kimbottles

Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

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The extra stringer under the galley shelves became necessary after I opted for removable cabin soles, Tim the engineer had relied on a solid cabin sole for stiffening in that area

 

Further proof that people who design things should be forced to clean them and then leave them completely dry before being allowed to unleash them on the public.

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We have teak grating though most of the boat that works very well, it's durable and drains easily. The master cabin and saloon are teak and holly. All of it is very heavy. Would your sole be composite?

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The extra stringer under the galley shelves became necessary after I opted for removable cabin soles, Tim the engineer had relied on a solid cabin sole for stiffening in that area

 

Further proof that people who design things should be forced to clean them and then leave them completely dry before being allowed to unleash them on the public.

 

+1

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We have teak grating though most of the boat that works very well, it's durable and drains easily. The master cabin and saloon are teak and holly. All of it is very heavy. Would your sole be composite?

 

We are looking at a composite backing for a thin teak & holly flooring. Really need to start looking around to see what else is available.

 

I have been concentrating on other issues............like the keel.

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The extra stringer under the galley shelves became necessary after I opted for removable cabin soles, Tim the engineer had relied on a solid cabin sole for stiffening in that area

 

Further proof that people who design things should be forced to clean them and then leave them completely dry before being allowed to unleash them on the public.

 

+1

 

I read somewhere that working in a boat yard is great training for a yacht designer.

 

I do know that when the massive refit of "Atalanta's" interior was underway every time I stopped by to visit (which was often) Bob was there in the thick of things. Bob is a good hands on designer. He knows the practical along with the theory.

 

Tim the engineer seems to also be hand on, his whole office is full of people who are down to earth and hands-on. Tim designed the extended sole under the shelves to be solid. Not an unreasonable design at all, I just like access to everywhere. So I am the reason for the extra short stringers.

 

Jim Franken know as much about boat-building as anyone I have ever met, he has been my go to guy for anything that needs deep understanding and thinking.

 

This is a great crew, Bob and I could not be happier with the quality of the project.

 

This is very comforting given I am spending more than I had originally budgeted. (But all boat-building projects cost more than the original fantasy budget, right?)

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Is it just boat projects in your world? Lucky guy.

 

Long ago, my dad told me to be prepared to hear this often, "In your case, Mr. Ray, it's going to take a little longer and cost a little more." Man, was he right!

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We have teak grating though most of the boat that works very well, it's durable and drains easily. The master cabin and saloon are teak and holly. All of it is very heavy. Would your sole be composite?

 

We are looking at a composite backing for a thin teak & holly flooring. Really need to start looking around to see what else is available.

 

I have been concentrating on other issues............like the keel.

 

It's been a long time, but our teak and holly is very thin veneer with a green foam underneath (klegecell?). The foam is wrapped in cloth and the whole thing is epoxied together. More than 10 years, no problems at all. Very very light.

 

Bob may remember?

 

If you or any of the crew would like to look at it, Amati's indoors at Seaview North at Fairhaven. If you want to look, call Seaview North, and they'll call me and I'll give permission.

 

Paul

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+1 for hands on shipyard training for designers and engineers. I wish all of the schools design programs would make 3 quarter shop apprenticeships mandatory before graduation or that companies would require 6 to 9 months be spent in the shop before the design office. Conversely I think shop personnel should have some training in the basics of engineering so that they would understand, for example, why they can't put a hole in a beam right next to the flange or why just adding more material won't necessarily make a part 'stronger and better'.

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+1 for hands on shipyard training for designers and engineers. I wish all of the schools design programs would make 3 quarter shop apprenticeships mandatory before graduation or that companies would require 6 to 9 months be spent in the shop before the design office. Conversely I think shop personnel should have some training in the basics of engineering so that they would understand, for example, why they can't put a hole in a beam right next to the flange or why just adding more material won't necessarily make a part 'stronger and better'.

 

We have clear direction from Tim as to where we can drill a hole and where we can't.

