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SurfCityCatamarans

Looking for Chutzpah and Magic

83 posts in this topic

SA community,

I am looking for these two early Bill Lee boats for my ongoing study of the history of Santa Cruz ULDBs. Any help appreciated. Please PM any specifics so as to not publicly expose private info. Talking to the current owners would be cool.

 

I know they're around here somewhere.

 

831.475.7245

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Chutzpah is in Honolulu...on the hard, and not sailing. Chartered her for 1990 PAC cup and she remains here...rumored to be a candidate for a potential remodel to be displayed at the original owners home. A classic for sure, the only boat to win back to back overall wins in the Honolulu race.

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I remember some fun sails in Chuztpah. Especially rocking and a rolling coming back from Maui. It was a shame what was done to the boat. Owner got married and had a couple of kids and never really saw him after that. Also had a boat call Momentum. Last I knew it was missing the mast and keel and sitting in a storage yard on Oahu totally stripped. That was been about 8 years ago.

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Last I knew it was missing the mast and keel and sitting in a storage yard on Oahu totally stripped. That was been about 8 years ago.

 

I believe that is still it's status - hull is on an old trailer in a storage yard deep behind La Mariana SC - I do not doubt it could be had for a song, but would require much effort to again sail.

 

If "Magic" is a similar Lee 36, the it could be "Witchcraft" - that used to be up in Haleiwa, now named "Hulabaloo" and sailing out of the Ala Wai, usually in the Friday Night Beercan races, I don't know if it still has the 'unusual' painting on one side of it's bow, but it for a while wore an air-brush-looking graphic that was....ah...unique ?

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If "Magic" is a similar Lee 36, the it could be "Witchcraft" -

 

Magic and Witchcraft are not the same boat (there were four in that era: Magic, Witchcraft, Chutzpah and Panache)

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If "Magic" is a similar Lee 36, the it could be "Witchcraft" -

 

Magic and Witchcraft are not the same boat (there were four in that era: Magic, Witchcraft, Chutzpah and Panache)

 

Word. We're dealing with third hand information stemming from 40+ year old memories. This is precisely why I'm documenting this stuff as best I can. Also... I believe that there were two boats during this period called "Magic".

 

Thanks again for the help. If anyone has specifics on the storage yard in Honolulu, let me know.

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Nevermind.

( Gilda Radner voice... )

 

But this I do know, Witchcraft (once with a black hull) is now Hulaballo with white topsides, fwiw.

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......''Looking for Chutzpah and Magic''

 

......as we get old we may call it by different names,,,

,,,,,,,but we're all looking for the same,eh? :unsure:

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......''Looking for Chutzpah and Magic''

 

......as we get old we may call it by different names,,,

,,,,,,,but we're all looking for the same,eh? :unsure:

Quite appropriate since today's my b-day.

 

Keep the info coming. Not stymied yet, and have met a ton of cool people on my quest today.

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......''Looking for Chutzpah and Magic''

 

......as we get old we may call it by different names,,,

,,,,,,,but we're all looking for the same,eh? :unsure:

Quite appropriate since today's my b-day.

 

Keep the info coming. Not stymied yet, and have met a ton of cool people on my quest today.

 

......happy B'day.......g'luck on your quest--don't do anything crazy! ;)

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Magic was residing in Long Beach until about a decade ago.

She was sitting on a trailer on Marina Drive when I saw her last.

I had heard that the owner was considering 'parting her out'.

I hope that did not happen, but I do not know where she went

from there. Magic is a cool little 30' boat, and does not

much resemble the 35' Chutzpah. More of a flattish Olson 30.

There have been several Latitude 38 articles over the

years that have outlined the history. One mentioned that

Magic was intended to be a 5-O-Thirty, and was inspired

by the 5O5 Worlds which had been held in Santa Cruz.

I recall when I visited the Chicken Coop in '79, they

had a little bulletinboard shrine to the boat.

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Magic was completely different from Chutzpah (which was a sistership to Witchcraft). You should have a possibility of finding both Chutzpah and Witchcraft on Oahu.

 

Magic was Bill Lee's first design (and build), and he built it about 1968-1970 (I can't remember precisely that long ago!!)

 

Magic was a 30' sloop. It weighed 2500 lbs. It was similar to modern Open class designs such as the Class 40, Open 40, Open 50, Open 60, in that it had a pointy bow, beam carried to the transom, a very flat bottom, and very low freeboard. Hard to remember now, but I think it had a small cabin house, but it may have had a simply flush deck. Amazingly fast in certain conditions, as one would expect.

