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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
kimbottles

Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

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15 hours ago, Bull City said:

Mystery Painter Revealed

The first clue is that the painting is based on this photo posted a while back, I forget where, and I posted my admiration of it.:

59b9b75ad7896_francislee.jpg.948ab357e81127114ea06dee41513707.jpg

The second clue is that I like skinny boats with tillers, and sail one.

In the photo, I was able to ID Frances Lee's designer, and kept him in the painting. Kim, I assumed, was steering. I left out the two other boats. I imagine Frankie left them behind in short order.

So, I am the painter. During the renovation of my H-Boat, Kim very kindly sent me an H-Boat brochure that he had received years ago.

WFD sir! 

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Thank you, folks. Thank you, thank you.

I started painting about 12 years ago, and really enjoy it. Oil painting is an interesting process. It starts with an underpainting, sometimes preceded by a sketch, and then application of the actual colors. At least that's the way I was taught. Obviously, I'm partial to anything with a sail on it, but I also like old houses.  A few years I did a painting of a house in one of older neighborhoods, and took some progress photos that I think are pretty neat in that they show the process:

Sketch with underpainting:

59bae63341e42_CH-11.jpg.8a107f7666b783b99ccdcab8b1e44e6d.jpg

Beginning to add colors:

59bae633e5b05_CH-12.jpg.805ee106d815994f5ba19aedce39d50e.jpg59bae634eefea_CH-13.jpg.19c02c1abcad9dcece3c5ef610d86e3f.jpg59bae635c5ab0_CH-14.jpg.694a2a7ce567678c4f434a67bcc6db76.jpg59bae636a47a2_CH-15.jpg.c3867b5f2e83fef4cf6e798c0f66f5bf.jpg59bae6376f438_CH-16.jpg.d2ae9e3211443febad11e6c7b53ae285.jpg59bae63840745_CH-17.jpg.2d3c1e6241139cb14a02fc53bb141fa8.jpg

Finished!

59bae638de68c_CH-18.jpg.6760b9e3d6ca925427de0c13a673d1c2.jpg

 

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12 hours ago, A horse, of course said:

Nice work! Where do we send photos of our boats for you to paint, Bull?

 

To my studio of course! :P I'll PM you.

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A very good long term friend of mine (one of my oldest buddies going on 50 years of friendship now) is a highly respected fine artist who is also known for his skill in teaching fine painting. Fine art is his full time profession and has been for decades (he was a professional illustrator before branching into fine art.)

He looked at the pictures of the painting I sent him and said "Hey! That's pretty good!" 

You should feel good about that Bull given his skill level.

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1 hour ago, kimbottles said:

A very good long term friend of mine (one of my oldest buddies going on 50 years of friendship now) is a highly respected fine artist who is also known for his skill in teaching fine painting. Fine art is his full time profession and has been for decades (he was a professional illustrator before branching into fine art.)

He looked at the pictures of the painting I sent him and said "Hey! That's pretty good!" 

You should feel good about that Bull given his skill level.

Kim, thank you so much for passing that on. As you work to develop and improve your skill, you sometimes wonder if you're getting anywhere. Hearing that from someone who is a professional (which I am not despite having sold numerous pieces), means a lot.

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Sometimes the photo needs help. Here is a B&B in Port Clyde, Maine where Mrs. Bull and I stayed several years ago, and the painting.

IMG_0843.JPG.jpg.9dc942e43b69be2aa8367d883297ac4d.jpg

59bb1999bc860_SummertimeattheSeasideInn.jpg.01b23b34009790e6229b278e61e772d0.jpg

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5 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

I really like this thread drift. Keep 'em coming Bull.

That blue boat behind me is the one that rolled over at launch.

twins

 

That shirt is a long way from home!

 

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8 hours ago, Tanton Y_M said:

We need Art and Chuck Paine on this side show. Very hard to find better talented watercolor and oil painters.

 

 Marc P.G. Berthier. is quite good also.

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We had this print on the wall over the fireplace when I was a kid.

montague-dawson-a-winning-tack_a-G-64109

Montague Dawson, The Winning Tack

I've often reflected on how much notions of sail trim have changed in a hundred years.

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Seems as though sail trim is (or should be) highly optimized for each design and each era since everyone is collecting the relevant data all the time. If boat speed suffers due to poor trim, you lose the race. Lots of real time evolutionary pressure there.

