elboracho

Farrier F-85SR

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Sorry about that. Next time I might learn how to post photos right way up. No smart assed comments about the boat please!

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Thanks Wayne!

 

As often, I was probably looking at a way too complicated construction. I like your KISS approach. And also Marks Idea of a pivot breaking pin.

 

BTW: If you click the 'save' button on the applicable pic, it will show right way up.

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Its been far too long that no updates have been posted so thought I'd chuck one in...

 

Here is a pic of the F85sr daggerboard foam blank being cut on my cnc and another one of the finished 2.7kg rudder next the cut dagger core and my itsy bitsy tiny TT720 centerboard.

 

Still need to do the topcoat on the rudder so weight will go up a tad but does show you what can be done with vacuum bagging and minimal fairing required over a cnc cut foam core. We also lengthened it a tad.

 

Cheers

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Here is a pic of a mast for theF85SR tall rig.

At 12.6m tall with most fittings built in including clutches for all 5 halyards , but minus halyards and stays, it weighs in at 57kg.

 

 

 

 

 

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Here is a pic of a mast for theF85SR tall rig.

At 12.6m tall with most fittings built in including clutches for all 5 halyards , but minus halyards and stays, it weighs in at 57kg.

 

 

 

 

 

Very nice. How long till launch?

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Good question.

Hopefully the boat will be in the water before the start of the next sailing season.

But if it takes longer so be it. I'll put all the time I can into it and just see how it pans out.

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Talking about masts... The difference between the standard 8.5m rule mast (11m28) and the unlimited mast (12m60) is quite big. I wanted something in between and had already done interpolation calculations on a 12m mast, but then stumbled onto another solution.

 

The new dragonfly 25 has an 11m80 carbon mast and about the same righting moment ( or more ). The only major difference is that the jib and forward stay attachment is about 50 cm higher than what I had calculated, but that is not really a problem. And Denmark is not too far away to drive up and pick up a mast :)

post-50012-0-40718900-1435661651_thumb.jpg

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Talking about masts... The difference between the standard 8.5m rule mast (11m28) and the unlimited mast (12m60) is quite big. I wanted something in between and had already done interpolation calculations on a 12m mast, but then stumbled onto another solution.

 

The new dragonfly 25 has an 11m80 carbon mast and about the same righting moment ( or more ). The only major difference is that the jib and forward stay attachment is about 50 cm higher than what I had calculated, but that is not really a problem. And Denmark is not too far away to drive up and pick up a mast :)

 

The standard F-85SR mast is very fast as it is - as demonstrated in the recent 'Race to Alaska' by Mail Order Bride, and I've now managed to obtain a very good photo of MOB from Nick Reid, which shows the rig well:

 

http://www.f-boat.com/pages/News5/Race-to-Alaska.html

 

The taller unlimited rig is about as tall as one can go, and still be manageable, but probably not a good idea in windy areas. Wayne was thinking about changing to the taller mast before the race, but I think he is now probably glad he didn't - the standard rig is still quite tall. However, sounds like the Dragonfly mast may be a practical alternative - who is making their masts these days?

 

Ian Farrier

 

Farrier Marine

Designs that work

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http://visionmast.com/

 

I came upon this company after reading through your news pages: http://www.f-boat.com/pages/News3/F-22inDenmark.html

The old website actualy has more information: http://visionboats.com/en/?Mast_and_Boom

 

Regards

Nico

 

 

Thanks for the details Nico - looks like they do some nice work.

 

Ian Farrier

 

Farrier Marine

Designs that work

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Sort of surprised at only 12.6m tall considering my A Class is 9.1m

Seacart 30 mast is 15m (Mainsail luff = 14.39). F32srcx has main luff = 15.09

My 27' cat launched 1989 had a 13m mast. 12.6 would be about right for a 'lightish' 8.5 m racing tri.

Blackjack's should be quite a weapon.

Can't wait to see it on the water.

I need some competition, IC has gone north, Lukim Yu beats me on OMR but only occasionally do we finish close together.

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Anyone have the heights above mast base for an F31 headstay, hounds, boom, diamonds, spreaders, screecher and spin exits? 31r so 42.5' mast, thanks

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Some more visible progress :)

 

As I've allready build the floats, beams, daggerboard and case, rudder and case, interior parts and several other smaller items I should be getting to the most rewarding part of the build now, although I first have to laminate most of the outside of the hull.

