elboracho

Farrier F-85SR

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I'm going with the standard system because sailing my old Farrier F82r with your crew standing in front of the hatchway and with the jib sheeting quite close to the centreline, with the speed of the Farrier through the tack the crew takes up the slack on the new sheet before releasing the tension, pops the old sheet and pulls the new sheet when the boat goes through head to wind and then just nips it up with the winch handle, very easy and very quick, also if the water conditions are very choppy and with little wind it is easier to back the jib with a standard system than a self tacker, cheaper too.

 

Evil

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Folks,

Thanks for all the good comments about the self tacking jib. It sounds to me like sticking with simplicity is the best way to go and to adopt a conventional jib.

It will also mean not having to deviate from the plans.

CheersGlynn

 

 

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.... with your crew standing in front of the hatchway and with the jib sheeting quite close to the centreline, with the speed of the Farrier through the tack the crew ...

 

Evil

 

And when you're sailing single handed? Is it still as easy? I guess I'll just have to try it out.

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Sailing mostly singlehanded then a self tacker is the go of course, a sailor in Pittwater has sailed for years a Farrier single handed called Kurt I believe, would be interesting how his boat is set up as he does spinnaker and everything on his own, legend.

 

Evil

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Forward steering with linkage to tiller, "tillermate" to hold the line whilst both hands are off ( or autopilot for those less pure) and electric halyard winch all help the single handed bit too.

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Going to a self tacker on the 85 will cost a lot more sail area than putting one on an 82. How many 82s have gone this way?

I did think about it for a while but concluded that organising a simple means of controlling the tiller while I pulled the new

jib sheet in would be the better option when single handing.

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Going to a self tacker on the 85 will cost a lot more sail area than putting one on an 82. How many 82s have gone this way?

I did think about it for a while but concluded that organising a simple means of controlling the tiller while I pulled the new

jib sheet in would be the better option when single handing.

 

Tacking an F-boat is real straightforward. I have an F-31 and you just set up the new jib sheet, let go the helm, and in anything but light air (where full battens can require attending) or over 15-18 knots breeze (where things happen fast), you should be able to get the jib sheet in by hand to the point where you can grind the last little bit as the boat builds speed just as if you had crew.

 

A tiller tamer- some simple device to hold the tiller- works well upwind to a close reach and will hold a course better than many folks can steer. Off the wind I'll set my chute without worry up to about 15 knots breeze with just the tiller tamer. I'll do it in more breeze, but then there is worry.

 

These boats are easy to sail alone or short handed.

 

 

 

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Going to a self tacker on the 85 will cost a lot more sail area than putting one on an 82. How many 82s have gone this way?

I did think about it for a while but concluded that organising a simple means of controlling the tiller while I pulled the new

jib sheet in would be the better option when single handing.

 

Tacking an F-boat is real straightforward. I have an F-31 and you just set up the new jib sheet, let go the helm, and in anything but light air (where full battens can require attending) or over 15-18 knots breeze (where things happen fast), you should be able to get the jib sheet in by hand to the point where you can grind the last little bit as the boat builds speed just as if you had crew.

 

A tiller tamer- some simple device to hold the tiller- works well upwind to a close reach and will hold a course better than many folks can steer. Off the wind I'll set my chute without worry up to about 15 knots breeze with just the tiller tamer. I'll do it in more breeze, but then there is worry.

 

These boats are easy to sail alone or short handed.

 

Tacking an F-boat is very easy singlehanded, even with conventional jib sheeting, but I must admit to being somewhat intrigued with self tacking. Has been used a number of times on various designs, and it really makes tacking dead easy and simple.

 

post-18231-040692500 1329790003_thumb.jpg

An F-41 with a self tacking jib

 

Tacking up a 50 yard wide channel on a small tri would then be effortless, whereas one would soon be worn out with normal jib sheets. However, the main downside is the track, which, if set to always give the best sheeting angle, can be a bit of an obstacle when moving forward. That is the only thing that gives me concerns, otherwise a self tacking jib could be a consideration for the production F-22, and particularly the centerboard version. And for those interested in the F-22, we have just moved into our new larger factory, details at:

 

http://www.f-boat.com/pages/News2/FM-Factory2010.html

 

Ian Farrier

Farrier Marine

Designs that Work..

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I have a self-tacker on my m23 and it is most certainly 99% upside as far as I can tell. The only downside might be the limitation on maximizing your sail design (overlapping etc.) But you just add a couple bigger sails on furlers (which you are gonna wanna do anyway) and voila.

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Tacking on the Farrier is a dream, on my cat Two Tribes which has a little bit more rocker in the hulls than most as fast as you can run from one side to the other Two Tribes has tacked, we have carried 4.5 knots through a tack which for a tack in a cat is great, we can up the works tack on shifts whenever, the difference for the Farrier is that the motion of the tack with one float transfering to the other float seems to work smoothly and easily and leaving the skipper in and one crew in the main hull seems to help it through, I have thought about the difference between sailng the two and my thought is that both have great advantages and both have great characteristics it all comes down to what you like, I am a fan of both cats and tris and can't say one is better than the other.

 

Multihullls rule that's a given

 

Evil::D sorry:angry: :

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PS

 

the only monohull in my life is a dinghy that I row out to Two Tribes to sail, I think I can get 5 knots out of it which may win a nationals in some monohull class, the question is WHY bother?

 

WTF?

 

 

Very Evil Gnome

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The cat/tri difference really stood out in the last Surf to City in the really light stuff up the channel- Poor Turning Point went backwards with the current while we were just making way. I don't know if getting caught in irons is such an issue for Tri's either.

Does Two Tribes have a self tacker? I was really impressed with BOSS racings overlapping self tacker, or at least that is what it looked like.

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The cat/tri difference really stood out in the last Surf to City in the really light stuff up the channel- Poor Turning Point went backwards with the current while we were just making way. I don't know if getting caught in irons is such an issue for Tri's either.

Does Two Tribes have a self tacker? I was really impressed with BOSS racings overlapping self tacker, or at least that is what it looked like.

 

The only difference between a good cat and a tri in the light stuff is the tri is slower, we've just sailed the Lexus Port Lincoln Regatta 2012 on Mad Max in generally light conditions against 10 tris and we were always faster and higher http://www.lincolnwe...ulti/series.htm.

In the 2012 Surf to City yacht race http://surf2city.com.au/ , we had hours of drifting at the front of the fleet and suffered by the tail enders getting better breeze later in the afternoon but note the elapsed times, not bad for an 8 year old cat with alloy beams.

