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kimbottles

Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

13,217 posts in this topic

I am running out of pictures with which to keep rescuing this thread! Here is the current class at the School. I don't think I have posted this before.

2011 Students.bmp

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Ahhh chickens. I was hoping we could segue into that.

 

The stepdaughter at about 12 decided she HAD to have chickens. We resisted for as long as possible to make sure it wasn't a "phase" then gave in.

 

So if we are to have chooks (oz language) lets do it right. So me on the internet, which chooks, how to build a proper pen, etc. We ended up with Rhode Island reds and she and I built a snazzy A frame chook house with a decent run for fun times.

 

End story, great eggs, even better compost and we would let them out while we sat in the backyard with a glass of wine and played being the Waltons.

Everyone from Little Compton, RI is proud of their place being the source of Rhode Island Reds. At the end of the Sakonnet to the E. Home of Awashonks, a female indian, native american chief, or sachem, who figured prominently in the Europeans successfully settling in America.

 

In college I had a thing for Liv Walton, the mom, an older woman for me at the time. "Goodnight John-Boy."

 

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I am running out of pictures with which to keep rescuing this thread! Here is the current class at the School. I don't think I have posted this before.

I have little doubt that your thread will survive the hijacks and discussions about chicken coops and tp.

 

The Sliver build will be followed by many, as it is such a stunning design. It's interesting and a cool opportunity to watch and learn about it. I know I won't be alone in checking in on a regular basis to look at your photos and read about the progress.

 

Of course it's a wee bonus to learn about coops at the same time.

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I am running out of pictures with which to keep rescuing this thread! Here is the current class at the School. I don't think I have posted this before.

I have little doubt that your thread will survive the hijacks and discussions about chicken coops and tp.

 

The Sliver build will be followed by many, as it is such a stunning design. It's interesting and a cool opportunity to watch and learn about it. I know I won't be alone in checking in on a regular basis to look at your photos and read about the progress.

 

Of course it's a wee bonus to learn about coops at the same time.

 

To say nothing about learning what proper TP to use with your septic system! We will be switching from Charmin to Scott post haste!

(Thanks for the research ND!)

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OOps that was sitting on the screen from last night so I just posted it this morning. Decks looking great Kimb, do they do chicken coop's?

Looks to me like they could just take the molds when they're done with the build and add a little wire.

 

kimb, the molds look impressive but I think I had it backwards - are they fitting pieces into the bow end of the deck mold or the stern in your photo?

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OOps that was sitting on the screen from last night so I just posted it this morning. Decks looking great Kimb, do they do chicken coop's?

Looks to me like they could just take the molds when they're done with the build and add a little wire.

 

kimb, the molds look impressive but I think I had it backwards - are they fitting pieces into the bow end of the deck mold or the stern in your photo?

 

 

Looks like they are working on the cabin front to me. So that would be towards the bow end. Kind of hard to tell when both ends are pointy. (But the forms are bow end towards the big roll up doors so that is the tip off.)

post-8115-056843800 1304739384_thumb.jpeg

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OOps that was sitting on the screen from last night so I just posted it this morning. Decks looking great Kimb, do they do chicken coop's?

Looks to me like they could just take the molds when they're done with the build and add a little wire.

 

kimb, the molds look impressive but I think I had it backwards - are they fitting pieces into the bow end of the deck mold or the stern in your photo?

 

 

Looks like they are working on the cabin front to me. So that would be towards the bow end. Kind of hard to tell when both ends are pointy. (But the forms are bow end towards the big roll up doors so that is the tip off.)

Well the second part definitely make sense... :lol:

 

I can see the cabin trunk now. I think in my head I just pegged it as pieces that weren't in place, not a planned cavity in the mold.

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Kimb said we could hijack.

 

[continued hijack]

IB, Mrs. Bitches has a source for local fresh eggs..let me know. I refuse to build a chicken coop, or house chickens myself...I did use chicken wire once around the grill to keep the squirrels from eating the flexible copper line up to the burner.. WTF?

 

$1.50/dozen I think. They are very tasty.

[/end continued hijack]

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I am running out of pictures with which to keep rescuing this thread! Here is the current class at the School. I don't think I have posted this before.

I have little doubt that your thread will survive the hijacks and discussions about chicken coops and tp.

 

The Sliver build will be followed by many, as it is such a stunning design. It's interesting and a cool opportunity to watch and learn about it. I know I won't be alone in checking in on a regular basis to look at your photos and read about the progress.

 

Of course it's a wee bonus to learn about coops at the same time.

 

To say nothing about learning what proper TP to use with your septic system! We will be switching from Charmin to Scott post haste!

(Thanks for the research ND!)

 

By the way, a running garden hose makes a pretty good plumbing snake, better than a real one, it turns out. Now back to your regularly scheduled thread, but only because I have not launched a septic system website. Yet.

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By the way, a running garden hose makes a pretty good plumbing snake, better than a real one, it turns out. Now back to your regularly scheduled thread, but only because I have not launched a septic system website. Yet.

 

Sorry but can't let that go. Yes a garden hose can clear out pipes but better than a real thing come on. Its like using a mop as a plunger to clear a block. Shit can come back and face you, never try and look down the pipe as the mop comes out, step away far away. Learnt that!

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The first picture is half of the brain trust working on the Sliver project. Russell Brown, Bruce Blatchley and Jim Franken. Then Brandon Davis and Tim Nolan. And last the Maestro himself Robert H. Perry.

 

I had no idea that once Bob and I started this project we would attract such talent. The Port Hadlock/Port Townsend area of Washington State is deep in talent when it comes to boat building and everyone seems to like Bob's design so we were able to gather up some great input on how best to approach the construction. (And not only are they talented, they are all really good people to boot.)