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All@sea:

Yes, that's my yacht club. It's the only club I belong to. Kim and I are the PNW chapter.

 

Semi:

That's the first Montague Dawson painting I have seen of a yacht. I thought he did clippers and square riggers exclusively He's my fav.

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6 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

We had this print on the wall over the fireplace when I was a kid.

montague-dawson-a-winning-tack_a-G-64109

Montague Dawson, The Winning Tack

I've often reflected on how much notions of sail trim have changed in a hundred years.

Semi, it looks like they've reefed and still need to de-power.

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Well done, Bull.  I dabble in oil and dont even come close to your level.  Awesome gift for Kim.

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Signed FRANCIS up for regular diver cleaning yesterday.

Divers showed up by boat and they were pretty quick with the two of them working.

Now FRANCIS will get her bottom cleaned every three months year round.

Nice that this old fart doesn’t have to try to fit into my wetsuit except when I feel like it.

I am pretty sure she suffered from a foul bottom several times this last year.

Now new bottom paint and regular cleaning.

Might race her a bit more next year, only went out racing a couple times this year.

(Divers loved the boat, said she was easy to clean.)

 

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Tomorrow I am going to get this old fart into his spring suit for a bottom brushing - not looking forward to it, but I am looking forward the Dagwood sandwich and beer which I have afterwards.

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On ‎10‎/‎21‎/‎2017 at 4:07 PM, kimbottles said:

 

(Divers loved the boat, said she was easy to clean.)

 

" It's like a Catamaran hull,  but there's only one of them..."

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50 minutes ago, Great Red Shark said:

" It's like a Catamaran hull,  but there's only one of them..."

Don't they have to decompress after cleaning off the bulb? :D

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15 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Don't they have to decompress after cleaning off the bulb? :D

Funny, they actually joked about that very thing when they came up to the surface. 

We are sailing Saturday, so great to have the bottom cleaned and checked out.

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When Son Derek and his wife took FRANCIS cruising this Summer they commented on how nice it would be to have an anchor hoist to lift the anchor away from the hull while trying to stay on board at the pointy little stern. Derek did it fine but he is younger than I, so I have been looking on Craigslist for a good hoist system to aid in anchor handling.

This week we got lucky and this very nice Stainless Steel unit appeared on Craigslist about 50 miles from Blakely Harbor at a reasonable price.

When we install the split stern rail this will get its slip ring and mounting ball installed along with the rail. We will stow it below when not in use. Another nice refinement to be added to FRANCIS. (I always figured that I would be fiddling around with FRANCIS for years after I took delivery adding and subtracting stuff depending on what we learned while using her.)

Jordan (greatdane28) is coming over to sail with us Saturday. Always nice to have one of her builders aboard. We should be able to try out the drifter we recently acquired from secondwindsails.com.

 

 

9FE768F5-E487-4594-8841-E665AEF0C8F9.jpeg

C0ADAEF1-C6CB-480E-86D3-1C5D8EFD2D10.jpeg

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16 minutes ago, Mr. Ed said:

Oo. I feel the weight building. 

Why only on the back? Is that the default end for anchoring? I’ve not been paying attention. . 

Anchoring off the stern has many benefits Ed. (I thought we discussed them when you visited.)

One major benefit is the boat settles down because the mast is aft of the center so she does not try to sail around the anchor. Another is I don’t have to hike all the way to the bow, it is a LONG walk for an old guy like me. Another is it frees the bow roller up for its primary purpose, attachment point for the asymmetrical tack line.

And because the rudder turns 360 degrees, anchoring off the stern does not cause any rudder alignment problems.

All good.

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4 hours ago, kimbottles said:

Funny, they actually joked about that very thing when they came up to the surface. 

We are sailing Saturday, so great to have the bottom cleaned and checked out.

Looks like the weather will be perfect. Have a great day. 

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16 hours ago, kimbottles said:

Anchoring off the stern has many benefits Ed. (I thought we discussed them when you visited.)

One major benefit is the boat settles down because the mast is aft of the center so she does not try to sail around the anchor. Another is I don’t have to hike all the way to the bow, it is a LONG walk for an old guy like me. Another is it frees the bow roller up for its primary purpose, attachment point for the asymmetrical tack line.

And because the rudder turns 360 degrees, anchoring off the stern does not cause any rudder alignment problems.

All good.

I remembered something about that and remember some photos but thought it was an option rather than the default. Makes a lot of sense. Maybe not when you’re kedging in a race!

