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Speng

When's Banque pop going?

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It's RTW season innit? WHat's going on?

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I hate to say it, but I'll be surprised if they go this winter at least.....

I really hope I'm proven wrong though

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Why? Inquiring minds want to know. I saw both of them in France this summer and BPV sure looked ready.

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Groupama's situation is clear: they are concentrated on the Volvo for 2 editions and both tris are up for sale.

 

As for BP V, the boat is still lying idle in Brest Marina, "waiting for a weather window".

BP's program in the future is unclear: they go on with the Figaro, have purchased (from their subsidiary) the current BWR Foncia, skipper yet unknown. Unknown too is how this will influence the maxi-tri program;

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Having this boat built for a Jules Verne attempt but never using it seems like major overkill to me..

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BP can't afford to waste two winters in a row waiting for the ultimate "weather window". Anytime soon they will have to go, even if the weather is less than optimal. Time is really running out.

 

For Groupama, both trimarans G2 and G3 are for sale. I saw the adverts in Seahorse, anyone interested?

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BP can't afford to waste two winters in a row waiting for the ultimate "weather window". Anytime soon they will have to go, even if the weather is less than optimal. Time is really running out.

 

For Groupama, both trimarans G2 and G3 are for sale. I saw the adverts in Seahorse, anyone interested?

 

Is there a link to the adds for g2 and g3. ?????

I had a quick look and couldn't find them.

Thank you

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BP can't afford to waste two winters in a row waiting for the ultimate "weather window". Anytime soon they will have to go, even if the weather is less than optimal. Time is really running out.

 

For Groupama, both trimarans G2 and G3 are for sale. I saw the adverts in Seahorse, anyone interested?

 

Is there a link to the adds for g2 and g3. ?????

I had a quick look and couldn't find them.

Thank you

 

I don't know about links but the ads are in the brokerage section of Seahorse International magazine, page 56 in the February issue. It says "Groupama sells it's (sic) multihull fleet". And the prices are on demand... G2, G3, but also the Extreme 40 Groupama catamaran are for sale.

On the same page, the Orma 60 Banque Populaire 4 is also for sale.

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Does anyone have any scoop on this? Cause BP5 really has to go soon....

 

Series of SW gales all week at this point ! code Red still

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One problem is the seemingly endless series of lows crossing the north atlantic, and another is that the lows in the southern ocean seem to be tracking more north than normal this year. In order to stay in downwind mode, a more northerly course, hence greater distance, would have to be sailed. Groupama had this problem to a lesser extent last winter, but succeeded in spite of it by incredible boat speed.

la nina is a bitch!

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Excellent article in the sailing-supportive daily "Le Télégramme":

 

bing translation

 

original in french

 

The press seems to start changing mood.

 

On the other hand it seems IMHO that this sponsor does not sound like knowing to entice people to work hard, at least financially :o

 

EDIT: the article online has been "amended" overnight B) it originally said: 375 Euros/day in waiting period and 400 Euros/day when sailing.

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Excellent article in the sailing-supportive daily "Le Télégramme":

 

bing translation

 

original in french

 

The press seems to start changing mood.

 

On the other hand it seems IMHO that this sponsor does not sound like knowing to entice people to work hard, at least financially :o

 

EDIT: the article online has been "amended" overnight B) it originally said: 375 Euros/day in waiting period and 400 Euros/day when sailing.

 

 

TOO funny. I have the newspaper here with the original amounts.

 

 

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Excellent article in the sailing-supportive daily "Le Télégramme":

 

bing translation

 

original in french

 

The press seems to start changing mood.

 

On the other hand it seems IMHO that this sponsor does not sound like knowing to entice people to work hard, at least financially :o

 

EDIT: the article online has been "amended" overnight B) it originally said: 375 Euros/day in waiting period and 400 Euros/day when sailing.

 

 

TOO funny. I have the newspaper here with the original amounts.

 

I do too ;) The BP's PR Agency must have been pretty busy, as - hidden in a small corner of the next day's newspaper - there was an embarrassed correction . I guess some crew-member might be up for some nasty remarks. I can already hear the bank's clients remarks about refusals on overdraft extension.

 

Classical example of sponsorship turning against it's original goal, delayed departure might be justified in view of a record but left too much void and frustration in the observing world. Interesting.

 

Incidentally Coville moored Sodebo's next to BP last night, ready for his own departure.

post-6361-062775900 1295087083_thumb.jpg

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BPV just went code orange...

Fingers crossed- check

 

Decade of the rosary- check

 

Dare to hope they might go......