 

This project has become much more than just a vessel construction, it has become a community project on top of being a learning experience for the School's students.

 

I am a very lucky guy to have these gentlemen working on the project.

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post-8115-082873200 1304781301_thumb.jpeg

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Nice to see we are back on track. It was a fun little hijack but I was starting to think that CA= chicken anarchy:D

 

I was working for a large boat building co. way back when,building 100'+ yachts. One had a huge swim platform, deck ,that had spiral staircases on each side leading up to the aft deck,this was built separatly from the boat,building those inside out and upside down was mind boggling :blink:to say the least.

 

Keep the pictures coming kimb and thanks for the thread.

I wonder why the emoticons aren't showing up?

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Kim, thanks for keeping this thread going. Have you posted an inboard profile? That might be interesting.

 

Viktor, I hear you. Transoms like that can be complicated pieces to tool.

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Kim, thanks for keeping this thread going. Have you posted an inboard profile? That might be interesting.

 

Viktor, I hear you. Transoms like that can be complicated pieces to tool.

 

Something like this? Not completely accurate, but close enough.

Kim prelim construction wood2 Keelson.pdf

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Kim, thanks for keeping this thread going. Have you posted an inboard profile? That might be interesting.

 

Viktor, I hear you. Transoms like that can be complicated pieces to tool.

 

Something like this? Not completely accurate, but close enough.

 

Damn that thing is going to be quick!!

 

Two coolers and 50gal holding tank! Sounds about right.:D

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Thanks Kim. The simplicity is awesome. I notice that the keel flange stands proud of the hull. Is that the way it will be?

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Jose:

Oh well, maybe the working drawings for the keel and how it is attached. And if you expect me to post them here you are nuts. My client paid good money for that technology and I'm not going to share it with everyone.

 

I know too well that you understand perfectly what I am talking about.

 

I will say that you are probably looking at a drawing that camne before the final keel geometry. Even then the flange was never, ever going to be proud. What do you think we are? A bunch of wankers?

Oh yeah, happy mother's day.

 

It's still raining. Hard.

I used my Cuisinart slow cooker for the first time today. It was my wife's idea. I have managed to cook beige muck. It smelled so strongly of onions that I had to take the fucking thing outside and plug it in. It was making me sick. It was becoming THE HOUSE OF ONION. I hate new cooking technology.

 

Ok, if Kim were standing here he'd say "You should not post that." And I would know he is right.

 

Jose, the fact is that we had the original keel engineered when the boat had no deadrise. It was still a GRP boat. When we decided to go with wood I added deadrise and changed the whole hull shape.

When we went to Tim we had him re-engineeer to keel to fit with the deadrise midsection. But then flange was never going to be proud.

 

You ask good questions. I can see why you are successful at your job after starting as a student of mine, you shit head. I would expect no less from you.

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Damn straight you're not going to leave the keel proud. Not like Mr. Lapworth did on my Cal 20. I dxpect that had more to do with economics though.

 

I sure don't expdct you to share proprietary information with anyone but the builders. My sistdr in las is an intellectual properties attorney and has me sign an NDA every time I say hello.

 

Sadly you have me mistaken with someone else in the class, maybe Eric Jolley. I was the one in th back of the room picking my nose and reading sailing magazines.

 

I hope your beige dinner was ok. Mine was simple, hakibbut and green beans. The more wine i drink the more the krys on my phone jump around and swap places .

 

Yr Obdt Shthd,

Jose

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No worries Jose,I speak fluent wine.

 

I didn't even taste the beige dinner. I had Wheaties with a banana. Now that's fine dining.

But I will follow up with a big breakfast.

 

The beige dinner is still outside in the crock pot waiting for tomorrow. It still doesn't look like food to me.

I am an old fashioned meat man.

 

Lentils and spinach? As ALF once said, "That's what food eats."

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Wow, I take Suzy out to a early mother's day dinner with our youngest and his family and look what I miss (he will be 40 in a few weeks, how can that be?)

 

We are enjoying a glass of Ice Wine right now, but the keys are staying put on the laptop because we are sipping it.

 

Jim & Tim tell me the keel flange will NOT be proud. They have some sort of a plan to make everything all nice and smooth. We do not want to spoil Bob nice fast hull design.

 

Happy Mother's Day everyone.

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Hi Kim

Frank S. told me about your project today and sent me here. WOW! First class top to bottom. It reminds me a little of Nor'easter, the Q boat that Stu McDougal surveyed for me many years ago. Thank goodness I listened to him and moved on. And great work with the NW School. It sounds like you are there on Mondays; maybe I can stop by and take a peek.

 

Bill Van Vlack

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No worries Jose,I speak fluent wine.

 

I didn't even taste the beige dinner. I had Wheaties with a banana. Now that's fine dining.

But I will follow up with a big breakfast.

 

The beige dinner is still outside in the crock pot waiting for tomorrow. It still doesn't look like food to me.

I am an old fashioned meat man.

 

Lentils and spinach? As ALF once said, "That's what food eats."

 

Weetabix is the best for wine dining, lots of texture and it does not matter whether you have it with milk or champagne. Strawberry jam helps.

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Slow cooker, duck season is on in NZ, shit I wish I was over there at my brother in laws place. I can imagine spitting out the shot.

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Kimb said we could hijack.

 

[continued hijack]

IB, Mrs. Bitches has a source for local fresh eggs..let me know. I refuse to build a chicken coop, or house chickens myself...I did use chicken wire once around the grill to keep the squirrels from eating the flexible copper line up to the burner.. WTF?

