regatta has crashed with only 81,000 players!

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The usual (good) race tracker is live here: http://routedurhum-labanquepostale.geovoile.com/2010/

 

Guess what? After three hours of race, Cammas was leading the race. But the 70' ex-ORMA Gitana is still quick.

In IMOCA, JP Dick is giving a hard time to Mich Desj...

The Multi 50 seem very quick on today's flat-ish water: Y. Escoffier on his 50' Crepes Whaou is faster than his daughter on her (old) ultimate.

 

Overall, I think that I will be cheering for Sydney Gavignet: being French I have always had sympathy for the outsiders...

Can't wait for the next tracker update, to see who's gonna come out of the channel in a good position!

 

C.

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Seeing how Cammas managed to drive his boat boat in less than ideal conditions at the start, ie tight and very little wind, I think he can win this one. As much as I like Sydney, I'm afraid he doesn't have a boat fast enough...

 

 

In IMOCA, my bet is on JP Dick. don't forget he was leading the Vendee at a good pace when he hit something and broke one rudder. Abd he really wants to win this one!

 

 

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Agree with everything said so far, is anyone following the Rhum category?

Some Stoner boats in there, check out Joris de Carlan's Boat:

 

 

610x.jpg

 

 

 

what the hell is going on with the hull?

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Agree with everything said so far, is anyone following the Rhum category?

Some Stoner boats in there, check out Joris de Carlan's Boat:

 

 

610x.jpg

 

 

 

what the hell is going on with the hull?

 

Urgh! No wonder he is last of the fleet with such an ugly thing!

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Agree with everything said so far, is anyone following the Rhum category?

Some Stoner boats in there, check out Joris de Carlan's Boat:

 

 

610x.jpg

 

 

 

what the hell is going on with the hull?

 

Urgh! No wonder he is last of the fleet with such an ugly thing!

 

I don't necessarily think it's ugly, I just want to know why it has the float thingies

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Reminds me of an F-27 Tri that they forgot to unfold

 

 

Agree with everything said so far, is anyone following the Rhum category?

Some Stoner boats in there, check out Joris de Carlan's Boat:

 

 

610x.jpg

 

 

 

what the hell is going on with the hull?

 

Urgh! No wonder he is last of the fleet with such an ugly thing!

 

I don't necessarily think it's ugly, I just want to know why it has the float thingies

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"22: the age of the youngest skipper of the event, Joris de Carlan. From nearby Saint Brieuc the youngster will set off on 31st October aboard the oldest boat of the fleet, Generik – Exp’hair, a 12.6 m boat built by his father and uncle in 1972 and launched in 1976."

 

I'd like to find out more about this crazy boat!

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Coville is leading on Sodebo, with Gavignet right behind on Majan. Cammas over 30 miles behind on Groupama.

 

in IMOCA, Jourdain has jumped out to a small lead on Desjoyeaux, with JP Dick running mid-fleet.

 

in Class 40, Stamm and Troussel are both running near the front, while Conrad Coleman and Nannini are near the back.

 

fuck this race is going to dominate my life for a couple of weeks, staying glued to my laptop or phone when i'm not busy.

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Coville is leading on Sodebo, with Gavignet right behind on Majan. Cammas over 30 miles behind on Groupama.

 

in IMOCA, Jourdain has jumped out to a small lead on Desjoyeaux, with JP Dick running mid-fleet.

 

in Class 40, Stamm and Troussel are both running near the front, while Conrad Coleman and Nannini are near the back.

 

fuck this race is going to dominate my life for a couple of weeks, staying glued to my laptop or phone when i'm not busy.

 

In distance to goal-post yes!

 

Getting interesting ! Cammas a lot more East (more than 100 miles from Gavignet) and the further South, with the best speed.

Gavignet right up North West, Coville in a center position

 

Looking at the current gribs at 12 to 30h on the website, the "just after Finisterre" looks interesting, timing shall be crucial.

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Coville is leading on Sodebo, with Gavignet right behind on Majan. Cammas over 30 miles behind on Groupama.

 

in IMOCA, Jourdain has jumped out to a small lead on Desjoyeaux, with JP Dick running mid-fleet.

 

in Class 40, Stamm and Troussel are both running near the front, while Conrad Coleman and Nannini are near the back.

 

fuck this race is going to dominate my life for a couple of weeks, staying glued to my laptop or phone when i'm not busy.