 

post-50012-0-02835000-1440696154_thumb.jpg

 

 

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Hi Phill. Yeah, Ian designed a great shape. It also looks good from the other side and with the F-22 type window.

 

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I'm starting to approach the pointy end of my F85 build. At least in the grand scheme of things. Probably still a few months before launch.

I have now acquired the carbon mast & boom, motor, sails, trailer and finally tow vehicle. Beams and floats finished and undercoated.

Painting the inside is finished and I've ordered the undercoat for the outside. They say it will take 7 days to get it in.

That just gives me with the opportunity to continue to improve the outside even though it is a case of diminishing returns.

Getting a coat of paint on it should be a big step forward in improving its looks.

 

For me right now the big question is what to do about anti fouling if anything at all?

 

12310413_10209015105721787_2972007574779

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It's looking good.

Avoid antifouling by hauling out to trailer on hardstand if you can, but if you do trail from time to time but normally moor, then you need something hard and designed for trailer boats; as many of the racing ablatives ( which might be great on boats that stay in the water) will fail if allowed to dry right out, as happens when you trail the boat around to regattas etc.

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I'm in the same boat, so to speak when it comes to antifoul. but was lead to believe that the hard/leaching style antifouls were the probelmatic ones as ablatives would just wear off to expose a new surface. Obviously the downside is that the softer ablative or dissolving styles wear easily on a trailer.

 

Read somewhere that you can get waxes that are effective (short term) but that would be a bit of a pain to reapply every time one wants to spend a week on the boat.

 

Anything new out there that works well?

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One of the copper epoxy products such as coppercoat is the best solution in my mind. Never wears out, can be sanded super smooth and even adds anther level of protection.

 

Good work by the way and thanks for the running updates. There is not much more satisfying than launching a self built boat. Best of luck.

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Coppercoat does have some advantages as noted above but it doesn't actually work particularly effectively as an antifoul per se. Still needs regular scrubbing if the boat is to live in the water. Over the years, I've used both ablative and "hard" antifouls and found the ablative stuff pretty well useless unless you don't mind seeing the stuff seriously discolour the water every time you are tempted to wave a sponge at it to remove some minor slime build up or similar. The hard scrubbable (non-epoxy) products from International (Ultra) or Norglass (Topflight) are reasonable. Call their technical support lines for advice.

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One of the copper epoxy products such as coppercoat is the best solution in my mind. Never wears out, can be sanded super smooth and even adds anther level of protection.

.

 

Several dutch F-boat builders used coppercoat and are very happy with it. One F-36 builder told me he applied it ten years before and his boat had not been hauled out of the water in between. The boats home port is not in salty water though.

 

Slight thread drift here, Evil Gnome launched his self built one yesterday, looks good.

 

Pictures!

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I SPENT A MONTH IN THE WHITSUNDAYS AND I SPRAYED below the waterline with lanocoat before I went. I wiped the hull every couple of days with a sponge and had no growth when I pulled out.

works but no good long term o a mooring

ian.

F82R in OZ

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Hi there

I am new here

I have had a change in circumstances (will be solo sailing again) so regrettably I will now be building a smaller design.

 

I am offering for sale my F-85SR plans with Carbon build option (electronic files and printed plan set, complete with two F-85src printed zip up Hoodies) Sail number 21 maybe the last private plan set sold I believe (Ian could confirm).

 

Seperately from these plans

I have plans and engineering specifications (that I had prepared by a leading New Zealand mechanical engineering company) for a carbon wing mast for the same design available separately.

I also have available plans and engineering specifications

(that I had prepared by a leading New Zealand mechanical engineering company) for a set of float lifting foils and cases with T foil rudders and cassettes and associated re engineering for the lamination specification for the hulls for the same design available separately.

Anyone interested can view in classifieds

email me on craigjohnstonnz@hotmail.com

Cheers

 

Craig

 

Christchurch

 

New Zealand

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I have launched my boat and have had a couple of sails on it now, still teething issues ( mine not Ians) but what a great boat, thank you Mr Farrier for designing this sized boat, I had 8 people on board ( approx 600 kgs) site seeing the Hobie Nationals last week and in max 15 knots westerly gust reached 12 knots with all on board until my tramp supports gave way, not blaming the crew though, easy to fix.