 

$1.50/dozen I think. They are very tasty.

[/end continued hijack]

 

Thanks,

 

We usually hit up one of the Amish farms on Friendship School Rd. Not sure what they cost.

 

Now I'm waiting for corn to grow. with teh wet spring, we should see good harvests and large ears of corn this year.

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Hi Kim

Frank S. told me about your project today and sent me here. WOW! First class top to bottom. It reminds me a little of Nor'easter, the Q boat that Stu McDougal surveyed for me many years ago. Thank goodness I listened to him and moved on. And great work with the NW School. It sounds like you are there on Mondays; maybe I can stop by and take a peek.

 

Bill Van Vlack

 

Bill,

 

I visit the project pretty much every Monday morning arriving between 9-10am. I take pictures and talk to the crew. Then I often go visit the CNC guy, the CAD guy, the engineer and the lamination guy. Sometimes we all meet up at the School.

 

I am amazed at the interest this project has generated, I only set out to build a long skinny daysailor to go sailing on. I didn't realize how many people would like the idea of such a vessel.

 

I too looked at Nor'easter back when she was in Everett. I guess she was purchased and fully restored and is now sailing on a lake in Montana with another LFH Q-Boat. I need to go visit her sometime. Always liked her look.

 

The School recently restored (built new hull for ) one of the Yankee One Designs, was it one of yours?

 

Kim

Ps. you are always welcomed to join me on one of the Monday visits.

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Yes, the Yankee that was 'rebuilt' at the School was Venture and one of two that I brought up to Seattle from SF. The other, Yankee Doodle, is now on the Chesapeake I believe. I've thought about tracking her down once I sell the Nautilus. Yankee Clipper, that went from SF to Seattle to SF is now the most original of the SF Yankees if it's still anything like it was when it left here. Wonder where it is now? Of course Twinkle would be the ultimate 30 footer for me.

 

It would be fun to go see the two Q's on Flathead Lake. The construction of Nor'easter was similar to Live Yankee. Big wide ring frames and longitudinal stringers. It was so narrow and long that the forepeak berth had a forepeak berth!

 

I couldn't tell from the photos; is the deck/cabin assembly on Sliver being built right side up, or upside down? I'd assumed upside down.

 

Thanks for the invite; I'll PM you soon.

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Yes, the Yankee that was 'rebuilt' at the School was Venture and one of two that I brought up to Seattle from SF. The other, Yankee Doodle, is now on the Chesapeake I believe. I've thought about tracking her down once I sell the Nautilus. Yankee Clipper, that went from SF to Seattle to SF is now the most original of the SF Yankees if it's still anything like it was when it left here. Wonder where it is now? Of course Twinkle would be the ultimate 30 footer for me.

 

It would be fun to go see the two Q's on Flathead Lake. The construction of Nor'easter was similar to Live Yankee. Big wide ring frames and longitudinal stringers. It was so narrow and long that the forepeak berth had a forepeak berth!

 

I couldn't tell from the photos; is the deck/cabin assembly on Sliver being built right side up, or upside down? I'd assumed upside down.

 

Thanks for the invite; I'll PM you soon.

 

Bill,

 

I remember sitting down below in Nor'easter when she was completely stripped out and marveling at her construction. She really was different from what I was used to seeing and I am glad she was saved.

 

Yes, the deck/cockpit/cabin is being built upside down and inside-out. It is kind of fun to turn this way and that way while standing next to the forms and seeing how it all comes together. I am looking forward to seeing the hull coming together next to the deck.

 

Yes, Twinkle is an ultimate 30 footer, where is she? She was in sad shape last I saw her and I am hoping someone saved her.

 

She was one of the many vessels I had in my mind when I sat down with Bob a couple years back and asked he to draw up a long narrow light Puget Sound Daysailor. So you could say the Sliver design owes something to Twinkle (and Sparkle, and Oceanus, and Rosinante, and LFH's sailing machine, and Istalena, and Fiery Cross and so many others.............)

 

Hope to see you soon Bill, it has been quite sometime since we last chatted.

 

Kim

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Kim,

I think she's somewhere on Bainbridge, hauled out, according to Scott R. of Pirate fame. Are you going to the Pirate event in June at SYC?

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Kim,

I think she's somewhere on Bainbridge, hauled out, according to Scott R. of Pirate fame. Are you going to the Pirate event in June at SYC?

 

Oh yes, we are Pirate Syndicate members so we have to go see how our investment is coming along. We actually visited Pirate this morning while we took a walk through South Lake Union.

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See you there! It will be fun to see how many of us Syndicate members show up; there's a few I haven't seen for awhile.

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Yes, the Yankee that was 'rebuilt' at the School was Venture and one of two that I brought up to Seattle from SF. The other, Yankee Doodle, is now on the Chesapeake I believe. I've thought about tracking her down once I sell the Nautilus. Yankee Clipper, that went from SF to Seattle to SF is now the most original of the SF Yankees if it's still anything like it was when it left here. Wonder where it is now? Of course Twinkle would be the ultimate 30 footer for me.

 

It would be fun to go see the two Q's on Flathead Lake. The construction of Nor'easter was similar to Live Yankee. Big wide ring frames and longitudinal stringers. It was so narrow and long that the forepeak berth had a forepeak berth!

 

I couldn't tell from the photos; is the deck/cabin assembly on Sliver being built right side up, or upside down? I'd assumed upside down.

 

Thanks for the invite; I'll PM you soon.

