kimbottles

Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

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FD

 

That is a beautiful spin re having a electric windlass.

 

I have never been on a yacht that has had an electric primary, but I can see the benefit. There has been more than once that I've felt like spewing after a tack, and/or being on the traveler on a multi.

 

Why wouldn't ya...

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Just Bob, "why wouldn't I" Because I'm a sparky by trade, the remote system for the winches mentioned in the above post, I installed. I try very hard to keep my boat as electrically simple as possible. The thought of maintaining anything electrical on my boat is like a busman's holiday, and the remote has far to many failure points for my liking. I'm happy cranking in my big headsail with my bottom handle, top cleat Murry winches just so I don't have to fuck around with more electrics.

Electric winches don't really add that much complexity to Sliver. Kim will enjoy them.

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I am curious about a structural issue. What do the ends of the girders bolt into here? What I mean to say is, as far as I remember the whole interior is constructed using the skinned foam panels. What gives them sufficient strength here to take the (presumably) massive forces of the keel, and/or the crush force of the nut on the bolt?

 

While I am at it, what is the purpose of the chockfast, or does that kind of answer the question above?

 

 

post-8115-0-18101400-1360028260_thumb.jpg

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I'm with kdh on this. Once you push that button you might as well throw the winch handle over the side.

 

So, how many of your folk with an electric windlass sometimes pull up the anchor by hand? (O.K. I do, but that's for another thread)

 

I've sailed a boat with electric primary’s exactly once, the secondary's were of the arm-strong Jones type, as soon as the primary's were free the secondary's were "tailed" by the primary's. The remote was kind off cool too! you can walk anywhere you want and tweek the sail.

 

Kim, If I remember correctly, This boat will live on a mooring, be day-sailed and not have solar. Being on a mooring I can't see a lot of motoring time. How are you planning on keeping the batteries topped up?

 

I'm loving the updates, Keep em coming.

 

I have both a dock and a mooring. I have used solar in the past to top batteries, plan to do it again.

 

(I use the mooring because it gives me a better view of the boat.)

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Just Bob, "why wouldn't I" Because I'm a sparky by trade, the remote system for the winches mentioned in the above post, I installed. I try very hard to keep my boat as electrically simple as possible. The thought of maintaining anything electrical on my boat is like a busman's holiday, and the remote has far to many failure points for my liking. I'm happy cranking in my big headsail with my bottom handle, top cleat Murry winches just so I don't have to fuck around with more electrics.

Electric winches don't really add that much complexity to Sliver. Kim will enjoy them.

 

Only one electric winch, the main winch (over-sized). The plan is to sail non electric and use the one electric winch when necessary, like raising the main, taking someone up the mast, etc. Might hardly ever use it for the next ten years or so, I am still pretty fit.

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I am curious about a structural issue. What do the ends of the girders bolt into here? What I mean to say is, as far as I remember the whole interior is constructed using the skinned foam panels. What gives them sufficient strength here to take the (presumably) massive forces of the keel, and/or the crush force of the nut on the bolt?

 

While I am at it, what is the purpose of the chockfast, or does that kind of answer the question above?

 

 

post-8115-0-18101400-1360028260_thumb.jpg

 

There is lots of reinforcing and solid (G-10 like) inserts throughout the structural interior. The girders are virtually solid. No way will a bolt crush anything on the girder. Chockfast simply fills the very small gap between the ends of the floors and the girder. The entire center of the interior is bonded together into one structure.

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Thanks Kim,

 

What I meant about crushing was the actual panel to which the end of the girder is bolted, not the girder itself - the vertical panel kind of immediately northwest of the piece of plastic in the picture. If that particular piece is G-10 glass panel rather than the skinned foam sort of panels that the bulkheads are made of, that totally answers both aspects of my question.

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Thanks Kim,

 

What I meant about crushing was the actual panel to which the end of the girder is bolted, not the girder itself - the vertical panel kind of immediately northwest of the piece of plastic in the picture. If that particular piece is G-10 glass panel rather than the skinned foam sort of panels that the bulkheads are made of, that totally answers both aspects of my question.

 

Yes, the bulkheads that connect to the girder have been reinforced where they join. Tim engineered the heck out of this vessel.

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Stands to reason. My pre-coffee question seems silly to me now.