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I have found that custom designs and one offs are much more repair friendly than production boats. The production guys will put in all the tanks, plumbing, elec, ect. and then just start building right over it without even thinking about the fact that some day some poor schmuck (me) will have to repair or replace it at some point. What really ticks me off is they think that EVERYTHING has to be glued and screwed (of course ALL the screws must be bunged) WTF. I know,after 30yrs of doing this, that some parts want glue,some want just a bit, and some none. I'm working on removing a water tank from 40ftr now and everything and I mean everything ,including small bits of trim, are all epoxy glued together. :angry: More work for me, milling and building every thing from scratch. More $$$for the owner to come up with.

I didn't start this to be a rant it just kinda ended up that way. :)

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I have found that custom designs and one offs are much more repair friendly than production boats. The production guys will put in all the tanks, plumbing, elec, ect. and then just start building right over it without even thinking about the fact that some day some poor schmuck (me) will have to repair or replace it at some point. What really ticks me off is they think that EVERYTHING has to be glued and screwed (of course ALL the screws must be bunged) WTF. I know,after 30yrs of doing this, that some parts want glue,some want just a bit, and some none. I'm working on removing a water tank from 40ftr now and everything and I mean everything ,including small bits of trim, are all epoxy glued together. :angry:/> More work for me, milling and building every thing from scratch. More $$$for the owner to come up with.

I didn't start this to be a rant it just kinda ended up that way. :)/>

 

You, sir, may stay.

 

And I'm figuring out what I'm going to have you guys do to Amati still. Thinking. Hard work.

 

One offs rock.

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The production guys will put in all the tanks, plumbing, elec, ect. and then just start building right over it without even thinking about the fact that some day some poor schmuck (me) will have to repair or replace it at some point.

 

Aw come on. It's not always you. Sometimes it's me! ;)

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+1, pan boats being -100 for repair work.

 

I have found that custom designs and one offs are much more repair friendly than production boats. The production guys will put in all the tanks, plumbing, elec, ect. and then just start building right over it without even thinking about the fact that some day some poor schmuck (me) will have to repair or replace it at some point. What really ticks me off is they think that EVERYTHING has to be glued and screwed (of course ALL the screws must be bunged) WTF. I know,after 30yrs of doing this, that some parts want glue,some want just a bit, and some none. I'm working on removing a water tank from 40ftr now and everything and I mean everything ,including small bits of trim, are all epoxy glued together. :angry: More work for me, milling and building every thing from scratch. More $$$for the owner to come up with.

I didn't start this to be a rant it just kinda ended up that way. :)

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I think the reason for one offs often being easier boats to work on is that prodcution boats can't focus on practical design issues. Practical design solutions don't sell at a boat show. You never hear the wife call out at the show, "Come below dear and check out the lovely engine access!"

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The production guys will put in all the tanks, plumbing, elec, ect. and then just start building right over it without even thinking about the fact that some day some poor schmuck (me) will have to repair or replace it at some point.

 

Aw come on. It's not always you. Sometimes it's me! ;)/>

 

This is me raising my f*cking hand.

 

Me too. :)/>

 

I mean, I love Brigadoon but, they literally buried some crucial stuff under some really well fit teak.

 

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+1 for hands on shipyard training for designers and engineers.

 

When my dad was in undergraduate for NA at Webb ('63 I think), he had to work for a while at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and do a tour as a merchant marine. I grew up looking at his photos from steaming up the Congo.

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Yipie, it's Monday and Kimb is feeling better.

 

PICTURES!!!!

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+1 for hands on shipyard training for designers and engineers.

 

When my dad was in undergraduate for NA at Webb ('63 I think), he had to work for a while at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and do a tour as a merchant marine. I grew up looking at his photos from steaming up the Congo.

 

Yes, Webb is good at providing hands on experience. We have made it a policy to provide internships for students from Webb, Michigan, and other schools each year.

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I have had several interns from Webb. I ended up hiring one guy. He was very smart. I like smart. I think that guy now works for Jose.

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I think the reason for one offs often being easier boats to work on is that prodcution boats can't focus on practical design issues. Practical design solutions don't sell at a boat show. You never hear the wife call out at the show, "Come below dear and check out the lovely engine access!"

 

Mine does.

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I have had several interns from Webb. I ended up hiring one guy. He was very smart. I like smart. I think that guy now works for Jose.