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The latest news on the BP web site is that they are planning to leave this week, most likely between Thursday and Sunday... but a departure as early as tomorrow afternoon (Wednesday) is not excluded!!!

 

They seem to be not too concern about the weather condition to cross the Bay of Biscay, but instead concentrate on the transition between the next low and the trade winds, around Cabo Verde Islands. There should be some kind of a decision tomorrow morning...

 

Don't pee in your pants... yet.

 

--- EDIT ---

When I write BP, I mean Banque Populaire, NOT British Petroleum... B)

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Yes!

should be quite the spectacle if the can hold the capricious bitch together!

Shame the BWR boats will probably be too far north, would be fun to see some footage from either side when they come flying by...

 

 

Had the privilege to look around the boat with one of the team's engineers last summer, with G3 next to her (with bike fitted and shorter rig fitted). Wasn't allowed downstairs (that's where the two boat apparently are really different and I still can't believe what they do with it.

 

Hope that they go and am well curious how the worlds fastest navigator (906nm in 24hrs) will do from shore. Fingers crossed, good winds and good luck (oh and go Sobedo too!)

 

 

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Good winds? When you look at the differences between the two boats you get the feeling that BP5 will take a whole lotta stopping for it not to break the record

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From Elaine Buntings Blog here:

 

Ready for a round the world record .Britain's Brian Thompson is poised to join the world's fastest boat for a world record attempt

 

 

 

 

The fast lane south to the Equator is opening up for business this weekend and the 14-man crew of the world's fastest multihull are confident they will get the green light for an attempt to break the outright round the world record.

 

Skipper Pascal Bidégorry and his crew are hoping to lop two days off the record time in their 130ft trimaran Banque Populaire V. That sounds modest until you remember that this is a target to cover 28,000 miles in a mere 48 days. Put another way, that would mean a pummelling six-week average speed of 24.5 knots.

 

Banque Populaire is the largest oceangoing multihull ever built for the Jules Verne round the world record. It is also the most complex, with a canting mast and curved foil daggerboards. It has sheets loads so high the crew need 2:1 purchases and hydraulic rams to control them.

 

When I went for a trial sail on the then newly launched giant in 2008 in a breeze of 10-12 knots and not a white cap in sight the apparent wind was so much higher it felt like a continual near gale on board. Even in that light wind, this boat was easily able to jog along at up to 27 knots.

 

Since then, Banque Populaire has covered well over 20,000 miles. The crew is well practised and the boat well proven. When she broke the North Atlantic record in 2009 she covered a breathtaking 908 miles in 24 hours.

 

 

 

That's not something her crew will be trying to better on this world record attempt. British sailor Brian Thompson (above), the sole ‘Anglo-Saxon', is mindful that "only 33% of Jules Verne attempts end in success."

 

Most fail because of gear or structural failure. It's a risky business, the more so now that the current 50-day record pits risk against a diminished margin of potential improvement.

 

The first hurdle has been to get the weather needed to set off on the record. That's become harder as the speeds of these big multis has increased and the runway gets longer and longer. "Because of the speeds of these boats a 14-day forecast can you past Cape Town," Thompson explains.

 

"After seven days the forecast isn't so accurate so you have to put more weight on the beginning, but you need to get Biscay, the Canaries and the tradewinds all lined up to get to the Equator in six days and after that if it works out down towards Rio and the St Helena High it's a bonus."

 

That's a big change from when Thompson, 48, sailed on Steve Fossett's Cheyenne and broke the record in 2003. "Then we just looked as far as the Canaries," he says.

 

Thompson says he is "feeling good about the reliability of the boat". Banque Populaire benefited from lessons learned during the attempts of Franck Cammas's smaller trimaran Groupama 3, also designed by VPLP.

 

But he adds: "Even if we did have perfect reliability to make a 24.5 knot average you need good luck. You could park up in the South or North Atlantic on the way back."

 

Thompson's role is as a helmsman and trimmer. He tells me that the boat is "really exciting" to steer (they didn't let me have a go, no surprise), but very demanding. "Average speeds are in the low 30 [knots] - say 30-35 knots with some decent breeze, ie over 18 knots. But often you are limited by sea state.

 

"The boat is very powered up; you can definitely feel the power. The load on the sheets are incredible. We half the loads with a 2:1 system so the winches don't blow up.

 

"It's very easy to fly a hull. It's a very narrow edge between coming up too high, and the boat powers up very, very quickly and flies a hull and being too low and slowing down. You've got to manoeuvre round the waves a bit as you overtake them and keep the apparent wind at the right angle.

