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18 minutes ago, hobot said:

DJDO0dPXYA0CLS5.jpg

Great retro shot Hobot!  The Professor & The Badger, with a very young Greg LeMond in the background.  Id have to go to the internet to find out who the Del Tonga guy in the middle is.

 

 

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8 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Atlantic Citey, 1980's?

Back door employees entrance to the Trump Taj Mahal.  They are holding their HB3 visas.  

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1 hour ago, Poodle56 said:

 

It's too bad Kimb doesn't visit this thread, he'd be able to tell us who the Del Tonga guy is!

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On 6/29/2018 at 1:07 AM, hobot said:

 

4881438166_058f5d48ec_b.jpg

 

From the same Atoll test area in French Polynesia.  

eight_col_boom.jpg?1467449123

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On 6/22/2018 at 6:45 AM, QBF said:

1966576792_SMIMotivator.jpg.3d744eb1526a715479c7fabed828c2a3.jpg

 

1283929740_KittyOneil.jpg.c8bb1ef701c5179dfbba46a4548c7eeb.jpg

 

This week the History Channel had a special on Speed Demons with one segment on Kitty O'Neil, giving her some well deserved recognition.

On December 6, 1976, the professional stuntwoman Kitty O’Neil sets the land-speed record for female drivers at the Alvord Desert in southeastern Oregon. The record hovered around 400 mph; O’Neil’s two-way average speed was 512.710 mph. Observers reported that O’Neil’s car actually reached a top speed of more than 618 miles per hour on her first pass, but she ran out of fuel and had to coast to the end of the course.

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/deaf-stuntwoman-kitty-oneil-sets-womens-land-speed-record

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4 hours ago, hobot said:

FB_IMG_1530373306076.jpg

 

 

That sr71 so does not belong in a bone yard....  shame they Couldn’t get the drone to work

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2 hours ago, Fat Point Jack said:

How small is a comparable machine today?

iPhone.

 

article snip:

Quote

cray2.jpg

The Cray-1 supercomputer ran at 80MHz

.......... in 1975, a supercomputer named Cray-1 came around. It was a capable and awesome-looking piece of machinery that "flew" at a rate of 80MHz. While generally used for scientific projects, such as simulating the interaction of fluids, one of these bad boys helped render the CGI for the first Tron movie, released in 1982. But a Cray-1's raw computational power of 80 million floating-point operations per second (FLOPS) is laughable by today's standards; the graphics unit inside the iPhone 5s produces about 76.8 GFLOPS – nearly a thousand times more. And surely, the iPhone can render 3D graphics looking better than Tron's Lightcycle scene. On a related note, the Cray-2 supercomputer was released 10 years after the Cray-1 and was the world's fastest supercomputer until 1990. But even with a performance of up to 1.9 GFLOPS, the liquid-cooled, 200-kilowatt machine still ranks behind the Apple iPhone, at least when it comes to GFLOPS ratings. 
(full article at phonearena)

pic in Hobot's original post may be a Cray 2, not sure.

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7 minutes ago, Marcjsmith said:

That sr71 so does not belong in a bone yard....  shame they Couldn’t get the drone to work

I think that's the SR-71 predecessor, the Lockheed A-12 single-seater.  May be Palmdale CA?

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19 minutes ago, Marcjsmith said:

That sr71 so does not belong in a bone yard....  shame they Couldn’t get the drone to work

Agreed - it's had its full life cycle and is in a boneyard and it's still hard to believe that anyone even thought it could be done almost 60 years ago.

Johnson's Skunk Works was an amazing place.

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1 hour ago, Marcjsmith said:

That sr71 so does not belong in a bone yard....  shame they Couldn’t get the drone to work

Looks like the Pima Air and Space museum outside Davis Monthan AFB/AMARG near Tucson. If so, I think they have it under cover now, but a lot the aircraft they have are out in the sun.

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On 7/13/2018 at 1:50 AM, Shootist Jeff said:

From the same Atoll test area in French Polynesia.  

eight_col_boom.jpg?1467449123

and the leftovers.....Ruinit Dome

 

Runit_Dome_001.jpg

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32 minutes ago, Slick470 said:

Looks like the Pima Air and Space museum outside Davis Monthan AFB/AMARG near Tucson. If so, I think they have it under cover now, but a lot the aircraft they have are out in the sun.

