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opensailor

C&C 37R?? any info guys?

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Does anyone have any experience or information on the C&C 37R. Looking at one now and need the low down.

 

Thanks

 

did bow on one in houston a few yrs back called electron. built solid and was nice after the races in the houston humidity to have the a/c. can sail to its rating if you work it hard enough (level 70 probably 72-73 but dont remember)

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Marketing genius! Lets build a 40' boat and call it a 37R . We used to race a J-35 against one for a couple of seasons. On occasion

it would show some legs but most of time we just kept an eye on the other J-35's and it worked out ok. Not a bad boat but I think I would rather have a J-35. To each their own.

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They are a bitch to fix up after a hurricane smashes them on the yacht Club lawn.

 

Trailer story: the guy who supervised late forties and early fifties construction on most airports where B 52s can land rebuilt this trailer in 1969 so he could move his new Columbis 21. I ahve added a few extra braces since I started using it in 1980 but the torsion bar style springs didn't even move when this monster was on the trailer.

 

 

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There are several of us up here in the Puget Sound. Haven't seen any "R's", Most are +'s or XL's.

 

We pick our fights and have to use the boat to it's fullest extent.

 

Basically, <10 knots the J boats are faster, 10 to 15, you will be able to match them, over 15 and you should be faster.

 

It is a heavy boat, in the realm of "modern" boats. J's will be 4-5000 lbs lighter. It is a bigger boat than most of the boats in your class 70-80's. The new crop of modern sails help with better speed. We typically sail faster than the original polars.

 

The R and the XL usually have the same mast configuration. Lots of adjustment with check stay, runners, hydrolic back stay.... We have learned not to over tension the back stay.

 

It also seems that having a crew of no more than 5 and aggressive weight placement makes a real difference.

 

Keep everyone in front of wheel when heading up wind. In light air, the key is of course to keep the weight on the leeward side until you are up to 4 knots water speed.

 

We race with a 100 and new140 and 155% headsail and New main.

 

We have sailed against a C&C115 (a month ago) in 5 to 10knots wind(with 155%) and passed them. Didn't do a sail change (to the 140%) at wind over 10 knts and was getting passed by the 115.

 

We have experimented with the spinnakers and found that a A-Sym isn't a good option. Our favorite Spin is a .4 oz. With pole.

 

The R is a more stripped out version than the + or the XL. There is a R out there somewhere that is heavily modified, including a partially hollowed keel.

 

Make sure the steering cable and assembly is in good shape (rust under the pedestal)

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They are a bitch to fix up after a hurricane smashes them on the yacht Club lawn.

 

... ...

 

What do you think of their Kevlar hull?

 

FB- Doug

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Smallest. Cockpit. Ever.

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I measured a number of the C&C 37R's and +'s at the factory in Niagara for IMS.

After hull #10, all R's had different keel weights. The owner got to say how much lead he wanted as the standard keel was heavy, the boat was over design weight by 20+%.

Somewhere in the first 10 hulls, C&C raised the freeboard by about 1 inch to get more headroom under the IMS rule.

 

All C&C 37? share the same hull, there were 2 decks, open transom for the R and closed transom for the others. 2 masts, slightly higher rig for the R. 5 keels, R, deep fin for +, deep and shallow wing keel for + and XL and keel centerboard.

 

Typical of the original C&C, the boats were well built, but also typical C&C you could mix and match deck, mast and keels.

 

C&C 37R has a reasonable interior. The other C&C 37's have a full interior, V berth etc. Choice of forward or aft head.

 

I weighed 2 C&C 37R's for IRC last year, 15,164lbs and 14,613lbs. C&C 37+ weighed 16,157lbs (deep keel, tall mast)

 

All of the old and it seems the new C&C's are 12 knot boats. They go the best in 12 knots of wind, can be a pig in less and OK in more.

 

PHRF Lake Ontario rating 66.

 

Watch out for repairs to the keel sump, I looked at a 37R on Lake Erie that had hit something and the front and back of the keel had both been pushed up into the hull and the sump was reinforced at both ends of the keel.

 

jcc

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I raced on a 37R during the early 90s including in a so called OD class with 10 of them at the Youngstown Levels. JCC is right on about some significant weight differences. C&C in those days was going through some tough times and they were pretty flexible on the the build. If my memory serves me correctly the 37R/40 was a Rob Ball design. The R model had a kevlar hull, no anchor locker, no v-berth, minimal head, large open area/berth/nav table under the cockpit. C&C used several rig makers so a lot of the rigs are different. The common set-up was a triple spreader with a slight swept back spreaders, hydraulic backstay adjuster, running back stays, and a baby stay. The rig was a bit of a noodle.