 

I do not know where Magic is, or if it even exists any more.

 

If I remember correctly, Magic was considered a disposable boat by its second owner who sailed it out of Long Beach, Southern California (my memory may be suspect here, corrections welcome).

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From one of the fastisfun.com blurbs:

 

Trained as an engineer at Cal Poly, Bill came to Santa Cruz in 1968 to work for Sylvania. That didn't last long, and he started messing around with boats. The 505 World Championships on Monterey Bay in 1970 set off sparks in the local boatbuilding community. Bill, George Olson and Ron Moore followed the ultralight, path but on a grander scale.

 

Lee's first real boat was Magic a 30-foot version of a 505, after which came Witchcraft, which was cruised through the South Pacific. Then there were the TransPac racers Panache, a 40 footer, and Chutzpah, a 35-footer.

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I remember seeing the 30' Magic in the N.B/Ensenada Race years ago. I thought I heard that the boat was badly waterlogged and that the owner at the time gave up on it, so it may very well have been chainsawed.

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No recollection of Magic out here. And if I can dust out the hazy corners of my brain I think that the boat now known as Hullabaloo was actually once called Apparition which was in Haleiwa and was built off of the Chutzpah mold later by some of Bill Lee's employees or something. Apparition had a light blue hull. Or there's another one around here that I missed, which is not unlikely.

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Blamo!

 

Hullabaloo

1148958513_Rj5UQ-XL.jpg

 

Chutzpah

1149008651_qJrzp-XL.jpg

 

Almost got my ass beat for the shots of Chutzpah. Great story. Thanks for the help everyone.

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Beyond gone, there's absolutely no monetary value left in that tub. Can't even imagine why it's being kept.

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I should have warned you - it's a kinda rough outfit down there - didn't think you'd actually find that place. Interesting aroma, eh ?

 

If you are still on the town side I'm headed to the WYC in a bit - buy you a beer.

 

DW

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I'm headed to the WYC in a bit

 

I think there is a photo of Chutzpah in her glory days

somewhere on a wall in that club. It is a shame she is so

far gone now. Panache however looks really good these days,

and I think I saw a sistership, possibly the old Loco Viente,

on a mooring in San Diego.

 

Great detective work SSC, please post any photos you can.

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I should have warned you - it's a kinda rough outfit down there - didn't think you'd actually find that place. Interesting aroma, eh ?

 

If you are still on the town side I'm headed to the WYC in a bit - buy you a beer.

 

DW

 

Thanks GRS for the invite. Will consult with family and see what's up. Just got your msg, will call. It's definitely off the beaten track down where that boat is. Got the owners ph#, and will attempt contact.

 

Interesting note, they're filming Hawaii 5-0 at WYC today.

 

I've had an outstanding day sleuthing around the backwoods of Oahu today.

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I should have warned you - it's a kinda rough outfit down there - didn't think you'd actually find that place. Interesting aroma, eh ?

 

If you are still on the town side I'm headed to the WYC in a bit - buy you a beer.

 

DW

 

Thanks GRS for the invite. Will consult with family and see what's up. Just got your msg, will call. It's definitely off the beaten track down where that boat is. Got the owners ph#, and will attempt contact.

 

Interesting note, they're filming Hawaii 5-0 at WYC today.

 

I've had an outstanding day sleuthing around the backwoods of Oahu today.

 

Was that near Haleiwa or over by Ewa/Kapolei area?

 

Used to live in Ewa Beach, back in the day.

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As far as chutzpah being a vaible boat ever again... It seems done to me. I can't believe how thin the decks are. She served a purpose, and it seems time to give her a proper burial. Lining up an interview with the owner. Hospitality here on Oahu has been outstanding. May race beer cans tomorrow night.

Batteries are dead. Time to swill a b day rum.

 

Cheers!

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As far as chutzpah being a vaible boat ever again... It seems done to me.

 

That's just so sad. No boat deserves a fate like that, let alone a legend.

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I last sailed on Chutzpah in a Lahaina Return in 91 or 92. What a sail in 15 to 26 knots. It was right after that that the owner stripped the boat with thoughst of putting a deeper keel and taller mas on itt. Of course it never happen and the boat as you see it is the way it has been since, I will not name him but a past Kanoehe YC commodore lived inside the boat for several months back in the early 90's when the boat was down at Pearl Harbor on the hard stripped out.