 

Well, he works with me is more accurate. Webbies do tend to be pretty smart. Webb is very picky about who it admits but if you get accepted you get a full scholarship. Students also work in the industry winter quarter for all 4 years I believe. Cool school.

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I have had several interns from Webb. I ended up hiring one guy. He was very smart. I like smart. I think that guy now works for Jose.

 

Well, he works with me is more accurate. Webbies do tend to be pretty smart. Webb is very picky about who it admits but if you get accepted you get a full scholarship. Students also work in the industry winter quarter for all 4 years I believe. Cool school.

 

Last I saw, they were unfortunately in a bit of financial trouble... outspending their endowment. Anyone know how they ended up dealing with that?

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Well, the deck is no longer on the mold and it looks very good. Russell and Jim the two perfectionists were pleased with the result as were Bruce and the rest of the crew. So we are a happy project!

 

The secret appears to be Teflon release tape. Expensive and worth it!!

 

Meanwhile the crew is making a mess of my pricey deck/cabin/cockpit mold as they demo it to get it out of the way. I mentioned to them how much that mold cost and they just smiled and kept on at it with sawz-alls and tools of destruction.

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The deck was a bit flexi when it came off the mold so it got some temporary reinforcing so it could be handled safely.

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the deck looks kind of funny suspended above the remainders of the mold. I guess we were all used to having it sitting on the south side of the hull, but pretty soon it will turn over and get fitted to the hull which will open up some serious room in the Hammond Shop.

 

Now for the really good news: Boomer came by with his fancy cameras and was still taking pictures when I left, so I think he will treat all of us to some good shots. He is a very skilled photographer (which I am not) so hopefully he will share. (Good guy that Boomer, that's him in the red in picture two and four taking interior shots.)

 

BTW, members of the WLYDO are always welcomed at the project so if you are going to be in the area on a Monday drop me a PM and let's arrange for you to get an in-person look at the project.

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meanwhile the crew was also making interior parts and we were messing around with the rudder and the rudder tube and bearings to see how they fit.

 

The last photo shows the rudder stock after we removed the peel-ply.

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Yeah, he said "members" not wannabe's. So be prepared to show your WLYDO credentials before being admitted to the shop.

The rest of you can stand on your tippy toes and look thru the sawdust covered windows.

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Does the destruction of the deck mold mean there will be no more of these?

 

Hell yes that's what it means! I like unique.

 

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Yeah, he said "members" not wannabe's. So be prepared to show your WLYDO credentials before being admitted to the shop.

The rest of you can stand on your tippy toes and look thru the sawdust covered windows.

 

Does being the "Head" consultant count? :)

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Yeah, he said "members" not wannabe's. So be prepared to show your WLYDO credentials before being admitted to the shop.

The rest of you can stand on your tippy toes and look thru the sawdust covered windows.

Lets me out then, I never recieved my credentials. They must have got lost in the mail.

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Are Jr. level associate positions to the WLYDO available?

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Yeah, he said "members" not wannabe's. So be prepared to show your WLYDO credentials before being admitted to the shop.

The rest of you can stand on your tippy toes and look thru the sawdust covered windows.

 

Does being the "Head" consultant count? :)/>

 

Yes Black, you are part of the team.

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Does the destruction of the deck mold mean there will be no more of these?

 

Hell yes that's what it means! I like unique.

 

In that case, you should probably have grabbed an implement of destruction and helped destroy the tooling rather than commenting on how much it cost. ;)

 

I find the attitude a bit odd. Someone else enjoying the same boat I have does not diminish my pleasure a bit, and can enhance it if we are together.

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Back to the other stuff happening on the project.....

 

Stringers under the galley to make up for the removable cabin sole and the stiffeners on the girder as it spans the length of the salon.

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After Cooper and Bruce hoisted up the deck assembly well clear of the mold, Russell and I stood under the cockpit and viewed the proportions of the cockpit.

 

That Bob Perry guy really knows his stuff, the cockpit seems just right, just the right proportions and the right size.

 

I called Bob up and told him how happy we were with his cockpit.

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Does the destruction of the deck mold mean there will be no more of these?

