Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guitar

Tempest

Recommended Posts

As an owner of a Tempest, a 1974 Mader, I can attest to the form and function of this boat design. I have raced against SC 27's, U20's and other sport boats in SF and SoCal, both with and without trap. The boat is very fast. The new spinnaker pulls like a train. Great bang for the buck for anyone who wants a sport boat but doesn't have the bucks or the crew to man one.

 

The design loves heavy air sailing, 30+ in SF is no problem.

 

Please assist the group with locating the missing US boats and help bring them out on the water again. We have two know boats in NorCal and even more in SoCal but we have buyers looking for the others.

DSC_3242r.jpg

DSC_3671r.jpg

 

 

Article Link

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I forget what race it was but a few years and beers ago I remember running DW through the slot on an Olson 29 moving along at a good clip when G and his Tempest came past us on a full plane just flying!! Since then I have been passed by that same damm Tempest many a time while sailing on ledmines!! They look like a metric shit ton O fun and I would love to get my hands on one to keep at the cabin on Tomales Bay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

ummmm you should see them upwind too... loads of fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

tempesta%203.jpg

shot of my boat at the HPDO with my buddy from the UK (GBR1100 on the wire)we will have 5 boats at the regatta next year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You may know the boat. I bought it in Santa Clara off a Chinese guy. Said he knew some guy in the East Bay who wanted to buy the mast. Was that you?

 

Red hull, white deck, and a great lesson to a fiirst time boat owner to check the condition better before buying

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

yea I think I do. Do you still have it intact? is it a project boat?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You may know the boat. I bought it in Santa Clara off a Chinese guy. Said he knew some guy in the East Bay who wanted to buy the mast. Was that you?

 

Red hull, white deck, and a great lesson to a fiirst time boat owner to check the condition better before buying

 

 

I know the boat. What condition is she in now? Pics?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

You may know the boat. I bought it in Santa Clara off a Chinese guy. Said he knew some guy in the East Bay who wanted to buy the mast. Was that you?

 

Red hull, white deck, and a great lesson to a fiirst time boat owner to check the condition better before buying

 

 

I know the boat. What condition is she in now? Pics?

 

was that the Polish guy's boat?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are they better now?

 

My impression of the Tempest back in the '70s is that they were weak, flexible and not built/designed-to-be-built well. They just seemed like disposable boats.

 

I find it telling that as soon as they lost Olympic status they simply disappeared.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great article Nick!

 

You've gotta teach me how to setup to run in 30kt wind Guitar. I'm learning, but there's so much to learn. I got a big lesson in light wind the other day, not enough twist and stalled the main. I sat there with a Catalina 22, and a J22, and watched the rest of the fleet leave us behind. Couldn't figure out what to do. After the race, I followed the leader around and kept fiddling with my sail til it looked like his. That fixed it.

 

Fine boat Kevin. I got the pictures (finally) of your boat that showed your spinnaker blocks, and that's how I'm going to do mine.

 

Glad to see the association coming together.

 

Thanks,

 

US 307post-47350-069316800 1288299259_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

 

My impression of the Tempest back in the '70s is that they were weak, flexible and not built/designed-to-be-built well. They just seemed like disposable boats.

 

 

the winner of the last worlds in Holland was in a 20 year old boat. They're built with foam core now so they're much more durable.

 

here's a cockpit shot of a Mark Two (newer cockpit design)

 

2u9qs5e.jpg

 

check out the other differences in these pix:

http://ustempest.com/USTempest.com/Mader_Mark_Two.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are they better now?

 

My impression of the Tempest back in the '70s is that they were weak, flexible and not built/designed-to-be-built well. They just seemed like disposable boats.

 

I find it telling that as soon as they lost Olympic status they simply disappeared.

 

I'll take the bait!

 

Mine was built in 1975, and is still sailing strong. I wouldn't call that a disposable boat. It's been outside the whole time, although It's probably been waxed 5 or 6 times and painted once. No blisters or soft spots. It's built light on the ends for performance, so you can't dance on the decks fore or aft, but dancing is for after the race at the club.

 

US 307

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the winner of the last worlds in Holland was in a 20 year old boat. They're built with foam core now so they're much more durable.

 

Ah! That's good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five
the winner of the last worlds in Holland was in a 20 year old boat. They're built with foam core now so they're much more durable.

 

Ah! That's good.