 

regards

 

Tony Considine

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The cat/tri difference really stood out in the last Surf to City in the really light stuff up the channel- Poor Turning Point went backwards with the current while we were just making way. I don't know if getting caught in irons is such an issue for Tri's either.

Does Two Tribes have a self tacker? I was really impressed with BOSS racings overlapping self tacker, or at least that is what it looked like.

 

The only difference between a good cat and a tri in the light stuff is the tri is slower, we've just sailed the Lexus Port Lincoln Regatta 2012 on Mad Max in generally light conditions against 10 tris and we were always faster and higher http://www.lincolnwe...ulti/series.htm.

In the 2012 Surf to City yacht race http://surf2city.com.au/ , we had hours of drifting at the front of the fleet and suffered by the tail enders getting better breeze later in the afternoon but note the elapsed times, not bad for an 8 year old cat with alloy beams.

 

regards

 

Tony Considine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Every boat is a compromise, set up to the wishes of the owner at one point of time, now those wishes might change as the owners wife chooses not to come out anymore, or as in dads army, the owner and crew are getting too old to worry about a few extra knots and choose to go the easy way around.

The economy at the moment doesn't allow too many owner to have a different boat for racing and cruising.

Not too many super dooper high tech racers being brought into Aus. at the moment, even though we are being assaulted by designers saying their creation is the best thing since Hobie was a lad.

Most Aus. multi racers are asked to race in a wide variety of conditions at different locations, so this kinda leans back to the standard designed config. and rely on better sailing skills to get a result.

IMHO cheers

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Once we got beyond the tight tacking in a narrow channel with crazy current, Turning Point was off and long gone.

It felt like we tacked 20 times in a mile. I think they had 4 or 5 runs at the same fisherman on the bank at the worst point.

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The cat/tri difference really stood out in the last Surf to City in the really light stuff up the channel- Poor Turning Point went backwards with the current while we were just making way. I don't know if getting caught in irons is such an issue for Tri's either.

Does Two Tribes have a self tacker? I was really impressed with BOSS racings overlapping self tacker, or at least that is what it looked like.

 

The only difference between a good cat and a tri in the light stuff is the tri is slower, we've just sailed the Lexus Port Lincoln Regatta 2012 on Mad Max in generally light conditions against 10 tris and we were always faster and higher http://www.lincolnwe...ulti/series.htm.

In the 2012 Surf to City yacht race http://surf2city.com.au/ , we had hours of drifting at the front of the fleet and suffered by the tail enders getting better breeze later in the afternoon but note the elapsed times, not bad for an 8 year old cat with alloy beams.

 

regards

 

Tony Considine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Every boat is a compromise, set up to the wishes of the owner at one point of time, now those wishes might change as the owners wife chooses not to come out anymore, or as in dads army, the owner and crew are getting too old to worry about a few extra knots and choose to go the easy way around.

The economy at the moment doesn't allow too many owner to have a different boat for racing and cruising.

Not too many super dooper high tech racers being brought into Aus. at the moment, even though we are being assaulted by designers saying their creation is the best thing since Hobie was a lad.

Most Aus. multi racers are asked to race in a wide variety of conditions at different locations, so this kinda leans back to the standard designed config. and rely on better sailing skills to get a result.

IMHO cheers

 

 

I'm simply correcting the statement that tris go better than a cat in the light stuff. To cater for all the different types and speeds of multis, we have a handicap system and in the Surf to City, we were first boat home and ended up 7th on handicap so I have no idea of the point you are trying to make.

regards

Tony Considine

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I never meant to infer tris went better in the light - just an observation of one specific instance and set of circumstances where transitions between two hugely different multis had an unexpected outcome. As I said, once the repeated short tacking up a narrow channel against a huge current was passed, they were off. By the bottom of Russell Is. I could barely hold a sheet anymore from the repeated tacking. Maybe the same thing was hindering other crews as well. There are so many factors who knows. Was interesting, that's all.

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I'm simply correcting the statement that tris go better than a cat in the light stuff. .

regards

Tony Considine

 

In my experience, with equivalent boats, and equal power to weight ratios, the tri is always much faster in light airs. Overall the tri is also generally faster to windward, while the cat is faster off the wind. But the tri has a better all round performance, and is more forgiving, which is why they are chosen more often by single handed racers, or for round the world record attempts, and a tri holds the current record.

 

The main advantage of the cat is that they only have two hulls which makes them simpler and cheaper to build, and they can be made faster than a tri in light airs by just putting on a much bigger rig. They can then fly a hull a lot earlier, which reduces wetted surface area in the light (faster), but they are then also much more prone to capsize.

 

post-18231-057396400 1330581836_thumb.jpg

 

You can see the size difference here, and obviously the cat is going to be faster., but it also capsized later in this race. The cat shown probably has a wind capsize speed of under 15 knots, whereas it is well over 20 knots for the tri. A big difference.

 

But regardless of all the claims, in the big shootout in the America's Cup between the fastest cat and tri that may ever be made, the fastest boat was the trimaran, and it did it easily.

 

Overall, they are just different types of multihulls with their own advantages and disadvantages. Personally I prefer the tri under 40 feet, for its better handling and overall performance, but prefer the cat over 40' as they are easier to build, and one gets much more bang for the buck in terms of room and practicality for a cruising boat. Just my opinion.

 

Ian Farrier

Farrier Marine

Designs that work..

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The cat and tri thing - if the rule is limited length the tri will be faster - because it can be made wider and still easy to maneuvre.

Ref AC and the 60feet class.

 

 

If its about a performance boat and the total cost - I think you can make a faster cat for the same money - and it will be longer than the

same cost tri - and have a bigger rig.

Ref. AC40

 

Round the world record - it was held by cats for many years - but the latest attempt has been with the biggest and most up to date tris - and no one has

buildt a cat for that purpose lately. So I guess that is still in the open.

 

and to add about the capsize problem; the cat will flip more easy upwind if one dont have full attention in hard wind - but to bear off with a

performance tri is really something too - so I wouldnt say its a clear winner here.

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Today I signed up with Michael Mallory and Andrew Johnson of Multihullsdirect (www.multihullsdirect.com) to get a F-85SR built. These guys use to be involved with Melvest Marine but they have now started their own business.