 

We raced against a couple of Express 37s, J-35s, and Schock 35s all rating the same. In light air the Express was faster, the Schock was even, and the J-35 slower. In light air and chop the Schock was clearly the fastest. In 10- 15 the 37r was neck and neck with the J-35, the others slower. In above 15 the C&C was fastest upwind by a bunch not so much downwind.

 

Bottom line the 37R can be a competitive all around boat. The sail inventory is pretty expensive and you need to race the the boat with 8-10 competent people. Figure a light #1, AP # !, Heavy #1 or 2, 3, 4, and a couple of chutes. I'd imagine a competitive inventory to be 35-40K.

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We just bought a 37R to use for cruising and limited racing. We've only sailed it once so far-from Vancouver down to Bellingham where it's waiting for the truck to bring her home. We did not have any boats to pace our selves against but her performance in the 10-12 kts we had seemed comparable to a S35 ( raced on one for 6 years).

There is a lot of room down below-one of our concerns for cruising. Seems to be well built, all the bulkheads are tabbed in, build quality looks pretty good. Head is small but don't plan on spending much time there. Our's is hull #1 and has a pretty good size v-berth, seems like others I've seen in pics did as well but sure some were removed.

I'm sure she's no match for some modern lightweights but seems she'll do ok for what we want. We'll see how she fares when we race her.

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I crewed on a + TR during a windy Hot Rum race in SD several years ago. My impressions were it needed lots of manpower. We did several sail changes and it seemed every configuration involved a different piece of deck hardware for just that sail combination. The boat went very well in 20 kts gusting to 25 with driving rain but that rain seemed to make it through every fastener on that deck hardware and if we hadn't been racing we'd all have been busy moving buckets around below. The comment about the cockpit size is right on; to get a full owner's stateroom aft, the cockpit seats are almost at coaming height and wide and long. If you like grinding the primary from your knees, no problem.

 

If the volume belowdecks is your first consideration, go for it, but I'll echo the earlier poster who said he'd rather have a J. The J will be much less likely to beat the crap out of your crew.

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I crewed on a + TR during a windy Hot Rum race in SD several years ago. My impressions were it needed lots of manpower. We did several sail changes and it seemed every configuration involved a different piece of deck hardware for just that sail combination. The boat went very well in 20 kts gusting to 25 with driving rain but that rain seemed to make it through every fastener on that deck hardware and if we hadn't been racing we'd all have been busy moving buckets around below. The comment about the cockpit size is right on; to get a full owner's stateroom aft, the cockpit seats are almost at coaming height and wide and long. If you like grinding the primary from your knees, no problem.

 

If the volume belowdecks is your first consideration, go for it, but I'll echo the earlier poster who said he'd rather have a J. The J will be much less likely to beat the crap out of your crew.

Sounds to me like the R is a reasonably good sailing cruiser and you'll need 8+ good crew and $40K in sails. What's your priority?

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but I'll echo the earlier poster who said he'd rather have a J. The J will be much less likely to beat the crap out of your crew.

 

yes.

x1000

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we've gone the gamet with the size crew. 4 to 9.

 

In heavy conditions, it's nice to have the bodies on the rail and help with the down hill run.

 

In lighter conditions 4-5 works great. Just have to be on the stick. Double handing with the wife also is well within the realm. Just have to use the A-sym and snuffer.

 

Cruising is great too, in double handing.

 

Single handed it a while back. Just had to go with non flying sails. and move quick.

 

Keeping the weight out of the bow and stern is key, along with leeward / windward. get everything into the center of the boat and out of the ends. Empty the water.

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I fly my chute single-handed on my C&C 35. Obviously this is a light air operation, but it isn't too hard if you do a little arranging. I have my halyard set so I can raise the sail from the mast and then drop it from the cockpit.

 

 

we've gone the gamet with the size crew. 4 to 9.

 

In heavy conditions, it's nice to have the bodies on the rail and help with the down hill run.

 

In lighter conditions 4-5 works great. Just have to be on the stick. Double handing with the wife also is well within the realm. Just have to use the A-sym and snuffer.

 

Cruising is great too, in double handing.

 

Single handed it a while back. Just had to go with non flying sails. and move quick.

 

Keeping the weight out of the bow and stern is key, along with leeward / windward. get everything into the center of the boat and out of the ends. Empty the water.

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check Creola's phrf2 scores at KWRW

doing pretty well i'd say

and there is one for sail here too www.rcryachts.com

 

I inquired on several before we bought ours, I think that one has some damage to the side at the toe rail...caved in an inch or two.

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Does anyone have any experience or information on the C&C 37R. Looking at one now and need the low down.