 

Hell yes that's what it means! I like unique.

 

In that case, you should probably have grabbed an implement of destruction and helped destroy the tooling rather than commenting on how much it cost. ;)

 

I find the attitude a bit odd. Someone else enjoying the same boat I have does not diminish my pleasure a bit, and can enhance it if we are together.

 

Good grief, you could complain about every aspect couldn't you ?

 

Kim's position right now is hardly one to hop in and start choppin' - they have guys - getting paid, in protective gear, for that.

 

That he would realize what an investment was being sawn up is hardly surprising - but he paid for the PRODUCT, not the tool - which was built as a one-use item, with no provision for storage/torsional stability, afterall. Yeah, in concept "All it would take is...." to 'pop out' a few copies - but as we ALL know from reading this that producing a completed boat this size is a much bigger job than most are up for - I notice you didn't offer to lam one up on your dime 'on spec'.

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Kim called me last night. He was all gushy about seeing his deck for the first time. He was very happy. I like it when clients are knocked out by what they see as the boat progresses.

I sat around trying to see if the dogs noticed my smug attitude.

They apparently didn't.

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Kim was very busy doing a multitude of tasks, at the same time he seemed to be walking on air. I'd say you have a very satisfied client, Bob.

 

I hope you were sipping something tasty and enjoying some fine tobacoo while feeling good about it all, you deserve it.

 

Got in later then planned yesterday, edited images till the wee hours of the morning, will post pix later this morning.

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Boomer:

 

I was feeling pretty good. It's not easy doing smug when you are alone but I gave it a good shot. Coudn't drink though I was on my way to Tai Chi. You woudn't want me to tip over and crush an old lady.

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Ha!

 

With the quality of the work being done by this crew, it just makes me feel good to have the privilege to view their handiwork and be in their presence... they're all good people up here!

 

Speaking of which, these guys were getting it on and having at it yesterday, demoing the mold and strongback.

 

They know when they have to take their time and do quality work, and they know when it's time to speed it up, yet work in a safe manner.

 

From what I've observed so far, this is a safe shop, that firmly believes in safety first...I like seeing safety taught and practiced....the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding does it right!

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Bob deserves to feel smug, he exceeded my expectations in this project.

 

It is pretty nice to be able to go to an old friend and have him do something like this. The whole project is very much enhanced by the fact that Bob (my friend of 20+ years) designed her.

 

I guess it helps that he is also a world class yacht designer.

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I think that kind of depends on the wife.

 

You never hear the wife call out at the show, "Come below dear and check out the lovely engine access!"

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Kim,

 

Thanks for the photos. It is GREAT to see you up and around and clearly feeling better. SWIMBO's chicken soup must work.

 

BV

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In order -

Dogs don't do smug to my knowledge.

What little contact I've had with the School has been really open and fun, yet very professional.

Chicken soup studies have indicated that it helps fight upper respiratory illness, though they aren't totally sure why.

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Ha!

 

With the quality of the work being done by this crew, it just makes me feel good to have the privilege to view their handiwork and be in their presence... they're all good people up here!

 

Speaking of which, these guys were getting it on and having at it yesterday, demoing the mold and strongback.

 

They know when they have to take their time and do quality work, and they know when it's time to speed it up, yet work in a safe manner.

 

From what I've observed so far, this is a safe shop, that firmly believes in safety first...I like seeing safety taught and practiced....the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding does it right!

 

Boomer,

 

I passed your very kind comments onto the crew and the School, I am sure they will very much appreciate them.

 

Kim

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I can't say enough about the quality and integrity of the crew and the school!

 

Still editing images....hope to be done in less then an hour.

 

...and thanks for the photo opportunity...never done this type of photography and it's very enjoyable...and being around such good people is the icing on the cake!

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I guess it helps that he is also a world class yacht designer.

 

Hie is? Ohhhhh, you mean he is THAT Bob Perry? Wow. And all this time I thought he was just this nice old guy with a funny hat and an even nicer dog livin' in a shack on the beach. This changes everything.

 

I hope the hat still fits.

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I guess it helps that he is also a world class yacht designer.