 

 

Bill, Is this the type of Q boat you are talking about? Lovely

http://www.spauldingcenter.org/boatfinder/

 

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Yes, that's a Q class boat. Cotton Blossom, Dennis Connors' boat, is also a Q boat.

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Yes, the Yankee that was 'rebuilt' at the School was Venture and one of two that I brought up to Seattle from SF. The other, Yankee Doodle, is now on the Chesapeake I believe. I've thought about tracking her down once I sell the Nautilus. Yankee Clipper, that went from SF to Seattle to SF is now the most original of the SF Yankees if it's still anything like it was when it left here. Wonder where it is now? Of course Twinkle would be the ultimate 30 footer for me.

 

It would be fun to go see the two Q's on Flathead Lake. The construction of Nor'easter was similar to Live Yankee. Big wide ring frames and longitudinal stringers. It was so narrow and long that the forepeak berth had a forepeak berth!

 

I couldn't tell from the photos; is the deck/cabin assembly on Sliver being built right side up, or upside down? I'd assumed upside down.

 

Thanks for the invite; I'll PM you soon.

 

Bill, I think I was the one who got you interested in the Yankee O/D during a sail with you and Eric H. in Friday Harbor many years ago aboard Yankee Clipper. I'm the one who donated her to the Center for Wooden Boats. If you find out what happened to her, let me know. I must say that seeing the pics of the 'new' Venture' was more than a little nostalgic for me. The Yankee Clipper is the only boat I've ever really loved. I really like my current ride but nothing will compare to the Yankee Clipper for pure sailing enjoyment. Hopefully, Kim will enjoy Sliver as much.

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Now that you reminded me, I do remember that sail and it certainly was when I became taken with the Yankee One-Design. Maybe some of the SA folks in SF know about her. CWB donated her to the Stone yard, and then the Stone yard closed.

 

Kim, sorry for the thread drift.........

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Thanks,

 

We usually hit up one of the Amish farms on Friendship School Rd. Not sure what they cost.

 

Now I'm waiting for corn to grow. with teh wet spring, we should see good harvests and large ears of corn this year.

No shit...I cannot wait for the local sweet corn.

 

Oh looky..it is Sunday night...maybe Kim will have some more pictures for us tomorrow!

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Yes, the Yankee that was 'rebuilt' at the School was Venture and one of two that I brought up to Seattle from SF. The other, Yankee Doodle, is now on the Chesapeake I believe. I've thought about tracking her down once I sell the Nautilus. Yankee Clipper, that went from SF to Seattle to SF is now the most original of the SF Yankees if it's still anything like it was when it left here. Wonder where it is now? Of course Twinkle would be the ultimate 30 footer for me.

 

It would be fun to go see the two Q's on Flathead Lake. The construction of Nor'easter was similar to Live Yankee. Big wide ring frames and longitudinal stringers. It was so narrow and long that the forepeak berth had a forepeak berth!

 

I couldn't tell from the photos; is the deck/cabin assembly on Sliver being built right side up, or upside down? I'd assumed upside down.

 

Thanks for the invite; I'll PM you soon.

 

Bill,

 

I remember sitting down below in Nor'easter when she was completely stripped out and marveling at her construction. She really was different from what I was used to seeing and I am glad she was saved.

 

Yes, the deck/cockpit/cabin is being built upside down and inside-out. It is kind of fun to turn this way and that way while standing next to the forms and seeing how it all comes together. I am looking forward to seeing the hull coming together next to the deck.

 

Yes, Twinkle is an ultimate 30 footer, where is she? She was in sad shape last I saw her and I am hoping someone saved her.

 

She was one of the many vessels I had in my mind when I sat down with Bob a couple years back and asked he to draw up a long narrow light Puget Sound Daysailor. So you could say the Sliver design owes something to Twinkle (and Sparkle, and Oceanus, and Rosinante, and LFH's sailing machine, and Istalena, and Fiery Cross and so many others.............)

 

Hope to see you soon Bill, it has been quite sometime since we last chatted.

 

Kim

 

The Longitudinal construction method LHF developed for YANKEE, and used in many of his later racing boats under the universal rule, is impressively light. LIVE YANKEE was built using the longitudinal method, and also was built without a wooden keel (another LHF peculiarity), and was designed to have an 80% of her weight in her lead ballast. This turned out to be a little optimistic, she had some loose pieces of lead in her bilge for adjusting her WL and some of these had to be removed if I remember correctly. I think one of the reasons that LHF hated the international rule so much must have been that they didn't let him do as he liked with construction. He always claimed that his 12 meter MITENA (another gorgeous double ender, incidentally) was ruined by having to be built to lloyds rule.

 

Is NOR'EASTER accompanied on Flathead by QUESTA? she's the only other Q designed by LHF that I know of. Does anyone know if they are they the only two he designed?

 

For no reason other than she's beautiful, here is a picture of MITENA, I wish I had a better picture of her stern.

 

Milo

post-41417-000033800 1304906377_thumb.png

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For no reason other than she's beautiful, here is a picture of MITENA, I wish I had a better picture of her stern.

 

Milo

 

Mitena? Did I hear someone say Mitena? Another double ender I always liked. I understand she is on the great Lakes now. Not a great set of pictures, but it is all I have of her.

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For no reason other than she's beautiful, here is a picture of MITENA, I wish I had a better picture of her stern.Milo
Mitena? Did I hear someone say Mitena? Another double ender I always liked. I understand she is on the great Lakes now. Not a great set of pictures, but it is all I have of her.
I guess she was never very competitive, but I've always thought she was one of the best looking 12s. LHF also did a double ended 6 meter named WASP.