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Richard when all else fails RTFT. :rolleyes:

 

Says the man who makes the 4,321st post in that thread!

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Richard when all else fails RTFT. :rolleyes:

 

I am pretty sure I have read the whole damn thing, but the thread is so long that if it weren't for the thread title I may have forgotten the name of the boat, let alone what that particular panel is made from.

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Richard when all else fails RTFT. :rolleyes:

 

I am pretty sure I have read the whole damn thing, but the thread is so long that if it weren't for the thread title I may have forgotten the name of the boat, let alone what that particular panel is made from.

 

Just so you know, the boat name is not "Sliver". I think the real name is mentioned somewhere in the thread...

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For the record the project name is "Sliver" but the vessel will be launched bearing my late father's formal name "Francis Lee".

 

Frank taught me to sail, gave me my love for boats and loved double ended sailing vessels.

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I can't sem to get anything right today. At least I'm still good-looking.

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Thanks Kim,

 

What I meant about crushing was the actual panel to which the end of the girder is bolted, not the girder itself - the vertical panel kind of immediately northwest of the piece of plastic in the picture. If that particular piece is G-10 glass panel rather than the skinned foam sort of panels that the bulkheads are made of, that totally answers both aspects of my question.

 

The structural center section looks like this:

 

And the reinforcing around the bulkheads look like this....

Sliver Interior Structure.pdf

PDF BHDS and Girders DWG_6-7-12 Hull Sheet & Framing.pdf

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Thanks Kim.

I really enjoy builders plans and sectional drawings.

Somehow the boat comes alive in my mind, it's like I can think through the construction process and see the whole thing.

Many folks treat these sorts of drawings as intellectual property, and don't share.

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Wait just a cotton pickin' minute.

 

Fact is the drawings ARE my intellectual property. Make no mistake about that.

But I am happy to share them with you at my pleasure. You may look at them but that's all.

But don't run off thinking they are "public domaine" cause they aren't.

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Wait just a cotton pickin' minute.

 

Fact is the drawings ARE my intellectual property. Make no mistake about that.

But I am happy to share them with you at my pleasure. You may look at them but that's all.

But don't run off thinking they are "public domaine" cause they aren't.

 

That wasn't the plan Bob, but I understand where you are coming from.

I am just saying it is generous to share the information.

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Well, fuck. I was going to take those plans and reduce them so I can make 14 foot ferrocement canoes and sell them through Wally World.

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Out of interest, what's the difference between a woman's fucking foot and a man's?

 

A man's fucking foot puts the footprints on the dashboard upside down.

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Olaf:

I knew what you meant exactly. I just thought it might be good to clarify my understanding of "intellectual property".

I have been ripped off enough times to be wary of this. It's not uncommon.

To share the details of a project to the level Kim has done here, along with my help is unusual but I think it has drawn a lot of attention to the project and that's good for my business.

 

As for: "Aren't you worried that another designer will copy you?"

No, I am not. I'm not worried about the designer who needs to copy me.

I worrry more about the designer who does not want to copy me.

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Ah, but I bet you are worried about the guy who says, "Hey that's a great design! But let's make it 2' longer...and that keel is too hard to build and too deep, so let's make it a scheel keel that we designed in our backyard. The steel is too expensive, so let's use lots of glass and foam. And while we're at it, let's make the beam wider so we can fit the double berth and the hot tub. Oh, and we want full standing headroom for a 6'6" person stem to stern."...etc...etc...ad nauseam...

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Out of interest, what's the difference between a woman's fucking foot and a man's?

 

A man's fucking foot puts the footprints on the dashboard upside down.

I was going to guess calluses.

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Fact is the drawings ARE my intellectual property. Make no mistake about that.

But I am happy to share them with you at my pleasure.

 

I'm picturing Anthony Quinn in "Lawrence of Arabia", a movie I like as much as you like Local Hero. As Lawrence says "he will do it not for gold, not fame nor . . . . . . but because it is his pleasure". Then you can stand up and say something like "my clients pay me a golden treasure yet I am poor . . . . . . . . . because I am a river to my people."

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Tucky:

Yeah, I was sitting here at 2:30am typing that and wondering where I got that line. For a while I had, "at my leisure". But that didn't sound right.