 

"You have got to be careful, as you're sailing the boat at the limit all the time."

 

When I interviewed Marcel Van Triest, navigator on board during their successful Atlantic record and now the on-shore router, about life at speed he told me the boat is "shockingly noisy. "

 

"It's the only boat I've ever been on where every single crewmember off watch wears earplugs. The noise of the water off the foils and along the hull is incredible. On deck, we use a wireless intercom system - and you need it," he confessed.

 

Thompson has that to come, but he concedes that the boat at speed is "like a demented subway ride. You have got to hold on to handholds all the time."

 

But the boat is so high out of the water, and has such a high aft crossbeam that the crew do have some protection from water.

 

"It's not as wet as a Volvo boat or an IMOCA 60 which are much closer to the water. There is always a lot of spray around and a light mist spewing off the bows, but when a wave hits you at 30 or 40 knots that will be an experience," he says.

 

He will soon know. Thompson's bag is packed - a very tiny bag containing just a toothbrush and his passport.

 

Everything else has been ready and stowed on board for weeks as he and the other 13 crew have been poised on standby, prepared to give this record their best shot.

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CODE GREEN

 

Announcement of departure

 

Departure predicted to be tomorrow

 

 

 

Finally. I wish their webpage was half of what Groupama was for the RTW trip.

 

Agreed! I can't find how to change it into English. Anyone have hints?

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CODE GREEN

 

Announcement of departure

 

Departure predicted to be tomorrow

 

 

 

Finally. I wish their webpage was half of what Groupama was for the RTW trip.

 

Agreed! I can't find how to change it into English. Anyone have hints?

 

Learn French.

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CODE GREEN

 

Announcement of departure

 

Departure predicted to be tomorrow

 

 

 

Finally. I wish their webpage was half of what Groupama was for the RTW trip.

 

Agreed! I can't find how to change it into English. Anyone have hints?

 

Learn French.

 

 

Thanks! You've been helpful.

 

 

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So how do they provision and pack for this kind of trip voyage? What is the routine and life of the racing crew once they leave the site of land?

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CODE GREEN

 

Announcement of departure

 

Departure predicted to be tomorrow

 

 

 

Finally. I wish their webpage was half of what Groupama was for the RTW trip.

 

Agreed! I can't find how to change it into English. Anyone have hints?

 

Learn French.

 

 

Thanks! You've been helpful.

 

 

 

 

 

Google the url . http://www.voile.banquepopulaire.fr/

http://www.google.com/search?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.voile.banquepopulaire.fr%2F&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

 

 

Then click more them click translate.

 

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=fr&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.voile.banquepopulaire.fr%2F

 

Then open a new tab on all links you will open a translated page . Note will not work on flash.

 

Latest News

http://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?hl=en&sl=fr&tl=en&u=http://www.voile.banquepopulaire.fr/home.html&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhj5OS9PFelG3vSzKAsrGWw7SD6cYA#2

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Agreed! I can't find how to change it into English. Anyone have hints?

 

There is an English "press" page on the website where you can access translated versions of the press releases...

 

http://www.voile.ban...ue-Populaire-V/

 

Thanks to you and Driftwood!

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CODE GREEN

 

Announcement of departure

 

Departure predicted to be tomorrow

 

 

 

Finally. I wish their webpage was half of what Groupama was for the RTW trip.

 

Agreed! I can't find how to change it into English. Anyone have hints?

 

Learn French.

 

 

Thanks! You've been helpful.

 

 

Oh, C'mon!

It was just a cynical French joke..

 

It's a French team (for the most part) on a French boat, with a French sponsor that does not have a high level of business outside France. Why do you expect a full English version of the web site?

 

If I look at the web site of an American NASCAR team with an American driver, on an American car, I do not expect a French version of the website...

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If you search via Google you get a translation option as circled below. If you open the site with Google Chrome, you get a translation option (see red arrow below).

post-200-043788300 1295730807_thumb.gif

post-200-083284400 1295730819_thumb.gif

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187.4nm lead as per the Jan 23 13:00utc race viewer; she is still hauling ass at 32.7 knots...

 

The westerly route is necessary to get away from the light conditions north of the Canary Islands...

 

 

 

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That is just so incredible! The boat just exudes such strength and raw power. In comparison, we are whooping it up with our hair on fire doing 18-22, while for them, anything under 25 kts must seem slow. Quite a different perspective.