What a great mast raising system, we have raised and lowered it on the folded trailer with the trailer winch and have raised and lowered it on the water with a block and boat winch floats extended, launching and retrieving is pretty simple, we had a side wind on a boat ramp and jetty situation so attached a bow rope, let the boat float out and then raised the mast, then brought back to the jetty to finish the loading, the longest part is tying the boat to the trailer but even that will get quicker when we have all of the gear right.

If anyone asks for videos or pictures it will happen but not yet, too many other things on right now,.

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How's production going at Multihulls Direct? They got the F85 listed under "previous models", does that mean they're no longer making it?

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How's production going at Multihulls Direct? They got the F85 listed under "previous models", does that mean they're no longer making it?

Correct, too busy with the F-45, F-33, and F-22 at present (more photos soon). The F-85 was an interesting custom build, but custom boats take a lot of time, and
we now want to concentrate on production molded boats only. The F-85 will be revisited once we have F-22s popping out at the required rate.
Ian Farrier

 

Farrier Marine

Designs that Work

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That's good to hear as the popular boats were the F 27 and the Corsair 28, the 85 seems to be a good size to handle with room to go below and excellent performance.

Once the 85's get out and about there will be more interest, I know it's taken a long time but it just takes so long to build a trimaran when you do it part time.

I think the best option for the 85 is to buy it as a platform and fit it out to what you want, building the hulls and glassing sucks let someone else do it who is set up , then the fitting out, mast and sails are the fun part where you can have your input, that's what I would do if there was a next time.

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I actually like the building process. But it does take a looooong time. :)

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I love the building, but thank my now dead carpenter/boatbuilder father for grabbing me as I was about to buy F82R plans " do you want to sail a boat or build a boat?". And he hated multihulls, but gave good advice. I went into debt and bought an F24 then F27, F22, now F28, and just looked at an F82R last week that could really go well if I added longer floats....

I am so glad I got to cruise with my daughters instead of blowing 3 years in the bog and torture board shed while they went elsewhere. Renovating each of my boats at least gave me a feel for the build process.

I think the old man would be happy.

 

PS both daughters are crewing with me in this weekend's Surf to City race.

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I love the building, but thank my now dead carpenter/boatbuilder father for grabbing me as I was about to buy F82R plans " do you want to sail a boat or build a boat?". And he hated multihulls, but gave good advice. I went into debt and bought an F24 then F27, F22, now F28, and just looked at an F82R last week that could really go well if I added longer floats....

I am so glad I got to cruise with my daughters instead of blowing 3 years in the bog and torture board shed while they went elsewhere. Renovating each of my boats at least gave me a feel for the build process.

I think the old man would be happy.

 

PS both daughters are crewing with me in this weekend's Surf to City race.

Hope their windward work is good. No need to pack the kite on the current forecast.

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now F C28,

Fixed

 

Please don't alter my text Andrew, especially when you are incorrect.

 

My F-28R is one of the first F-28 imports to AUS, in about '98 by Ian (Ox) Davis. I think the boats were Scud, Pear Tree, Summit, mine was Special Kay owned by Greg Kay of Classic Trailers who made their trailers I think. His dad Bob owned one as well, and they were most definitely F-28R boats designed by Ian Farrier who I believe was working in the factory at the time.

Mine is boat #14, now proudly more F than the rest because Ian Farrier has signed inside the float at my request after he inspected the boat.

In the pic you will see us enjoying a cruise, with the Corsair F-28 logo clearly visible.

The sail logo has become F-28RX in case I modify something to make it go xtra fast.

( I love love love the Omohundro carbin mast)

 

Peter

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Settle petal - it was a wind up. Jeesus - you spent too much time around Ian and some of his sense of humour rubbed off on you

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Settle petal - it was a wind up. Jeesus - you spent too much time around Ian and some of his sense of humour rubbed off on you

 

Given that you are the local Corsair dealer and I am the Farrier dealer, perhaps the "wind ups" are best done in person instead of on an F-85SR forum?

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On the subject of building and in particularly building an F85.

I have really enjoy it. It has been great fun.

I know from experience that you cant beat the feeling of sailing a boat that you have built yourself.

 

But to build you have to really want to build.

 

If you just want to go sailing get an extra job and pay someone else to build it.

 

BTW:- I does look a little better with paint. Also I have decided to skip the antifoul and only put it on when I get sick of bringing it home.