Words are like musical notes and I like to find the right ones. I knew I had heard it before but I didn't think of L of A.

 

That is very funny. I love that movie and will watch it everytime it is on TV.

That is my favorite line out of the movie, "I am a river to my people!

 

I am Audah.

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In an effort to run out the string of this hijack . . . . . .

 

I was lucky enough to see the movie in a proper theater when it was redone in proper 70mm with all the TV cuts restored, and it was like listening to audiophile vinyl- they don't make 'em like that anymore.

 

I saw the movie when it came out when I was 13, and when Lawrence dies in the opening minutes I felt set free. I had only seen movies where "how does it end" is the sole plot device, and I got to watch all of Lawrence just moved and transported. I've never forgotten it. And a proper intermission.

 

Yes I know the movie has a bunch of non-arabs playing arabs, but it is so much better than an awful western and it is hard to fault Omar Sharif, Alec Guinness, and Anthony Quinn. One of my top three.

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Out of interest, what's the difference between a woman's fucking foot and a man's?

 

A man's fucking foot puts the footprints on the dashboard upside down.

I was going to guess calluses.

 

Old "naughty" song:

Was It You Who Did The Pushing?

Was it you who did the pushing

left the stains upon the cushion

footprints on the dashboard upside-down

Was it you, who's sly wood pecker

who got into my daughter Rebecker

if it was you, you better leave this town

Response:

Yes, was I who did the pushing

left the stains upon the cushion

footprints on the dashboard upside-down

But, since I've got into your daughter

I've had trouble passing water

so, I guess we're even all around!!

etc. ....

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I love it when this thread goes to movies. I too love Laurence of Arabia. It features some of the most beautiful photography in the history of moves - capturing vistas like that is not as simple as it seems. A similar problem exists at sea or in the prairies, or in the mountains. You simply cannot translate the sense of scale. Fargo was the first film that I thought gave you a sense of the enormity of the prairies. I lived (and made films) in the prairies for quite a long time, and that was the first time I had seen someone really nail it. In L of A, there are wonderful vistas, but the scale really becomes apparent when Omar Sharif rides up to the well from the far distance, starting off as only dust on the horizon.

 

Of course, Peter O'Toole's performance was extraordinary, and has become the stuff of legend. Sharif, Guinness, and Quinn were no slouches either.

 

Can anyone think of a film that really translates the scale of the sea?

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Richard:

I think you and I would get along just fine.

Try 1937 CAPTAINS COURAGIOUS.

 

This movie does it for me.

To paraphrase Bob Dylan, "I'd watch anything with Lionel Barymore in it."

 

Name the Dylan song. I dare you.

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Bob Who?

 

I've seen Dylan a half dozen times, and I would never pay to see him again. I had gotten the sense for a long time that he didn't really care that much for live performance, but the last time I saw him I strongly felt he held the audience in complete contempt. He blasted through the songs at a pace that made them unrecognizable in that ever-deteriorating nasal-mumble-rasp vocal style, did his duty and nearly ran off the stage. Makes me sad because I was once a great admirer. Not nearly as much an admirer of course as my old golf pro friend Jim Neufeld, who once had a game of cards against the cover from Blonde on Blonde propped up on a chair. Now Jim works for the post office.

 

I don't know Captains Courageous except by reputation, though it was directed by Victor Fleming, who shortly after made a couple of semi-famous films, The Wizard of Oz and Gone with the Wind. Something really worked in the ancient studio system when a guy could make three top-drawer films in as many years (with two lesser films tucked in between).

 

The Wizard of Oz is pretty up there in my esteem as well. Entirely different from either Laurence or Local Hero, of course, but set new standards for production design, and became the benchmark against which to measure three-strip technicolor photography.

 

I was about to type that regrettably despite trying to google and cheat I don't know the song, then I realized it was Brownsville Girl, and the actor to whom you are referring is Gregory Peck.

 

Which brings us to To Kill a Mockingbird, one of the great films of all time as well, featuring a very young Robert Duvall as Boo Radley.

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Excellent...just when I thought CA was lost, Ajax has a few threads I can relate to, and Kim posts some technical drawings that Mr. Perry drew that bring me back. There may be hope, yet.