 

if you're ever on the east coast I'll take you for a ride. They're 'comfy'...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BFS%202tn.jpg

Look what just came in my email. One stored in the rafters. Minus sails but comes with a trailer.

 

Waiting for hull info.

 

My Mader is a 1974, same year as my Triumph TR6. Both get comments whenever they go out. I race mainly in San Francisco and have done some ocean in SoCal.

TBF

IMG_4138.JPG

Mr%20Bone%201st.jpg

 

Great single-hander. On my way to first in class, first overall, 24 boats, 25 mile course out of LB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great article Nick!

 

You've gotta teach me how to setup to run in 30kt wind Guitar.

 

Put on goggles, the spray is intense. Close your scuppers, they scream at these speeds. :lol:

 

 

Got an article for you to read. I'll pm it to you.

 

You got her put away for the season?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tempest4a.jpg

This was the day WD saw us out.

P1010079.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the winner of the last worlds in Holland was in a 20 year old boat. They're built with foam core now so they're much more durable.

 

Ah! That's good.

 

if you're ever on the east coast I'll take you for a ride. They're 'comfy'...

 

THere were two in the SE Mass. years ago and they were both donated to this organization.

http://www.communityboating.org/

 

One was red One was blue. The blue one "hot Temper" I think is still sitting outside in storage. Give them a call and I am sure it could be had cheap.

 

I sailed them a few times and all were complete but in very rough shape. NOt sure of current condition. PM me and I can take a look for you if your interested

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please assist the group with locating the missing US boats and help bring them out on the water again. We have two know boats in NorCal and even more in SoCal but we have buyers looking for the others.

 

 

The University of Texas Sailing Club was given US152 in about 1981. Sweet Geebus, it was an awesome boat! Definitely ahead of its time. Great teaching platform, too. Maybe there's a UTSC anarchist about that knows where it is. I hope it survives.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please assist the group with locating the missing US boats and help bring them out on the water again. We have two know boats in NorCal and even more in SoCal but we have buyers looking for the others.

 

 

The University of Texas Sailing Club was given US152 in about 1981. Sweet Geebus, it was an awesome boat! Definitely ahead of its time. Great teaching platform, too. Maybe there's a UTSC anarchist about that knows where it is. I hope it survives.

 

 

Hey Red,

I wonder if it might be in AYC's dry storage? Slight hijack- What do ya sail Red and are ya sialing Wurstfest?

I'll be this weekend on the Contender, Amazing how the Contender, Flying Dutchman and Tempest sorta have the same hull shape.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great Boat.....and Not because I owned one...hahaha.....Spin was a frac and a little underpowered in light stuff.

 

Has anyone put a prode on and gone w/BIG A-Sym's yet???

 

I sailed mine off the dock and up the river w/no engine into Long Island Sound....the Looks I got were classic. The best line was from a Stink Potter...."Hey where's your engine??" Me as I look around with that dumb befuddled look (which just happen to come so easy to me) "Whoa is was here a minute ago....guess someone stole it".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Red,

I wonder if it might be in AYC's dry storage? Slight hijack- What do ya sail Red and are ya sialing Wurstfest?

I'll be this weekend on the Contender, Amazing how the Contender, Flying Dutchman and Tempest sorta have the same hull shape.

 

UTSC was sailing out of a marina at Volente back then but I guess anything's possible.

 

Weta's are sailing Wurstfest II next weekend with the Portsmouth cats. We asked to sail with the Portsmouth dinghies this weekend, but no go. I'll be launching next door to LCYC this weekend and doing my best to stay out of your way. If the forecast wind out of the South holds, should be pretty easy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good Morning,

 

I love the Tempest story about the British Tempest guys at the 1976 Games in Canada.

 

They won a medal but the boat was a bit tired by the end of their regatta.

They duly pulled the plug on it heading home after the last race and sank their boat.

 

The guys were quoted as saying that the old horse was past it and like you do with any old horse, you put it out.

 

If I remember corectly the boat was called "Gift Horse" or "Trial Horse"? Can one of you give us the full story please?

 

So if anyone is looking for a project boat, try the bottom of Lake Ontario.

 

Regards,

Multisail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good Morning,

 

I love the Tempest story about the British Tempest guys at the 1976 Games in Canada.

 

They won a medal but the boat was a bit tired by the end of their regatta.

They duly pulled the plug on it heading home after the last race and sank their boat.

 

The guys were quoted as saying that the old horse was past it and like you do with any old horse, you put it out.