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Great job Clive, are you calling it Tribe-Beater?

If you do drop her back in the lake on the mooring, a mate of mine with an 82R has been using a homemade shadecloth "boatbag" held up by pool noodles. The shadecloth jiggles the growth off the hull, and he only needs to clean the slime off every few months. Hasn't seemed to abrade the polyurethane either, probably same relative hardness?

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hey Pete,

thats not my boat, I can't make things that shiny,

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Easy to remember ...Evil has shiny black folding struts and Blackjack has shiny natural aluminium struts... and I'm pretty sure both these guys have spent enough hours on each of their boats to know which is which...a lot of blood sweat and tears in each I would wager

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now F C28,

Fixed

 

 

 

My F-28R is one of the first F-28 imports to AUS, in about '98 by Ian (Ox) Davis. I think the boats were Scud, Pear Tree, Summit, mine was Special Kay owned by Greg Kay of Classic ( I love love love the Omohundro carbin mast)

 

Peter

 

Hey Pete, there was another one called Moreton Bay Bug (sailed by Ox I think) that we raced against at Wangi one year back in the late 90's.

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How's production going at Multihulls Direct? They got the F85 listed under "previous models", does that mean they're no longer making it?

Correct, too busy with the F-45, F-33, and F-22 at present (more photos soon). The F-85 was an interesting custom build, but custom boats take a lot of time, and
we now want to concentrate on production molded boats only. The F-85 will be revisited once we have F-22s popping out at the required rate.
Ian Farrier

 

Farrier Marine

Designs that Work

 

Damn...

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now F C28,

Fixed

 

 

 

My F-28R is one of the first F-28 imports to AUS, in about '98 by Ian (Ox) Davis. I think the boats were Scud, Pear Tree, Summit, mine was Special Kay owned by Greg Kay of Classic ( I love love love the Omohundro carbin mast)

 

Peter

 

Hey Pete, there was another one called Moreton Bay Bug (sailed by Ox I think) that we raced against at Wangi one year back in the late 90's.

 

I think John Partridge's brother had one as well. Don't remember the name though and "My Toy" is still around in Gosford I believe. Definitely one of Ian's best designs ever IMHO.

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On the subject of building and in particularly building an F85.

I have really enjoy it. It has been great fun.

I know from experience that you cant beat the feeling of sailing a boat that you have built yourself.

 

But to build you have to really want to build.

 

If you just want to go sailing get an extra job and pay someone else to build it.

 

BTW:- I does look a little better with paint. Also I have decided to skip the antifoul and only put it on when I get sick of bringing it home.

 

Nice fairing and paint job, and be glad you did not have to fair and paint this:

 

post-18231-0-41567200-1453578314_thumb.jpg

F-45R side

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F-45 and F-45R under construction in Philippines,

with #3 started in foreground

Ian Farrier

 

Farrier Marine

Designs That Work

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Very nice looking hulls.

From what I've seen of the work of the guys in the Philippines they are going to be great boats.

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Congratulations! You sure did a lot of work in the last few months.

 

Enjoy!

 

Regards

Nico

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Hey do you like the parking job :) Got to put the first scratch on the boat LOL Who knew that this thing wouldn't slow down as fast as my TT720....

 

Great day out and its going to be an absolute cracker of a boat.

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now F C28,

 

Fixed

Please don't alter my text Andrew, especially when you are incorrect.

 

My F-28R is one of the first F-28 imports to AUS, in about '98 by Ian (Ox) Davis. I think the boats were Scud, Pear Tree, Summit, mine was Special Kay owned by Greg Kay of Classic Trailers who made their trailers I think. His dad Bob owned one as well, and they were most definitely F-28R boats designed by Ian Farrier who I believe was working in the factory at the time.

Mine is boat #14, now proudly more F than the rest because Ian Farrier has signed inside the float at my request after he inspected the boat.

In the pic you will see us enjoying a cruise, with the Corsair F-28 logo clearly visible.

The sail logo has become F-28RX in case I modify something to make it go xtra fast.

( I love love love the Omohundro carbin mast)

 

Peter

attachicon.gifIMG_3104fixedlow.jpg

John Partridge was the 'entrepreneur'who did the deal with Paul Koch to import the first batch of F28Rs into Sydney.