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this might be due to the fact that marinetraffic.com receives AIS data via onshore computers. they only cover a certain range, depending on the height above sea level of the AIS transmitter and the receiving antenna. in the faq they say that it is usually up to 40-60 miles offshore, 200nm max. bp must have been out of range rather quickly.

if you look at the map on the first page you will also note that the amount of ships shown is clustered around the coastlines. offshore they reduce a lot, not necessarily in line with the real amount of traffic.

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they've hit a top speed of 45kts already!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

It must be nice to be able to sail to the weather you want like an aircraft carrier.

post-200-013950800 1295887684_thumb.gif

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they've hit a top speed of 45kts already!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

It must be nice to be able to sail to the weather you want like an aircraft carrier.

 

Right on! It's a matter of hooking into a favorable weather pattern and riding the same one/staying in it all the way around. Orange 2 did this on their record breaking lap in early 2000s. In fact, they had to slow down a couple of times in order not to out run it and stay with it. I think Groupama did this several times last year as well, if memory serves...

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That is just so incredible! The boat just exudes such strength and raw power. In comparison, we are whooping it up with our hair on fire doing 18-22, while for them, anything under 25 kts must seem slow. Quite a different perspective.

 

It looks like he's driving a fuckin' locomotive.

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Is it just me or does this thing look just SO much more stable and substantial in its overall sea-worthiness as well as speed as anything else we have seen to date (Groupama, Orange2, Cheyenne/Playstation, etc.)?

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Really cool feature on the tracker!

 

There is an icon of either a audio recording or video recording on the track of Banque Populaire where the crew recorded/uploaded the content. Very cool!

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Is it just me or does this thing look just SO much more stable and substantial in its overall sea-worthiness as well as speed as anything else we have seen to date (Groupama, Orange2, Cheyenne/Playstation, etc.)?

 

I am not sure about the stability part, but it is certainly more substantial IMHO. After viewing the onboard vid with BT speaking, and seeing how this boat is sailing, it is most certainly a very powerful machine, to say the least. I sensed a difference between BPV and Groupama 3 last year where G3 appeared (to me) more limber and subtle over and through the waves, while BPV appears to just absolutely overpower the water it is sailing through. G3 is a lean, mean strong tough sailing machine and BPV is a tank where nothing can stop it, big diesel locomotive all powerful.

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Is it just me or does this thing look just SO much more stable and substantial in its overall sea-worthiness as well as speed as anything else we have seen to date (Groupama, Orange2, Cheyenne/Playstation, etc.)?

 

I am not sure about the stability part, but it is certainly more substantial IMHO. After viewing the onboard vid with BT speaking, and seeing how this boat is sailing, it is most certainly a very powerful machine, to say the least. I sensed a difference between BPV and Groupama 3 last year where G3 appeared (to me) more limber and subtle over and through the waves, while BPV appears to just absolutely overpower the water it is sailing through. G3 is a lean, mean strong tough sailing machine and BPV is a tank where nothing can stop it, big diesel locomotive all powerful.

 

 

And according to Franck Cammas, BPV is 9 meters (30 ft) longer than G3.

 

That must have something to do with it...

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Really cool feature on the tracker!

 

There is an icon of either a audio recording or video recording on the track of Banque Populaire where the crew recorded/uploaded the content. Very cool!

 

But why taking away the day / 24hrs marks? not so cool!

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Is it just me or does this thing look just SO much more stable and substantial in its overall sea-worthiness as well as speed as anything else we have seen to date (Groupama, Orange2, Cheyenne/Playstation, etc.)?

 

I am not sure about the stability part, but it is certainly more substantial IMHO. After viewing the onboard vid with BT speaking, and seeing how this boat is sailing, it is most certainly a very powerful machine, to say the least. I sensed a difference between BPV and Groupama 3 last year where G3 appeared (to me) more limber and subtle over and through the waves, while BPV appears to just absolutely overpower the water it is sailing through. G3 is a lean, mean strong tough sailing machine and BPV is a tank where nothing can stop it, big diesel locomotive all powerful.

 

 

And according to Franck Cammas, BPV is 9 meters (30 ft) longer than G3.

 

That must have something to do with it...

 

Yeah...that too.

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Is it just me or does this thing look just SO much more stable and substantial in its overall sea-worthiness as well as speed as anything else we have seen to date (Groupama, Orange2, Cheyenne/Playstation, etc.)?

 

I am not sure about the stability part, but it is certainly more substantial IMHO. After viewing the onboard vid with BT speaking, and seeing how this boat is sailing, it is most certainly a very powerful machine, to say the least. I sensed a difference between BPV and Groupama 3 last year where G3 appeared (to me) more limber and subtle over and through the waves, while BPV appears to just absolutely overpower the water it is sailing through. G3 is a lean, mean strong tough sailing machine and BPV is a tank where nothing can stop it, big diesel locomotive all powerful.