 

If I remember corectly the boat was called "Gift Horse" or "Trial Horse"? Can one of you give us the full story please?

 

So if anyone is looking for a project boat, try the bottom of Lake Ontario.

 

Regards,

Multisail.

 

 

That's fuckin' awesome

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good Morning,

 

I love the Tempest story about the British Tempest guys at the 1976 Games in Canada.

 

They won a medal but the boat was a bit tired by the end of their regatta.

They duly pulled the plug on it heading home after the last race and sank their boat.

 

The guys were quoted as saying that the old horse was past it and like you do with any old horse, you put it out.

 

If I remember corectly the boat was called "Gift Horse" or "Trial Horse"? Can one of you give us the full story please?

 

So if anyone is looking for a project boat, try the bottom of Lake Ontario.

 

Regards,

Multisail.

 

Close. They burned it just off the beach.

 

John Oakeley and Tim somebody. No medal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

Alan Warren I think?

 

The boat was called 'Gift Orse' and was badly damaged in transit. It performed so poorly that they put it out of its misery by dousing it with lighter fluid and lighting it afire. The last act was for a Coast Guard vessel to ram it, sending it to the bottom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were these the same guys that the crew taped wooden blocks to his shoes and told everyone it was legal and allow him to hike better?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

Were these the same guys that the crew taped wooden blocks to his shoes and told everyone it was legal and allow him to hike better?

 

I think so. That's why it was written into the class rules to ban that. Kind of funny really. I think it was the era of platform soles. Imagine trapezing with those on....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice way to distract your opponents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

right up there with Butch Ulmer spritzing water from a bottle on his hull and winning a race right after. It distracted the competition enough that they banned it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

sport-graphics-2008_700733a.jpg

 

Sailing: What a joy to see the 'Orse ablaze

 

By Tim Jeffery

Published: 12:01AM BST 09 Jul 2008

 

 

Fitting finale: the 'Orse burns after the 1976 Olympics I always thought it was healthy to have a job, a normal life and then an obsessive interest in your chosen sport. Ours was sailing. Alan Warren and I always tried very hard but we also liked to have fun. I don't know if Olympic sailors do any more.

 

British team benefit from Chinese home

Tim Jeffery: Weymouth loses Bill Ludlow | Beijing Olympics calendar

British sailing team left as rank outsiders for Beijing

At the 1976 Games, the Olympic officials lived the life of Riley. We used to dress ourselves up a bit in a blazer and tie and order an official car to take us out for the evening. We'd sit in the back and talk measurer-speak as we got taken off to our restaurant.

 

 

Related Articles

Liverpool manager Roy Hodgson says Fernando Torres is 'finding the joy' again

Arsenal v Shakhtar Donetsk: live

Anchorage, Alaska: Of moose and men

Liverpool takeover: John W Henry and NESV must now win battle for hearts and minds

Norway cruise guide: Hurtigruten's coastal Odyssey

Diamond League 2010 Paris: Usain Bolt sees off Asafa Powell to win 100m in 9.84sec

I'd won world, European and national titles in the Flying Dutchman class crewing for John Oakeley and Alan had a lot a wins in many classes, including the Merlin Rockets, when someone on high decided they wanted to put us together as a tuning partner for Clifford Norbury for the 1972 Olympics. He worked for Ian Proctor, who had designed the new Tempest class and seemed the safe bet to go to Germany.

 

Well, we had a bit of a chip on our shoulders about that. Others thought we were joking but we were rather serious. We tried very hard and got selected to go to Kiel instead, and we would have won the gold medal instead of the silver if the wind hadn't died on the last leg of the last race.

 

The boat allocated to us was one of several old ones at Hayling Island and we named her Gift Horse. 'The 'Orse' was what we used to call her.

 

We also won the 1976 trials and headed for our second Olympics - at Kingston, on Lake Ontario, where the Montreal Games regatta was held.

 

Unfortunately for The 'Orse she had a rough Atlantic crossing. Whoever had loaded her into the container didn't secure the trailer properly and she was rather badly damaged. There's a bit of black art to boats and though our team boatbuilder, Bungy Taylor, repaired the cracked frames, she was never as fast as she had been. The 'Orse had gone a bit lame. Alan and I thought about those old kings and so forth who burned their old boats, so we agreed to give The 'Orse a proper Viking burial after the last race.