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Yes, Nor'easter V is on Flathead lake with Questa. Woodenboat magazine had an article about the boats a few years ago. I believe these are the only two Q boats LFH designed.

 

When I first saw Nor'easter she was in Poulsbo and named 'Angel Wings'. The owner claimed she was a Herreshoff design and I said 'right'. Boy was I mistaken. In the process of researching her I contacted the owner of Questa in Flathead lake. (He told me a great story about the Chicago owner that came west for a hunting trip and during a long turn at the bar told the present owner he would give him the boat. The present owner thought it was fiction and forgot about it until he got a phone call some days hence announcing that the boat was in transit and where did he want it delivered!). I let Questa's owner know when I decided not to purse Nor'easter and figured that was that. About a year later I heard from him that he was buying her.

 

That owner also had a bunch of six meter boats for awhile IIRC, but I haven't heard anything about them for many years.

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Cockpit forms with various details. As you might be able to tell, it is a split cockpit, tiller to be handled from the after section and crew work (or lounging) from the forward section.

 

(Remember, you are looking at a female mold that is upside down and insideout. )

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Some overview pictures of the deck/cabin cockpit mold setup.

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Hatch forms, The deck hatches are planned to be Lewmar Ocran hatches, the cockpit hatches will be laminated up per some very nice work already researched by Brandon with some amazing lock down fittings. Hopefully I will remember to show how they come together later on when they get built up.

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Stern (kind of hard to tell it from the bow, however the proximity of the aft cockpit is a tip off, and for the very good eye the fuller deck aft might be a tip off.)

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Inside out view of the upside down cabin trunk with some details.....and the joint holding the starboard cabin side together

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E-glass for the sheathing. Triaxial and 34 ounce. I guess Tim wants to make sure it is strong. Also a couple shots from before showing the test panels made with the glass (just add epoxy.)

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primary winch pad as molded into the deck/cockpit joint.

Bow.

Finger Joint of port side cabin house.

So what do you suppose this is?

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Launchtube for the retractable pole!

 

Nice try, no it is the formed corner for the front of the aft cockpit foot well form as seen with the gap above the winch pad it picture # 1. (I had to ask what it was because it did not look like it was for my project. But I was wrong.)

 

Here is a better picture of the gap at the forward end of the foot well of the aft cockpit (one on each side of course so the formed piece will be cut in half after it is finished.) The curved area between the two gaps (one gap which you can't see in this view) is the mainsheet winch pad (upside down of course.)

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It makes me happy to see the boat coming together.

I could use some happy.

 

And Just Bob,,,Fuck off. In a nice sort of friendly way. Sort of. Kinda.

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E-glass for the sheathing. Triaxial and 34 ounce. I guess Tim wants to make sure it is strong. Also a couple shots from before showing the test panels made with the glass (just add epoxy.)

 

Kim - Can I ask what epoxy you're using? (Apologies if it's been mentioned, I've tried to keep up with this thread).

 

Did the decision on brand take more than 30 seconds of thought or was it an automatic choice?

 

I know West System sponsors one of the forums and I don't want to start a shit fight or get anyone bent out of shape so no worries if you care not to go into detail.

 

Seeing your pictures is really motivating me to get to work on some stitch and glue dinghy plans I've been sitting on for a year and I'm enjoying absorbing as much as possible from your project.

 

Thanks again for sharing.

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E-glass for the sheathing. Triaxial and 34 ounce. I guess Tim wants to make sure it is strong. Also a couple shots from before showing the test panels made with the glass (just add epoxy.)

 

Kim - Can I ask what epoxy you're using? (Apologies if it's been mentioned, I've tried to keep up with this thread).

 

Did the decision on brand take more than 30 seconds of thought or was it an automatic choice?

 

I know West System sponsors one of the forums and I don't want to start a shit fight or get anyone bent out of shape so no worries if you care not to go into detail.

 

Seeing your pictures is really motivating me to get to work on some stitch and glue dinghy plans I've been sitting on for a year and I'm enjoying absorbing as much as possible from your project.

 

Thanks again for sharing.

 

I believe the School uses West System epoxy. I will try and confirm.

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Launchtube for the retractable pole!

 

Nice try, no it is the formed corner for the front of the aft cockpit foot well form as seen with the gap above the winch pad it picture # 1. (I had to ask what it was because it did not look like it was for my project. But I was wrong.)

 

Here is a better picture of the gap at the forward end of the foot well of the aft cockpit (one on each side of course so the formed piece will be cut in half after it is finished.) The curved area between the two gaps (one gap which you can't see in this view) is the mainsheet winch pad (upside down of course.)

 

WOW - those CNC machines really do make short work of setting up frames!!!!

 

I know what *I* am going to do w/my next project!

Thanks a BUNCH Kimb - I'm really enjoying the pics and progress reports!!

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Looks like a deck mold that could be used for a glass boat...

 

Would really love to see the cost numbers as they occur... like the cost of doing the deck mold that way.

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Looks like a deck mold that could be used for a glass boat...

 

Would really love to see the cost numbers as they occur... like the cost of doing the deck mold that way.

 

I am not really sure I want to know what this project is costing me. Ignorance can be blissful sometimes.

 

PM me with specific cost questions and I will see if they are ones I can answer.

 

I am not going to post anything about costs here.

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Here is some detail I got today from the project. The gaps from the last set of picture at the front of the foot well in the steering (aft) cockpit have their corner pieces installed and the edge has a fillet added. I understand there was a class in filleting that utilized the deck mold and now we have lots of detail added to the mold.

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Kim:

Why is the fillet tapering like that? It should be constant.