 

In distance to goal-post yes!

 

Getting interesting ! Cammas a lot more East (more than 100 miles from Gavignet) and the further South, with the best speed.

Gavignet right up North West, Coville in a center position

 

Looking at the current gribs at 12 to 30h on the website, the "just after Finisterre" looks interesting, timing shall be crucial.

Moody, Did you catch any reason for Marc being at the back of the IMOCA Fleet?

 

Looks like all classes a going to be close for the next few days before there gets to be more of a spread.

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Coville is leading on Sodebo, with Gavignet right behind on Majan. Cammas over 30 miles behind on Groupama.

 

in IMOCA, Jourdain has jumped out to a small lead on Desjoyeaux, with JP Dick running mid-fleet.

 

in Class 40, Stamm and Troussel are both running near the front, while Conrad Coleman and Nannini are near the back.

 

fuck this race is going to dominate my life for a couple of weeks, staying glued to my laptop or phone when i'm not busy.

 

In distance to goal-post yes!

 

Getting interesting ! Cammas a lot more East (more than 100 miles from Gavignet) and the further South, with the best speed.

Gavignet right up North West, Coville in a center position

 

Looking at the current gribs at 12 to 30h on the website, the "just after Finisterre" looks interesting, timing shall be crucial.

Moody, Did you catch any reason for Marc being at the back of the IMOCA Fleet?

Looks like all classes a going to be close for the next few days before there gets to be more of a spread.

 

No did not ! too many new boats ?

 

Potter: if you can catch his french, listen to the Audio of Thomas Coville (website main page) at the time of the morning poll, which he had yet looked at. Interesting that he did not realize at the time where Gavignet and Cammas had disappeared, and stating he was playing the middle till the next gribs before choosing his options, while both Gavignet and Cammas had obviously taken differing decisions during the night. These "ultimates" go so fast (Finisterre in 1 day) that the chess-play is impressive.

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During the commentary one of the French guys asked Sam Davies whether the race would be more popular in the UK if the race was called 'La Route du Thé'!

 

The live commentary and coverage has set a very high standard for other races- quite incredible!

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Looking at the current gribs at 12 to 30h on the website, the "just after Finisterre" looks interesting, timing shall be crucial.

 

I'm no expert at reading gribs, but the 12-30 hours forecast on the RdR tracker makes it look like Oman Air Majan could be making sweet on the deal- although it will be more on the nose, he should benefit from the stronger sea and his ability to cut through waves. The guys further south are looking at a wind-hole ahead but better direction.

Sidney said before the race that IDEC and Sodeb'O have an advantage upwind because of their foils- up to 3 knots boatspeed advantage so he'll be looking for that separation to pay in his favour.

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Looking at the current gribs at 12 to 30h on the website, the "just after Finisterre" looks interesting, timing shall be crucial.

 

I'm no expert at reading gribs, but the 12-30 hours forecast on the RdR tracker makes it look like Oman Air Majan could be making sweet on the deal- although it will be more on the nose, he should benefit from the stronger sea and his ability to cut through waves. The guys further south are looking at a wind-hole ahead but better direction.Sidney said before the race that IDEC and Sodeb'O have an advantage upwind because of their foils- up to 3 knots boatspeed advantage so he'll be looking for that separation to pay in his favour.

 

Look at Cammas he may sneak in between the "wind-hole" and Spanish coast.

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Looking at the current gribs at 12 to 30h on the website, the "just after Finisterre" looks interesting, timing shall be crucial.

 

I'm no expert at reading gribs, but the 12-30 hours forecast on the RdR tracker makes it look like Oman Air Majan could be making sweet on the deal- although it will be more on the nose, he should benefit from the stronger sea and his ability to cut through waves. The guys further south are looking at a wind-hole ahead but better direction.Sidney said before the race that IDEC and Sodeb'O have an advantage upwind because of their foils- up to 3 knots boatspeed advantage so he'll be looking for that separation to pay in his favour.

 

Look at Cammas he may sneak in between the "wind-hole" and Spanish coast.

 

Brave move but if it pays off he will slingshot across to guadeloupe while the others are left scratching their heads! Philippe Monnet is doing well on the pizza box considering he only found out 5 days ago he would be on the start line!

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Goss is doing alright in the 40s...

God I love this race!

29th of 44 boats? I have to wonder if I am seeing the same data.