 

There was no security or searching back then, so I took something highly flammable afloat. The label was full of hazard warnings and talk of flash points. After the last race I opened the bow compartment, poured out the liquid, lit a match and threw it in. The only thing that happened was my eyebrows disappeared. I'd found out what 'flash point' meant.

 

Alan borrowed a cigarette lighter from a Belgian sailor who knew our plan and he got to work in the aft compartment on the wooden frames. His slow-burn technique worked much better and soon The 'Orse was billowing black smoke and orange flames.

 

The race committee was flummoxed. They sent a boat over and asked if we were okay. Yes we were, thank you. We had already arranged to be picked up.

 

Great British Olympians | Olympics countdown

The amount of chatter on the radio increased dramatically, much to our delight and everyone else's consternation. Eventually a Canadian Navy warship was summoned and rammed our Tempest. The 'Orse was sunk. She'd met the fitting end we intended.

 

It wasn't quite the end of the story. The officials didn't see the funny side of it. And Canadian customs couldn't accept that the boat was neither staying in Canada for them to inspect nor being taken out of the country for them to stamp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good evening,

 

kmccabe, thanks for the full story on Gift Horse. It was a real sailing classic.

 

Stories like this make the sport. It is when you read about these antics that you realise just how clinical and boring modern day sport has become.

 

Imagine what the Chinese officials would have done, should you have set a boat alight at the Games in this day and age.

 

Somehow, only a bunch of Brits would think up something like this. Are there any more?

 

Regards,

 

Multisail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

Are there any more?

 

more Brits? yup... this place is filthy with them. Ohhh stories... dunno I suppose so. There are many local stories like Butch Ulmer's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post-738-068243500 1288389681_thumb.jpg

My brother and I at the 1969 Atlantic Coast Champs, this was the last race we sailed together, we were on fire upwind.

I sailed Tempests through the 1972 trials. My Dad and I were the oldest and youngest competitors and finished 8th.

 

Tempests were really fast boats but you had to sail them properly, and to do that you had to be big and strong. At 6'1" 190 pounds I was a small crew. I wore the max weight ( at the time 20 kg) and had a cup on a bungee so I could keep my weight jacket sopping wet. There have been very few small boats that I wasn't strong enough to muscle around, but the Tempest was one of them. I was rowing pretty competitively during those years and there were things that just didn't happen if you didn't catch the moment just right. People thought the loads would be about like those on an FD, but they were more like those on a half tonner. The best crews were over 6'6 and that's why David Hunt built his platform dinghy boots. These were deemed to be "hiking assists" and were therefore banned, but we all shopped for the thickest sole boots we could find and added insoles to be as tall as we possibly could be and not get busted. The boats could fly.

 

The Tempest was repeatedly and ruthlessly hacked by the Star class and it's supporters in the IYRU. There wasn't a single thing about the boat that wasn't belittled or criticized. Hypocrisy and intellectual honesty weren't even a concern as long as the Tempest was killed an the Star reestablished as the Olympic keelboat. At the time I didn't understand that it s not possible to sail a legitimate Olympic regatta without the Star and the Finn because those two classes epitomize yacht racing to the majority of IYRU delegates.

 

The Tempest was, however, a product of it's time. It would look different if you did it today. The Keel in particular was terrible. The raising feature wasn't done well, so they were all bonded in the down position, and the mild steel flat plate rusted constantly. Other than the fact that a flat plate keel was just wrong, it was a constant maintenance headache. The construction also was mid 60s vintage single skin mat and roving laminates that were not very stiff by modern standards. Add to that the fact that the hull deck joint was a shoe box ( which just doesn't work well, and the floor stiffeners were hard to bond to the underside of the cockpit and you have a product that wasn't always right. The Mader boats were assembled with more care and thus were generally better. Like so many things, value engineering forced compromises that didn't really save anyone any real money, but made the product harder to own and maintain.

 

The biggest thing Mader did was to cheat the keel specs. There was a tolerance on how heavy the keel had to be. It started by letting people drill lead out of the bulb to keep their older boats down to weight. The bulb was cast in halves from official molds, and Mader started pouring the minimum amount of lead into each half. Thus his bulbs were quite a bit thinner than everyone else's. There was really legal way to modify existing keels to look like Maders. and a bulb that is something like 30mm thinner is a whole lot less draggy.