 

That is EXACTLY what I was talking about. And BPV is not much bigger than Cheyenne, which would be the next closest in dimensions compared to BPV, but it just blazes through the waves compared to what Cheyenne was doing.

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Is it just me or does this thing look just SO much more stable and substantial in its overall sea-worthiness as well as speed as anything else we have seen to date (Groupama, Orange2, Cheyenne/Playstation, etc.)?

 

I am not sure about the stability part, but it is certainly more substantial IMHO. After viewing the onboard vid with BT speaking, and seeing how this boat is sailing, it is most certainly a very powerful machine, to say the least. I sensed a difference between BPV and Groupama 3 last year where G3 appeared (to me) more limber and subtle over and through the waves, while BPV appears to just absolutely overpower the water it is sailing through. G3 is a lean, mean strong tough sailing machine and BPV is a tank where nothing can stop it, big diesel locomotive all powerful.

 

That is EXACTLY what I was talking about. And BPV is not much bigger than Cheyenne, which would be the next closest in dimensions compared to BPV, but it just blazes through the waves compared to what Cheyenne was doing.

 

Outside of the obvious cat/tri thing, I think generationally there is much more difference than we first may admit or recognize.

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Is it just me or does this thing look just SO much more stable and substantial in its overall sea-worthiness as well as speed as anything else we have seen to date (Groupama, Orange2, Cheyenne/Playstation, etc.)?

 

I am not sure about the stability part, but it is certainly more substantial IMHO. After viewing the onboard vid with BT speaking, and seeing how this boat is sailing, it is most certainly a very powerful machine, to say the least. I sensed a difference between BPV and Groupama 3 last year where G3 appeared (to me) more limber and subtle over and through the waves, while BPV appears to just absolutely overpower the water it is sailing through. G3 is a lean, mean strong tough sailing machine and BPV is a tank where nothing can stop it, big diesel locomotive all powerful.

 

That is EXACTLY what I was talking about. And BPV is not much bigger than Cheyenne, which would be the next closest in dimensions compared to BPV, but it just blazes through the waves compared to what Cheyenne was doing.

 

Outside of the obvious cat/tri thing, I think generationally there is much more difference than we first may admit or recognize.

 

One thing that is just awesome on BPV, and to not TOO much lesser degree on Groupama, is the size of the working area at the back of the boat. It is ABSOLUTELY HUGE compared to the little cockpits on the big cats like Cheyenne and Orange2. I think that makes the whole show look way more "stable".

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One thing that is just awesome on BPV, and to not TOO much lesser degree on Groupama, is the size of the working area at the back of the boat. It is ABSOLUTELY HUGE compared to the little cockpits on the big cats like Cheyenne and Orange2. I think that makes the whole show look way more "stable".

 

The other thing is the height of the bows and the steadiness fore and aft. The curved foils have come a long way- not so relatively powerful like on the smaller ORMA 60's, but enough lift to keep the bows up so you can press that much harder. The contrast to the pitching of Playstation/Cheyenne or and of the other big cats is striking.

 

It is not surprising that lift is becoming important in the Open 60 monos as well and is leading to new speeds. It really assists in the ability to sail in optimal weather conditions. The averages are incredible, even more than the max speeds.

 

 

 

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One thing that is just awesome on BPV, and to not TOO much lesser degree on Groupama, is the size of the working area at the back of the boat. It is ABSOLUTELY HUGE compared to the little cockpits on the big cats like Cheyenne and Orange2. I think that makes the whole show look way more "stable".

 

The other thing is the height of the bows and the steadiness fore and aft. The curved foils have come a long way- not so relatively powerful like on the smaller ORMA 60's, but enough lift to keep the bows up so you can press that much harder. The contrast to the pitching of Playstation/Cheyenne or and of the other big cats is striking.

 

It is not surprising that lift is becoming important in the Open 60 monos as well and is leading to new speeds. It really assists in the ability to sail in optimal weather conditions. The averages are incredible, even more than the max speeds.

 

 

 

 

Absolutely. It will be very interesting in a few years when/if Hydroptere gets their G-Class boat built, how smoothly it rides, and if fully foiling boats really do become the future of these big ocean races/records. But man, the thought of keeping that boat up in the air riding on those foils through the night seems like a sketchy endeavor.

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Wind forecast looks awfully light for the next few days. Port jibe back towards Cap Vert, looking for pressure.