 

 

Ooopsy. Looks like The Maestro just got one of the Students busted! :ph34r:

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Well, it seems to be intentional, but what possible reason would there be for it having sharp transitions like that? I was thinking the same thing as Bob but when you look closely it's not actually tapered - it's stepped, abruptly going down in size from largest to smallest and back again.

 

Demonstration for the class, to be filled in later?

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Kim:

Why is the fillet tapering like that? It should be constant.

 

Unknown captain, I am in Bellevue, someone sent me the picture. I will ask.

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Looks carefully tapered to me.

When I get over there I'm going to grab about a 40" long piece of strip planking and go around rapping knuckles like an old Zen master KWATZ!

"How you like that Grasshopper?"

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Looks carefully tapered to me.

When I get over there I'm going to grab about a 40" long piece of strip planking and go around rapping knuckles like an old Zen master KWATZ!

"How you like that Grasshopper?"

 

Bob, I'm thinking it it tapered to meld in with the MS winch. If the held the large curve the winch would be to far back from the edge.

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There are a series of marks on both sides, and it looks like the edge of the fillet has been moved back in a sequence from the original line.

I reckon you are right Paps, they describe a circle, probably a base for something like a winch.

 

Maybe the curve of the vertical panel is out?

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I am no expert on anything, but I think that picture shows that the builder expects that the loads come down the convex curvatures. The concave curvature has (little) load, so it does not need the extra support from a fat fillet since the convex parts have already supported the load.

 

Again, I don't know shit about shit and I most recently stayed at a Hilton instead of a Holiday Inn, and I am heavy into the Michelob Ultra tonight. I am also performing remedial tasks like drilling holes in the sideplate parts of my 1976 Atomic 4, so I am definitely outclassed here.

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It makes me happy to see the boat coming together.

I could use some happy.

 

And Just Bob,,,Fuck off. In a nice sort of friendly way. Sort of. Kinda.

 

Well, in a friendly kinda sorta way, just to piss you off. I WILL be in NZ next year for the opening of Duck seasonsmile.gif

 

Hmm Duck, and I'm sure we'll go out on the Kaipara and catch a few snapper and pull some mussels of the rocks, and maybe a few Lion Reds

 

In regards to the fillet job, are we looking at it inside out and upside down? What ever way it is there certainly looks like some skill is working on the build!

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Looks like the deck mold is getting along nicely. I will visit Monday as always and see it up close and personal. Good that these pictures keep coming, otherwise I might miss something between Mondays.

 

Hull molds will be cut on the CNC machine this coming week. Ordered up the West System epoxy yesterday. Progress is being made.

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I think the main winch will look much better placed up against to this smaller radius. A nice formal platform for the most important winch of them all. Will it work better being a little closer to the sheet handler?

 

Maybe it helps with the underdeck main winch support as well.

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Just Bob:

What is a Lion Red?

I caught a flathead once at Shoal Beach and we would spend a couple weeks on Mackeral Beach on Pittwater some summers where I would catch a bucket full of Leather jackets and plenty of mackeral.

But that was pre 1957 and I here the fishing is not so good anymore. Pity, back then the fishing was great.

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A couple more details of the deck/cabin/cockpit mold. The tapered fillet was indeed to accomodate the main winch mounting. I guess I should just trust things to be right when Russell lays them out, he is the master of lamination (and so much more.)

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They started to cut the hull station molds after I left yesterday so I only have pictures of the 5x10 sheets of melamine stacked up waiting. Each sheet weighs in at about 150 pounds. Heavy! Good thing Brandon has that sturdy cart to move them around!

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Let 'er rip! Er, well, not quite rip but ...

 

Got to get the hull mold erected first.....I think they plan to scarf the strips on the mold, not beforehand.......we will see once they start.

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A couple more details of the deck/cabin/cockpit mold. The tapered fillet was indeed to accomodate the main winch mounting. I guess I should just trust things to be right when Russell lays them out, he is the master of lamination (and so much more.)

 

 

 

I have done a bit of filleting and these guys do noice work. 150 lbs per sheet of Melamine?? That cant be right surely?

 

Looking great Kimb, I'm sure its been covered but I cant recall, is the deck going to be in glass off that mold?

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A couple more details of the deck/cabin/cockpit mold. The tapered fillet was indeed to accomodate the main winch mounting. I guess I should just trust things to be right when Russell lays them out, he is the master of lamination (and so much more.)

 

 

 

I have done a bit of filleting and these guys do noice work. 150 lbs per sheet of Melamine?? That cant be right surely?

 

Looking great Kimb, I'm sure its been covered but I cant recall, is the deck going to be in glass off that mold?

 

I didn't actually weigh the 5'x10' piece of melamine, but it was quite heavy!

 

Given that this is a School of Wood we tend to say the deck is of foam core composite construction. (I guess most would call that glass.)

 

We decided the one piece deck/cockpit/cabin would be a better way to go for a number of reasons and because I am not a traditionist I agreed.

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A couple more details of the deck/cabin/cockpit mold. The tapered fillet was indeed to accomodate the main winch mounting. I guess I should just trust things to be right when Russell lays them out, he is the master of lamination (and so much more.)

 

 

 

I have done a bit of filleting and these guys do noice work. 150 lbs per sheet of Melamine?? That cant be right surely?

 

Looking great Kimb, I'm sure its been covered but I cant recall, is the deck going to be in glass off that mold?

 

I just looked it up. A couple sources say that a standard 3/4" sheet weighs 100#. I know whenever I have worked with this stuff, it's damn heavy.

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man! I should follow this thread more often. They are movin!

 

Can't wait to see the CNC'd hull. Would be extremely cool if someone could video capture it.