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The entire boat was built VERY light, not just the deck. There is no structure forward of the main bulkhead, just the hull skin. One of the crew (who did both T-Pacs on her) said that either side of the forward lower bow could (& would) oil can in and remain dented in until some one went forward & stomped it back out. Engine was a Johnson outboard modded somehow into a saildrive with an alternator added on. It sat in the middle of the floor with no engine cover at all.

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These boats were built at "magic marine". The witchcraft design became the lancer 36. There are a lot of those around.

 

Jeremy, why don't you ask the owner if he still pays rent to store that thing?

 

Looks like it's ready for some gasoline, and a match!

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This thread is proof that every now and then something good still comes out of this site!! Great sleuthing J and thanks for sharing…..I hope you had a great birthday (looks like you did) and enjoy your vacation.

 

 

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I think there is a photo of Chutzpah in her glory days

somewhere on a wall in that club.

 

In a place of honor in the dining room, her night finish of a Transpac.

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This thread is proof that every now and then something good still comes out of this site!! Great sleuthing J and thanks for sharing…..I hope you had a great birthday (looks like you did) and enjoy your vacation.

 

Thanks Raw, and everyone. I indeed had a good time and met a ton of great, random people. I try to keep on the positive trip, and usually come out way ahead because of it.

 

As I was dragging the family, including the inlaws, across Sand Island my father in law yelled out like a little kid, "there's my old sailing club!" He lived here in the 60s and had thought that the La Mariana Sailing Club had been torn down. Apparently the neighborhoodhas changed since the mid 60s! We had a nice lunch and listened to the sea stories of a single guy living the life in Hawaii during that time. Sounds like it was a pretty incredible time.

 

So at least there was more for the family to focus on than me dragging them through an industrial junk yard on a wild goose chase.

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Cool adventure, I keep my La Mariana membership card in my wallet at all times.

 

Thanks for the mermaid pic, I blogged it to NSL.

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Cool adventure, I keep my La Mariana membership card in my wallet at all times.

 

Thanks for the mermaid pic, I blogged it to NSL.

 

I've got a ton of hi res pics that I'll post when I get home. No way to deal with them right now. Blog 'em all!

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As I was dragging the family, including the inlaws, across Sand Island my father in law yelled out like a little kid, "there's my old sailing club!" He lived here in the 60s and had thought that the La Mariana Sailing Club had been torn down. Apparently the neighborhoodhas changed since the mid 60s!

 

 

Actually, it DID get torn down, kinda. The original location is South of it's current spot a couple hundred yards or so - happened in the late 70's I think - they'd lost thier state lease and dug everything up and moved it. I keep my Impulse there, Annette Nahinu was an old friend.

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a past Kanoehe YC commodore lived inside the boat for several months back in the early 90's when the boat was down at Pearl Harbor on the hard stripped out.

 

How past of a commodore? ;)

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Thanks Jeremy and a belated Happy Birthday!

Bob

past SC27 owner

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A few tidbits on Magic. I was a UCSC student and sailor in the pre-banana slug days (69-71). Bill was just getting is fast is fun matra in gear. And we spent many days playing with glass and tweaking 505s in Ron Moores shop - he never charged a dime for us taking up space and using his tools to make glass tank covers to replace the old bent plywood one. Different times then

 

A couple of fond memories of the MORC 30' Magic. Pre-cursor to the SC-27

 

1. Unless Bill corrects me, I believe I remember him sleeping in the aft cabin (well sort of a cabin) between gigs.

2. I think it did MORC Coastal race of 500 miles in something very fast like just under 2 days.

3. As you all know what the Cruz harbor gets like... one day coming in from a race, launched off a wave, hit the sand and ripped the keel off, screaming with delight the whole way.

 

That's what I recall and am sticking to it unless corrected. It was Cruz in the 60s after all

 

Last I say Magic, she was on a trailer at Alamitos Bay Yacht Club more than five years ago.

 

Bulga Naba out

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And we spent many days playing with glass and tweaking 505s in Ron Moores shop - he never charged a dime for us taking up space and using his tools to make glass tank covers to replace the old bent plywood one. Different times then...

 

 

Nice one! Thats the essence of what I'm trying to capture. It was such a different era, with everyone sharing info and designs etc. That would never happen these days.

 

I can confirm all of your stories and have them saved in an audio interview that I did with Bill last year.