 

I have drawn the second generation Tempest on the back of more than one place mat and in the margins of more than one boring agenda. The existing boat can humiliate most modern sport boats, the next one (with double wires and and a masthead a sail) would treat them like a prison bitch. But I have never done anything serious about it because the original boat, which was so fucking brilliant, got such a shaft from the yachting establishment. If the market couldn't accept what that design was capable of, why would they accept the thing that came next. The anti Tempest propaganda is so dense that it has become regarded as fact. Most people think I am totally nuts when I say the Tempest was a great design, do it again with what we know and have available now.....

SHC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That post would make for good content somewhere where more would read it. The FP perhaps.

 

Thanks Steve.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the winner of the last worlds in Holland was in a 20 year old boat. They're built with foam core now so they're much more durable.

 

Ah! That's good.

 

if you're ever on the east coast I'll take you for a ride. They're 'comfy'...

 

"+1" for the 'comfy' comment. Actually quite comfortable to helm and hike, coming from one who didn't grow up as a dinghy sailor. I helm, kmccabe hangs out on the wire and we have some amazing rides on LIS. Definitely my favourite ride.

 

Nice thing, too, the new class-approved chute - bigger and better and she pulls!

 

Having the Heineken HPDO as a venue for showing them off is a great advantage. Fun to hear chatter from those who know its history and those who are curious to learn.

 

 

Awesome image of platform shoes ... the lever advantage would be great, but stepping back into the boat would take some getting used to (!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for that Steve, great to hear about some of the antics from the past regarding the Tempest and your involvement with the class.

 

I'm just a rags and ropes kind of sailor but sailing the Tempest is like playing golf with a better player, you kind of slip-stream into a different level of sailing whether you want to be there or not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That post would make for good content somewhere where more would read it. The FP perhaps.

 

Thanks Steve.

 

 

Bump and +1 for the front page.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

another one in Texas has shown up.

boat 0211.jpg

tx boat 1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the winner of the last worlds in Holland was in a 20 year old boat. They're built with foam core now so they're much more durable.

 

Ah! That's good.

 

if you're ever on the east coast I'll take you for a ride. They're 'comfy'...

 

THere were two in the SE Mass. years ago and they were both donated to this organization.

http://www.communityboating.org/

 

One was red One was blue. The blue one "hot Temper" I think is still sitting outside in storage. Give them a call and I am sure it could be had cheap.

 

I sailed them a few times and all were complete but in very rough shape. NOt sure of current condition. PM me and I can take a look for you if your interested

 

 

I know one of them is NOT complete. The fin and bulb is at my factory, ready to be scrapped if a certain someone doesn't get it out soon!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know one of them is NOT complete. The fin and bulb is at my factory, ready to be scrapped if a certain someone doesn't get it out soon!!!

 

RED ALERT!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

 

 

RED ALERT!!!

 

 

You want I should go get that coach?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the winner of the last worlds in Holland was in a 20 year old boat. They're built with foam core now so they're much more durable.

 

Ah! That's good.

 

if you're ever on the east coast I'll take you for a ride. They're 'comfy'...

 

THere were two in the SE Mass. years ago and they were both donated to this organization.

http://www.communityboating.org/

 

One was red One was blue. The blue one "hot Temper" I think is still sitting outside in storage. Give them a call and I am sure it could be had cheap.

 

I sailed them a few times and all were complete but in very rough shape. NOt sure of current condition. PM me and I can take a look for you if your interested

 

 

I know one of them is NOT complete. The fin and bulb is at my factory, ready to be scrapped if a certain someone doesn't get it out soon!!!

 

 

What's the scoop with the keel and rudder? Who, what and where?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Totally agree with SHC...

 

Tempest a great boat that got the shaft from the establishment in star class... stars were truly pissed that the tempest got the olymipic berth..

 

oh well, it does speak volumes about how the star class has protected/maintained its world class status

 

I sailed a lot of stars, but only watched the T's..always wanted to try one..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Email me the details of the one in East Texas, if it's for sale. I may have an interested party. Not sure how much he likes working on boats, but we'll see.

 

Also, there was mention of an article on heavy weather Tempest sailing. I'd like to see it too.

 

Thanks,

 

Art

US307

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you got it. I think I just got the one in SoCal sold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The real shame is that there are so many really neat OD boats that no longer develop the critical mass to get noticed and - thier day 'passed' they become junkers - obselete or not.

 

The One Design czar would direct all of these to a region where they'd flourish as a competitve fleet once again.