 

Thank you Mr. Perry & Mr. Bottles. Can't wait for the next update...in the meantime, I'll be sanding & painting (again) my 35 year old Atomic 4 engine parts & sanding my teak veneer and slapping some polyuethane on it to freshen it up a bit, and scouring ebay for a used Origo stove, because even Defender wants too much for a new one. :rolleyes:

 

It is great to live vicariously thru others. B)

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Yeah, I was looking at the plans over my entire lunch.

I get it just enough to appreciate the fact I don't quite get the why, but it's neat to look at.

 

Like going to the Art Institute and Museum of Science & Industry on a Tuesday in Chicago.

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Richard:

The last time I saw Dylan in person, he did an awful electric set with a very so-so band.

 

Then he came out by himself, with a guitar and played for an hour and a half. It was spellbinding. The hall was dead silent. He may have his off nights but they don't call him Bob Dylan for nothing.

 

The song I referenced was Brownsville Girl.

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You know what I like about those double handled winch handles? When you're short tacking the beach on Night Runner with her ginormous genoa, after you're done grinding you can just hold onto the handles and rest instead of falling over :)

 

Classic Sam

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Richard when all else fails RTFT. :rolleyes:

 

Says the man who makes the 4,321st post in that thread!

 

Well no one said this shit was easy, otherwise everyone would be doing it. Pay attention.

 

 

 

 

I am Spartacus!

 

 

 

 

 

Oops, wrong movie.

 

 

Perhaps the wrong movie but indeed Ish, you are Spartacus.

 

 

Richard:

I think you and I would get along just fine.

Try 1937 CAPTAINS COURAGIOUS.

 

This movie does it for me.

To paraphrase Bob Dylan, "I'd watch anything with Lionel Barymore in it."

 

Name the Dylan song. I dare you.

 

Same for me but Drew. My wife understands god love her.

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In an effort to run out the string of this hijack . . . . . .

 

I was lucky enough to see the movie in a proper theater when it was redone in proper 70mm with all the TV cuts restored, and it was like listening to audiophile vinyl- they don't make 'em like that anymore.

 

I saw the movie when it came out when I was 13, and when Lawrence dies in the opening minutes I felt set free. I had only seen movies where "how does it end" is the sole plot device, and I got to watch all of Lawrence just moved and transported. I've never forgotten it. And a proper intermission.

 

Yes I know the movie has a bunch of non-arabs playing arabs, but it is so much better than an awful western and it is hard to fault Omar Sharif, Alec Guinness, and Anthony Quinn. One of my top three.

 

They're NOT Arabs!?

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IB:

Nobody askes me to crew for them any more. I don't need the handle,. Nice of you to ask.

 

You can go with us on this year's Swiftsure. Any position you want. Any bunk you want. I'll supply the two-handed winch handles.

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Thanks Beer. That's a great offer but I'll pass. My knees aren't what they used to be and I don't think I could be an asset to your crew. I don't want to end up being one of the old guys that the young crew guys look at and wonder, "Why is he here?" Maybe I could go. I'd just lay on my back on the foredeck staring up at the luff of the jib constantly yelling out, "You're high! You're high!" I remember one of those guys.

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Always thought that sounded like a thankless job. And with oilskins that didn't work. Thank God for the invention of the tell-tail.

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Listen dip shit Ed:

It wasn't 1643. We had tell tails. It was 1970---something or 1980--something or 1990--something. So many races so little memory.

We had tell tails. But from time to time you hade this old guy ( me? God forbid) who could contribute nothing else than trying to tell the helmsman when he was low or high. It was fucking annoying.

I want a crew where every member can do the job of every other member.

 

If it's blowing 25 TWS 160 TWA and we need to change chutes. I'm not going to be able to do what I know needs to be done in a timely manner.

I wouldn't want me for crew. I'd sure as hell like me at 30 years old. I'd kill for that guy. He' has left the building.

 

I think he left one of his knees behind.

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I bought faucets today. SWMBO is happy. Now she knows the Sliver will have running water. And to think I started out wanting virtually no down below. Now we have heat, hot and cold running water, next thing you will know there will be a sound system being installed. What happened to my daysailor?

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Have you figured out where you're putting the washer/dryer?

 

Stop it Ish, don't jinx the poor vessel!