 

As for that fillet, mark my word...when the boat's done, take some closeups of that area. Those curves are going to be damn sexy!

 

Those finger joints are cool as hell too. Too bad you can't mold that into the hull somehow. ;)

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man! I should follow this thread more often. They are movin!

 

Can't wait to see the CNC'd hull. Would be extremely cool if someone could video capture it.

 

As for that fillet, mark my word...when the boat's done, take some closeups of that area. Those curves are going to be damn sexy!

 

Those finger joints are cool as hell too. Too bad you can't mold that into the hull somehow. ;)

 

Brandon Davis and that CNC machine of his has made this project move along quite a bit faster than I had originally anticipated.

 

It will be interesting to see how fast (or slow) the strip planking goes.

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The School did not waste much time last week. They got the hull forms on Weds.

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Jim and Brandon designed and cut some alignment points into the forms, they are kind of hard to photograph but they do look cool in person if you crawl inside of the hull form and line them up by eye.

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stairs to get on top of the deck form and various other random shots.

 

The hull shape is exactly what I was aiming for, I am now even a bigger fan of the maestro. I was pretty sure he had gotten it right when I studied the drawings, but nothing quite takes the place of seeing it in person. She sure is skinny! I climbed inside and looked at her volume, she is a small boat, just like she is suppose to be.

 

Bob, you done really good!

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Kim:

I love it when you talk like that.

Seems like that stage went very fast.

 

I'd pat myself on the back but I have been doing that so long now that I have built up a calous on my back and I can't even feel it anymore.

 

I'm just sitting here eating licorice, watching the puppy sleep and enjoying the hockey.

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Kim,

Thanks for the updates.

I think your vision, and Bob's design, has touched a nerve; boats like the Sliver, both beautiful and (sure to be) fast are rarely built today. I'm completely freakin' jealous!

What are your thoughts on colors for the Sliver?

Who's going to build the mast?

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Kim,

Thanks for the updates.

I think your vision, and Bob's design, has touched a nerve; boats like the Sliver, both beautiful and (sure to be) fast are rarely built today. I'm completely freakin' jealous!

What are your thoughts on colors for the Sliver?

Who's going to build the mast?

 

I was originally going to paint her very dark green, but I have two dark boats right now (one blue, one green) both are LP and both are suffering from sun damage and some other issue with the dark hulls. So right now I am thinking a very traditional White.

 

The mast is an interesting dilemma. I really want carbon. Have quotes from Hall and Forespar and GMT. All expensive. Also have a quote from Ballenger for Aluminum.

Hope I have enough money left over for carbon......

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That boat will look awesome in black. But I say that as someone who wussed out and probably will go white.

 

I have the same dilemma on masts -- and same vendors. After much hair pulling, I'd say go carbon if you can. I KNOW thats what Bob is telling you. Find the money somewhere. tons of reasons.

 

By the way, is your boat named Sliver, or what? Never been sure ...

 

Kim,

Thanks for the updates.

I think your vision, and Bob's design, has touched a nerve; boats like the Sliver, both beautiful and (sure to be) fast are rarely built today. I'm completely freakin' jealous!

What are your thoughts on colors for the Sliver?

Who's going to build the mast?

 

I was originally going to paint her very dark green, but I have two dark boats right now (one blue, one green) both are LP and both are suffering from sun damage and some other issue with the dark hulls. So right now I am thinking a very traditional White.

 

The mast is an interesting dilemma. I really want carbon. Have quotes from Hall and Forespar and GMT. All expensive. Also have a quote from Ballenger for Aluminum.

Hope I have enough money left over for carbon......

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That boat will look awesome in black. But I say that as someone who wussed out and probably will go white.

 

I have the same dilemma on masts -- and same vendors. After much hair pulling, I'd say go carbon if you can. I KNOW thats what Bob is telling you. Find the money somewhere. tons of reasons.

 

By the way, is your boat named Sliver, or what? Never been sure ...

 

Kim,

Thanks for the updates.

I think your vision, and Bob's design, has touched a nerve; boats like the Sliver, both beautiful and (sure to be) fast are rarely built today. I'm completely freakin' jealous!

What are your thoughts on colors for the Sliver?

Who's going to build the mast?

 

I was originally going to paint her very dark green, but I have two dark boats right now (one blue, one green) both are LP and both are suffering from sun damage and some other issue with the dark hulls. So right now I am thinking a very traditional White.

 

The mast is an interesting dilemma. I really want carbon. Have quotes from Hall and Forespar and GMT. All expensive. Also have a quote from Ballenger for Aluminum.

Hope I have enough money left over for carbon......

 

 

 

Judging by the names on all the picture files, she's called "Silver". As in Hi-Yo Silver! Yippee-yi-o-ki-yay.

 

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Looking very impressive Kim, talk about fast!!!

 

And its Sliver as in sliver of wood.

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Getting everything cmc cut has obviously saved a lot time, It will be interesting how quickly the strip planking goes on

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By the way, is your boat named Sliver, or what? Never been sure ...

 

The "Sliver" name kind of showed up one day when Bob and I were discussing various boats and I mentioned Bruce King's "Nantucket Splinter". I started to refer to this design as the "Perry Splinter".

 

Somehow it morphed to the "Perry Sliver". So that has been the working name of the design ever since (including the tweezers on the sail.)

 

You will have to attend her launch to see what name we paint on her stern (both sides of her stern.)

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See, I wasn't sleeping through the movie.

 

By the way, is your boat named Sliver, or what? Never been sure ...

 

The "Sliver" name kind of showed up one day when Bob and I were discussing various boats and I mentioned Bruce King's "Nantucket Splinter". I started to refer to this design as the "Perry Splinter".