He brought together Bob and Greg Kay, who had F24 mkIIs and Kurt Ottowa, who had a F27. John had a ex Considine 075 (APC). Thr 28s were Pear Tree, Scud, Special Kay and Troika. Bob sold Troika to Robyn Ottowa who renamed it Summit after his company. Scud and Summit are still on Pittwater and both have had much sail track problems with the omo mast.

Greg made trailers for the Kay boats. The other 2 didn't need trailers.

Your boat looks great Peter. What name have you given it? See you in November?

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Previous owner called her Trinity, nicer than Special Kay.

Wangi hopeful.

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Previous owner called her Trinity, nicer than Special Kay.

Wangi hopeful.

If you can tow a Jayco around Australia you can tow a boat to Wangi.
I'll make sure he forms a convoy down with me.

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Previous owner called her Trinity, nicer than Special Kay.

Wangi hopeful.

If you can tow a Jayco around Australia you can tow a boat to Wangi.
I could never compare to you Pete, you tow with a Jeep which is illegal (and unlikely to go anywhere) other than in South Aus.

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You two are so cute

 

quote name="Peter Hackett" post="5346317" timestamp="1465380287"]

 

 

Previous owner called her Trinity, nicer than Special Kay.

Wangi hopeful.

If you can tow a Jayco around Australia you can tow a boat to Wangi.
I could never compare to you Pete, you tow with a Jeep which is illegal (and unlikely to go anywhere) other than in South Aus.

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IT has been a while for this post but the three boats that I know of are well and truly up and racing and finally I have some photos of the Evil Gnome at Wangi, a great boat for a fantastic place :)post-32253-0-67512900-1484529763_thumb.jpgpost-32253-0-71623600-1484529777_thumb.jpg

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That was how Clive had to sail that regatta. As each piece of rudder broke, he had to do a hot glass repair and keep it air drying on the track. Actually an easy feat on an F-85SR.

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That is why I now have TWO rudders on the floats, as you can see from the hull flying photo the F85 floats are so buoyant that the main hull lifts up and the rudder is hardly in the water, putting a lot of load on the one rudder so I arrived at the decision to put two rudders on and will trial them on the boat this Sunday at Wangi.

There is so much more potential to discover on this boat starting with steering it, I can't wait.

post-32253-0-28520900-1484546097_thumb.jpg

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I'm very interested hearing how the float rudders go.

The single rudder seems OK upwind but your pic shows how the float rudders could come into their own once the kite goes up.

 

 

post-74552-0-17204200-1484730011_thumb.jpg

 

post-74552-0-45290000-1484730041_thumb.jpg

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Previous owner called her Trinity, nicer than Special Kay.

Wangi hopeful.

Boat names can be personal

Special Kay and Pear Tree are examples.

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I'm very interested hearing how the float rudders go.

The single rudder seems OK upwind but your pic shows how the float rudders could come into their own once the kite goes up.

 

 

attachicon.gifMHflying.jpg

 

attachicon.gifEvil1.jpg

I know I'm stating the obvious but what a difference float rudders do on the F85, yesterday in breeze of up to 15knts at Wangi after being very anxious whether the rudder system was going to work as hoped the first sail confirmed it, nice light balanced helm, direct response to tiller and just being able to winch the main on and gain height without losing steering was fantastic, there was some lee helm on the downwind but not bad, now I can rake the mast back more as the rudders are more efficient, even though building the system was a pain in the neck and not cheap and there are some getting on and off the trailer issues it was a good move, first race this Thursday in the Australia Day regatta at Wangi, can't wait

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Looks good Evil and I think it will be a good move considering the buoyancy in the floats like you say.

 

I know most of the times only one rudder will be in the water but do you think it would be worth putting bent tillers on the float rudders to setup proper Ackermann angles for when low riding or under power? Your tillers look straight in the photo.

 

Cheers

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I am a basic sailor as you know, I thought about it, it was two hard so went with what I know.

It doesn't seem to slow down much in the tack BUT we will see.

Maybe because one rudder is hardly in the water at all the effect might not be as noticeable like a cat with both hulls in the water while tacking?

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I am a basic sailor as you know, I thought about it, it was two hard so went with what I know.

It doesn't seem to slow down much in the tack BUT we will see.

Maybe because one rudder is hardly in the water at all the effect might not be as noticeable like a cat with both hulls in the water while tacking?