 

I have decided to build the standard F-85SR Farrier design with the main modifications being that I have decided to adopt a centreboard due to the number of unchartered rocks in the Philipines. I have also decided to not incorporate the foils at this stage and instead just reinforce the floats so that the foils can be added later with a complete rebuild. I am adopting a standard jib arrangement (not self tacking) and I have got some minor additions to make it easy to set up for Category 3 passage racing.

 

The expected launch date is to be the 1st October so even though I am sail number 10, I hope to be the first to take an F-85 for a sail.

 

I will post photos to the forum once production starts next month.

 

CheersGlynn

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Today I signed up with Michael Mallory and Andrew Johnson of Multihullsdirect (www.multihullsdirect.com) to get a F-85SR built. These guys use to be involved with Melvest Marine but they have now started their own business.

 

I have decided to build the standard F-85SR Farrier design with the main modifications being that I have decided to adopt a centreboard due to the number of unchartered rocks in the Philipines. I have also decided to not incorporate the foils at this stage and instead just reinforce the floats so that the foils can be added later with a complete rebuild. I am adopting a standard jib arrangement (not self tacking) and I have got some minor additions to make it easy to set up for Category 3 passage racing.

 

The expected launch date is to be the 1st October so even though I am sail number 10, I hope to be the first to take an F-85 for a sail.

 

I will post photos to the forum once production starts next month.

 

CheersGlynn

www.multihullsdirect.com doesn't work for me.

Any more info on who these guys are?

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I have decided to build the standard F-85SR Farrier design with the main modifications being that I have decided to adopt a centreboard ....

 

Is that the standard F-82 centreboard? Or a newly designed longer one?

 

..... I have got some minor additions to make it easy to set up for Category 3 passage racing.

 

Could you explain what other additions you are making?

 

Looking forward to the pictures.

regards

Nico

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1330801733[/url]' post='3610148']
1330785892[/url]' post='3609911']

I have decided to build the standard F-85SR Farrier design with the main modifications being that I have decided to adopt a centreboard ....

 

Is that the standard F-82 centreboard? Or a newly designed longer one?

 

1330785892[/url]' post='3609911']

..... I have got some minor additions to make it easy to set up for Category 3 passage racing.

 

Could you explain what other additions you are making?

 

Looking forward to the pictures.

regards

Nico

 

The standard F-85 comes with a daggerboard only. When I was specifying the boat with Andrew, the first thing he recommended that I consider was a centreboard due to the number of unchartered rocks in the Philippines. He said it would not be pretty if the daggerboard hit a rock at 20knots, with the possibility of actually damaging the boat not just the daggerboard. Also, I am only going to have the racing cabin, so at least the ceneboard won't take up all the room in the cabin (unlike a dagger board).

 

I sent Ian Farrier an email and he is going to prepare a custom design as it needs to be a bit bigger than the F-82 centreboard to match the sail plan.

 

In regards to the additions for Cat 3 races, this is mostly related to installing anchor points for safety lines, attachment points in the event of capsize, a pushpit, and bases for stations. For boats this size, the escape hatch can be a "cut here" solution, and the rest of the safety rules appears to relate to what you need to carry on the boat as opposed to changes to the boat design.

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This may have been discussed before but what are the pros/cons for the daggerboard centerboard options. They each take up different spaces in the cabin. A centerboard will kick up in a wreck. Is the centerboard option heavier? I guess the dagger could be used halfway up but is that ever necessary except for shallow waters?

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Today I signed up with Michael Mallory and Andrew Johnson of Multihullsdirect (www.multihullsdirect.com) to get a F-85SR built. These guys use to be involved with Melvest Marine but they have now started their own business.

 

I have decided to build the standard F-85SR Farrier design with the main modifications being that I have decided to adopt a centreboard due to the number of unchartered rocks in the Philipines. I have also decided to not incorporate the foils at this stage and instead just reinforce the floats so that the foils can be added later with a complete rebuild. I am adopting a standard jib arrangement (not self tacking) and I have got some minor additions to make it easy to set up for Category 3 passage racing.

 

The expected launch date is to be the 1st October so even though I am sail number 10, I hope to be the first to take an F-85 for a sail.

 

I will post photos to the forum once production starts next month.

 

CheersGlynn

www.multihullsdirect.com doesn't work for me.

Any more info on who these guys are?

 

It appears that the website is not yet live.

 

What I can say is that the company Multihullsdirect Corp. is owned by Michael Mallory. Michael is currently building a F-44SC which is currently at the fit out stage and looks absolutely fantastic. The F-85SR will be his first commercial sale but he hopes to build many more boats.

 

The company is located in Subic Bay, in the Philippines, which is the old American Naval Base until 1991.

 

I am very satisfied that these guys will build an excellent boat. PM me if you want Michael's contact details.

 

Cheers

Glynn

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This may have been discussed before but what are the pros/cons for the daggerboard centerboard options. They each take up different spaces in the cabin. A centerboard will kick up in a wreck. Is the centerboard option heavier? I guess the dagger could be used halfway up but is that ever necessary except for shallow waters?

 

From my research, a dagger board is:

- faster

- lighter

- cheaper

- easier to build

- easier to maintain

- can be removed without putting the trimaran on a stand

 

but it does not kick-up and takes up more cabin space. For me, these two disadvantages outweighed the advantages. There is lots of unchartered rocks in the Philippines and I had to convince my wife there was enough cabin space, even though I only wanted the racing cabin.

 

If I was going to race where I know I would not hit the bottom, I would probably have put up with the cabin space issues and adopted the dagger board option for all the above reasons.

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www.multihullsdirect.com doesn't work for me.

Any more info on who these guys are?

 

Me neither, in fact the login popup prevented me from bailing, had to shut down the browser completely to escape. Not nice.

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Sorry guys, the Multihullsdirect website is not yet live. Please be paitent and I will let you know when it is up and running.

 

In the meantime please PM me if you want Michael's contact details.

 

Regards

Glynn

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gThomas73^^ what aspects of the center board make it slower than the daggerboard. If you design out most of the drag by implementing a slot filler as shown in the m23 thread are you just left with the increased weight that slows you down? Is there some other factor that I am missing?

Adding all these contraptions would surely add to the complexity and weight. But it may be worth it to keep your boat in one piece.

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gThomas73^^ what aspects of the center board make it slower than the daggerboard. If you design out most of the drag by implementing a slot filler as shown in the m23 thread are you just left with the increased weight that slows you down? Is there some other factor that I am missing?

Adding all these contraptions would surely add to the complexity and weight. But it may be worth it to keep your boat in one piece.