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I love this race especially this year : ther are the formula 1 on the first line, the formule 3000 just after and 40 WRC cars ( class 40) fighting hard. I like the mix of class especially as there is a strong competition in each class!

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Coville is leading on Sodebo, with Gavignet right behind on Majan. Cammas over 30 miles behind on Groupama.

 

in IMOCA, Jourdain has jumped out to a small lead on Desjoyeaux, with JP Dick running mid-fleet.

 

in Class 40, Stamm and Troussel are both running near the front, while Conrad Coleman and Nannini are near the back.

 

fuck this race is going to dominate my life for a couple of weeks, staying glued to my laptop or phone when i'm not busy.

 

In distance to goal-post yes!

 

Getting interesting ! Cammas a lot more East (more than 100 miles from Gavignet) and the further South, with the best speed.

Gavignet right up North West, Coville in a center position

 

Looking at the current gribs at 12 to 30h on the website, the "just after Finisterre" looks interesting, timing shall be crucial.

Moody, Did you catch any reason for Marc being at the back of the IMOCA Fleet?

Looks like all classes a going to be close for the next few days before there gets to be more of a spread.

 

No did not ! too many new boats ?

 

Potter: if you can catch his french, listen to the Audio of Thomas Coville (website main page) at the time of the morning poll, which he had yet looked at. Interesting that he did not realize at the time where Gavignet and Cammas had disappeared, and stating he was playing the middle till the next gribs before choosing his options, while both Gavignet and Cammas had obviously taken differing decisions during the night. These "ultimates" go so fast (Finisterre in 1 day) that the chess-play is impressive.

 

I am not sure 'new' boats counts for Marc's position, as he is even behind DCNS, however he seems to be up to speed and there is a long way to go.

 

I am intrigued with the Ultime Class. They are allowed Weather Routing, and for sure Sodebo and Groupama are faster than Oman upwind, but to see such a wide East/West spread so soon is intriguing. So even the routers studying the wx are not certain at the moment.

 

For the IMOCA's and the 40s will the pain now (getting West), and taking the shorter route, pay off? With no substantial trade winds (well, it is pretty early) then I really think it could. For the Ultime, they move too quickly for me to work when they will be in the next weather!! B)

 

As for Goss, 29th is bloody good after so long away from Single handed racing, but I thought there were a lot more than 44 40s in the race?

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Coville is leading on Sodebo, with Gavignet right behind on Majan. Cammas over 30 miles behind on Groupama.

 

in IMOCA, Jourdain has jumped out to a small lead on Desjoyeaux, with JP Dick running mid-fleet.

 

in Class 40, Stamm and Troussel are both running near the front, while Conrad Coleman and Nannini are near the back.

 

fuck this race is going to dominate my life for a couple of weeks, staying glued to my laptop or phone when i'm not busy.

 

In distance to goal-post yes!

 

Getting interesting ! Cammas a lot more East (more than 100 miles from Gavignet) and the further South, with the best speed.

Gavignet right up North West, Coville in a center position

 

Looking at the current gribs at 12 to 30h on the website, the "just after Finisterre" looks interesting, timing shall be crucial.

Moody, Did you catch any reason for Marc being at the back of the IMOCA Fleet?

Looks like all classes a going to be close for the next few days before there gets to be more of a spread.

 

No did not ! too many new boats ?

 

Potter: if you can catch his french, listen to the Audio of Thomas Coville (website main page) at the time of the morning poll, which he had yet looked at. Interesting that he did not realize at the time where Gavignet and Cammas had disappeared, and stating he was playing the middle till the next gribs before choosing his options, while both Gavignet and Cammas had obviously taken differing decisions during the night. These "ultimates" go so fast (Finisterre in 1 day) that the chess-play is impressive.

 

I am not sure 'new' boats counts for Marc's position, as he is even behind DCNS, however he seems to be up to speed and there is a long way to go.

 

I am intrigued with the Ultime Class. They are allowed Weather Routing, and for sure Sodebo and Groupama are faster than Oman upwind, but to see such a wide East/West spread so soon is intriguing. So even the routers studying the wx are not certain at the moment.

 

For the IMOCA's and the 40s will the pain now (getting West), and taking the shorter route, pay off? With no substantial trade winds (well, it is pretty early) then I really think it could. For the Ultime, they move too quickly for me to work when they will be in the next weather!! B)

 

As for Goss, 29th is bloody good after so long away from Single handed racing, but I thought there were a lot more than 44 40s in the race?