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Just got to your posts. If you are still on Oahu I have all the original build files and press on chutzpah from the first owner. We are doing a story on her for Transpac Magazine. Michael - rothcomm@lava.net i was one fo the crew who sailed her in the 1990 Pac Cup. A great ride...

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Since no one has asked, "What does it rate?

Does anyone have any idea what PHRF rating

Chutzpah was sailing to?

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A few more:

 

That's just... phuggin' criminal. NO boat should have that fate.

(well... except maybe a Mac26)

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Agreed, it looks like an old exotic sports car waiting for the right owner to come along for the rebuild and green pastures.

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Cool adventure, I keep my La Mariana membership card in my wallet at all times.

 

Thanks for the mermaid pic, I blogged it to NSL.

 

I've got a ton of hi res pics that I'll post when I get home. No way to deal with them right now. Blog 'em all!

 

 

 

SCR,

 

Just in case there might be someone out there with more money than sense, do you think its held its shape well enough to serve as a mold?

 

 

 

Marc

 

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No point using Chutzpah as a mold - the Lancer 36 I think already did that. Lots of those kicking around.

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Cool adventure, I keep my La Mariana membership card in my wallet at all times.

 

Thanks for the mermaid pic, I blogged it to NSL.

 

I've got a ton of hi res pics that I'll post when I get home. No way to deal with them right now. Blog 'em all!

 

 

 

SCR,

 

Just in case there might be someone out there with more money than sense, do you think its held its shape well enough to serve as a mold?

 

 

 

Marc

 

 

Support the hull with 2X4s, add some glass to prevent oil canning, fair it where it's sat on the trailer melting for 15 years, get rid of the deck, as it is pretty effff'd, and I think you'd have a fine mold. The hull was still fairly sound where I poked around. That project reminds me of the little rhyme, "When I was young and had no sense, I took a wiz on an electric fence...".

 

As far as my digging into the history of this era of sailing in CA... I've been invited into the home of one of the dudes that was there. He said that I could go through his shoe boxes of pics. I'm pretty excited about it!

 

Here's some more Bill Lee Fun.

 

1160283385_DDsU4-XL-2.jpg

 

1160288207_L3LgF-XL-2.jpg

 

1160296919_QhzrB-XL-2.jpg

 

1160282484_eRBoA-XL-2.jpg

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I told you that bow art was pretty 'special' - didn't I ?

 

Nobody believes me when I say this stuff....

 

Glad to hear you got home OK and good to see the pics of your faberglass scavenger hunt, but how about the story of getting menaced down at the Sand Island storage place ? You can't just leave us hanging with a "darn-near got whupped..." statement - anything serious or just the mokes from the canoe-building shop protecting thier turf ?

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a past Kanoehe YC commodore lived inside the boat for several months back in the early 90's when the boat was down at Pearl Harbor on the hard stripped out.

 

How past of a commodore? ;)

 

You should know:) Good times

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Sledracer,

 

You just made my morning! Thanks for the trip down memory lane. Now I'll head over to the boatyard here in Santa Cruz and get back to work.

 

Thanks again,

 

BV

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SCR,

 

When you get all this history together, are you going to publish it? Book, internet, whatever? Cool ass project!

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SCR,

 

When you get all this history together, are you going to publish it? Book, internet, whatever? Cool ass project!

 

Lots of ideas have been tossed around for the past 3 years since I started gathering info. Whatever happens will be with the full support and in conjunction with the guys that were there. Most of these guys aren't into talking about the past so much, but recently i had one of the 'elders' say, "Yeah, I guess you're right, someone should write down these stories."

 

Lets face it, we're all getting older.When George Olson died, it really hit home. This was such a magical time in boat building history.

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Bulga Naba wrote:

A couple of fond memories of the MORC 30' Magic. Pre-cursor to the SC-27

 

3. As you all know what the Cruz harbor gets like... one day coming in from a race, launched off a wave, hit the sand and ripped the keel off, screaming with delight the whole way.

 

That's what I recall and am sticking to it unless corrected. It was Cruz in the 60s after all

_________/)____________________

 

 

Actually, it was 1972 when MAGIC's keel got ripped off on the Santa Cruz Harbor sandbar. Ron Holland, fresh faced from Kiwiland, was driving as the boat launched off a wave and hit the sandbar at 15 knots. Ron eyes got real big as six geysers of water erupted from where the keel bolts used to be.