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11 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

I remembered something about that and remember some photos but thought it was an option rather than the default. Makes a lot of sense. Maybe not when you’re kedging in a race!

We still have a bow roller Ed in case we ever wanted to kedge..........and a couple of light Fortress anchors.........

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Happiness is building a boat and then sailing it with your kids.

Tried out the bargain basement drifter in very light air yesterday. It worked well and after we make some adjustments it will be a very useful sail on Puget Sound light air days.

Fractional jib 9 oz 485 sq ft      Masthead drifter 4 oz 680 sq ft.

The regular scheduled diver visits to clean FRANCIS bottom seems to be helping greatly, she really slipped through the water yesterday.

3F1FD0C6-210B-4725-9765-43FAE6884E69.jpeg

47658D49-8926-4922-B3EA-6A62390742FC.jpeg

7E109073-5A7C-40A5-A7A8-554E17B8330B.jpeg

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I don't know what's more expressive - the deep satisfaction of the helmsman or the numbers on the dials. Either way it looks like a great day. 

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6 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

I don't know what's more expressive - the deep satisfaction of the helmsman or the numbers on the dials. Either way it looks like a great day. 

He had a huge small on his face just before I snapped that shot.

Just missed it by a second or so......

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Just found out that Bob Perry will be receiving a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Sept 2018 Port Townsend Wooden Boat Show

FRANCIS will certainly attend that event!

A very richly deserved award for the Maestro.

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27 minutes ago, kimbottles said:

Just found out that Bob Perry will be receiving a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Sept 2018 Port Townsend Wooden Boat Show

FRANCIS will certainly attend that event!

A very richly deserved award for the Maestro.

And we didn't even know he had died.......

Hat, coat.......

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24 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Right, does that mean he has to stop achieving now? That doesn't seem fair...

Best we let him continue to design, he seems to get even better as he keeps designing.

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22 hours ago, kimbottles said:

FRANCIS will certainly attend that event!

A very richly deserved award for the Maestro.

Heck, for that, MAKANA might even attend.  Congratulations, Bob, that's really cool.

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"People are saying"  that the award will be presented by a steel-boat sage from Comox...

See how fun it is to speak like the president? -  with just a few quick qualifiers you can talk complete nonsense !

 

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I don't know if PTWBS could use any pics of Bob's woodies (for the ceremony or installation), but I have some nice ones of Amati.  If PTWBS would like any, through whom should the images be funneled?  

For example:

photo.JPG

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6 minutes ago, Amati said:

I don't know if PTWBS could use any pics of Bob's woodies (for the ceremony or installation), but I have some nice ones of Amati.  If PTWBS would like any, through whom should the images be funneled?  

For example:

photo.JPG

Bring her to the show next year. We should round up as many wooden Perry boats as possible and have a special Perry Wooden Boat section at the show.

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33 minutes ago, kimbottles said:

Bring her to the show next year. We should round up as many wooden Perry boats as possible and have a special Perry Wooden Boat section at the show.

Great idea! African Star, Loon (love that little boat) Amati, Francis Lee. Any other local Perry woodies?

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1 hour ago, viktor said:

Great idea! African Star, Loon (love that little boat) Amati, Francis Lee. Any other local Perry woodies?

The all time great NIGHT RUNNER........

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That wood be kewl-  we'll have to check on business conflicts.

If we turn in the applications in time, we might get moored together, like Schooner Creek used to do with Rave, Amati, etc.  

Gosh, we could dress alike!

:lol:

 

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17 minutes ago, See Level said:

And this one by Schooner Creek.

Nothing goes to weather like a 502 ci

Chevy.

fad57ba5a13fccbaf01da5733e50646b.jpg

If I had access to a boathouse I might acquire her. 

I like speed.....and Perry designs.

 

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41 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

Jakartan is wood core, and she is on the west coast.

I wonder if Eclipse would be finished....

I am pretty sure Eclipse is glass not wood.......

Trickypig, where are you when we need your input?

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The great ECLIPSHION is an airex cored grp boat.

Jakatan is wood skins over a core. I'd call that "composite" and not a wood boat.

When I was driving back from JAKATAN's launching the US border patrol guy asked me what I was doing in Canada. I said I was up for a boat launching. Surprisingly he asked "What kind of boat?" I said, "Composite built shonner." He asked, "What kind of composite?" I explained wood veneers in epoxy over a foam core." He said emphatically, "That's not composite." (he had my passport in his hand. Read the fucking name on the Passport dipshit.)  Then he noticed my Glengarry (my hat) on the seat next to me. He said, "What does that hat have to do with the launching?" (I kid you not) I said, "Nothing, it's just my hat." He let me go.