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Only one flat screen TV Paps? Of course for the electronics you will need antennae which means an arch, correct? Might as well add floodlights and a liferaft while you're at it. Make it a bit larger and you could put one of those little drone helicopters up there for scouting out the wind and uncrowded anchorages. Of course Bob didn't provide enough buoyancy for that (Sheesh Bob...) so you will need to add sponsons.

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And there would still be room for a Hammond B2 with a Leslie speaker. I bet the acoustics would be awesome.

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Been gone for a while, just got back from a holiday.Went up to the school on Monday. My youngest daughter, joined in to shoot as well and to provide a different perspective. We'll be going up for the next eight weeks or so to shoot more of the school as well as the Sliver project.

 

http://s174.photobuc...mview=slideshow

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Kim,

 

Sound system.

 

Speakers, Bose 151s. Amp, the "Left Coast Simple Stereo" that Jim Lee here on CA offers. Source, an ithing.

 

Ignore me at your peril!

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At 62' you'd think a wine chiller could get squeezed in somewhere.

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Always thought that sounded like a thankless job. And with oilskins that didn't work. Thank God for the invention of the tell-tail.

 

I got what you meant Ed. Sometimes it gets lost in translation. Hang in there.

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I bought faucets today. SWMBO is happy. Now she knows the Sliver will have running water. And to think I started out wanting virtually no down below. Now we have heat, hot and cold running water, next thing you will know there will be a sound system being installed. What happened to my daysailor?

You made it 62 feet long.

 

At 62' you'd think a wine chiller could get squeezed in somewhere.

 

He's right, you know. ;)

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Mission creep! Got a change order for every one?

 

Top down furler next! Then Bob's old knee can go along.

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Always thought that sounded like a thankless job. And with oilskins that didn't work. Thank God for the invention of the tell-tail.

 

I got what you meant Ed. Sometimes it gets lost in translation. Hang in there.

 

Well, those of us in the Commonwealth got it. I think it needs more pies and yelling for the 'mericanos.

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Thanks Beer. That's a great offer but I'll pass. My knees aren't what they used to be and I don't think I could be an asset to your crew. I don't want to end up being one of the old guys that the young crew guys look at and wonder, "Why is he here?" Maybe I could go. I'd just lay on my back on the foredeck staring up at the luff of the jib constantly yelling out, "You're high! You're high!" I remember one of those guys.

That guy on the bow would be in a big fight with one of my buddies who HATES weight on the bow.

We always took my dad along and now he doesn't want to go. Everyone is running for the high side and he does a slow crawl up there and needs help to make sometimes. He tells me "I feel like I'm not contributing." He says he feels "in the way." Though nothing could be further from the truth. I think he still has lots to teach me. This is a guy who has sailed actually forgotten more about sailing than I know (actually that is not that hard). No matter how I begged or pleaded, he just stopped coming along. I am thankful that I got to do a few races with him on my boat. We always had a great time with him aboard. Nobody makes me laugh harder.

Ah shit...as Bette Davis once said, "getting old ain't for sissies."

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Bear:

I remember a few years back talking to Lowell North and he was giving up racing because of his knees. At that time I wondered how bad can knees be. Now I know.

I can relate to how your Dad feels. You can still take him out sailing though. Sounds like a guy I would like to meet.

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+1.

 

No, +2.

 

Except mine got this way courtesy of a Civic bumper. Can a boat be made that doesn't require stepping up or down? Cruising that is. I don't need wheelchair accessible yet.

 

Before anybody says RC, think again. Although we saw a bunch of guys racing RC's at the South Lake Union park, and God help me, it began to look good.....

 

:(

 

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That's a great photo of the shop. I can even smell it.

 

Jax:

Which one of my old knees?

 

Which one is oldest?

 

And remember, when Lowell North gave up racing, he was giving up on the Devil's Own Tool, the Star. Hell on knees for decades before other small boat classes caught on to "mini-hiking" techniques.

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+1.

 

No, +2.

 

Except mine got this way courtesy of a Civic bumper. Can a boat be made that doesn't require stepping up or down? Cruising that is. I don't need wheelchair accessible yet.

 

Before anybody says RC, think again. Although we saw a bunch of guys racing RC's at the South Lake Union park, and God help me, it began to look good.....