 

Oh well.

 

Hard to argue with modern designs that are easier to live with, ya know ? But still - it seems a real pity to see a race-horse headed for the road that leads to the dog-food factory. My own much-enjoyed obscure little boat has a few pockets of interest, and I know those fleets do thier best to find and recover the odd boat that wandered into the wilderness of PHRF/neglect. Fight the good fight guys - enjoy those old boats, 'cause they sure aren't going to make any more !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you got it. I think I just got the one in SoCal sold.

Not to DM... right? He already has four...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

you got it. I think I just got the one in SoCal sold.

Not to DM... right? He already has four...

 

(five........sssssshhhhh)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five


(in French)
What the world's looked like in Martinique in 2006. ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One man's Tempest fleet. I guess I shouldn't say anything, for one day I had 3 Tempests, still have two.

 

US 307

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The real shame is that there are so many really neat OD boats that no longer develop the critical mass to get noticed and - thier day 'passed' they become junkers - obselete or not.

The One Design czar would direct all of these to a region where they'd flourish as a competitve fleet once again.

...

 

That's what's great about regattas like the Heineken HPDO. We don't much care what kind of boat you have as long as it goes fast. Just bring it.

 

We brought out 11 Fireballs this year, up from 5 last year. That's huge.

One Tempest last year. 3 Tempests this year. Six next year? Who knows.

 

The most important point is : Just get yer boat out and love sailing it!

 

Word travels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

she knows how to drive a Tempest. Steady hand and quick reflexes!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

she knows how to drive a Tempest. Steady hand and quick reflexes!!

 

Mwahahahahahaha .... yes, and with that steady hand and those quick reflexes I can teabag you in a nanosecond and still have time to put on the "WTF!?!" look :ph34r:

 

:lol:

 

 

 

Seriously, though, I love the Tempest. I missed her this summer. When we get in the groove, there's nothing like it to put an ear-to-ear grin on my face ...well, except surfing down waves on an Open 60, but given the odds of that happening again I'll live happily with the 3-sail reaches thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

We've got a bunch of people on the Left Coast that want to buy boats now...

 

just need to find the boats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

she knows how to drive a Tempest. Steady hand and quick reflexes!!

 

Mwahahahahahaha .... yes, and with that steady hand and those quick reflexes I can teabag you in a nanosecond and still have time to put on the "WTF!?!" look :ph34r:

 

:lol:

 

 

 

Seriously, though, I love the Tempest. I missed her this summer. When we get in the groove, there's nothing like it to put an ear-to-ear grin on my face ...well, except surfing down waves on an Open 60, but given the odds of that happening again I'll live happily with the 3-sail reaches thanks.

 

yea, need that snorkel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I called the number Rick gave me for the one in Ft Worth. Whoever answered said it was the wrong number. I couldn't read the boat number on the picture of the plate I had. I tried to figure out which one it was from my Tempest handbook, but there were several choices.

 

US 307

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

They set fire to it, which somewhat upset the Canadian authorities.

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/othersports/olympics/2305180/Sailing-What-a-joy-to-see-the-Orse-ablaze.html

 

I have a vague recollection that Warren's next boat was called "Afterburner", but that might be wishful thinking.

 

cited above. Warren is a great sailor. He and his grand-children I believe are quite busy sailing Merlins.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess now I have to get a purple and gold spinnaker with a big LSU Tiger on it.

 

Geaux Tigers!

 

US 307

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I emailed the man in Ft Worth about his Tempest, but only a very brief answer. His boat is US283. I couldn't find it in the handbook. Anyone know who made that one?

 

US307

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

I emailed the man in Ft Worth about his Tempest, but only a very brief answer. His boat is US283. I couldn't find it in the handbook. Anyone know who made that one?

 

US307

 

pretty sure that was an O'Day. Good boats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's an O'Day for sale at Community Boating in New Bedford, MA. Call Peter Durant. He has it listed for $1,000. Here are a couple of pictures. Peter said it has a measurement sticker from an Olympics. He, obviously, could tell you more about it.

 

Community Boating NB

post-8657-003477000 1289488872_thumb.jpg

post-8657-015703500 1289488878_thumb.jpg

post-8657-021622700 1289488885_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice looking boat! Somebody will snag it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got a reply from the guy in Ft. Worth. I gotta do a little research and I'll let you know what I find out.