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One thing that is just awesome on BPV, and to not TOO much lesser degree on Groupama, is the size of the working area at the back of the boat. It is ABSOLUTELY HUGE compared to the little cockpits on the big cats like Cheyenne and Orange2. I think that makes the whole show look way more "stable".

 

The other thing is the height of the bows and the steadiness fore and aft. The curved foils have come a long way- not so relatively powerful like on the smaller ORMA 60's, but enough lift to keep the bows up so you can press that much harder. The contrast to the pitching of Playstation/Cheyenne or and of the other big cats is striking.

 

It is not surprising that lift is becoming important in the Open 60 monos as well and is leading to new speeds. It really assists in the ability to sail in optimal weather conditions. The averages are incredible, even more than the max speeds.

 

 

 

 

Absolutely. It will be very interesting in a few years when/if Hydroptere gets their G-Class boat built, how smoothly it rides, and if fully foiling boats really do become the future of these big ocean races/records. But man, the thought of keeping that boat up in the air riding on those foils through the night seems like a sketchy endeavor.

 

i think hydroptere will have a 'foiling' and 'displacement' sailing modes, when the weather is good enough it will foil, when it's too rough or too light it will sail in displacement mode. also if bpv has hit 45kts already then what will hit in the southern ocean, 50+? same for applies for hydroptere.

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also if bpv has hit 45kts already then what will hit in the southern ocean, 50+? same for applies for hydroptere.

 

Sea state will slow them down.

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Wind forecast looks awfully light for the next few days. Port jibe back towards Cap Vert, looking for pressure.

Me thinks they want to get moving, pronto I mean tres vitesse...

post-200-047805700 1295988222_thumb.gif

post-200-049202300 1295988233_thumb.gif

post-200-088881500 1295988242_thumb.gif

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Yes, i think the foils are a real key to how these boats stabilize, especially at high speeds, wave pattern permitting..

 

Shes moving very well, this is awesome to be able to follow as it happens..

 

And soon we will get to watch Sodeb'o as well, solo.....

 

Does anyone here have any hands on experience on the foiled Orma 60s or 50s. That may have an opinion on the foils????

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So far, wow, really nice window that these guys picked. At the greatest they had almost 300nm advance!

 

But, iirc, one of the things Groupama did so well (go Stan go) was to approach the equator really fast and to have a super skinny convergence zone.

 

I think the first check-mark was approx the Canaries, to which BP has kicked butt. I think the next one is approx Recife, and I do not think it is anything near a given that BP will be able to match G to that point. Take a look at the comparative speeds on the tracker over the last several hours - BP has been losing ~3 nm an hour. I expect that to keep happening over the next 24 or so and maybe beyond.

 

bp vs g.tiff

 

 

OK, but now I need to complain ... why can these guys not have a second language on the site?? I can only guess at the French (high-school was a long time ago, and not terribly effective). English would be great, but if there is some sort of anti-anglo thing going on, how about Spanish. Well, that would help me, but seriously, in this day and age shouldn't a site with global fans have a half-dozen languages???

 

2N

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Le race est tres passionant. Le bateau est fantastique aussi!

 

Might as well get into the spirit lads!

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As I posted earlier, this is mostly a French crew (except Brian Thompson, UK, Yvan Ravussin, Switzerland, Juan Vila, Spain), on a French design boat (VPLP) built in France (CDK Technologies) for a French sponsor with not so much business outside France... What can you expect?...

On the other hand, it is true that Groupama did a much better job on their web site.

 

Now, I do understand your frustration, so if you look at the track on their web site, there is a video posted while they were on the NW of Iles du Cap Vert (Cabo Verde Islands). Here is a rough translation of what Pascal Bidégorry says.

 

****************************************************************************

 

Hello! the Earth, do you copy?

Big change from last night, the temperatures are rising fast since this morning.

This morning work: some sail changes, genaker change. We also moved stuff inside the boat forward to center the weights (my notes: they moved all they could aft during the first night in the heavy wind and seas).

The wind dropped from 22 to 26 knots last night to about 15 now.

We had the wind exactly in our back so we jibed several times last night.

The future is not so bright for the next 2 days; the windspeed is getting low, it is going to be complex to deal with it. Let's cross fingers.

The team did a good job.

I just check with the guys how they feel at the helm; we have to be careful to reef at the right time, or it can get really hairy really fast.

The first night was really rough and we had top boat speed of 45 knots (FORTY FIVE!!! Is this what you call being careful?!! So what is "hairy"?...).