 

 

I guess you could adopt the systems shown on the M23 thread. I am not experienced on that matter. It looks like to me more things that need to be maintained and could go wrong. This could result in the centreboard not kick-up, but worse still that the centreboard getting stuck down and not allowing you to get back to shore to put the boat on a trailer. In that case you would probably need to go for a swim to un-jam the centreboard.

 

For me, I intend to keep the centre hull skimming on the top of the water when racing and therefore drag should not be an issue. Looking at the drawings, the weight penalty will be minor.

 

Glynn

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When your counting weight penalty don't forget the loss of bouyancy that the volume of a centerboard case adds. But like stated several down sides but one really big positive one when a grounding is likely.

 

Cheers

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dear mr. gthomas,

you intend to keep the center hull skimming, but the wind is going to allow that only when it feels the need to do so, which will most likely be rare indeed, unless it blows over 20 kts. all day every day where you race. Having a very long, open trunk adds lots of drag lots of the time and is an issue that needs to be addressed if you're serious about performance. If I had a choice I would absolutely have a dagger instead of a centerboard on my m23. Hitting rocks with a centerboard locked down is likely to be just as disastrous as it would be with a daggerboard.

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Just to get back on topic here's some progress photos I snapped the other day:

 

Mainhull forms leaning against my TT

post-19294-026960000 1331069989_thumb.jpg

NYX's beam sides being cut out in foam on my home built CNC

post-19294-029011800 1331070031_thumb.jpg

 

Cheers

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Hi folks,

 

I have attached the first photo's of my F-85SR currently being built by Multihulls Direct (www.multihullsdirect.com).

 

They have completed the frames (including the beam frames) and are awaiting delivery of the first shipment of foam so they can start actual hull construction. These guys are buying enough foam for 3 boats and will be ready to start their second boat as soon as an order is placed.

 

The hull certainly very roomy, so much so that I have decided to revert back to the daggerboard option. I was a difficult decision between the centreboard and daggerboard, but I decided that ultimately I am buying a racing boat, so why limit it with a centreboard (whether there is much limitation anyway is unknown). I am going to get Mulithulls Direct to reinforce the daggerboard case, so that if I do hit bottom, I should definitely break the board and not the boat.

 

The cabin is the standard low profile cabin as per the Farrier plans. I am going to make the cabin about 250mm longer though to give some more space on entry so as to avoid the daggerboard case.

 

Andrew Johnson is standing in the background of the first photo. Andrew is managing the actual boat construction.

 

Hopefully this time next month, I will have pictures of the hull and first float complete.

 

Cheers

Glynn

 

 

post-57370-001216800 1334583634_thumb.jpg

 

post-57370-064395100 1334584141_thumb.jpg

 

post-57370-041608000 1334584162_thumb.jpg

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post-32253-084528100 1334613093_thumb.jpgFirst half out of the mould, went for higher cabin top in between longer cabin and cutty cabin, this is good can actually see a boat forming now.

 

Evil

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I'm way behind :rolleyes:

 

Working on the beams while waiting for the temperature to go up again, so I can finish my floats.

 

12mrtbeam1uitmal.jpg

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Guys,

I have been reading the forum for a while and decided to take the plunge. 85SR #11 is on its way. I started cutting the float frames yesterday and hope to start have foam going in next weekend.

Keep up the good work

 

Johnno

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Guys,

I have been reading the forum for a while and decided to take the plunge. 85SR #11 is on its way. I started cutting the float frames yesterday and hope to start have foam going in next weekend.

Keep up the good work

 

Johnno

Johnno,

 

Welcome to the club. Good to hear about another F85 builder that's not too far away.

 

I have a complete set of CNC cut float frames and B/H templates sitting my garage taking up space along with battens with screws still in place.

The battens are numbered and the float frames all marked so the battens go in the right places for the position of the screws, provided one

sticks to the same foam panel widths that I used.

( It's amazing how long it can take to get the screws in the battens, hence the labeling of battens and positions, much better than having to do screws again.)

 

A drive to Gosford could have saved you a heap of work.

 

Also I should be finished with the beam jig come Monday.

 

Regards,

Phill

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Guys,

I have been reading the forum for a while and decided to take the plunge. 85SR #11 is on its way. I started cutting the float frames yesterday and hope to start have foam going in next weekend.

Keep up the good work

 

Johnno

Johnno,

 

Welcome to the club. Good to hear about another F85 builder that's not too far away.

 

I have a complete set of CNC cut float frames and B/H templates sitting my garage taking up space along with battens with screws still in place.

The battens are numbered and the float frames all marked so the battens go in the right places for the position of the screws, provided one

sticks to the same foam panel widths that I used.

( It's amazing how long it can take to get the screws in the battens, hence the labeling of battens and positions, much better than having to do screws again.)

 

A drive to Gosford could have saved you a heap of work.

 

Also I should be finished with the beam jig come Monday.

 

Regards,

Phill

congrats to both of you! post pics when you can!

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The guys at Multihullsdirect have started planking the first half of the main hull and the first float. The beams will start shortly and they are on track to have the boat assembled by early July.

 

Hope you enjoy the photo's.

 

If you want the contact details, please PM me.

 

Cheers

Glynn

 

post-57370-029999500 1337510854_thumb.jpg

 

post-57370-042420200 1337510856_thumb.jpg

 

post-57370-052632200 1337510858_thumb.jpg

 

post-57370-052010800 1337510860_thumb.jpg

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The guys at Multihullsdirect have started planking the first half of the main hull and the first float. The beams will start shortly and they are on track to have the boat assembled by early July.

 

Hope you enjoy the photo's.

 

If you want the contact details, please PM me.

 

Cheers

Glynn

 

 

Looks like I had better get the remaining plan sheets finished! This will probably now be the first one launched.

 

Ian Farrier

Farrier Marine

Designs that work...

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I have attached the latest photos of the F-85 begin built at Multihullsdirect.

 

The port side of all three hulls are now complete, 100% vacuum bagged and out of the moulds.

 

They have also completed the underside of the first two beams.

 

The beam fittings are also going well and they are on target to have the F-85 fully assembled in July.

 

In the background, you will note the Michael's F-44SC which he built on spec. It is about 95% complete and will be launched shortly. It is available for purchase if anyone is interested in a brand new Farrier Catamaran.