 

Hie is? Ohhhhh, you mean he is THAT Bob Perry? Wow. And all this time I thought he was just this nice old guy with a funny hat and an even nicer dog livin' in a shack on the beach. This changes everything.

 

I hope the hat still fits.

 

He comes back down to earth pretty quickly, the dogs keep him honest.

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I've spent the last hour wading around my neighborhood seeing what the tide and wind have wroaght/wraught/wrot/ done.

Ruby goes with me. As long as I keep wading she is certain I am world class.

As long as I keep my hemp fanny pack full of dog treats she knows I am world class.

If I can keep my dog thinking that I'm not sure I care what others think.

The people at the UPS store think I'm a world class pain in the ass.

" You seem to have issues with our service."

" Well yes, if you think "issues" is expecting to get what I have paid for."

If the gal there Yvette wasn't so damn cute I'd find another postal store.

She likes my hat. One day she sid, "I like a military man." I don't have the heart to tell her I was a Viet Nam draft evader chicken shit.

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I got an e-mail from the executive director of the School this morning. It didn't say much just had a link to the School's website and this picture.

 

I guess they had a party at the shop after I left yesterday (or maybe this was this morning) in any event it was all hands on deck to flip the deck. I will try and get more details and maybe more pictures.

 

Check out:

 

Click here: (18) Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding

 

and

 

www.flickr.com/nwswb

 

there are some short videos at this second link.

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Right side up.

 

It happened this morning and there is a video somewhere they will locate and then we will post the link.

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I love this stuff!!

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Great balls of fire!

That is impressive.

 

" All hands on deck!"

 

Bruce called me a few minutes ago to say it was another non event. I guess Bruce's new middle name is "Nonevent". First the hull roll and now the deck flip.

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Wow! Kim just told me we missed the fun stuff and should have gone up today. I probably pack a lunch and go up tomorrow for pics of lift and placement operation.

 

Here are pics from yesterday.

 

Turn off the auto and manually click through them, or the full image may not load fully before advancing to the next image...files are large.

 

Or click on options in upper right hand corner, and set slideshow to slow.

 

Click on f11 on your keyboard to remove address bar. The album is new, so till it get's used a few times it may load the samee image twice...use the right and left arrows on your keyboard to reverse or advance, if the same image displays twice.

 

http://s174.photobuc...mview=slideshow

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Great balls of fire!

That is impressive.

 

" All hands on deck!"

 

Bruce called me a few minutes ago to say it was another non event. I guess Bruce's new middle name is "Nonevent". First the hull roll and now the deck flip.

 

The sign of a professional.

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Right side up.

 

It happened this morning and there is a video somewhere they will locate and then we will post the link.

 

This picture is the ONE. More than any other in the thread this picture really illustrates the long lean nature of this craft. It looks fast just laying there (nearly) on the floor.

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They also don't know why wood chopping blocks are cleaner then the new fangled plastic chopping blocks but they are. We have wood chopping blocks. I like wood, the slimy chicken d doesn't slide around when I cut it up.

 

Blocks

In order -

Dogs don't do smug to my knowledge.

What little contact I've had with the School has been really open and fun, yet very professional.

Chicken soup studies have indicated that it helps fight upper respiratory illness, though they aren't totally sure why.

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Skinny?

Who you calling skinny?

 

I should be so lucky. I wish for the day when once again I could be called "skinny".

 

Think of yourself as "patriarchal", as opposed to "chubby". I find it helps to give distasteful things impressive names.

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Skinny?

Who you calling skinny?

 

I should be so lucky. I wish for the day when once again I could be called "skinny".

 

Think of yourself as "patriarchal", as opposed to "chubby". I find it helps to give distasteful things impressive names.

 

The tobacco pipe helps to complete the image.

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Looks great Kim! It's a big day. Glad it came out of the mold so well. Question,there needs to be draft built into parts of the mold,such as the cockpit, hatch openings ect. anything that may lock the part to the mold. Does Bob put that in his drawings or is that done on site.

If I remember correctly,back when I worked making molds,the draft was put in on the floor,this was mainly for smaller parts and pre computer.I Helped make a mold once of a semi circular staircase, had to be built inside out and upside down :blink: I was,at the time, working with an older guy that really knew his shit,learned a lot from that old dude. Again, looks great, any idea when it gets put on the hull?