 

A lot more than 44? Jeez.... the largest box-rule class ever for a race of this magnitude and you want more! The class has about 105 with issued numbers, of which a dozen are in the US so that 46 number is a pretty good percentage of the class. The Penn Duick would have freaked out if there were many more than that. And St. Malo was running out of room at the docks.

 

In reality, 46 ended up signing up. One dropped out (DNS) prior to the start due to damage incurred by a fishing boat hitting it during the delivery. The other dropped out DNS due to skipper injury.

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Coville is leading on Sodebo, with Gavignet right behind on Majan. Cammas over 30 miles behind on Groupama.

 

in IMOCA, Jourdain has jumped out to a small lead on Desjoyeaux, with JP Dick running mid-fleet.

 

in Class 40, Stamm and Troussel are both running near the front, while Conrad Coleman and Nannini are near the back.

 

fuck this race is going to dominate my life for a couple of weeks, staying glued to my laptop or phone when i'm not busy.

 

In distance to goal-post yes!

 

Getting interesting ! Cammas a lot more East (more than 100 miles from Gavignet) and the further South, with the best speed.

Gavignet right up North West, Coville in a center position

 

Looking at the current gribs at 12 to 30h on the website, the "just after Finisterre" looks interesting, timing shall be crucial.

Moody, Did you catch any reason for Marc being at the back of the IMOCA Fleet?

Looks like all classes a going to be close for the next few days before there gets to be more of a spread.

 

No did not ! too many new boats ?

 

Potter: if you can catch his french, listen to the Audio of Thomas Coville (website main page) at the time of the morning poll, which he had yet looked at. Interesting that he did not realize at the time where Gavignet and Cammas had disappeared, and stating he was playing the middle till the next gribs before choosing his options, while both Gavignet and Cammas had obviously taken differing decisions during the night. These "ultimates" go so fast (Finisterre in 1 day) that the chess-play is impressive.

 

I am not sure 'new' boats counts for Marc's position, as he is even behind DCNS, however he seems to be up to speed and there is a long way to go.

 

I am intrigued with the Ultime Class. They are allowed Weather Routing, and for sure Sodebo and Groupama are faster than Oman upwind, but to see such a wide East/West spread so soon is intriguing. So even the routers studying the wx are not certain at the moment.

 

For the IMOCA's and the 40s will the pain now (getting West), and taking the shorter route, pay off? With no substantial trade winds (well, it is pretty early) then I really think it could. For the Ultime, they move too quickly for me to work when they will be in the next weather!! B)

 

As for Goss, 29th is bloody good after so long away from Single handed racing, but I thought there were a lot more than 44 40s in the race?

 

I was guessing that the East road was "level-crossing" (as the French would say) prone, with a risk of being gobbled by the wind-hole, Groupama - which looks faster - may have found the risk worthwile, while others did not.

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Goss is doing alright in the 40s...

God I love this race!

29th of 44 boats? I have to wonder if I am seeing the same data.

 

 

 

It's okay considering he has never raced a 40 before and is coming back to solo racing after 13 years,,,, Right?

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damn, this race just keeps getting better. i went to bed and everything was different when i woke up! that east/ west split in the big multi's is insane. Will be interesting to see how it pays off for Cammas, but even more so for Gavignet. He's wayyyy out there to the west. i didn't look at the gribs, but is he trying to go up and over some weather system and get strong wind off the beam or stern? what is he doing? i'm sure he's being routed and has intelligent people helping him make decisions. interesting.

 

Class 40 seems to be settling in with the 3 favorites running strong at the front: Stamm, Ruyant and Troussel. seems like everyone is racing as a fleet. no one has broken off from the pack yet.

 

also interesting is the IMOCA class. beginning to see an east/ west split similar to the Ultime class. a couple of IMOCA's ( as well as two Multi 50's) are going NW and following Gavignet. Desjoyeaux is listed as 8th out of 9 in class, but I still think he's looking good. he's the furthest inside to Cape Finisterre, basically following Cammas' lead. He's also got 1-2 knots of boat speed on the top 4 boats. Just as Cammas has close to 5 knots of speed on the rest of the Ultime fleet at the moment.

 

this is fucking awesome so far. me thinks this race may be won or lost on weather routing.