 

Cheers

Glynn

F-85SR #10 "KatRat"

 

post-57370-057987400 1338557185_thumb.jpg

 

post-57370-031027600 1338557192_thumb.jpg

 

post-57370-099437600 1338557189_thumb.jpg

 

post-57370-077203100 1338557187_thumb.jpg

 

post-57370-022711800 1338557181_thumb.jpg

 

post-57370-049876900 1338557183_thumb.jpg

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"fully assembled in July." What does that mean exactly? - if it means ready to sail then they are boat building gods, there is a massive amount of work to go from where they are at.

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"fully assembled in July." What does that mean exactly? - if it means ready to sail then they are boat building gods, there is a massive amount of work to go from where they are at.

 

"fully assembled in July" means that the port and starboard sides of each hull will be connected together, all bulkheads in place, beams complete and in place and the folding mechanism working. This way we can see exactly what we are getting in terms of size, layout, space, etc. Hopefully the vessel lines are looking really sexy, but I suspect it will leak like a sieve if you tried to put it in the water.

 

Once the F-85 is fully assembled, the guys will then do a fully dimensional and alignment check, we will ensure we have HD foam at all the appropriate locations for all the attachment points, items like hatch covers will be temporarily fitted, and any modifications and/or customisation in the cabin and cockpit will be made.

 

Only once all this is complete and signed off do they start fairing and painting. They will actually undo the folding mechanism so they can paint the floats and main hulls separately. This way they ensure the highest quality paint job and should eliminate any touch up where hull modifications had to be made because something was missed.

 

The target date for launching is 1st October this year. Hopefully that is the date I can raise the sails and take it for a spin. One advantage of the Multihullsdirect factory is that it is right on the edge of Subic Bay, a sheltered harbor with good winds a times. It is less than 1 km from the factory to the ramp. I am living the Philippines for the next few years so will be sailing it here before I take it back to Perth, Australia.

 

 

I hope this clarifies your question.

 

Cheers

Glynn

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I hope this clarifies your question.

 

 

Yes that makes sense, if they have a reasonable sized squad on the job that sounds possible - it would still be a very quick build. Then all you need to do is bring it down to Auckland and see how it goes vs the rest of the 8.5 fleet :-).

 

 

 

 

 

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Bob,

My boat, being their first F-85 will be built in 7 months, which included establishing the factory. They say they can build the second boat in less than 5 months as the forms and systems are now all in place. They have 6 workers on my boat and will expand the team once they get there next order. They will also do a kit boat even faster for those that just want the hulls, beams and folding mechanism.

I hope I can sail the F-85 as fast as they can build it. I am not sure where the boat will go next as it all depends on the next big construction project I can find. I would love to sail it on Auckland Harbour with the other 8.5s. I much to prefer to sail similar rated boats, than have to wait for someone to get a calculator out to see who wins a race.

CheersGlynn

 

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I have uploaded a few more photos taken today of my F-85SR under construction at Multihullsdirect.

- the starboard float is assembled,

- the starboard side of the mainhull is vacuum bagged and ready to receive its bulkheads,

- the daggerboard case is complete any ready to be put in the main hull

- all four beams are progressing,

- the first beam mount is underway

 

It is looking good for see the basic boat assembled in early July.

 

Cheers

Glynn

F-85SR #10 - KatRat

Philippines

 

post-57370-051591400 1339426113_thumb.jpg

 

post-57370-032210100 1339426110_thumb.jpg

 

post-57370-058088000 1339426116_thumb.jpg

 

post-57370-051982800 1339426121_thumb.jpg

 

post-57370-011148200 1339426124_thumb.jpg

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I have uploaded a few more photos taken today of my F-85SR under construction at Multihullsdirect.

- the starboard float is assembled,

- the starboard side of the mainhull is vacuum bagged and ready to receive its bulkheads,

- the daggerboard case is complete any ready to be put in the main hull

- all four beams are progressing,

- the first beam mount is underway

 

It is looking good for see the basic boat assembled in early July.

 

Cheers

Glynn

F-85SR #10 - KatRat

Philippines

 

I was able to get by Multihulls Direct factory in Subic Bay last week, and was impressed with their factory and Glynn's F-85SR. They have managed to combine high quality with efficient building systems and controls, and are making excellent progress.

 

post-18231-054176000 1339996666_thumb.jpg

A well organized and clean shop - office and customer viewing area being built at left.

 

It was also good to see Multihulls Direct's F-44SC cat, which is now nearly finished, and the build quality equals the best I have seen. Being custom built by skilled craftsmen, with all epoxy foam core construction, this will be a very light boat that is going to perform well, while also offering a great amount of cruising room.

 

post-18231-049799900 1339997428_thumb.jpg

 

post-18231-047858200 1339997326_thumb.jpg

The high standard of finish, even under bridge deck, can be clearly seen.

 

It was a little hard to get good photos while I was there, as the new factory lighting system still required some work, so lighting was not good. However, full and more extensive photos will be available soon, once the interior is fully complete. In the meantime, more details are at:

 

http://www.f-boat.com/pages/News4/F-44SCProduction.html

 

The F-44SC pricing also looks to be extremely interesting, and more details in this regard are available from me offline.

 

Ian Farrier

Farrier Marine

Designs That Work

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I just want to say thanks to Ian for the privilege of meeting up in the Philippines. It is great to know that the F-85SR is being built to an excellent standard and I am looking forward to your next visit to the Philippines when I might be able to take you for a sail on the F-85SR once it has been launched.

 

I have also attached some of the pictures taken during the visit, which shows the continual progress of the F-85SR.

 

post-57370-089334400 1340029169_thumb.jpgpost-57370-006990600 1340029152_thumb.jpg

 

The port side of the main hull being vacuum bagged and then with the daggerboard case fitted.

 

post-57370-012101600 1340029165_thumb.jpgpost-57370-044920600 1340029167_thumb.jpg

 

Ian and Andrew Johnson inspecting the F-85 Port Hull - Ian and Michael Mallory with the F-85 in the background

 

post-57370-031474800 1340029155_thumb.jpgpost-57370-000398800 1340029163_thumb.jpg

 

Ian, Michael Mallory and myself - Multihullsdirect F-44SC (for sale)

 

Glynn Thomas

F-85SR #10 - KatRat

Its More Fun in the Philippines

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If anyone is looking for a rotating wing mast - 204mm x 98mm Sparcraft section with carbon tip from hounds up. Fully fitted with single diamond / clutch's / spectacles for halyards etc. Overall length 12.2mt

 

Allyacht spars boom to match. Brand new with reefing and outhaul sheave box at outboard and inboard end. Length 3.7mt

 

Location - Gold Coast

 

Cheap. Very cheap.