I think you are right. When a cat is tacking both rudders are fully immersed. When a F85 is tacking only one will be immersed at any point and the other will be clear or just touching the surface. It will change from one to the other mid-tack as the tri flops over.

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That is why I now have TWO rudders on the floats, as you can see from the hull flying photo the F85 floats are so buoyant that the main hull lifts up and the rudder is hardly in the water, putting a lot of load on the one rudder so I arrived at the decision to put two rudders on and will trial them on the boat this Sunday at Wangi.

There is so much more potential to discover on this boat starting with steering it, I can't wait.

 

Hi,

 

Truly lovely boats!

 

Truly hope I will get to start building a tri for myself in not too distant future.

 

Two short questions on the rudders

 

Do the rudders simply kick back for folding?

And only the motor is used to steer when folded?

 

 

Many thanks

P

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That is why I now have TWO rudders on the floats, as you can see from the hull flying photo the F85 floats are so buoyant that the main hull lifts up and the rudder is hardly in the water, putting a lot of load on the one rudder so I arrived at the decision to put two rudders on and will trial them on the boat this Sunday at Wangi.

There is so much more potential to discover on this boat starting with steering it, I can't wait.

 

Hi,

 

Truly lovely boats!

 

Truly hope I will get to start building a tri for myself in not too distant future.

 

Two short questions on the rudders

 

Do the rudders simply kick back for folding?

And only the motor is used to steer when folded?

 

 

Many thanks

P

 

I only move a short distance in flat water so the motor is ok, but if you had to go further then a temporary small rudder would be necessary, I am thinking of building a small rudder, short tiller and rudder pin all in one to slip into the existing rudder gudgeon on the transom.

They will kickup but not yet, I have them bolted together now because I know the area and depths so is not a problem, but what system I am thinking about is like the of the beach cats with a s/s rod that pushes the rudder back and locks in rather than ropes and pulleys, more positive but that is the winter job, time to go sailing while I can.

Had a good race yesterday at the Australia Day regatta at Wangi in 8-13 knots, boat went great except for the first spi hoist where someone tied the sheets around the spi and earlier Watty said on the beach "have you ever had your main halyard slip", well not until he mentioned it we hadn't so first work bang and dropped 6 inches and stayed, we will now tie off the halyard, minor issues but thinking now should have a checklist before a major race.

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That is why I now have TWO rudders on the floats, as you can see from the hull flying photo the F85 floats are so buoyant that the main hull lifts up and the rudder is hardly in the water, putting a lot of load on the one rudder so I arrived at the decision to put two rudders on and will trial them on the boat this Sunday at Wangi.

There is so much more potential to discover on this boat starting with steering it, I can't wait.

 

Hi,

 

Truly lovely boats!

 

Truly hope I will get to start building a tri for myself in not too distant future.

 

Two short questions on the rudders

 

Do the rudders simply kick back for folding?

And only the motor is used to steer when folded?

 

 

Many thanks

P

I only move a short distance in flat water so the motor is ok, but if you had to go further then a temporary small rudder would be necessary, I am thinking of building a small rudder, short tiller and rudder pin all in one to slip into the existing rudder gudgeon on the transom.

They will kickup but not yet, I have them bolted together now because I know the area and depths so is not a problem, but what system I am thinking about is like the of the beach cats with a s/s rod that pushes the rudder back and locks in rather than ropes and pulleys, more positive but that is the winter job, time to go sailing while I can.

Had a good race yesterday at the Australia Day regatta at Wangi in 8-13 knots, boat went great except for the first spi hoist where someone tied the sheets around the spi and earlier Watty said on the beach "have you ever had your main halyard slip", well not until he mentioned it we hadn't so first work bang and dropped 6 inches and stayed, we will now tie off the halyard, minor issues but thinking now should have a checklist before a major race.

Checklist before every race.

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I think C-Tech. I got a quote from them at $22k USD, which is beyond my means.

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AFAIK Evil has an aluminium mast, while the Mad Hatter has carbon

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I think C-Tech. I got a quote from them at $22k USD, which is beyond my means.

I went back and checked. Just over $22k NZD ex freight.

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If you just get the blank carbon tube from C tech the price is not so bad. I was quoted around $8,500AUD.

If they completely fit it out with carbon fittings, as they did for me, the price goes up by a huge amount.

Were they quoting a fitted mast?