 

god this shit gets so much better after you get a solo ocean race under your belt. i thought i had played it right in SHTP and got KILLED on playing the weather. was walking out to a decent lead, and then sat still while the boat south of me sailed off to victory. there is still a LOT of racing left to go. will be super interesting to watch how this all unfolds.

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It's okay considering he has never raced a 40 before and is coming back to solo racing after 13 years,,,, Right?

 

i think he's doing a fine job. that is a star studded fleet. probably the most competitive fleet in entire race. more boats and more parity between said boats.

 

Goss has some of the best boat speed in the fleet at the moment, steadily working his way up. 29th out of 44 is nothing to sneeze at. it's still early.

 

look at Conrad Colman. Steadily working his way up! 22nd at the moment. Nannini is on a sharp learning curve. Sitting in 30th in his first Class 40 race. seems he already has corporate sponsorship to keep racing, so all he needs to do is race hard, make it to the finish and achieve a decent result.

 

pulling for Conrad Colman to continue moving up the results. that fucker mortgaged his house to charter that boat. literally bet the farm to go racing, haha. a man after my own heart. Go the Conrad!

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I love this race especially this year : ther are the formula 1 on the first line, the formule 3000 just after and 40 WRC cars ( class 40) fighting hard. I like the mix of class especially as there is a strong competition in each class!

 

Yes, quite interesting to follow, do you guys use the "replay feature" on the tracker ? Much improvment from previous races (the croping of the fleet gets updated real time follwing the psoitions), if for instance you put the replay on the class 40 from the beginning with a quite high zoom level, and "start the race" full speed at 20x, quite funny to follow :)

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damn, this race just keeps getting better. i went to bed and everything was different when i woke up! that east/ west split in the big multi's is insane. Will be interesting to see how it pays off for Cammas, but even more so for Gavignet. He's wayyyy out there to the west. i didn't look at the gribs, but is he trying to go up and over some weather system and get strong wind off the beam or stern? what is he doing? i'm sure he's being routed and has intelligent people helping him make decisions. interesting.

 

 

marcel van triest is doing the routing for gavignet. has to be someone you respect, but i guess the others also have similar high calibre routers.

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damn, this race just keeps getting better. i went to bed and everything was different when i woke up! that east/ west split in the big multi's is insane. Will be interesting to see how it pays off for Cammas, but even more so for Gavignet. He's wayyyy out there to the west. i didn't look at the gribs, but is he trying to go up and over some weather system and get strong wind off the beam or stern? what is he doing? i'm sure he's being routed and has intelligent people helping him make decisions. interesting.

 

 

marcel van triest is doing the routing for gavignet.  has to be someone you respect, but i guess the others also have similar high calibre routers.

 

Wouter "the Router" Verbraak is working with Joyon and Escoffier for this RduR. Was on 3 VO70s last time round (and not because he got fired from any boat) Russia (out of cash), Green Dragon (the 40-odd day leg out of China when Delta Lloyd was not fixed yet) and from Brazil with Delta Lloyd.

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looking at the tracker on the map rather than just the positions; they don't all seem to be too accurate??! guessing it's just done on distance to finish and there just needs to be a bit more of spread for it to become a little clearer?!

 

But hey; it's already an interesting race; glad to see conrad's on the way up the fleet!

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damn, this race just keeps getting better. i went to bed and everything was different when i woke up! that east/ west split in the big multi's is insane. Will be interesting to see how it pays off for Cammas, but even more so for Gavignet. He's wayyyy out there to the west. i didn't look at the gribs, but is he trying to go up and over some weather system and get strong wind off the beam or stern? what is he doing? i'm sure he's being routed and has intelligent people helping him make decisions. interesting.

 

 

marcel van triest is doing the routing for gavignet.  has to be someone you respect, but i guess the others also have similar high calibre routers.

 

Wouter "the Router" Verbraak is working with Joyon and Escoffier for this RduR. Was on 3 VO70s last time round (and not because he got fired from any boat) Russia (out of cash), Green Dragon (the 40-odd day leg out of China when Delta Lloyd was not fixed yet) and from Brazil with Delta Lloyd.

 

Anyone know whether Stan Honey is working with Cammas? He was on G3 for the crewed Round the world stuff.

 

How much shorter is the solo rig on G3?

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How much shorter is the solo rig on G3?

 

4 meters I think (if I remember well from reading about it in a mag)