Glad your feeling better, Vik

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Looks great Kim! It's a big day. Glad it came out of the mold so well. Question,there needs to be draft built into parts of the mold,such as the cockpit, hatch openings ect. anything that may lock the part to the mold. Does Bob put that in his drawings or is that done on site.

If I remember correctly,back when I worked making molds,the draft was put in on the floor,this was mainly for smaller parts and pre computer.I Helped make a mold once of a semi circular staircase, had to be built inside out and upside down :blink: I was,at the time, working with an older guy that really knew his shit,learned a lot from that old dude. Again, looks great, any idea when it gets put on the hull?

Glad your feeling better, Vik

 

Jim Franken did all of the computer tweaking to make the mold work. And then the Teflon release tape was very good idea (thanks Russell.)

 

Deck might get onto hull by end of year. Some fitting to do and some finishing of the outside (which has been attached to the mold until a couple days ago.)

 

I am going to try and do a couple hours at work tomorrow, won't get to see the right-side up deck until next Monday.

 

(Boomer might go up tomorrow and take some pictures for us.)

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Looks great! Thanks for giving us a chance to see this amazing project come together in real time! Not many of us get a chance to be a part of something like this.

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Kim, it's been a real joy and an education, watching this project come together. Thanks for sharing it so.

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If you are interested in what I gave Jim Franken for the deck modelling you can look at my deck lines drawing. This is the standard way I lay out a deck design. I give Jim a lot of credit and thanks for staying faithful to the shapes I drew. It would have ben very easy for him to go "creative" on me. Jim's a peach and really understands boats.

 

If I had not been working with Jim and cnc tooling I would most probably plotted al the sections out full size on mylar for the builder. That is why you don't see a whole lot of dimensioning on the drawing. With full sized patterns you really don't need many dimensions. The dimensional data is all on the full sized pattern.

deck lines 12-5-12.pdf

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If you are interested in what I gave Jim Franken for the deck modelling you can look at my deck lines drawing. This is the standard way I lay out a deck design. I give Jim a lot of credit and thanks for staying faithful to the shapes I drew. It would have ben very easy for him to go "creative" on me. Jim's a peach and really understands boats.

 

If I had not been working with Jim and cnc tooling I would most probably plotted al the sections out full size on mylar for the builder. That is why you don't see a whole lot of dimensioning on the drawing. With full sized patterns you really don't need many dimensions. The dimensional data is all on the full sized pattern.

 

Bob Perry and Jim Franken, now there is team that would be very hard to beat.

 

If any of you out there are thinking of a custom boat I can not recommend this team enough.

post-8115-0-84782400-1354730142_thumb.jpg

post-8115-0-60573000-1354730182_thumb.jpg

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I just replaced the Borco on my drawing board last week. I wasn't even sure they sold it anymore. My old piece had to be at least 25 years old. I can't bring myself to throw it away.

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Borco! Now there is a blast from the past. I probably still have rolledup pieces of it laying around. Never could throw it out. I've used it as chafe patches on inflatables, nearly indestructable.

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If you are interested in what I gave Jim Franken for the deck modelling you can look at my deck lines drawing. This is the standard way I lay out a deck design. I give Jim a lot of credit and thanks for staying faithful to the shapes I drew. It would have ben very easy for him to go "creative" on me. Jim's a peach and really understands boats.

 

If I had not been working with Jim and cnc tooling I would most probably plotted al the sections out full size on mylar for the builder. That is why you don't see a whole lot of dimensioning on the drawing. With full sized patterns you really don't need many dimensions. The dimensional data is all on the full sized pattern.

 

Bob Perry and Jim Franken, now there is team that would be very hard to beat.

 

If any of you out there are thinking of a custom boat I can not recommend this team enough.

 

Kerry and I sometimes buy a lottery ticket. I think we spend maybe $10-20.00 a year on it. What we are buying is entertainment, along with an astronomically thin chance that we may win.

 

The game we play is, "what would we do with the money?" because the biggest mistake people that *do* win is not having a plan.