 I saw a SR-71 at a sort of obscure Air Force Weapons Museum in Ft Walton. It was outside and looking a bit shabby. The Gulf Coast humidity is probably worse for it than the desert heat and sun but it was right next to a B-52 and many other old warbirds. At least you could get up close and even climb up in the wheel wells with no museum docents to mess with you. I was told that as part of some stupid treaty (that had probably never been enforced) that the main wing spars had been deliberately broken to ensure that the whole fleet of SR 71's would never fly again! I marveled at the single piece forged and billet milled Titanium landing struts. I've got some photos somewhere.

 

http://www.afarmamentmuseum.com/

 

Worth a stop if you are ever in the area.

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From reading Ben Rich's book about the Skunk Works they pretty much created the methods and tooling to machine Ti - it was an "impossible" material prior to the development of that plane.

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    I heard a story that the US planning guys for the SR-71 were so worried that their efforts to procure enough Titanium to build those speedsters would tip off the effort to the Russians who had the monopoly on Titanium at that time. They came up with an elaborate scheme of shadow holding companies to make the inquiries and purchase of the stockpiles of Titanium but the Russian spooks at some point noticed and brought it up with their leaders that the US was gathering a lot of strategically vital alloy. One of the big bosses sort of shrugged their concerns off saying, 'What? It's not like the can build an airplane with the stuff...'

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37 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

 I saw a SR-71 at a sort of obscure Air Force Weapons Museum in Ft Walton. It was outside and looking a bit shabby. The Gulf Coast humidity is probably worse for it than the desert heat and sun but it was right next to a B-52 and many other old warbirds. At least you could get up close and even climb up in the wheel wells with no museum docents to mess with you. I was told that as part of some stupid treaty (that had probably never been enforced) that the main wing spars had been deliberately broken to ensure that the whole fleet of SR 71's would never fly again! I marveled at the single piece forged and billet milled Titanium landing struts. I've got some photos somewhere.

 

http://www.afarmamentmuseum.com/

 

Worth a stop if you are ever in the area.

I was curious and looked that up about the wing spars. It's possible that they did that to that particular aircraft, but according to the Smithsonian, the example they have just outside DC was flown to Dulles, towed into the hangar and drained. Other than that (and obviously all the other stuff you'd need to actually actually get one flight ready), it is in "fly-able" condition. There is an act of Congress that requires in most cases retired military aircraft are required to be "De-Mil'ed" which basically means that they cannot be restored to flight condition easily. For museums, this usually means that hard to get, but necessary parts are removed or disabled in a way to make the aircraft hard and expensive to restore to flight status. For most aircraft this probably excludes structural changes since you don't want the plane to fall apart while it's on display and hurt somebody. 

The only treaty that I have heard of that requires aircraft to be destroyed or visibly broken are the ones that govern nuclear weapon delivery systems, like what they did with all of the older B-52s. Congress has also required special stuff to be done to the F-14s on display to prevent the Iranians from getting spare parts for theirs. 

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Image may contain: one or more people and shorts

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16 hours ago, P_Wop said:

I think that's the SR-71 predecessor, the Lockheed A-12 single-seater.  May be Palmdale CA?

thanks for the background info...

 

B52 cut for scrap   

But 365 of the jets are doomed under the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty with Russia and other successor states of the Soviet Union.

It takes about 300 hours to prepare a plane for destruction, logistics management specialist Carl Mlodzik explained before a recent session. The B-52s are stripped of their engines and other reusable parts, and radiation and hazardous fluids are removed, he said.

Then a 120-foot tall crane brings over the guillotine, attached by cables, to drop the blade about 80 feet.

More than a dozen airmen watched as the blade went to work on one day's task: Destruction of two B-52Ds, Nos. 50073 and 50070.

The first slice cut across the tail section of 50073, severing the fuselage. The treaty allows 60 days from the first chop to finish the job, but the crew does the chore in a day.

It took seven drops of the guillotine to cut the fuselage of 50070 into three pieces and sever both wings. The nose almost rolled over at the last cut, but stayed upright.

 

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1 hour ago, hobot said:

FB_IMG_1531237708621.jpg

 

 

It puts into perspective how HUGE was Britain's Avro Vulcan nuclear bomber, here dwarfing the itself quite large English Electric Lightning.  Only one of each still flying, I believe

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2 hours ago, SailBlueH2O said:

WP rating.jpg

Wow.  CCA Rating 76.8 on an LOA of 72.5 and LWL 63.25.  Such a flying machine!

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