We have no breakage, only 2 small leaks with all the water we had on deck.

It was actually a good thing to have this wind at the start; it gave us a small slap on the head, it helped us to get into the rythm.

The "routine" is coming in now.

 

I only have my lower foulies now, and I am pretty much naked underneath it, but I won't show you...

The shower tomorrow will not only be necessary but also compulsory.

We changed boots and socks... I will spare you the details...

 

Right now, we have flat seas; it's great. Actually, it is "too great"! There isn't enough wind to my taste.

The equator? Well, we will have to build momentum to go through it...

We will jibe tonight in the ridge below the low.

Right now, we have 15 knots of wind, with a boat speed of 26 knots...

Big Brian is at the helm, he is on the starboard wheel as you can see; we are on starboard tack.

Tonight the wind will veer from the North towards the East, so we will jibe on port tack and our course will be straight South.

 

The guys did great videos and photos to share our experience with you. It was really a challenge for them to take pictures because of the rough seas.

The next 2 days will be calmer, so everybody will rest. Nobody is hurt; nobody is burnt out either.

Today is what? The fourth day? I'm already lost...

Everything is OK on board.

There will be a bit of nervous stress because of the lack of wind, our lead will shrink...

 

Yvan is at the camera, 4 guys are in the kitchen taking a snack; we are changing shift in half an hour. And 4 guys are sleeping: Ronan (Lucas), Fred (Le Peutrec), Erwan (Tabarly - the nephew or Eric...), and.... and... Manu! (Le Borgne). Gosh! I forgot Manu!

 

I take this opportunity to send a kiss to my wife and to my daughter.

 

 

 

*************************

As close as I could get it. No cuts. You get all the blah-blah-blah as well...

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As I posted earlier, this is mostly a French crew (except Brian Thompson, UK, Yvan Ravussin, Switzerland, Juan Vila, Spain), on a French design boat (VPLP) built in France (CDK Technologies) for a French sponsor with not so much business outside France... What can you expect?...

On the other hand, it is true that Groupama did a much better job on their web site.

 

Now, I do understand your frustration, so if you look at the track on their web site, there is a video posted while they were on the NW of Iles du Cap Vert (Cabo Verde Islands). Here is a rough translation of what Pascal Bidégorry says.

 

****************************************************************************

 

Hello! the Earth, do you copy?

Big change from last night, the temperatures are rising fast since this morning.

This morning work: some sail changes, genaker change. We also moved stuff inside the boat forward to center the weights (my notes: they moved all they could aft during the first night in the heavy wind and seas).

The wind dropped from 22 to 26 knots last night to about 15 now.

We had the wind exactly in our back so we jibed several times last night.

The future is not so bright for the next 2 days; the windspeed is getting low, it is going to be complex to deal with it. Let's cross fingers.

The team did a good job.

I just check with the guys how they feel at the helm; we have to be careful to reef at the right time, or it can get really hairy really fast.

The first night was really rough and we had top boat speed of 45 knots (FORTY FIVE!!! Is this what you call being careful?!! So what is "hairy"?...).

We have no breakage, only 2 small leaks with all the water we had on deck.

It was actually a good thing to have this wind at the start; it gave us a small slap on the head, it helped us to get into the rythm.

The "routine" is coming in now.

 

I only have my lower foulies now, and I am pretty much naked underneath it, but I won't show you...

The shower tomorrow will not only be necessary but also compulsory.

We changed boots and socks... I will spare you the details...

 

Right now, we have flat seas; it's great. Actually, it is "too great"! There isn't enough wind to my taste.

The equator? Well, we will have to build momentum to go through it...

We will jibe tonight in the ridge below the low.

Right now, we have 15 knots of wind, with a boat speed of 26 knots...

Big Brian is at the helm, he is on the starboard wheel as you can see; we are on starboard tack.

Tonight the wind will veer from the North towards the East, so we will jibe on port tack and our course will be straight South.

 

The guys did great videos and photos to share our experience with you. It was really a challenge for them to take pictures because of the rough seas.

The next 2 days will be calmer, so everybody will rest. Nobody is hurt; nobody is burnt out either.

Today is what? The fourth day? I'm already lost...

Everything is OK on board.

There will be a bit of nervous stress because of the lack of wind, our lead will shrink...

 

Yvan is at the camera, 4 guys are in the kitchen taking a snack; we are changing shift in half an hour. And 4 guys are sleeping: Ronan (Lucas), Fred (Le Peutrec), Erwan (Tabarly - the nephew or Eric...), and.... and... Manu! (Le Borgne). Gosh! I forgot Manu!