 

Well, it comes down to levels.

 

[Very nice but not huge amount] = pay off the rest of the bills, upgrade (maybe gold plate) Brigadoon, and continue with our plans.

 

[insanely large amount] = pay off all the bills, buy a home for her parents, trust funds for my ex, my kids, keep Brigadoon until we hire Bob to design us a boat, have it built, then sail away. :)

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If you are interested in what I gave Jim Franken for the deck modelling you can look at my deck lines drawing. This is the standard way I lay out a deck design. I give Jim a lot of credit and thanks for staying faithful to the shapes I drew. It would have ben very easy for him to go "creative" on me. Jim's a peach and really understands boats.

 

If I had not been working with Jim and cnc tooling I would most probably plotted al the sections out full size on mylar for the builder. That is why you don't see a whole lot of dimensioning on the drawing. With full sized patterns you really don't need many dimensions. The dimensional data is all on the full sized pattern.

 

Bob Perry and Jim Franken, now there is team that would be very hard to beat.

 

If any of you out there are thinking of a custom boat I can not recommend this team enough.

 

Kerry and I sometimes buy a lottery ticket. I think we spend maybe $10-20.00 a year on it. What we are buying is entertainment, along with an astronomically thin chance that we may win.

 

The game we play is, "what would we do with the money?" because the biggest mistake people that *do* win is not having a plan.

 

Well, it comes down to levels.

 

[Very nice but not huge amount] = pay off the rest of the bills, upgrade (maybe gold plate) Brigadoon, and continue with our plans.

 

[insanely large amount] = pay off all the bills, buy a home for her parents, trust funds for my ex, my kids, keep Brigadoon until we hire Bob to design us a boat, have it built, then sail away. :)

 

Always fun to dream...

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If I win big, I'm converting the farm to the biggest dog rescue playland in the world.

They'll only be adoptable through recommendations from other dogs.

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If you are interested in what I gave Jim Franken for the deck modelling you can look at my deck lines drawing. This is the standard way I lay out a deck design. I give Jim a lot of credit and thanks for staying faithful to the shapes I drew. It would have ben very easy for him to go "creative" on me. Jim's a peach and really understands boats.

 

If I had not been working with Jim and cnc tooling I would most probably plotted al the sections out full size on mylar for the builder. That is why you don't see a whole lot of dimensioning on the drawing. With full sized patterns you really don't need many dimensions. The dimensional data is all on the full sized pattern.

 

Bob Perry and Jim Franken, now there is team that would be very hard to beat.

 

If any of you out there are thinking of a custom boat I can not recommend this team enough.

 

Kerry and I sometimes buy a lottery ticket. I think we spend maybe $10-20.00 a year on it. What we are buying is entertainment, along with an astronomically thin chance that we may win.

 

The game we play is, "what would we do with the money?" because the biggest mistake people that *do* win is not having a plan.

 

Well, it comes down to levels.

 

[Very nice but not huge amount] = pay off the rest of the bills, upgrade (maybe gold plate) Brigadoon, and continue with our plans.

 

[insanely large amount] = pay off all the bills, buy a home for her parents, trust funds for my ex, my kids, keep Brigadoon until we hire Bob to design us a boat, have it built, then sail away. :)

 

Always fun to dream...

 

Get a room you two...sheesh ;)

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If I win big, I'm converting the farm to the biggest dog rescue playland in the world.

They'll only be adoptable through recommendations from other dogs.

 

Yeah. Most of the fun we have is planning on what we are going to do for *other* people. The stuff for us just goes along on that ride.

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If I win big, I'm converting the farm to the biggest dog rescue playland in the world.

They'll only be adoptable through recommendations from other dogs.

 

I would like to do some research on lotteries (it might have been done and i too lazy research the research). my hypotheseis would be that most lottery buyers are regular people and that they don't buy tickets to get rich. they buy tickets with the hope of gaining security of the life style they have. most lottery dreams are as black suggested: secure what we have and have the ability to enjoy what they have. sure people will dream of upgrading their homes, boats whatever but most people don't want to win enough to buy a mansion or a superyacht...they really dream of financial security.

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