 

US307

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

That boat in New Bedford is in surprisingly good shape given its age.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

taking possesion of two boats this weekend. One is a Meier boat built in 1976 the other is a 1975 Mader built for a German team and sold in the states. I've promised one away (the Meier) to someone who's going to give it some love. Pix when I get there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I am the perfect wife ..... For the record. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

she knows how to drive a Tempest. Steady hand and quick reflexes!!

 

Mwahahahahahaha .... yes, and with that steady hand and those quick reflexes I can teabag you in a nanosecond and still have time to put on the "WTF!?!" look :ph34r:

 

:lol:

 

 

 

Seriously, though, I love the Tempest. I missed her this summer. When we get in the groove, there's nothing like it to put an ear-to-ear grin on my face ...well, except surfing down waves on an Open 60, but given the odds of that happening again I'll live happily with the 3-sail reaches thanks.

 

Alright guys. Get a room. I mean come on. KM-when did you start calling it a tempest? Or from Bow girls explanation she is a stripper and you are one lucky man living the dream.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

I keep telling people that I'm livin' the dream. Nobody gets it. Oh well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

I'll be this weekend on the Contender, Amazing how the Contender, Flying Dutchman and Tempest sorta have the same hull shape.

 

Gorgeous ain't they...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

KC 55 got a good start at Wurstfest last weekend

 

From wurstfestregatta and smugmug

 

tempestkc55b.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yo Jambalaya, more VANG. ...

 

Do you mean more Cunningham (down haul)? The boom vang, as I understand it, is used on broad reaches and runs and not for anything closer to the wind. Since the boom is uncontrolled by the main sheet when the boom is far out over the side of the boat, the vang controls the boom in those situations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yo Jambalaya, more VANG. ...

 

Do you mean more Cunningham (down haul)? The boom vang, as I understand it, is used on broad reaches and runs and not for anything closer to the wind. Since the boom is uncontrolled by the main sheet when the boom is far out over the side of the boat, the vang controls the boom in those situations.

 

The Vang is very much an upwind control,

Depowers the rig by bending it aft...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It de-powers by tightening the leech and flattening the sail.

It also keeps to leech tight if you ease,

so as not to put power on while trying to take it off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yo Jambalaya, more VANG. ...

 

Do you mean more Cunningham (down haul)? The boom vang, as I understand it, is used on broad reaches and runs and not for anything closer to the wind. Since the boom is uncontrolled by the main sheet when the boom is far out over the side of the boat, the vang controls the boom in those situations.

 

The Vang is very much an upwind control,

Depowers the rig by bending it aft...

 

Bending the mast aftward would make the main more full, not less so. I can't see how a vang would bend the mast anyway. On the Star the backstays are used for that. Maybe the backstay is not adjustable on the Tempest? Does the boom goodseneck slide on the mast on the Tempest? It's fixed in place on the Star. Jag vet inte.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It de-powers by tightening the leech and flattening the sail.

It also keeps to leech tight if you ease,

so as not to put power on while trying to take it off.

 

That would only work if the goose neck slides in the mast, assuming the vang attaches to the boom close to the goose neck. If the goose neck is fixed to the mast then it wouldn't do much of anything. When on a close reach or close hauled, the mainsheet has far more influence on the tightness of the leech than the vang. When close hauled in light wind, the traveler should be used to keep the main full while moving the boom towards the centerline of the boat .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

any bets on how long star heart keeps his stick in one piece when he starts to sail. :unsure: :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

One down one to go. The white boat is in a cheerful new owner's capable hands. The red boat is left.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

any bets on how long star heart keeps his stick in one piece when he starts to sail. :unsure: :unsure:

+1

I'm no expert an my explanation wasn't great but Jesus... Bending the rig aft makes the sail fuller?

Sailing since I was 7 and never figured that one out...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

on a star,, the bendiest, mast snappingest class in da world.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

Got a builder lined up to do the glass and gelcoat work. Will keep everyone up to date.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or Google "vang sheeting".

 

You don't have to read all 9,700-odd articles; any one will do.

 

I did. here's a quote:

"A boom vang is used on a sailboat to pull down the boom on off-wind points of sail when the wind in the mainsail would lift the boom. Proper use of a boom vang helps keep the sail full and drawing well.