 

PM for photos / more details etc.

 

(I think this should be in a classified section - but I am a bit special and cannot seem to locate it....)

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that would be the

 

F175c section then?

 

http://www.sparcraft.com/uk/technical_support/technical_brochures/multihulls/fichiers/catamaran.pdf

 

http://www.sparcraft...nd_sections.asp

 

classifieds link is on the home page

 

but mysteriously hidden at the very bottom

 

http://www.sailingan.../classified.htm

 

pic here would be nice...

post-23477-031505100 1340355731_thumb.jpg

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that would be the

 

F175c section then?

 

http://www.sparcraft.com/uk/technical_support/technical_brochures/multihulls/fichiers/catamaran.pdf

 

http://www.sparcraft...nd_sections.asp

 

classifieds link is on the home page

 

but mysteriously hidden at the very bottom

 

http://www.sailingan.../classified.htm

 

pic here would be nice...

 

Correct.

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I have attached the latest Photo's taken of my F-85 being built at Multihullsdirect in Subic Bay, the Philippines.

 

It is all coming together nicely and starting to look very similar to the F-32SR (just a little smaller).

 

In the next few weeks they hope to have the three hulls assembled together with the beams connected and the cockpit complete.

 

post-57370-053436800 1342711206_thumb.jpgpost-57370-024020000 1342711209_thumb.jpg

 

Three Hulls and the reverse bow complete on the floats.

 

post-57370-034264100 1342711216_thumb.jpgpost-57370-086297600 1342711213_thumb.jpg

Vacuum Bagging the deck of the main hull.

 

post-57370-094749400 1342711201_thumb.jpgpost-57370-015309800 1342711204_thumb.jpg

 

Centreboard almost complete and rudder ready to make the rudder case.

 

post-57370-054436000 1342711211_thumb.jpg

 

The very roomy cockpit.

 

Regards

Glynn Thomas

F-85SR #10 KatRat (under construction)

Philippines

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The guys at Multihullsdirect have been delayed a little with the heavy rain we have been having in the Philippines, resulting in very high humidity. Instead of pressing on and compromising the build quality they have stopped work and proceeded to build a humidity controlled room.

 

The room is nearing completion and they have now started installation of the fwd and aft beams mounts. It is still looking good for a launch in October this year.

 

Hope you like the new photos.

 

post-57370-0-77257400-1345552834_thumb.jpg

Humidity Controlled Room with the Main Hull taking shape nicely

 

post-57370-0-84048900-1345552820_thumb.jpg

Fwd Beam Mounts being installed

 

post-57370-0-76162400-1345552812_thumb.jpg

Aft Beam Mounts being installed

 

Glynn Thomas

F-85SR #10 KatRat

Philippines

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The F-85SR plans are now finally finished, but they will only be available for a short time, as all my plans are being withdrawn from sale on September 25th in order to concentrate on production boats. So if you want to build an F-85SR then do not delay. More details including the unlimited sail plan profile are also now on:

 

http://www.f-boat.co...5SRconcept.html

 

So instead of wondering about lifting foils, you can actually build a boat with them to see if they work (they do). Nothing like practical experience to answer any questions. Definitely not inexpensive, but they are only an option, plus the cases can be installed in the floats during construction, and the foils can then be purchased at a later date.

 

The F-85SR will remain available after the 25th, but only as a professionally built kit or sail away boat, and it will no longer be possible to build your own from scratch

 

Ian Farrier

Farrier Marine

Designs that work...

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It is still looking good for a launch in October this year.

 

 

Hello Glynn. How is your boat coming along? I saw a few new pictures on the multihulls direct website. Would be nice to see pictures of your boat fitting out. And of course a video of the first sail :-)

 

regards

Nico

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I have just visited the boat and it is coming on really well. The first coat of paint is on and the final set-out will start next week. It should be launched early in November.

 

I have some really good photos but need a good Internet connection to upload them. Should be able to do tomorrow.

 

Cheers

Glynn

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I had a great visit with Michael Mallory and Victa Periabras of Multihullsdirect this weekend. The first coat of paint is on and outfitting will start next week. Also met with the marine electrician about the electrics fit out.

 

These guys make feel really comfortable that the boat will be finished in an excellent condition ready for sailaway in mid November. The boat has been held up a little waiting for fabricated parts and delivery of all the fittings but it is all coming together now. Multihullsdirect have done a great job to be able to finish their first boat in 8 months, given that the design has only just been fully complete in the last months, needing to establish a new factory and having to deal with some pretty bad floods in Manila and Subic, which did not affect the factory, but did hold up a lot of suppliers for a couple of months.

 

Victa Periabras is the former lead boat builder from Melvest Marine and completed most of their boats there. He is now responsible for all production at Multihullsdirect.

 

Here is the latest photos. Hope you enjoy.

 

Regards

Glynn

F-85SR #10 - KatRat

Philippines

 

post-57370-0-54058500-1350207419_thumb.jpgpost-57370-0-45519300-1350207421_thumb.jpg

 

post-57370-0-88791300-1350207426_thumb.jpgpost-57370-0-19179200-1350207424_thumb.jpg

 

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post-57370-0-96489700-1350208241_thumb.jpg

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very nice, like the slightly reversed bows

 

so thom

 

with the sale of plans stopped, if you want an f85sr

 

you have to buy it from an approved builder

 

the big ?

 

so what's it costing you

 

ps looking at the pics, something mysterious seems to have been blurred out in the background of 2 of them...

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Eric,

 

If you want to the know the price of any Farrier Trimaran or Catamaran from www.multihullsdirect.com, simply send them an enquiry and Michael will send you back a firm price within 24 hours.

 

Michael has fixed pricing for all the major variations of the F-85, F-32 and F-44. He can supply a complete sailaway boat, which includes all rigging, sails, mast, outboard, trailer, etc, or just a bare kit, which you can then finish off in your own time, with your your own equipment. Once you decide what you want, he will then customise the quotation as you need it.

 

You can have a bare boat in under 4 months if you want, which for me is much better than spending a couple of years up to your eye balls in epoxy and foam.

 

Regards

Glynn

 

ps, there was some dodgy looking construction equipment in the background of the photo's in the same yard that Mike subleases. Thought it might be best to hide it from the images of the state of the art Farrier racing machine.

 

 

 

very nice, like the slightly reversed bows

 

so thom

 

with the sale of plans stopped, if you want an f85sr

 

you have to buy it from an approved builder

 

the big ?