 

Somehow it morphed to the "Perry Sliver". So that has been the working name of the design ever since (including the tweezers on the sail.)

 

You will have to attend her launch to see what name we paint on her stern (both sides of her stern.)

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I wonder if the dark topsides would make the boat look too low? I have played around with Photoshop on the Swede, as well as looking at some of the spirit boats that have been built, and the ones with low topsides and a dark hull don't look quite right to my eye. Too long & low...

Good luck with the Carbon mast. I have a black Ballenger, and it's a great mast, but I sure wish it was Carbon...

I love this thread, thanks for the pics - and sorry I can't place an order for Hull #2.

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"Too long and low"? I'm sorry, I dont understand what that means.;)

 

Really, can a sailing vessel that is seaworthy truly ever be too long and low -- especially in this era of fat pigs and wedding cakers?

 

I wonder if the dark topsides would make the boat look too low? I have played around with Photoshop on the Swede, as well as looking at some of the spirit boats that have been built, and the ones with low topsides and a dark hull don't look quite right to my eye. Too long & low...

Good luck with the Carbon mast. I have a black Ballenger, and it's a great mast, but I sure wish it was Carbon...

I love this thread, thanks for the pics - and sorry I can't place an order for Hull #2.

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"Too long and low"? I'm sorry, I dont understand what that means.;)

 

Really, can a sailing vessel that is seaworthy truly ever be too long and low -- especially in this era of fat pigs and wedding cakers?

 

I wonder if the dark topsides would make the boat look too low? I have played around with Photoshop on the Swede, as well as looking at some of the spirit boats that have been built, and the ones with low topsides and a dark hull don't look quite right to my eye. Too long & low...

Good luck with the Carbon mast. I have a black Ballenger, and it's a great mast, but I sure wish it was Carbon...

I love this thread, thanks for the pics - and sorry I can't place an order for Hull #2.

 

+1

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My pal Tom calls the current trend in production boats the "bloated tennis shoe" look.

 

"Too long and low"? There is no such thing.

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My pal Tom calls the current trend in production boats the "bloated tennis shoe" look.

 

"Too long and low"? There is no such thing.

 

What the boat designer said.

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I wonder if the dark topsides would make the boat look too low? I have played around with Photoshop on the Swede, as well as looking at some of the spirit boats that have been built, and the ones with low topsides and a dark hull don't look quite right to my eye. Too long & low...

Good luck with the Carbon mast. I have a black Ballenger, and it's a great mast, but I sure wish it was Carbon...

I love this thread, thanks for the pics - and sorry I can't place an order for Hull #2.

 

 

It almost seems like a shame not to build the second hull now that I have paid for the building jigs, but I kind of like the idea of there being only one vessel of this design.

 

I like unique and anyway how many people would be crazy enough like me to want a 62' daysailor?

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Kim,

Thanks for the updates.

I think your vision, and Bob's design, has touched a nerve; boats like the Sliver, both beautiful and (sure to be) fast are rarely built today. I'm completely freakin' jealous!

What are your thoughts on colors for the Sliver?

Who's going to build the mast?

 

I was originally going to paint her very dark green, but I have two dark boats right now (one blue, one green) both are LP and both are suffering from sun damage and some other issue with the dark hulls. So right now I am thinking a very traditional White.

 

The mast is an interesting dilemma. I really want carbon. Have quotes from Hall and Forespar and GMT. All expensive. Also have a quote from Ballenger for Aluminum.

Hope I have enough money left over for carbon......

 

Kimb,

 

I have had a number of rigs from Ballenger over the years and Buzz has always done a GREAT JOB. I would highly recommend his work.

 

S'agapo has a Hall spar in Carbon, which I love. Steve Leddy and I just went through it all and it is amazingly well built. But someone overspeced it and it's probably 100lbs overweight for what it really should be. That said, I'm a old race guy who doesn't mind a noodle for a spar and actually enjoys playing with runners and check stays (S'agapo has neither). So, my estimates of what "overweight" and "overbuilt" are could be off.

 

BV

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Kim,

Thanks for the updates.

I think your vision, and Bob's design, has touched a nerve; boats like the Sliver, both beautiful and (sure to be) fast are rarely built today. I'm completely freakin' jealous!

What are your thoughts on colors for the Sliver?

Who's going to build the mast?

 

I was originally going to paint her very dark green, but I have two dark boats right now (one blue, one green) both are LP and both are suffering from sun damage and some other issue with the dark hulls. So right now I am thinking a very traditional White.

 

The mast is an interesting dilemma. I really want carbon. Have quotes from Hall and Forespar and GMT. All expensive. Also have a quote from Ballenger for Aluminum.

Hope I have enough money left over for carbon......

 

Kimb,

 

I have had a number of rigs from Ballenger over the years and Buzz has always done a GREAT JOB. I would highly recommend his work.

 

S'agapo has a Hall spar in Carbon, which I love. Steve Leddy and I just went through it all and it is amazingly well built. But someone overspeced it and it's probably 100lbs overweight for what it really should be. That said, I'm a old race guy who doesn't mind a noodle for a spar and actually enjoys playing with runners and check stays (S'agapo has neither). So, my estimates of what "overweight" and "overbuilt" are could be off.

 

BV

 

I have runners and just about every other rig line possible on my 30 Square metre and I love to have all of the adjustments available to me. However on the Sliver design we really tried to keep it simple.

 

Buzz sounds like a great guy to work with. As I get closer to needing the mast I am thinking of paying him a visit. He is the closest to here.

 

But I would really like carbon.

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