My mast fitted with sheaves, 5 cleats and diamond wires but without halyards and stays it only weighed 57kg and over 7kg of that was the diamond wires. I had them put hi mod carbon down the side to improve the stiffness through the minor axis and they could have reduced the weight by another 3kg but I chose to keep the weight and increased safety factor. (This is the 12.6m mast)

I'm retired and offset the cost by making some etching presses.

I had already bought a lathe to make one for my misses. It was cheaper to buy the lathe and make her press than get someone else do the machining. (browny points plus as the lather was handy making stuff for the boat too) So I just made half a dozen more etching presses and that helped pay for the mast.

I'm extremely happy with the C Tech mast.

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I think C-Tech. I got a quote from them at $22k USD, which is beyond my means.

 

I went back and checked. Just over $22k NZD ex freight.
That is a bit pricey for an F-25C mast, Try http://visionboats.com/en/?Mast_and_Boom

He also builds the dragonfly 25 sport carbon mast

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My boat mast is 12.6 and all up weight fully rigged is 85 kg.

I have double spreaders and a top mast stiffener for the masthead spi and backstays as well.

The unlimited rig should be called the standard rig as this suits the boat well.

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If you just get the blank carbon tube from C tech the price is not so bad. I was quoted around $8,500AUD.

If they completely fit it out with carbon fittings, as they did for me, the price goes up by a huge amount.

Were they quoting a fitted mast?

My mast fitted with sheaves, 5 cleats and diamond wires but without halyards and stays it only weighed 57kg and over 7kg of that was the diamond wires. I had them put hi mod carbon down the side to improve the stiffness through the minor axis and they could have reduced the weight by another 3kg but I chose to keep the weight and increased safety factor. (This is the 12.6m mast)

I'm retired and offset the cost by making some etching presses.

I had already bought a lathe to make one for my misses. It was cheaper to buy the lathe and make her press than get someone else do the machining. (browny points plus as the lather was handy making stuff for the boat too) So I just made half a dozen more etching presses and that helped pay for the mast.

I'm extremely happy with the C Tech mast.

Yes, that was a fitted mast quote. You're correct, the price drops to almost half removing full fit out. I saw the pics of your mast and thought I should explore the possibility of a new rig. I decided to hold out and use my original mast with a new set of sails. When I wear them out I will decide what to do. If I decide to build a set of F-85 floats/beams for my F-25C I may add the F-85 rig too. That was were I was heading when considering a new rig.

 

I'm also watching the F-85 float rudders discussion with considerable interest.

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Nelson

I think you could use your current beams. At least if they are the same as the F82 beams you could.

Building the floats is a "walk in the park" compared to building the beams.

I like the F85 floats but have not sailed the F25 or 82 to make a comparison.

Maybe Evil could tell what he thinks.

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I think C-Tech. I got a quote from them at $22k USD, which is beyond my means.

I went back and checked. Just over $22k NZD ex freight.
That is a bit pricey for an F-25C mast, Try http://visionboats.com/en/?Mast_and_Boom

He also builds the dragonfly 25 sport carbon mast

 

My mast for the F32R cost me 21500 Euro and I bought a Axxon mast

http://www.axxoncomposites.com/en/

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"My mast for the F32R cost me 21500 Euro and I bought a Axxon mast

http://www.axxoncomposites.com/en/"

 

The currency conversion has that a bit more than what I paid, but it is also 1.4m longer.

Was that with all the fittings or just the tube?

 

it was the compleet mast with carbon goosneck, gull sheave, mast bal, mast rotation control, pad eyes for masttop runner and reef and one pair of spreaders. The Karver track is not in the price but will be put on. The mast is 14 meters long and has also a thicker wall then a mast for a F85.

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Nelson

I think you could use your current beams. At least if they are the same as the F82 beams you could.

Building the floats is a "walk in the park" compared to building the beams.

I like the F85 floats but have not sailed the F25 or 82 to make a comparison.

Maybe Evil could tell what he thinks.

I had an F82r and the difference in the float volumes is larger and for the better , I can drive the F85 floats heaps harder and that is why I went to the float rudders as the main hull comes out of the water more putting more load on the centre rudder, other people would not have a problem with the centre rudder only but I push very hard, floats are easy to build, beams are NOT so easy to build but the mods are really worth it, I'd check with Ian Farrier about your current beams being used myself. Good luck

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