 

I take this opportunity to send a kiss to my wife and to my daughter.

 

 

 

*************************

As close as I could get it. No cuts. You get all the blah-blah-blah as well...

 

 

 

thanks man! the bla bla is what gives all the info about the every day live on board, much appreciated!

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thanks a lot for the translation. i have the same issue with lack of attention to high school classes. enough for reading, but listening...

 

talking about the life onboard: post-8722-091336300 1296036921_thumb.jpg

looking at this picture i noted that their smocks seem very long, almost like skirts. is that todays cut of musto hpx or have they been extended for the jvt? why would you do that if you have a survival suit for when it gets really hairy? doesn't look like it is comfy to move around in these things.

 

cheers

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The first night was really rough and we had top boat speed of 45 knots (FORTY FIVE!!! Is this what you call being careful?!! So what is "hairy"?...)

 

*************************

As close as I could get it. No cuts. You get all the blah-blah-blah as well...

 

Thanks for the translation, Laurent. I guess maybe 50 knots through big waves at night might be hairy? ;)

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As I posted earlier, this is mostly a French crew (except Brian Thompson, UK, Yvan Ravussin, Switzerland, Juan Vila, Spain), on a French design boat (VPLP) built in France (CDK Technologies) for a French sponsor with not so much business outside France... What can you expect?...

On the other hand, it is true that Groupama did a much better job on their web site.

 

Now, I do understand your frustration, so if you look at the track on their web site, there is a video posted while they were on the NW of Iles du Cap Vert (Cabo Verde Islands). Here is a rough translation of what Pascal Bidégorry says.

 

****************************************************************************

 

Hello! the Earth, do you copy?

Big change from last night, the temperatures are rising fast since this morning.

This morning work: some sail changes, genaker change. We also moved stuff inside the boat forward to center the weights (my notes: they moved all they could aft during the first night in the heavy wind and seas).

The wind dropped from 22 to 26 knots last night to about 15 now.

We had the wind exactly in our back so we jibed several times last night.

The future is not so bright for the next 2 days; the windspeed is getting low, it is going to be complex to deal with it. Let's cross fingers.

The team did a good job.

I just check with the guys how they feel at the helm; we have to be careful to reef at the right time, or it can get really hairy really fast.

The first night was really rough and we had top boat speed of 45 knots (FORTY FIVE!!! Is this what you call being careful?!! So what is "hairy"?...).

We have no breakage, only 2 small leaks with all the water we had on deck.

It was actually a good thing to have this wind at the start; it gave us a small slap on the head, it helped us to get into the rythm.

The "routine" is coming in now.

 

I only have my lower foulies now, and I am pretty much naked underneath it, but I won't show you...

The shower tomorrow will not only be necessary but also compulsory.

We changed boots and socks... I will spare you the details...

 

Right now, we have flat seas; it's great. Actually, it is "too great"! There isn't enough wind to my taste.

The equator? Well, we will have to build momentum to go through it...

We will jibe tonight in the ridge below the low.

Right now, we have 15 knots of wind, with a boat speed of 26 knots...

Big Brian is at the helm, he is on the starboard wheel as you can see; we are on starboard tack.

Tonight the wind will veer from the North towards the East, so we will jibe on port tack and our course will be straight South.

 

The guys did great videos and photos to share our experience with you. It was really a challenge for them to take pictures because of the rough seas.

The next 2 days will be calmer, so everybody will rest. Nobody is hurt; nobody is burnt out either.

Today is what? The fourth day? I'm already lost...

Everything is OK on board.

There will be a bit of nervous stress because of the lack of wind, our lead will shrink...

 

Yvan is at the camera, 4 guys are in the kitchen taking a snack; we are changing shift in half an hour. And 4 guys are sleeping: Ronan (Lucas), Fred (Le Peutrec), Erwan (Tabarly - the nephew or Eric...), and.... and... Manu! (Le Borgne). Gosh! I forgot Manu!

 

I take this opportunity to send a kiss to my wife and to my daughter.

 

 

 

*************************

As close as I could get it. No cuts. You get all the blah-blah-blah as well...

 

Thank you! Now this was most helpful...two thumbs up!

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The equator? Well, we will have to build momentum to go through it...

 

 

Thanks for the translation- I love the way this sentence reads- I can just picture them arriving at the doldrums with such speed that they coast thru on their apparent wind like an iceboat.

 

It really is that different from the way the rest of us sail.

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...going through the doll drums is not about the momentum...it is all about to get the right passage...weather permiting!!

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