 

so what's it costing you

 

ps looking at the pics, something mysterious seems to have been blurred out in the background of 2 of them...

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I got in touch with the Multihulls direct guys about the Farrier options they have - extremely fast, clear, and frank replies every time. Pricing came out pretty much in line with what I estimated self building to cost. I figure that makes sense. They are in a very low cost country, buying in bulk, and I am in a very high cost one, buying at retail. Everything I have learned from previous builders also indicates the you very rarely save much money in the end, you just spread the payment period out over more time.

 

Personally, I suffer from an odd dementia where I would like to build a boat just for the sake of doing it. But, if life keeps getting in the way like it has been the past few years, then I will very likely end up buying from the Multihullsdirect guys when I've saved up enough pennies and get my building fix from something smaller like an F-16 or an A-cat.

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Personally, I suffer from an odd dementia where I would like to build a boat just for the sake of doing it.

 

I have sewing dementia. all consuming.

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"here is the latest photos. Hope you enjoy."

 

 

No, Glynn, I do NOT enjoy. Too jealous.

 

Love the lines on this boat. It has been said that Mr. Farrier has spent the last 25 years designing the same boat over and over. Practice makes perfect, eh?

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Great pictures. thanks. The boat looks beautiful.

 

 

You can have a bare boat in under 4 months if you want, which for me is much better than spending a couple of years up to your eye balls in epoxy and foam.

 

 

Can't argue with that. I'll have to wait another 3-4 years until mine is ready, looking at the pace at which I'm building. On the other hand, I enjoy myself very much. The whole building experience has been a great journey until now and was my reason to start building. So, it is a mixed feeling. It would be nice to have the boat in the water next year, but then I would miss out on all the building fun, so I'm content to wait. If building the boat is just a necessity for you, it's much better to source it out.

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If multihulls direct would agree to putting a more modern (foil compatible) ama on the F85 mainhull and beams they'd be able to sell at least two to the SF Bay area. I'm aware the Ian F does not have the time for this sort of thing, nor the inclination.

And I acknowledge stirring the pot a bit with this, but for boats that will be sailed in breeze most of the time with the curved foils extended, I don't think Ian's ama shape will prove to have enough buoyancy aft.

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If multihulls direct would agree to putting a more modern (foil compatible) ama on the F85 mainhull and beams they'd be able to sell at least two to the SF Bay area. I'm aware the Ian F does not have the time for this sort of thing, nor the inclination.

And I acknowledge stirring the pot a bit with this, but for boats that will be sailed in breeze most of the time with the curved foils extended, I don't think Ian's ama shape will prove to have enough buoyancy aft.

 

Not sure what I'm missing, but float foils have always been an option for this boat -

http://www.f-boat.com/pages/News2/F-85SRconcept.html

and I don't think it's very likely Ian has his buoyancy distribution wrong. Of course, until the first couple of 85sr's are sailing we won't know...

 

Multihulls direct can't/won't give you differenct floats for 2 reasons - they are restrained by Ian's plans/ changes approval (licensed builder and all,) and they are likely not qualified to design new hulls for you.

 

If you can pry him away from the F-22 project, you may be able to entice Ian to design something specific for you, for a price...

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when they say "bare boat" that includes the mast though, right?

 

One advantage of working with a builder like Michael is that he is prepared to customise your quote how ever you want. If you want a mast with your "bare boat" he can do this. Currently, Michael is even prepared to parts of a boat and is currently building a set of customised all carbon F-9 floats for a home builder who decided it would take to long to build these himself.

 

At the moment all Masts for Multihullsdirect will be built by Ballenger Spars in California.

 

If you are in North America, you might be better to order the mast separately to save shipping to the Philippines and then back to America with the bare boat.

 

Cheers

Glynn

 

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If multihulls direct would agree to putting a more modern (foil compatible) ama on the F85 mainhull and beams they'd be able to sell at least two to the SF Bay area. I'm aware the Ian F does not have the time for this sort of thing, nor the inclination.

And I acknowledge stirring the pot a bit with this, but for boats that will be sailed in breeze most of the time with the curved foils extended, I don't think Ian's ama shape will prove to have enough buoyancy aft.

 

Not sure what I'm missing, but float foils have always been an option for this boat -

http://www.f-boat.com/pages/News2/F-85SRconcept.html

and I don't think it's very likely Ian has his buoyancy distribution wrong. Of course, until the first couple of 85sr's are sailing we won't know...

 

Multihulls direct can't/won't give you differenct floats for 2 reasons - they are restrained by Ian's plans/ changes approval (licensed builder and all,) and they are likely not qualified to design new hulls for you.

 

If you can pry him away from the F-22 project, you may be able to entice Ian to design something specific for you, for a price...

 

If you want foils, simply ask for them. I choose not to have foils, since this was the first F-85 to be completed and I wasn't sure how much benefit they might give. Since reading the sailing reports for the F-32SRs I partially regret not getting them put in up front, but I still got to learn to sail the boat and get off the training wheels first.

 

My boat has had the floats reinforced to fit the foils in the future. If I really enjoy the sailing over the coming 6 months, but want to get the next 10% performance from the boat, then I will order the foils from Ian Farrier and have them fitted back in the factory. It is estimated that it would take less than a week to fit, with the biggest headache in getting the paint to match up at the connections.

 

If I had a few fibreglassing skills or knew someone that did, I could probably do it myself, but since I currently live in the Philippines I have no need, but this could be an option for others.

 

Cheers

Glynn

 

 

 

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"If multihulls direct would agree to putting a more modern (foil compatible) ama on the F85 mainhull and beams they'd be able to sell at least two to the SF Bay area. I'm aware the Ian F does not have the time for this sort of thing, nor the inclination.

And I acknowledge stirring the pot a bit with this, but for boats that will be sailed in breeze most of the time with the curved foils extended, I don't think Ian's ama shape will prove to have enough buoyancy aft."

 

I guess time will tell. Early reports from the yellow Ff32Ssr in Holland sounded encouraging.

 

These are certainly interesting times for the development of foiling multihulls. I imagine your concerns might be reinforced by the sight of the Batmaran in wheelie mode-- a different kettle of fish certainly, but food for thought. I guess it is all about balance, refinement, execution.

 

I have wondered if the Catri approach might get another look with all the scrutiny of foils on multihulls. That guy might have been ahead of his time.

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For 98% of people getting the basic boat done by people like this is the go, it takes a special person (and I mean special) to want to spend every waking hour for two to three years scratching around in fibreglass, fitting 2000 hours in around life, have a life, keep your family and your sanity.