Some time I 'll tell you about the time three guards took me to a little room at the Sea-tac airport. That was scarier.

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Paul:

AMATI is "wood composite". I would love to see it in Port Townsend.

That's a great shot of AMATI.

If it's not too much trouble could you email me a high res file of that photo., I'd love it for my archives.

"See Violet, Buppy did actually have a job, sort of."

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Will do, hope the address is still good.

Kim, forgive the drift, but one of my favorite pics-  4 knots TW- I'll leave it to the wave train as far as S/L, but it's faster than TW

 

IMG_0653.JPG

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44 minutes ago, Amati said:

Will do, hope the address is still good.

Kim, forgive the drift, but one of my favorite pics-  4 knots TW- I'll leave it to the wave train as far as S/L, but it's faster than TW

 

IMG_0653.JPG

Pretty picture of wooden Perry boat is not thread drift.

This thread is about pretty wooden Perry boats.

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On 11/6/2017 at 5:27 PM, Amati said:

Will do, hope the address is still good.

Kim, forgive the drift, but one of my favorite pics-  4 knots TW- I'll leave it to the wave train as far as S/L, but it's faster than TW

 

IMG_0653.JPG

Looking good, Amati.

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12 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

I love the way AMATI cleaves the water with no bow wave fuss at all.

38213148736_8b71da3410_z.jpgAMATI 3 by robert perry, on Flickr

That's a great shot Bob...and a great looking boat Amati.

I just got my sail magazine and read Bob's review of the new J/121 and was struck by how similar in concept the 121 and Amati are, though Amati came first by a good number of years.  Both are relatively light 40 foot performance short-handed racer/cruisers.  They are relatively close numbers wise.  Amati is narrower, with deeper draft and a touch less sail area.  The J has more beam, not quite as much draft, is a bit heavier and has water ballast and a sprit....but in concept, pretty similar boats I thought.  With out hull lines, I can't say how close or different the hulls are, but I'd guess not that far apart...

And oh yeah, even though I'm something of a J/Boats fan, I think Amati is better looking.  

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Thanks Crash. I really liked that J Boat J/121.

If I were to sensibly pick one of my own designs for my own use I'd be hard pressed to choose between AMATI and Frankie.

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48 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

Thanks Crash. I really liked that J Boat J/121.

If I were to sensibly pick one of my own designs for my own use I'd be hard pressed to choose between AMATI and Frankie.

I think it boils down to what kind of wake you like.  There's lots to be said for both.  Frankie looks like elegant smooth speed, with no obvious transition to higher SLR's.  Amati planes more like a Finn- it's fun to watch the stern wave separate from the transom, sometimes even upwind a little bit.  Ooching a 40' is fun.:lol:  more work though.

The J is heavier and a lot more complex, and I doubt if young self appointed enforcers walk up to any of the J family and pronounce the 121 a 'bullshit boat'.  (!)  Creeping incrementalism has its uses.  

Enlightened design like Amati, Frankie, JS9000, Fast 40 (however flawed), the Hunt 110- 510 series, 30 square m family,  J 80, 90 etc have a place, but it's kind of like the Greeks being overtaken by the Romans in a wild and strange sailboat design metaphor, and anyway,  Bob figured that  artificiality out a long time ago...

i do like the hull windows on the J's, Hanse's, Beneteaus, Pogos, etc.... very modern.  They never leak, ya betcha :)  But with deeper heavier canoe bodies, they need 'em..... (oh, Snap!)

 

 

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1 hour ago, Bob Perry said:

Thanks Crash. I really liked that J Boat J/121.

If I were to sensibly pick one of my own designs for my own use I'd be hard pressed to choose between AMATI and Frankie.

 

21 minutes ago, Amati said:

I think it boils down to what kind of wake you like.  There's lots to be said for both.  Frankie looks like elegant smooth speed, with no obvious transition to higher SLR's.  

 

 

Frankie gets my vote!  ...and for the reasons Amati points out. (though Amati IS a mighty fine design!)

I just need the solarium for the Admiral which is a comfort feature on my Mainecat, but..... there really is no substitute for LWL, lean and light!

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29 minutes ago, Veeger said:

 

Frankie gets my vote!  ...and for the reasons Amati points out. (though Amati IS a mighty fine design!)

I just need the solarium for the Admiral which is a comfort feature on my Mainecat, but..... there really is no substitute for LWL, lean and light!

Motorboat Solariums are driving bigger hull ports, if you think about it.  It'd be heavy, but a cabintop shaped of glass or plastic on a shoal canoe body so you could see out while sitting might be Wally Sexy?  I think some cats have tried it-

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Although if you think about it, an electric flat pak under a cabin sole would make for a logical spot for batteries while creating a platform for a solarium on a shallow canoe body sailboat while keeping cg low.  Or opposed cylinder engines, hydrogen, etc

 

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7 minutes ago, Amati said:

Motorboat Solariums are driving bigger hull ports, if you think about it.  It'd be heavy, but a cabintop shaped of glass or plastic on a shoal canoe body so you could see out while sitting might be Wally Sexy?  I think some cats have tried it-

I tried it but chickened out.  Another 8-10' loa would be nice too.

 

Cat Yawl.jpg

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1 hour ago, Amati said:

I think it boils down to what kind of wake you like.  There's lots to be said for both.  Frankie looks like elegant smooth speed, with no obvious transition to higher SLR's.  Amati planes more like a Finn- it's fun to watch the stern wave separate from the transom, sometimes even upwind a little bit.  Ooching a 40' is fun.:lol:  more work though.

The J is heavier and a lot more complex, and I doubt if young self appointed enforcers walk up to any of the J family and pronounce the 121 a 'bullshit boat'.  (!)  Creeping incrementalism has its uses.  

Enlightened design like Amati, Frankie, JS9000, Fast 40 (however flawed), the Hunt 110- 510 series, 30 square m family,  J 80, 90 etc have a place, but it's kind of like the Greeks being overtaken by the Romans in a wild and strange sailboat design metaphor, and anyway,  Bob figured that  artificiality out a long time ago...

i do like the hull windows on the J's, Hanse's, Beneteaus, Pogos, etc.... very modern.  They never leak, ya betcha :)  But with deeper heavier canoe bodies, they need 'em..... (oh, Snap!)

 

 

There's no doubt the J is heavier and more complex, but that's what happens I think, when you have to make a production boat appeal to a broader range of people than just you ;) .  Amati doesn't bear the burden or suffer the trade offs  as a result. 

I hate the hull ports on modern boats.  One of the things I like about the 121 is there aren't any...though I would say you need them when you jack the freeboard so high like many modern boats do, but I prefer low freeboard...so then there is no reason for them.  Plus I'm sure you're right and they won't leak at all!

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47 minutes ago, Veeger said:

I tried it but chickened out.  Another 8-10' loa would be nice too.

 

Cat Yawl.jpg

:wub: Damn!  

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That looks great Veegs!

Maybe a bit less chord on the keel fin. At least at the tip.

 

As for me being ahead on the curve with the AMATI design: I don't think so.

I'd say the production boat world has been slow to adapt to exactly how most casual sailors use their boats these days. I had the advantage of having Paul and Lorrie walked in my door and telling me exactly how they would use the boat. We lived two blocks apart, above the marina so I knew their sailing area very well.  Sometimes it's hard to pin a client down as to use of the boat. "Well I'm thinking that one day, in the future, maybe,  I might like to sail to Tahiti or Fiji." This does not work. Tell me how you will use the boat now. The perfect boat for light air, summer evening sails after work on Puget Sound is obviously not the perfect boat to go offshore.

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Dat's vhat Eye ment dat yoo figgered dis out long ago- ifh eye tink rite, wee wer tinkingk aboot 1930's boots a bit (skarsgaard too, ja.....

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13 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

That looks great Veegs!

Maybe a bit less chord on the keel fin. At least at the tip.

 

As for me being ahead on the curve with the AMATI design: I don't think so.

I'd say the production boat world has been slow to adapt to exactly how most casual sailors use their boats these days. I had the advantage of having Paul and Lorrie walked in my door and telling me exactly how they would use the boat. We lived two blocks apart, above the marina so I knew their sailing area very well.  Sometimes it's hard to pin a client down as to use of the boat. "Well I'm thinking that one day, in the future, maybe,  I might like to sail to Tahiti or Fiji." This does not work. Tell me how you will use the boat now. The perfect boat for light air, summer evening sails after work on Puget Sound is obviously not the perfect boat to go offshore.

Bob,  we didn't get far enough along in the process to refine such things.  That keel was what you've often referred to as a 'placeholder'.

Your comments regarding people needing to know how they are going to use the boat is probably the single most important factor in the 'success' of a design.  With Amati and Kim, they were extremely clear and the results bear witness to it.   That's also why the preliminary I showed didn't survive, sadly, I still wanted a bit of cruise-ability.  But the moment I can talk the Admiral into a fleet... well....

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1 hour ago, Bob Perry said:

That looks great Veegs!

Maybe a bit less chord on the keel fin. At least at the tip.

 

As for me being ahead on the curve with the AMATI design: I don't think so.

I'd say the production boat world has been slow to adapt to exactly how most casual sailors use their boats these days. I had the advantage of having Paul and Lorrie walked in my door and telling me exactly how they would use the boat. We lived two blocks apart, above the marina so I knew their sailing area very well.  Sometimes it's hard to pin a client down as to use of the boat. "Well I'm thinking that one day, in the future, maybe,  I might like to sail to Tahiti or Fiji." This does not work. Tell me how you will use the boat now. The perfect boat for light air, summer evening sails after work on Puget Sound is obviously not the perfect boat to go offshore.

To piggy back on this, I think many casual sailors buy a boat for how they hope they will use their boats, as opposed to how they actually will end up using their boats.  In some respects you probably need to have had a couple 3 or 4 boats (or more) and developed some "honesty and self-awareness" before you really know how you will actually use a boat.

This may be one of J/Boats secrets.  They seem to have a pretty good idea of how their boats will actually get used...and have built a customer base that uses the boats in that way....plus they advertise to that customer base well, which doesn't hurt either.

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Amati is still one of my favorite boats of all time.  Were I loaded to the gills with greenbacks, I'd own a sistership.

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In the selling business they call it "Painting the Picture" and when inexperienced sailors are selling themselves on the dream of owning a sailboat,  well - the whole fantasy is up for grabs, picnics,  regatta wins, far-off destinations, quiet coves and pulling a tropical island out of the horizon.   They just don't know what they don't know and you can't expect the broker to disabuse them of the notion.

It's America.  Buy first,  ask questions never.

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I just realized that I never got around to showing off the tender we acquired for FRANCIS a while back.

A classy Perry design deserves a classy tender.

I took delivery at Elliott Bay Marina and towed her home with the Hadlock Skiff.

Yet another wooden vessel for the Fleet!

F52167AA-BFC0-44D5-916D-4F524692CDC6.jpeg

6F7A4907-CE88-408C-BE73-9A05AD4D4D94.jpeg

059E526C-FD20-425F-A720-005F7BB21495.jpeg

AE339D01-52EA-4045-A57D-D960A6E67522.jpeg

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3 hours ago, Crash said:

To piggy back on this, I think many casual sailors buy a boat for how they hope they will use their boats, as opposed to how they actually will end up using their boats.  In some respects you probably need to have had a couple 3 or 4 boats (or more) and developed some "honesty and self-awareness" before you really know how you will actually use a boat.

This may be one of J/Boats secrets.  They seem to have a pretty good idea of how their boats will actually get used...and have built a customer base that uses the boats in that way....plus they advertise to that customer base well, which doesn't hurt either.

One of the brothers is quoted as saying something like" if you want a dodger for this boat (one of the smaller J's) you probably won't go sailing anyway".  There is hope!  Creeping incrementalism (sic).....<_<

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1 hour ago, kimbottles said:

I just realized that I never got around to showing off the tender we acquired for FRANCIS a while back.

A classy Perry design deserves a classy tender.

I took delivery at Elliott Bay Marina and towed her home with the Hadlock Skiff.

Yet another wooden vessel for the Fleet!

F52167AA-BFC0-44D5-916D-4F524692CDC6.jpeg

6F7A4907-CE88-408C-BE73-9A05AD4D4D94.jpeg

059E526C-FD20-425F-A720-005F7BB21495.jpeg

AE339D01-52EA-4045-A57D-D960A6E67522.jpeg

Russell was scooting around one of the Wooden Boat shows up in PT in the first one- talk about crisp in 1-3 knots of wind!  Neat.

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I'm pretty sure that actually is the nesting version.  Look again, I think I can see the seam, barely.

Now looking at the photo with the sail up it is clearly the nesting version.  Lovely tender.

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