 

Thanks

 

did bow on one in houston a few yrs back called electron. built solid and was nice after the races in the houston humidity to have the a/c. can sail to its rating if you work it hard enough (level 70 probably 72-73 but dont remember)

 

Electron was a 37+. The 37r's had a kevlar composite hull, and the cockpit was reconfigured. I think the cockpit lockers were removed to make it a more race friendly area. Also. the interiors were quite different. Be sure which version you are looking at.

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my father owned an R (one of the first one back in the 80's) and a +R(?) in 2000 wich had the same mast and keel but with the cruising interior. Nice boat , very strong.

 

what else do you need to know?

 

here is some pretty random (very random) pictures i took of the (?) +R

 

DSCF0021-vi.jpg

 

DSCF0022-vi.jpg

 

DSCF0043-vi.jpg

 

DSCF0064-vi.jpg

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"my father owned an R (one of the first one back in the 80's) and a +R(?) in 2000 wich had the same mast and keel but with the cruising interior. Nice boat , very strong. "

 

The 37R and 37XL/+ came out in 1988 so not sure what his 1st boat was but the pics show the XL/+ -which has the cruising interior and possibly a shorter stick, do you remember if it was 2 or 3 spreader ? I think the "+" version had the 3 spreaders like the R's did.

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"my father owned an R (one of the first one back in the 80's) and a +R(?) in 2000 wich had the same mast and keel but with the cruising interior. Nice boat , very strong. "

 

The 37R and 37XL/+ came out in 1988 so not sure what his 1st boat was but the pics show the XL/+ -which has the cruising interior and possibly a shorter stick, do you remember if it was 2 or 3 spreader ? I think the "+" version had the 3 spreaders like the R's did.

 

The XL was the same hull / rig config as the "R" version only with the + interior. I think the "R" version had up to an 8' foot keel, where the XL was likely 6-9" shorter.

 

The XL and R version do still race competitively but with expensive sail inventories to up keep and they do need 7 + crew to sail well IMO!

 

CdM

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the rig dimensions I have show the XL mast as being slightly shorter than the R but the P dimension is 1.5 ft shorter which I guess would indicate the boom was mounted a little higher for more headroom-and less main sail area as well.

We have the 8' draft keel on our R.

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Where is this one? I remember one on the Great Lakes that was for sale in Wisconsin a few years back. I remember it because of the pictures of the boat tied up on the Black River in Port Huron. That boat had a very wet hull and the broker was trying to do a fast sale with the included much to be appreciated double talk about the integrity of the vessel.

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"my father owned an R (one of the first one back in the 80's) and a +R(?) in 2000 wich had the same mast and keel but with the cruising interior. Nice boat , very strong. "

 

The 37R and 37XL/+ came out in 1988 so not sure what his 1st boat was but the pics show the XL/+ -which has the cruising interior and possibly a shorter stick, do you remember if it was 2 or 3 spreader ? I think the "+" version had the 3 spreaders like the R's did.

 

You win sir!

 

the one on pic is a 37XL+ , first one was a 37R wich was sold in chicago back in 1993 before he bought a j-130. I think the name back in chicago was Hawk or something near that. White hull.

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All good comments here - I will add that if you are looking for a boat with good racing ergonomics - Keep looking.

 

Huge interior but a hard boat to sail if you like good raceboat decks.

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Posted · Hidden by Grueusa, July 4, 2011 - wrong date
Hidden by Grueusa, July 4, 2011 - wrong date

I still sail mine. It's an R. I love it but most comments are correct. It needs a good crew of 7 to 8 to be competitive. The PHRF on the Chesapeake is 66. I think it should be between 70 to 72. Last year I raced it in the BOR in the double handed division. I then singled it back. It's a tough boat but a little spongie (bends) a bit when Id really load it up. I think this is more true with the R version because they are so open with not many bulkhead or a frames. I added two too mine.

 

The boat can be competitive with the right sails and crew but what boat isn't (ala handicaps)? d

 

The boat really likes going to windward. Puts her bow down and slugs her way up wind. Great fun!

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I measured a few of the C&C 37's for IMS back when the old C&C was still around.

 

1 Hull, 2 decks, 2 masts and 5 keel options.

 

The R has a basic interior, open transom and tall rig with an eliptical keel, anything else and it's not an R. There were about 25 R's built, after Hull #10, they raised the freeboard about 3/4" to get a little more headroom, also after about hull #10, the purchaser got to determin the keel weight. All the boats came in over design weight so it paid to get a lighter keel.

 

I have weighed a few R's and +'s or XL's for IRC. R's come in around 14,600 - 15,170lbs, the other models are around 1,000 lbs or more heavier. IRC rating for R's 1.049 - 1.051, I have 1 37+ rated at 1.047.

 

Not a bad boat, if well sailed, but I agree with some of the earlier comments, a J 35 offers the most bang for the buck.

 

A J 35 is one of the top boats in our local IRC fleet of over 70 boats.

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