 

"No problem, Ron," said Dave Wahle, local garbageman and "bosun" on MERLIN. MAGIC was sailed to the hoist, sans keel, before the deck was awash, hooked up to the lifting sling, and the water drained back out the keel bolt holes.

 

It didn't set the boys back a bit: Bill bolted on a piece of 3/4" plywood for a keel, and MAGIC was out sailing soon after.

 

~sleddog

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Somehow, I can see Dave Wahle saying just that...

 

Bulga Naba wrote:

A couple of fond memories of the MORC 30' Magic. Pre-cursor to the SC-27

 

3. As you all know what the Cruz harbor gets like... one day coming in from a race, launched off a wave, hit the sand and ripped the keel off, screaming with delight the whole way.

 

That's what I recall and am sticking to it unless corrected. It was Cruz in the 60s after all

_________/)____________________

 

 

Actually, it was 1972 when MAGIC's keel got ripped off on the Santa Cruz Harbor sandbar. Ron Holland, fresh faced from Kiwiland, was driving as the boat launched off a wave and hit the sandbar at 15 knots. Ron eyes got real big as six geysers of water erupted from where the keel bolts used to be.

 

"No problem, Ron," said Dave Wahle, local garbageman and "bosun" on MERLIN. MAGIC was sailed to the hoist, sans keel, before the deck was awash, hooked up to the lifting sling, and the water drained back out the keel bolt holes.

 

It didn't set the boys back a bit: Bill bolted on a piece of 3/4" plywood for a keel, and MAGIC was out sailing soon after.

 

~sleddog

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You could have sold tickets to the spectacle of the recovery of MAGIC's keel from the Santa Cruz sandbar. The usual morning purple haze obscured the viz, so I may not have the cast of characters exactly right.

 

Bill had marked MAGIC's sunken keel with a floating Clorox bottle. A small navy of surfboards, led by Phil Vandenberg's Malibu outrigger LOVELY AMA descended on the sandbar and hovered over the keel on a minus tide.

 

I think Tommy was there, Bobbo, Howard Spruit, and George Olson, who was, on this particular day, on speaking terms with Bill. The keel, an encapsulated fiberglass shell with lead ingots inside, was hoisted beneath the LOVELY AMA as a cast of dozens watched from the West Breakwater.

 

As the keel was floated past Aldo's Bait Shack towards the hoist, applause erupted. George Olson looks up into the smiling faces and says, "Man, everyone must be really bored today."

 

MAGIC was sailed with the temporary plywood keel until Bill got around to getting the hull dropped on to the keelbolts of the old keel, which was now standing upright on a rather marginal trailer. Things were then glassed over, and all was back to normal.

 

Ron Holland went back to work at GW Mull's office on Monday, muttering "those Santa Cruz guys are CRAZY."

 

~sleddog

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Outstanding! And the stories go on and on and on...

 

And about the 'crazy' part, on a tangential topic. SC has long been known to be a community of out of the box thinkers and more than that, doers. Many boats were brought here to get the SC seal of approval. Basically, "Here's a boat, try to break it."

 

Hobie 14 at the SC Harbor mouth. The glass was still green. Rest in peace old number 41! Multihulls played a roll in the early development of the ULDBs here in SC. The Hobies helped join the Surfers and the sailors.

 

S Cruz Harbor mouth circa 1973.

 

600137180_GsJHg-XL.jpg

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looks like fun, for a brief moment. Sounds like number 41 may not have survived the ride, though.

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Wasn't there a story about a SC 70 that was headed out for a test sail or something or other when a big sneaker wave came in. Skipper gunned the engine and leaped the wave but there was a guy on the bow that had both his ankles broken on the landing?

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Since no one has asked, "What does it rate?

Does anyone have any idea what PHRF rating

Chutzpah was sailing to?

 

Chutzpah originally did not have a PHRF rating. There was no PHRF at the time.

These first generation ULDBs mostly raced as severely deoptimized IOR racers! Moore 24s rated close to 1/2 tonners, SC27 were 3/4 tonners. My bet is that Chutzpah and Witchcraft rated with the 2 tonners

In the early 70's, even Groovy Santa Cruz and the SCYC were in disapproval of these "Cheater Boats." They were not even scored on Wednesday night until Bill, George and the rest became a little more respectable and the shit box sailors caught on to "fast is fun."

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Since no one has asked, "What does it rate?

Does anyone have any idea what PHRF rating

Chutzpah was sailing to?

