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jarcher

Tacking lines

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To work correctly, do tacking lines have to be put in the center of the boat? Or is that too minor an issue to make any difference?

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I made a template for my tacking lines and put them on the deck with a Sharpie (the sunlight erases them after awhile and allows me to refine them). Then I draw a set on either side, on the deck, just forward of shrouds near the towrail for the use of the bowman. There's a second set forward and outboard of the primaries for the use of the trimmer and the driver. My template has a cross or not line, a layline and a tack and clear line. The design came from Conner's Sail like a Champion.

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I made a template for my tacking lines and put them on the deck with a Sharpie (the sunlight erases them after awhile and allows me to refine them). Then I draw a set on either side, on the deck, just forward of shrouds near the towrail for the use of the bowman. There's a second set forward and outboard of the primaries for the use of the trimmer and the driver. My template has a cross or not line, a layline and a tack and clear line. The design came from Conner's Sail like a Champion.

 

 

Picture/diagram please?

 

-m

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We use a much simpler one than above which takes some use to get used to but works well after you know your angles.

 

We use a 45 degree (ahead or behind line) Works extremely well for most crossing situations.

 

70, 80, and 90 degree lines. My boats tacks thru 74 degrees in anything above 6 knots TWS. If we tack at 80 degrees in that windspeed we usually nail the layline(the extra 6 degrees accounts for leeway).

 

In less wind, tacking angles can be 90 degrees or more. In more wind, tacking angles can be less than 74 degrees.

 

We have these lines drawn on the deck just forward(and outboard) of the primary winches for my trimmer to use.

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We use a much simpler one than above which takes some use to get used to but works well after you know your angles.

 

We use a 45 degree (ahead or behind line) Works extremely well for most crossing situations.

 

70, 80, and 90 degree lines. My boats tacks thru 74 degrees in anything above 6 knots TWS. If we tack at 80 degrees in that windspeed we usually nail the layline(the extra 6 degrees accounts for leeway).

 

In less wind, tacking angles can be 90 degrees or more. In more wind, tacking angles can be less than 74 degrees.

 

We have these lines drawn on the deck just forward(and outboard) of the primary winches for my trimmer to use.

 

Your laylines were beautiful at the BBR this year, absolutely stunning :wub:

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That Suderland one is waaaay too complicated. It looks like it is intended to take tidal effects into account

 

I sharpied lines at 90 45 and 135, and thinner lines at +/- 5 degrees on the 45 and 135. On the cockpit seats just forward of where the helm sits

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We sail with a GPS and I like to write down the heading over the ground on each tack, this is useful in spotting headers, but if you have the weather mark in as a way point you can also watch the bearing to the next waypoint display and use this to help decide.

 

aa

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Thanks everyone... So, if you imigian an extension of the lines, they don't need to pass through the middle of the boat (fore and aft)?

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Thanks everyone... So, if you imigian an extension of the lines, they don't need to pass through the middle of the boat (fore and aft)?

 

No, not really, if I understand your question correctly.

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Jarcher, as long as the baseline of the semi circle is parallel with the centreline of the boat, you're sweet.

 

I stopped using these years ago though, and now just use my hockey puck compass, is more accurate. But that would be a whole other discussion.

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Thanks everyone... So, if you imigian an extension of the lines, they don't need to pass through the middle of the boat (fore and aft)?

 

Nope because your down wind gybe angles will be different angles than your upwind lay lines/tacking angle..

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Jarcher, as long as the baseline of the semi circle is parallel with the centreline of the boat, you're sweet.

 

I stopped using these years ago though, and now just use my hockey puck compass, is more accurate. But that would be a whole other discussion.

 

^^^

What he said...

 

Not sure I agree about the hockey puck though.... The problem I find with "the puck" is your baseline heading that you reference off. Having to take a heading bearing & then a mark bearing, & then figuring the difference, especially if working through the north quadrant of the compass, see it's taxing just trying to write/read about it.