Good looking boat

Evil

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If multihulls direct would agree to putting a more modern (foil compatible) ama on the F85 mainhull and beams they'd be able to sell at least two to the SF Bay area. I'm aware the Ian F does not have the time for this sort of thing, nor the inclination.

And I acknowledge stirring the pot a bit with this, but for boats that will be sailed in breeze most of the time with the curved foils extended, I don't think Ian's ama shape will prove to have enough buoyancy aft.

 

I would certainly be interested to hear of what experience you may have with curved foils to where you came to this odd conclusion. Maybe you should also advise Hydroptère that their boat is not going to perform on SF Bay, as they have no float or buoyancy whatsoever behind their foils.

 

There will always be many different opinions, but the F-85SR floats are the exact right shape, with foils where they should be, based on my years of experience, and I was probably the first to start using curved float foils in 1985.

 

The foils and float are designed to provide a boat that goes well both upwind and downwind, with or without foils. This gives balanced all round performance in other words, and results so far with the F-32SR indicate that I have it right. If anyone is foolish enough to change the float or foil design on either the F-85SR or F-32SR then they would have to remove my name and trademarks from the boat.

 

Ian Farrier

 

Farrier Marine

Designs That Work

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If multihulls direct would agree to putting a more modern (foil compatible) ama on the F85 mainhull and beams they'd be able to sell at least two to the SF Bay area. I'm aware the Ian F does not have the time for this sort of thing, nor the inclination.

And I acknowledge stirring the pot a bit with this, but for boats that will be sailed in breeze most of the time with the curved foils extended, I don't think Ian's ama shape will prove to have enough buoyancy aft.

 

I would certainly be interested to hear of what experience you may have with curved foils to where you came to this odd conclusion. Maybe you should also advise Hydroptère that their boat is not going to perform on SF Bay, as they have no float or buoyancy whatsoever behind their foils.

 

There will always be many different opinions, but the F-85SR floats are the exact right shape, with foils where they should be, based on my years of experience, and I was probably the first to start using curved float foils in 1985.

 

The foils and float are designed to provide a boat that goes well both upwind and downwind, with or without foils. This gives balanced all round performance in other words, and results so far with the F-32SR indicate that I have it right. If anyone is foolish enough to change the float or foil design on either the F-85SR or F-32SR then they would have to remove my name and trademarks from the boat.

 

Ian Farrier

 

Farrier Marine

Designs That Work

 

Okay Ian, I get it. The F-85R is perfect, and even before it's been sailed with foils you know exactly how it will sail (perfectly) in all conditions. I bow before you.

 

The fact that most, if not all, other trimarans that use foils successfully use amas that have remarkably different shapes to yours just proves that VPLP, M&M, Irens, and the such, are just idiots that have left much performance potential on the drawing board.

 

Ian, I think you've done a fine job with your boats, especially on the engineering side. That's why I said I would buy one except for that one aspect.

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^

 

why not get just the hull and put whatever floats on you like

 

as previously mentioned has been done before with the F82R

 

not calling it a farrier sounds like a cheap price to pay if you think you can improve the breed

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If multihulls direct would agree to putting a more modern (foil compatible) ama on the F85 mainhull and beams they'd be able to sell at least two to the SF Bay area. I'm aware the Ian F does not have the time for this sort of thing, nor the inclination.

And I acknowledge stirring the pot a bit with this, but for boats that will be sailed in breeze most of the time with the curved foils extended, I don't think Ian's ama shape will prove to have enough buoyancy aft.

 

I would certainly be interested to hear of what experience you may have with curved foils to where you came to this odd conclusion. Maybe you should also advise Hydroptère that their boat is not going to perform on SF Bay, as they have no float or buoyancy whatsoever behind their foils.

 

There will always be many different opinions, but the F-85SR floats are the exact right shape, with foils where they should be, based on my years of experience, and I was probably the first to start using curved float foils in 1985.

 

The foils and float are designed to provide a boat that goes well both upwind and downwind, with or without foils. This gives balanced all round performance in other words, and results so far with the F-32SR indicate that I have it right. If anyone is foolish enough to change the float or foil design on either the F-85SR or F-32SR then they would have to remove my name and trademarks from the boat.

 

Ian Farrier

 

Farrier Marine

Designs That Work

 

Okay Ian, I get it. The F-85R is perfect, and even before it's been sailed with foils you know exactly how it will sail (perfectly) in all conditions. I bow before you.

 

The fact that most, if not all, other trimarans that use foils successfully use amas that have remarkably different shapes to yours just proves that VPLP, M&M, Irens, and the such, are just idiots that have left much performance potential on the drawing board.

 

Ian, I think you've done a fine job with your boats, especially on the engineering side. That's why I said I would buy one except for that one aspect.

 

So you don't have any facts or experience to back your claims? Your only argument appears to be that if my F-85SR design works well (as it will), then all other designers have to be idiots. That has to be one of the strangest arguments I have seen in quite a while,

 

It now seems your opinion is based on pictures of other boats whose foils are not even like mine (don't have as much curve), and you have actually never sailed on a foiled boat, so really have no idea how they behave.

 

You have thus made a completely erroneous claim, with no facts to back it up, and do not seem to realize that constant development and improvement usually leads to boats that sail very well. An F-85SR has not been sailed yet, but it is an improved version of the F-82/F-25C which has been thoroughly well tested and proven over many years, and its performance will be improved again by foils which I first developed in 1985, resumed work on in 2004, and have now successfully used them in the F-32SR (two sailing). The F-85SR is thus the result of over 28 years of testing and development, and yet you claim to know better, but seem unable to back anything with any real world facts or experience.

 

Perhaps you should tell everyone what you see this added buoyancy at the float stern will actually do? It could be needed if the foil is too far forward in the float (a common mistake) but put the foil in the right place and the boat will be perfectly balanced. In fact one could get rid of the whole float as with Hydroptère, but then one would lose many of the all round advantages of having full floats with retractable foils.

 

Ian Farrier

Farrier Marine

Dsigns That Work

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How big a task is it going to be to retro fit the foil cases in the future?

 

Not a big job, and cases were added after the fact to the F-31 Cheekee Monkee, and the F-9R Wilparina in Australia. A number of builders are actually fitting the cases when the floats are made, with the intention of purchasing the foils (the expensive parts) later.

 

Ian Farrier

Farrier Marine

Designs that work

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