 

Chutzpah originally did not have a PHRF rating. There was no PHRF at the time.

 

She may not have since most distance races used IOR then,

but PHRF came on the scene in 1959 in So Cal.

I seem to recall that Loco Viente rated about 90 in the late '70s.

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Outstanding! And the stories go on and on and on...

 

And about the 'crazy' part, on a tangential topic. SC has long been known to be a community of out of the box thinkers and more than that, doers. Many boats were brought here to get the SC seal of approval. Basically, "Here's a boat, try to break it."

 

Hobie 14 at the SC Harbor mouth. The glass was still green. Rest in peace old number 41! Multihulls played a roll in the early development of the ULDBs here in SC. The Hobies helped join the Surfers and the sailors.

 

S Cruz Harbor mouth circa 1973.

 

600137180_GsJHg-XL.jpg

Is that Mr. Canepa piloting that thing?

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FYI that boat you've decided is the old witchcraft...isn't the old witchcraft. Boat had a bunch of work done and is on the hard due to losing the Haleiwa slip. My good friend "Biehl" who's grandfather comissioned her is the current owner, she remains named witchcraft.

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I doubt you're still following this topic, but in case you are ... I was Bill's first employee when he started Magic Marine. Alan Wirtanen, George Olsen, a kid named Mike (whose last name I forget) and I were the four main guys who build both Chutzpah and Panache. Dave Wahle was in on it too but not full time. Those were fun days. I might be able to answer questions about Chutzpah and Panache.

 

If you check out this video, you can see me in the photo at the 4:40 mark, which was taken the day we launched Panache. I'm the very tall kid in the middle with the purple headband. Alan Wirtanen is behind me to the left, almost invisible in the shadows (you can see him if you click on the 720p resolution in YouTube). George is behind Bill Lee, and Mike is the guy almost on the left with the beard and ski hat.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Nvp6b_qmy8

 

I came across this old thread because I've been looking for Panache. I hear rumors that she's berthed here in Southern California somewhere.

 

I did most of the drafting for Bill. George, Alan and I built the hulls and decks. I built the keels and did all of the chainplates, and I carved the rudder of one of them (I think it was Panache) out of a beautiful slab of spruce. Alan and I did all of the hardware and rigging. George built the interiors.

 

Craig James

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Wow. Best first post ever

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Wow. Best first post ever

 

word. I move that we waive the standard initiation

seconded

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What ended up happening with the story Surf City? Find anymore sleds?

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Wow, now I'm wondering what the "standard initiation" is .... or maybe it's better if I don't know!

 

Those were fun days indeed.

 

I remember that a couple days before launch, I drove Panache over to the scales (I think there was a scale over off Soquel somewhere), and we came in at 7,500 pounds, of which 2,500 was the keel. The Cal 40s were coming off the factory floor at around 20,000 pounds. Bill and George had a bit of an argument because Panache had a monocoque hull (no bulkheads at all, just hull and deck), and Bill was trying to go ultra-thin on all the fiberglass. George wanted one extra layer of roving along the keel line stem to stern, but Bill said no. So George waited until Bill was out, then told us to do it. Bill was pretty pissed. But in retrospect, it was probably smart ... Panache was pretty light, and that extra 50 pounds or so probably strengthened and stiffened her dramatically.

 

I'll never forget how the IOR committee for the Transpac race screwed us royally on Panache. We were about half done building the hull ... i.e. way after the point when the design could be altered ... and they sent a guy up to have a look. Next thing we knew, they announced a new special rule designed specifically to penalize ultralights. Something to do with waterline, draft and I think there was something particular about the boat's width at the stern, which of course would only apply to boats like Panache.

 

Next thing we knew, we had an addition TWENTY HOUR penalty ... on a race that was supposed to be around eight days. (Dave Wahle had spray-painted "8 days, 13 hours" on the wall of the old building down on River Street, to remind us of the record we wanted to beat.) As I recall, Panache lost in her division by just ten hours. Without that penalty, Panache would have won by ten hours. Rod Parks (the owner) was a real gentleman about it, but it was one of the most unfair rule changes I've ever seen before or since.

 

Chutzpah didn't have quite as radical of a design. It was narrower in the stern and a bit more of a traditional round-bottom design (but still an ultra light). I think the new rule hit Chutzpah with an eight hour penalty, pretty severe, but she overcame the penalty and took first in her class on corrected time.

 

Craig

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It was a few years later that I.O.R ruels imposed a 10% penalty on U.L.D.B's.