 

The biggest advantage of having tacking lines on the side deck, & aft? It doesn't matter if your lifted knocking, pinching, 80 deg is always 80 degrees 150 is always 150, relative to the boat. Frees up the mind to think more about speed & tactics. My 2c

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Jarcher, as long as the baseline of the semi circle is parallel with the centreline of the boat, you're sweet.

 

I stopped using these years ago though, and now just use my hockey puck compass, is more accurate. But that would be a whole other discussion.

 

^^^

What he said...

 

Not sure I agree about the hockey puck though.... The problem I find with "the puck" is your baseline heading that you reference off. Having to take a heading bearing & then a mark bearing, & then figuring the difference, especially if working through the north quadrant of the compass, see it's taxing just trying to write/read about it.

 

The biggest advantage of having tacking lines on the side deck, & aft? It doesn't matter if your lifted knocking, pinching, 80 deg is always 80 degrees 150 is always 150, relative to the boat. Frees up the mind to think more about speed & tactics. My 2c

I have a bit of a head for crunching those kinda numbers quickly I guess.

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Jarcher, as long as the baseline of the semi circle is parallel with the centreline of the boat, you're sweet.

 

I stopped using these years ago though, and now just use my hockey puck compass, is more accurate. But that would be a whole other discussion.

 

^^^

What he said...

 

Not sure I agree about the hockey puck though.... The problem I find with "the puck" is your baseline heading that you reference off. Having to take a heading bearing & then a mark bearing, & then figuring the difference, especially if working through the north quadrant of the compass, see it's taxing just trying to write/read about it.

 

The biggest advantage of having tacking lines on the side deck, & aft? It doesn't matter if your lifted knocking, pinching, 80 deg is always 80 degrees 150 is always 150, relative to the boat. Frees up the mind to think more about speed & tactics. My 2c

I have a bit of a head for crunching those kinda numbers quickly I guess. :D

Or maybe the boats slow enough that you have time to work it out :lol:

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Jarcher, as long as the baseline of the semi circle is parallel with the centreline of the boat, you're sweet.

 

I stopped using these years ago though, and now just use my hockey puck compass, is more accurate. But that would be a whole other discussion.

 

^^^

What he said...

 

Not sure I agree about the hockey puck though.... The problem I find with "the puck" is your baseline heading that you reference off. Having to take a heading bearing & then a mark bearing, & then figuring the difference, especially if working through the north quadrant of the compass, see it's taxing just trying to write/read about it.

 

The biggest advantage of having tacking lines on the side deck, & aft? It doesn't matter if your lifted knocking, pinching, 80 deg is always 80 degrees 150 is always 150, relative to the boat. Frees up the mind to think more about speed & tactics. My 2c

I have a bit of a head for crunching those kinda numbers quickly I guess. :D

Or maybe the boats slow enough that you have time to work it out :lol:

Nice comeback, give you that one!

 

ROFLMAO.

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I stopped using these years ago though, and now just use my hockey puck compass, is more accurate. But that would be a whole other discussion.

 

I use a hockey puck if I'm hiking on the rail of a >30 footer, but if you are driving on a one-design keelboat, you can't exactly drop the tiller or mainsheet to put a handbearing compass to your eye.

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Graham Sunderland produces "Winning laylines".

 

WL%20help%20document%20C.jpg

 

 

(No connection, just a satisfied customer of Winning Tides)

anybody have anything like this in USA?

 

not anyone who looks outside the boat from time to time

 

All too much for me. use time on the water and your judgement to build up a mental model of when to tack. surface currents fouls up anything that might be precise.

 

IMHO

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I stopped using these years ago though, and now just use my hockey puck compass, is more accurate. But that would be a whole other discussion.

 

I use a hockey puck if I'm hiking on the rail of a >30 footer, but if you are driving on a one-design keelboat, you can't exactly drop the tiller or mainsheet to put a handbearing compass to your eye.

nor can you come into the boat to look over sightlines. a quick glance over the shoulder is all you get.

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