 

What a Boom Vang Does

 

When a sailboat sails downwind, the mainsail is let out for best sail trim, and the boom is typically 50 to 80 degrees from the centerline out to the leeward side. Because of this angle, the mainsheet has little downward pull on the boom, which freely rises and falls with wind changes and when the boat rolls on waves from behind. When the boom rises, the mainsail billows out, twists, and spills wind, then may snap back - over and over. This motion makes the sail less efficient.

 

A boom vang prevents this motion by pulling downward on the boom regardless of its position in relation to the centerline. A traditional block-and-tackle vang (photo) mounts between the base of the mast and mid-boom. The control line is typically led back to the cockpit, where pulling the line exerts force to pull the boom down.

"

 

and another:

"When the boom is near the centerline, the sheet is nearly vertical, and can exert downward force on the boom. As the sheet is loosened to increase the horizontal angle of the boom and sail, the sheet becomes horizontal and exerts less downward force. A vang works with the sheet to apply the downward force on the boom at all horizontal angles, allowing the sheet to be used to control the horizontal angle of the boom effectively."

and yet another:

"On a run or broad reach, when the mainsheet traveler has been eased all the way out, further easing of the mainsheet causes the boom to rise, and puts a twist in the sail. If you trim the twisted sail to prevent the upper portion from luffing, it will be over-trimmed at the base, resulting in excess weather helm.A vang avoids this by pulling the boom down to straighten the leech and put the head and foot of the sail more nearly in the same plane. This, in turn, reduces the amount of rudder correction needed, and improves boat speed. On a beat, a vang can be used to prevent the boom from rising whenever the mainsheet is eased for a puff of wind. Using a vang to prevent the rise and fall of the boom with every change in wind and sea conditions increases sail efficiency and gives you a steadier, more controlled ride.

 

When sailing downwind, vanging the boom parallel to the water's surface also limits the effect of forces pushing the top of the mast to weather, causing uncomfortable rolling or, at worst, a sudden broach. A vang can help you control jibes and prevent dangerous accidental jibes when it serves as a preventer, restraining the boom by holding it forward, not down. Properly rigged, one device can serve both functions."

 

 

As I said before, the vang is mostly useful for downwind tacks, not upwind.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I'm no expert an my explanation wasn't great but Jesus... Bending the rig aft makes the sail fuller?

Sailing since I was 7 and never figured that one out...

 

The Star has two backstays per side. I got the information about how to use each of them confused.

 

"Your backstays are two more adjustments that help you get the most out of your sails. The lower backstay controls the bend in the lower part of the mast. In very light air and flat water there should be no tension on your lower backstays. As the wind increases and the water gets rougher you will need to pull on your lower backstay to give the boat enough power to sail through the waves. As the wind further increases and you start to get overpowered you can start to put some tension on your upper backstays. This bends the mast which helps flatten the sail and twists open the top part of the main. Also this tensions the head stay which makes the jib a little flatter. All of these things help de-power the boat and make it more manageable in windier conditions. Again as with the Cunningham, it is very important to ease the upper backstay as soon as the conditions get lighter."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

Guys:

He's learning how to sail, in a pretty complicated boat rigging wise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Missed it by a mile.

 

Again: "vang sheeting".

 

Started off as a dinghy technique now used on all sizes of boats. Not the only method of leech control, but certainly in play.

 

Being a Star owner, hasn't it struck you how much the vang (or is it a traveler??!?!!!) (or both!!!) differs from practically every other boat? And why this would come to be?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Missed it by a mile.

 

Again: "vang sheeting".

 

Started off as a dinghy technique now used on all sizes of boats. Not the only method of leech control, but certainly in play.

 

Being a Star owner, hasn't it struck you how much the vang (or is it a traveler??!?!!!) (or both!!!) differs from practically every other boat? And why this would come to be?

 

Vang sheeting is not used on a Star boat and it is not in the sail tuning instructions provided by North Sails, etc. You can yank on the vang all you want on a Star boat and it won't bend the mast. The official Star Class tuning DVD that I have does not show vang sheeting either. They show that the vang is used to control the shape of the main while running before the wind only. Sorry about the confusion.

 

I apologize for derailing this thread. Back to the Tempest class, which actually would have been an excellent choice of boat for us since it can be launched from a ramp. Maybe we'll get one some day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

Don't sweat it. The Tempest is launched almost exclusively by dolly in the UK. Its pretty cool to watch. This is the trailer/dolly they use:

 

2qdwtjq.jpg

 

yes I have the drawings for it. Its on that silly UK/European paper format though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites