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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
kimbottles

Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

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34 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

I think that some people build proas which are either pacific or atlantic depending on the tack. In French we call these "prao monodrome".

OJ1b.jpg

That is a tacking outrigger (aka Hawaiian sailing canoe) , not a proa.  Nice one!

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1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

A bidirectional Proa is somewhat redundant isn't it? 

Yep, but given the confusion that nearly always erupts, better  to hammer and countersink.  Besides some irritation about my answer, my meaning, methinks, was apparently clear.

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1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

Better to be doubly redundant than oxymoronic! Just messing with you Amati, just show some pics of said craft for now.

 

IMG_0359.JPG

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1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

Better to be doubly redundant than oxymoronic! Just messing with you Amati, just show some pics of said craft for now.

 

IMG_0360.JPG

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36 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

You said bi-directional but it looks to have anti-gravity qualities too. Are those photos upside down? 

They're upright on my iPhone-

maybe we should move this to multihills if anyone's interested

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38 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Are those photos upside down?

Yes, but if you click to "magnify" in Chrome, it gets fixed when viewed this way:

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/uploads/monthly_2017_11/IMG_0360.JPG.7d3a9477e4a140673051465043cbb43e.JPG

Bigger image would be better?  Not to push this thread drift too far, but I wonder what the French call a bi-directional proa?

Quote

maybe we should move this to multihills if anyone's interested

Yes, please, would love to hear more about it.

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5 hours ago, ProaSailor said:

Yes, but if you click to "magnify" in Chrome, it gets fixed when viewed this way:

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/uploads/monthly_2017_11/IMG_0360.JPG.7d3a9477e4a140673051465043cbb43e.JPG

Bigger image would be better?  Not to push this thread drift too far, but I wonder what the French call a bi-directional proa?

Yes, please, would love to hear more about it.

Hokay, going over to multihulls tomorrow- I'll call it XP-BD Proa, and try for a better pics

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20 hours ago, ProaSailor said:

Bigger image would be better?  Not to push this thread drift too far, but I wonder what the French call a bi-directional proa?

 

We call the bi-directional ones "Prao amphidrome" In greek amphi means "both sides" and drome means "running". Then we divide them between Pacific (ama to windward) and Atlantic (ama to leeward)

TBH even if some of us are fascinated by proas it isn't really part of our maritime culture as the Pacific is obviously far away from France.

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4 hours ago, Panoramix said:

We call the bi-directional ones "Prao amphidrome" In greek amphi means "both sides" and drome means "running". Then we divide them between Pacific (ama to windward) and Atlantic (ama to leeward)

TBH even if some of us are fascinated by proas it isn't really part of our maritime culture as the Pacific is obviously far away from France.

Ever since Dien Bien Phu, anyway.

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You weren't much better than us at dealing with the Vietnam mess! We still have leftovers from our colonial past in the Pacific area, it's still a long way... 

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A merry christmas to all! 

Kim, what kind of anchor do you recommend for the best holding in snow?   Maybe you and Panope  could do some testing!  I could use some data, it is currently blowing 32 knots here, although no snow. 

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Merry Christmas to eveyone!

We were on the snow/rain line here in Stamford. We got a dusting, but a couple miles south it was all rain. Most of New England got some actual accumulation.

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47 minutes ago, sculpin said:

A merry christmas to all! 

Kim, what kind of anchor do you recommend for the best holding in snow?   Maybe you and Panope  could do some testing!  I could use some data, it is currently blowing 32 knots here, although no snow. 

Generally speaking I recommend a 5000 pound ecology block as a sure fire hold for an anchor in virtually all conditions.

(Somewhat difficult to handle under most circumstances, but they rarely drag.)

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4 hours ago, kimbottles said:

looks like you have more snow than we do Ish, 1" here on the terrace.

We had a couple of inches down, mostly gone now.

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5 hours ago, kimbottles said:

Generally speaking I recommend a 5000 pound ecology block as a sure fire hold for an anchor in virtually all conditions.

(Somewhat difficult to handle under most circumstances, but they rarely drag.)

You know what they say; Go big or go home.

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35 minutes ago, RedRyder said:

One of these should do nicely, I think.

town_of_augusta_oshkosh_v_plow.jpg

Well, there IS a nice eye down at the bottom of the blade to shackle on the mooring chain. Add that 5000 lb eco block to the dump bed & you can sleep well at night!

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I'd say no, the purpose of a snowplow is to move thru the snow...  if I want to get stuck in the snow I was thinking one of Kim's anchor collection would work well, but for maximum holding something like an 1882 Dodge Omni is optimal...

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3 hours ago, sculpin said:

I'd say no, the purpose of a snowplow is to move thru the snow...  if I want to get stuck in the snow I was thinking one of Kim's anchor collection would work well, but for maximum holding something like an 1882 Dodge Omni is optimal...

Damn, Dodge has been around way longer than I thought.

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3 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Damn, Dodge has been around way longer than I thought.

Well, the tech in the Omni was from 1882.  The car might have been "manufactured" in 1982...  Or that could'a been a typo.  You pick.

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I rented a Plymouth Horizon back in the day, the Plymouth version of the Chrysler Omni.  It was a peppy little car and fun to drive.  Far better than a Ford Pinto or Chevy Vega, that's for sure. They had front wheel drive, the first small American car to have it.

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5 hours ago, soak_ed said:

I rented a Plymouth Horizon back in the day, the Plymouth version of the Chrysler Omni.  It was a peppy little car and fun to drive.  Far better than a Ford Pinto or Chevy Vega, that's for sure. They had front wheel drive, the first small American car to have it.

That's like calling someone a better sailor than Rimas.

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9 hours ago, soak_ed said:

I rented a Plymouth Horizon back in the day, the Plymouth version of the Chrysler Omni.  It was a peppy little car and fun to drive.  Far better than a Ford Pinto or Chevy Vega, that's for sure. They had front wheel drive, the first small American car to have it.

Yup, North America auto manufactures had finally noticed what Alec Issigonis at BMC (Austin and Morris) had accomplished 25 years earlier, back in 1959.

7147280-1964-austin-and-morris-mk-1-mini

This was the half price version...

Mini_cross_section.jpg

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5 hours ago, Salazar said:

Yup, North America auto manufactures had finally noticed what Alec Issigonis at BMC (Austin and Morris) had accomplished 25 years earlier, back in 1959.

7147280-1964-austin-and-morris-mk-1-mini

 

 

You'd be amazed at what a nicely restored Mini goes for these days (hint: north of $40k).

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16 hours ago, soak_ed said:

I rented a Plymouth Horizon back in the day, the Plymouth version of the Chrysler Omni.  It was a peppy little car and fun to drive.  Far better than a Ford Pinto or Chevy Vega, that's for sure. They had front wheel drive, the first small American car to have it.

Clearly you only rented, if you had owned one your perspective would have been different.

1 example: aluminum bumper, held in place with steel bolts.  In an environment where the roads get salted to remove ice buildup... 

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Ah, the old K-car platform.  It did sort of save Chrysler from the toilet. 

My favorite story is about Lee Iacocca; he was considering bringing convertibles back. (they had disappeared in the '60's)

He asked the head engineer what it would take to get him a convertible.  

'Hmmm... replied the engineer - that's a 3 year project, and will cost several $millions"

'No, said Lee... I want you to take a K car and cut the frigging top off"

"Oh, I can have that for you tomorrow".

So Iacocca drove the chopped car around and counted how many people waved.  When enough did, he approved the project. 

 

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My first car was a 1985 Plymouth Reliant SE 4-door.

The carburetor was not a highlight. Nor were things such as starting, running, or driving uphill. They switched to fuel injection the next year.

Backseat was passable for backseat activities.

When it was time to get rid of it, I remember that some guy in the middle of a divorce bought it because he was obligated to give his soon-to-be-ex-wife something to drive, and he didn't want to exceed minimum requirements.

1985-89_Plymouth_Reliant_K_LE.png

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4 hours ago, RedRyder said:

My first car was a 1985 Plymouth Reliant SE 4-door.

The carburetor was not a highlight. Nor were things such as starting, running, or driving uphill. They switched to fuel injection the next year.

Backseat was passable for backseat activities.

When it was time to get rid of it, I remember that some guy in the middle of a divorce bought it because he was obligated to give his soon-to-be-ex-wife something to drive, and he didn't want to exceed minimum requirements.

1985-89_Plymouth_Reliant_K_LE.png

I once rented one like that for a ski trip to Vail. We almost got snowed in and left a day early for Denver, arriving as the city became virtually paralyzed with drifts two to three feet (would have been Christmas Eve, 1982). Denver didn't  have any snow removal equipment in those days. I have to say that old Reliant handled it all quite well, without snow tires or chains. 

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6 hours ago, RedRyder said:

My first car was a 1985 Plymouth Reliant SE 4-door.

The carburetor was not a highlight. Nor were things such as starting, running, or driving uphill. They switched to fuel injection the next year.

Backseat was passable for backseat activities.

When it was time to get rid of it, I remember that some guy in the middle of a divorce bought it because he was obligated to give his soon-to-be-ex-wife something to drive, and he didn't want to exceed minimum requirements.

1985-89_Plymouth_Reliant_K_LE.png

Sure was a looker though!  My '69 Triumph GT6 may have have been any more reliable, but at least had some style while sitting on the side of the road..

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1 hour ago, kinardly said:

I once rented one like that for a ski trip to Vail. We almost got snowed in and left a day early for Denver, arriving as the city became virtually paralyzed with drifts two to three feet (would have been Christmas Eve, 1982). Denver didn't  have any snow removal equipment in those days. I have to say that old Reliant handled it all quite well, without snow tires or chains. 

Well with "drifts 2 to 3 feet" tells me that the actual accumulation was probably at or under 12 or so inches.  That's an OK amount of snow but just about any front wheel drive car with a competent driver can drive in that without too much trouble.  It also depends on the moisture level in the snow, if it is heavy 'wet' snow or powdery 'dry' snow.  If the snow was drifting then it was probably a light, dry snow and again, driving without winter tires and FWD is a breeze if you already know how to drive in snow.   Snow tires are really only helpful in deep heavy snow, the lugs will give something to grab in the snow for traction.  They suck on ice because there is far less rubber on the road on a snow tire as opposed to a summer tire.  If your state allows it, studded tires are great on ice.  Unfortunately the tungsten carbide studs will chew up pavement rather nicely.  Just look at a steep driveway in a snow belt state and you'll see what I mean  The real determining factor in snow driving, all other things being equal, is ground clearance.  Even a Hummer will get stuck if you get enough snow packed under it.

There is an old story that Eskimos have more than 100 words for snow.  Having grown up in an area where winter started in late October/November and lasted until mid April or even early May, and the annual snowfall was between 5 and 8 feet total, I can assure you we had a lot of words for snow too (some of them unprintable).  You get to recognize how cold it is just by the texture of the snow and how much the snow squeaks when you walk on it.  You can feel the different qualities of the snow.  Good snowman or snowball snow requires pretty warm temps to get the snow wet enough to pack into a ball, around 28-30 F is ideal.  But it is a bitch to shovel because it is heavy and sticks to the shovel.  If it is too cold the snow just won't stick to itself.  Those are the nights you can go out in your driveway with a big board or a broom and just push or sweep the light, dry snow with little effort.  And there are all kinds in between those 2 extremes.  God, I hate snow and cold.  I am glad I am here, as you might have seen in the news, my home town got 54" of snow in 30 hours and I believe they ended up 5 feet.  And more is predicted for this weekend.

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2 hours ago, kinardly said:

I once rented one like that for a ski trip to Vail. We almost got snowed in and left a day early for Denver, arriving as the city became virtually paralyzed with drifts two to three feet (would have been Christmas Eve, 1982). Denver didn't  have any snow removal equipment in those days. I have to say that old Reliant handled it all quite well, without snow tires or chains. 

WTF?

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2 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

Hell, this probably would.

3449689979_82e6665bef_b.jpg

From what I have seen, anything mobile would. A four-year-old with a little red wagon will eventually beat a Chrysler rotting on the start line.

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And there was a Shelby version of the Omni...   from Wikipedia:

The '1986 Shelby GLH-S' was a modified Dodge Omni GLH, with changes made at the Shelby factory. They were retitled as Shelby Automobiles cars sold at select Dodge dealerships. GLH stood for "Goes Like Hell" and GLHS stood for Goes Like Hell S'more. Just 500 were made.

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19 hours ago, kinardly said:

I once rented one like that for a ski trip to Vail. We almost got snowed in and left a day early for Denver, arriving as the city became virtually paralyzed with drifts two to three feet (would have been Christmas Eve, 1982). Denver didn't  have any snow removal equipment in those days. I have to say that old Reliant handled it all quite well, without snow tires or chains. 

We lived in Denver during that blizzard.  I had to abandon my K-car on Wadsworth Blvd in white-out conditions.  It took my several hours to find it and dig it out the next day, because a non-existent snow plow buried it in a heap.  The car had a stupid plastic gear that was part of the window raising/lowering system.  At one point, I rolled the window down and held my head out the window in order to see.  When I abandoned the car, the gear broke and I couldn't raise the window.  That was before the snow plow came by.  Anyone else have to shovel out the INSIDE of a car?  Denver had plows and snow routes back then; however, the city mismanaged the system and somehow certain neighborhoods were plowed while others languished.  And somehow the mayor's street was plowed.  He lost his job in the next election, partly because of the way the city handled it all.

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Ha, My parents owned Chrysler products for years and in the 80s my mom had a Plymouth Reliant station wagon and my dad had a Plymouth Caravelle sedan. The Caravelle was technically an E-car instead of a K-car, but it was about the same level of crappy. My mom really loved her Reliant though and drove it well into the 90s. It was a manual and had lost 1st gear at some point, but started off in 2nd just fine. 

After those cars, they gave up on Chrysler and went to Saturns, now both drive Chevys... 

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On the subject of Detroit masterpieces from the 1970s, I recall a unique Ford product that one of my fellow bank employees drove as a company car. Many of you will recall the "mid-size" Ford Granada and it's Mercury version, the Monarch. (A heavily chromed sister-ship Granada is shown below.) My colleague's car was mostly a Granada, but the rear nameplate said "Monarch." He referred to the car as the "Gronarch."

Ford_Granada.jpg.6f9d14bbecc58f9646b29850651153fb.jpg

 

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Ford trying to look like a Mercedes. :D

The Mustang off that platform lasted a long time - far from my favourite though. Drag racers love them - I guess they are light.

image.png.d517dbd1c3f9fda82ed36f9b1e539198.png

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Ford trying to look like a Mercedes. :D

The Mustang off that platform lasted a long time - far from my favourite though. Drag racers love them - I guess they are light.

image.png.d517dbd1c3f9fda82ed36f9b1e539198.png

I had a '79 Mustang GT 5.0.  I think it weighed about 1,500 pounds and had a 5 liter/302 cubic inch V8, .  That car would break traction on a dry road without any problem just accelerating in 2nd gear.  You can imagine with the rear wheel drive what a beast that thing was for winter driving.  And we got a lot of snow where I lived.  I had a piece of scrap steel plat e that weighed about 100 lbs that I threw in the back during the winter to help the traction a little bit.  As they say, if it doesn't kill you it makes you stronger...

 

It looked similar to this minus the fancy custom touches on the body.

5a46d12f4439e_79Mustang.jpg.7a091cbbcefeeb2e3b3a43e103ce357b.jpg

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21 minutes ago, soak_ed said:

I had a '79 Mustang GT 5.0.  I think it weighed about 1,500 pounds and had a 5 liter/302 cubic inch V8, .  That car would break traction on a dry road without any problem just accelerating in 2nd gear.  You can imagine with the rear wheel drive what a beast that thing was for winter driving.  And we got a lot of snow where I lived.  I had a piece of scrap steel plat e that weighed about 100 lbs that I threw in the back during the winter to help the traction a little bit.  As they say, if it doesn't kill you it makes you stronger...

 

It looked similar to this minus the fancy custom touches on the body.

5a46d12f4439e_79Mustang.jpg.7a091cbbcefeeb2e3b3a43e103ce357b.jpg

We used sandbags in Saskatchewan, you can pile them right over the rear wheels and they are much easier to move around. Also, if you got stuck on an icy patch, you had bags of sand on hand.

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Just now, Ishmael said:

We used sandbags in Saskatchewan, you can pile them right over the rear wheels and they are much easier to move around. Also, if you got stuck on an icy patch, you had bags of sand on hand.

Yeah, I have used bags of sand or road salt in the past.   I liked the steel plate because it was heavy but flat and didn't really impact the cargo space at all.  I think I paid a couple of bucks for it at a scrap yard.

One thing I never considered is the danger of unrestrained weight in the back of a pickup truck or a hatchback car.  In a frontal impact all that weight flies forward at a good speed.  I had a college professor that was driving his pickup in the winter and was hit head on by a drunk driver.  The prof had some concrete blocks in the truck bed for weight.  They flew forward and partially crushed the back of the cab, pinning him between the seat and steering wheel, causing further injuries then he already sustained form the initial collision.  Due to the double impact he suffered serious head and internal injuries and almost died.  I shudder to think what that heavy steel plate could have done to me in my Mustang.

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2 hours ago, soak_ed said:

I had a '79 Mustang GT 5.0.  I think it weighed about 1,500 pounds and had a 5 liter/302 cubic inch V8, .  That car would break traction on a dry road without any problem just accelerating in 2nd gear.  You can imagine with the rear wheel drive what a beast that thing was for winter driving.  And we got a lot of snow where I lived.  I had a piece of scrap steel plat e that weighed about 100 lbs that I threw in the back during the winter to help the traction a little bit.  As they say, if it doesn't kill you it makes you stronger...

 

It looked similar to this minus the fancy custom touches on the body.

5a46d12f4439e_79Mustang.jpg.7a091cbbcefeeb2e3b3a43e103ce357b.jpg

I have a 1990 Mustang GT. It is still a project car. The previous owners did some engine upgrades and I did some bolt on power adders. I changed the throttle body to a larger And it really woke things up. And yes it will break loose in 2nd gear on dry pavement. I won't drive it in the snow and a little bit of frost on the road makes things really interesting. Fun driving car! I have some supension upgrades planned. Funny, this is only the second car I have ever owned. The first was in high school 47 years ago and this one I bought in 2013. My other vehicles have been 3 trucks, a SUV and 8 motorcycles.

DSCN0818.JPG

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4 minutes ago, Great White said:

I have a 1990 Mustang GT. It is still a project car. The previous owners did some engine upgrades and I did some bolt on power adders. And yes it will break loose in 2nd gear on dry pavement. I won't drive it in the snow and a little bit of frost on the road makes things interesting.

 

Nice car.  You are lucky, on mine the headlights were smaller and a little recessed and the bumper in front was quite wide and flat  The perfect place to accumulate large amounts of snow to obscure the headlights, including while driving. 

All it took was a little rain to make driving interesting.  I found that out the first time I drove mine in the rain.  Luckily I was going pretty slow when I foolishly tapped the gas a little while making a left turn.  

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1 minute ago, soak_ed said:

Nice car.  You are lucky, on mine the headlights were smaller and a little recessed and the bumper in front was quite wide and flat  The perfect place to accumulate large amounts of snow to obscure the headlights, including while driving. 

All it took was a little rain to make driving interesting.  I found that out the first time I drove mine in the rain.  Luckily I was going pretty slow when I foolishly tapped the gas a little while making a left turn.  

As a 79, yours was what is commonly referred to as a "4 eye" with separate hi and low beam headlights. I came close to buying a 85 that had that nose. In 87, they modified the shape to the "aero shape". I think it resembles a older Taurus. I have a Cobra insert to install to break up the shape.

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6 hours ago, soak_ed said:

Yeah, I have used bags of sand or road salt in the past.   I liked the steel plate because it was heavy but flat and didn't really impact the cargo space at all.  I think I paid a couple of bucks for it at a scrap yard.

One thing I never considered is the danger of unrestrained weight in the back of a pickup truck or a hatchback car.  In a frontal impact all that weight flies forward at a good speed.  I had a college professor that was driving his pickup in the winter and was hit head on by a drunk driver.  The prof had some concrete blocks in the truck bed for weight.  They flew forward and partially crushed the back of the cab, pinning him between the seat and steering wheel, causing further injuries then he already sustained form the initial collision.  Due to the double impact he suffered serious head and internal injuries and almost died.  I shudder to think what that heavy steel plate could have done to me in my Mustang.

You need to read about Red Greens friend who cobbled up a septic tank pumper out of an old station wagon and a pool liner.

He still breaks into a sweat whenever he sees a stop sign. :D

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5 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

You need to read about Red Greens friend who cobbled up a septic tank pumper out of an old station wagon and a pool liner.

He still breaks into a sweat whenever he sees a stop sign. :D

Oh shit!   

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10 hours ago, Great White said:

I have a 1990 Mustang GT. It is still a project car. The previous owners did some engine upgrades and I did some bolt on power adders. I changed the throttle body to a larger And it really woke things up. And yes it will break loose in 2nd gear on dry pavement. I won't drive it in the snow and a little bit of frost on the road makes things really interesting. Fun driving car! I have some supension upgrades planned. Funny, this is only the second car I have ever owned. The first was in high school 47 years ago and this one I bought in 2013. My other vehicles have been 3 trucks, a SUV and 8 motorcycles.

DSCN0818.JPG

Great car for a project GW.  Those days were pretty special.  Queens: Francis Lewis BLVD.  

 5.0 after Vanilla Ice made them famous vs. 5.7 Camaro/Firebird vs. RX-7 twinT vs. 300 ZX twinT vs. ZX-1 vette'

All before 'Fast and Furious' movies or drifting was a thing.  It was horsepower and how soft your feet and how tough your clutch was that mattered.  If you had wide front tires, you took off down another road to see who handled the best.  The kitted out LX 5.0 were typically always on top in the straights - unless the GNs came to play, and they were only good for a couple runs before a rod or valve would blow a hold in the hood.

Good times.  Thanks for the memories.  

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On 12/25/2017 at 8:17 AM, kimbottles said:

Merry Christmas everyone from Snowy Blakely Harbor.

A very rare White Christmas here this year.

Cheers to you all!

FRANCIS LEE

DF01951F-4A58-4FEB-A4C2-699E6061B2CE.jpeg

What a difference a week makes!

Happy New Years Eve everybody!

FB5A0BCC-920A-4B29-B13F-26A4756DBB1B.jpeg

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Happy new year all - in keeping with the snow theme, herewith in the background a snow dusted Hungry Hill On the Beara Peninsula, where we’ve spent the end of the year fixing things and cleaning black mould in between gales and rainstorms. The joys of a cold damp boat in winter, but we soon warmed it up and shipshaped it  

 

 

IMG_4079.jpg

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Happy New Year to all from here in the Sunny South, where we are in a deep freeze.

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On 12/28/2017 at 7:35 PM, SloopJonB said:

WTF?

Swear to God! My family is all from that area but I grew up and live in SoCal. Every winter I would go "home" for Christmas and a blizzard would come through, DIA would close down, schools would close, bus service would cease and all the locals would just shake their heads and say "It never snows like this, here". Bulls--t!

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Happy new year to everyone. The cold does not discriminate.  When we left Pensacola, yesterday morning the temp was so cold, that my daughter's hair, which was still wet from the shower, froze while we packed the car. It was 20F, I am told.  Thankfully we missed the real cold stuff at home with wind chills close to -40F

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Finally found a proper anchor for FRANCIS.

She will never drag this one.

(Now I just have to figure out how to get it down to her and aboard.)

DD86EC1F-EAAF-41D5-94D1-27AC12FB12D6.jpeg

A7B9371C-A1C4-46BD-91C5-31619018C84B.jpeg

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5 hours ago, kimbottles said:

Finally found a proper anchor for FRANCIS.

She will never drag this one.

(Now I just have to figure out how to get it down to her and aboard.)

DD86EC1F-EAAF-41D5-94D1-27AC12FB12D6.jpeg

A7B9371C-A1C4-46BD-91C5-31619018C84B.jpeg

That's what sons are for.

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We had a 20# version of one of those on our little 16' Lyman with a 35 hp Johnson outboard.  It held pretty well but not well enough to prevent me from dragging it through some lagoons long enough to foul the impeller and overheat the motor to the point the cylinder walls got burned.  I just couldn't figure out why, when I had the throttle wide open we could barely move.  Doh!  I probably made it a couple of hundred yards dragging that anchor over a bottom full of muck, weeds, and branches. This was when I was pretty young and the park police boat towed us out of the lagoons and the 44' Coast Guard towed us across the bay to the launch ramp where the car was.  They still did that back then luckily.  My father was a little pissed off about the bill to rebore the cylinders.  Sorry dad.

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9 hours ago, kimbottles said:

Finally found a proper anchor for FRANCIS.

She will never drag this one.

(Now I just have to figure out how to get it down to her and aboard.)

 

I'll go out on a limb here and guess that Bob might not like the adjustment to boat trim with this one...  the bow will be 10ft higher...

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Well, if we can find 15 guys who each weigh 200 pounds we can test your theory.

(is there enough room on the stern for 15 guys?)

Speaking of guys on the stern, we were racing once and Bob yelled at the guy who was standing on the stern, Bob does not like extra weight on the ends of FRANCIS.

 

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8 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

We had a 20# version of one of those on our little 16' Lyman with a 35 hp Johnson outboard.  It held pretty well but not well enough to prevent me from dragging it through some lagoons long enough to foul the impeller and overheat the motor to the point the cylinder walls got burned.  I just couldn't figure out why, when I had the throttle wide open we could barely move.  Doh!  I probably made it a couple of hundred yards dragging that anchor over a bottom full of muck, weeds, and branches. This was when I was pretty young and the park police boat towed us out of the lagoons and the 44' Coast Guard towed us across the bay to the launch ramp where the car was.  They still did that back then luckily.  My father was a little pissed off about the bill to rebore the cylinders.  Sorry dad.

You really forgot the anchor was down? Excellent story. 

 

E

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49 minutes ago, Mr. Ed said:

You really forgot the anchor was down? Excellent story. 

 

E

I was fishing, that takes a lot of concentration!   It's easy to forget a little thing like an anchor under those circumstances.  :rolleyes:

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How often have you driven off with the parking brake on?

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    I ran a sailing school at Caneel Bay on St John and one of the toughest things was sorting out customers who thought that they were savvy enough to just rent our Sonar 23 boats instead of taking a course. We had a policy of doing a 'checkout ride' for $20 on the boat and I could usually tell in three minutes if someone was BS about their prior sailing skills. If a guy can't sort out the halyards and which sail they clip onto then they probably don't deserve to get the chance to put one of our sweet new Sonars on a reef. $20 was not really enough to cover the time to dinghy a guy and his mates out to the sloop on a mooring but if I gave them the thumbs down I would apply the checkout ride fee to a intro lesson at $50 for an hour. Then they would usually opt for the three lesson plan. 

    One guy wanted so bad to show off his dubious sailing skills to his girlfriend that when he did finally manage to get the main and jib up he looked at me and asked if he could sail the boat now. I told him to have at it and the guy pulled the tiller up to his chest and sheeted in and the boat made a big half circle and rounded up into the wind and luffed. The guy looked confused and said that he thought something was wrong with the rudder. I told him to release the sheets. He had neglected to throw off the mooring pennant which was pretty long to make it easier for neophytes to pick up when coming back from a sail. The pickup bouy was still plainly in sight on the foredeck and I sort of hinted that he take a look around and make sure everything was ready to go sailing. I guess he thought that sailboats had parking brakes and he once again sailed along the radius of the mooring pennant and this time got to windward of the big mooring bouy and tacked before getting the bow jerked back around and he sailed right into the bouy! He asked if there was some sort of odd current eddy that was causing the boat to steer so erratically and I had to bite my lip and told him to keep trying or fail his checkout ride. He finally was convinced that we were in the Devils Triangle or something and was frustrated and embarrassed and I had to go to the bow and flip the mooring eye off the cleat. 

    He signed up for the full week long lesson package and went of to be a pretty good student. I dropped he and his GF off at the boat on the last day and let him in command and he came back fully satisfied with the whole course. 

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On 9/15/2017 at 1:18 PM, Bob Perry said:

All@sea:

Yes, that's my yacht club. It's the only club I belong to. Kim and I are the PNW chapter.

 

Semi:

That's the first Montague Dawson painting I have seen of a yacht. I thought he did clippers and square riggers exclusively He's my fav.

Antonio Jacobson is my fave.. have you seen his work?

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