 

post-32003-0-12557400-1373162925_thumb.jpg

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I doubt you're still following this topic, but in case you are ... I was Bill's first employee when he started Magic Marine. Alan Wirtanen, George Olsen, a kid named Mike (whose last name I forget) and I were the four main guys who build both Chutzpah and Panache. Dave Wahle was in on it too but not full time. Those were fun days. I might be able to answer questions about Chutzpah and Panache.

 

If you check out this video, you can see me in the photo at the 4:40 mark, which was taken the day we launched Panache. I'm the very tall kid in the middle with the purple headband. Alan Wirtanen is behind me to the left, almost invisible in the shadows (you can see him if you click on the 720p resolution in YouTube). George is behind Bill Lee, and Mike is the guy almost on the left with the beard and ski hat.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Nvp6b_qmy8

 

I came across this old thread because I've been looking for Panache. I hear rumors that she's berthed here in Southern California somewhere.

 

I did most of the drafting for Bill. George, Alan and I built the hulls and decks. I built the keels and did all of the chainplates, and I carved the rudder of one of them (I think it was Panache) out of a beautiful slab of spruce. Alan and I did all of the hardware and rigging. George built the interiors.

 

Craig James

I do know for a fact that 2001 panache was at emorycove yacht harbor in Emeryville ,ca. It was still called Panache . The guy that owed it did quite a bit fixing her up. But he lost his dot com job. And had it for sale. At that date the boat looked in good shape. So unless somebody beat the crap out of it... It should still be in decent shape. But I don't know where it went. Good luck finding it.. You might talk to Dave Hodges about it.. He just may know or know somebody that knows. He found for me where the boat that I now have, back in Ohio...

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I was looking on the web like others to find out what ever happened to Magic and other fast is fun designs of Bill Lee.

This brought back memories of the awesome 30 foot. I was sailing at the time on a Columbia 36 that the owner campaigned heavily (pun intended) in PHRF. In one of the series, there were two races. Race one was from LA/Long beach to the Catalina Isthmus, Race two was from Isthmus back to Long Beach. In packing the sail inventory on Friday night, the owner, Bill Rohrs, decided that we didn't need the storm jib. We threw it back in the locker. But we did take two main's.

The race over was smooth and there were no unusual events, headsail changes etc (pre foil days...), followed by the normal dinner, parties, consumption of alcoholic beverages and enjoying the wisdom of hindsight. It was beautiful at the island.

I slept in the cockpit that night I woke up looking at a sea of white. Not white caps, white. The thinking of pop the chute and have a nice ride back to LA disappeared. The anemometer was reading 30/35 knots. From the north west putting the wind right on the nose for the trip home. Anyway the race committee was able to get anchored and the race started. Fast forward as we keep trying to find a balanced combination to keep the boat up right. It was blowing so hard that it took a team to pull the headsail down. It just stayed up with the halyard released (remembering the mighty storm jib sitting in locker in Newport. The anemometer kept going up.

As we were slugging it out, about half way across, This little white dot of a sailboat was coming up on us at a high rate of speed. Soon we it was clear it was Magic. They had a triple reefed main and a postage stamp jib and went by us doing probably 25+ knots. By now the anemometer was in the 40's steady. Here you had four guys sitting as far back on the tail as they could on Magic to keep the rudder in the water. I remember seeing a friend named Billy Morrell who was on her and as they went by and every one of those guys had saucer eyes and Cheshire Cat smiles as they blew by.

We finally gave up as we couldn't even motor into Long Beach by this time and surfed home to Newport doing 14+ knots on double reefed main. The weather for that day in May in LA was 51 MPH sustained. I don't recall the peak our anemometer hit, it was at that or probably higher. Epic day to say the least.

 

Thank you all for the stories, locations and conditions of these wonderful boats.

 

-Steve Sellers

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I remember Magic and Summertime as well as an older guy can rememember stuff that happened when he was 10. I was a mean Jester class racer then and I remember a lot of stuff. There was a boat called Grendel (or was it Gretel)? Am I imagining this?

Russell

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Yves, It was not really an IOR committee, but Transpac YC that added the very aggressive penalty to Panache. My memory serves that IOR proper soon started specifically penalizing ULDS, but clearly, not by enough (witness how quickly one tonners became light).

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Grendel was the boat whose design, widened with boards pushing the gunnels apart, became the Moore 24. If I remember correctly.

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