 

:(

 

Just been beginning the RC investigation recently myself up here in Anacortes. They sail twice a week year round, rain or no rain. Certainly is a great way to get your racing starts down! I think the median age however is 75, so I'm definitely the youngster!

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That's a great photo of the shop. I can even smell it.

 

Jax:

Which one of my old knees?

 

Which one is oldest?

 

And remember, when Lowell North gave up racing, he was giving up on the Devil's Own Tool, the Star. Hell on knees for decades before other small boat classes caught on to "mini-hiking" techniques.

 

For the skipper, maybe. At what point did Star crew stop being :)layabouts:)?? Mid 60's? Then they got to the knees....

Although isn't there a pic somewhere of BOTH Star crew doing the prone thing? Hard to see telltales doing that. Other boats too.

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That's a great photo of the shop. I can even smell it.

 

Jax:

Which one of my old knees?

 

Which one is oldest?

 

And remember, when Lowell North gave up racing, he was giving up on the Devil's Own Tool, the Star. Hell on knees for decades before other small boat classes caught on to "mini-hiking" techniques.

 

For the skipper, maybe. At what point did Star crew stop being :)layabouts:)?? Mid 60's? Then they got to the knees....

Although isn't there a pic somewhere of BOTH Star crew doing the prone thing? Hard to see telltales doing that. Other boats too.

 

That and the prone thing ends up nose to tail, so the view never changes.

 

And the prone thing also makes the dive for the lee runner a bit more desparate in any breeze.

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Always thought that sounded like a thankless job. And with oilskins that didn't work. Thank God for the invention of the tell-tail.

 

I got what you meant Ed. Sometimes it gets lost in translation. Hang in there.

 

Well, those of us in the Commonwealth got it. I think it needs more pies and yelling for the 'mericanos.

 

Guess so Ish, pies always improve a situation. Shame is the buggers invented Ketchup, got to love em for that.

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Bear:

I remember a few years back talking to Lowell North and he was giving up racing because of his knees. At that time I wondered how bad can knees be. Now I know.

I can relate to how your Dad feels. You can still take him out sailing though. Sounds like a guy I would like to meet.

 

He's going out with us this weekend. Taking him to Eagle Harbor on Friday then over to SYC outstation in Port Madison for the chili cook-off there on Sat-Sun. Possibly go to Poulsbo or Blakely Harbor for Sunday night/Monday. Swing on the hook for a night. Nice glass of wine. Gumbo.

You and him would get along great I'd think.

He has had a wide range of boats. Mostly ugly. Let's see O'Day 27 with that high cabin, Hirondelle cat, Gemini cat with that sprung sheer, a Columbia not sure of the size with that blister cabin top, currently has a Nimble 25. Trying to sell that as he just can't handle the boat by himself. Poor guy. Always thought that line about being happy getting rid of your boat was bullshit. He's not happy about it. My mother is though.....

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(I use the mooring because it gives me a better view of the boat.)

 

I had to quote this, Most folk just get a nice painting or something.

My grandfather put his boat on the mooring to get a better view. I have the photo.

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I think Kim's running around in circles in a padded room screaming "why, why"

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Did Kimb absolutely rule out a piano? This one looks pretty good and sounds wonderful with the pretty lass's melodious songs.post-25637-0-04361200-1360561320_thumb.jpg

 

How in the heck do they have the stern out of the water with the piano and her back there? Lead bow?

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I'd guess the piano is very old, by the looks of it, and if I'm right in that, very light, with little metal frame. Maybe 2-3 hundred pounds tops, maybe less.

 

Schimmel made a few aluminum pianos for the Hindenberg and her sister ships. Very light.

 

Or photo shopped- the pianist isn't a small person, there are two other guys sitting right next to it, and the stern is not dragging. hmmm. But the hull just in front of the rower looks low- maybe there's ballast forward?

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Piano needs to be painted orange and have Santa Cruz style beer holders installed.

 

 

just sayin' B)

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"Schimmel made a few aluminum pianos for the Hindenberg and her sister ships. Very light."

 

You see, that's why we keep Paul around.

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Piano needs to be painted orange and have Santa Cruz style beer holders installed.

 

 

just sayin' B)

 

Wouldn't that make her play too fast? Or would the beer counteract the speed of the orange?

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Went sailing on the James Craig on Sunday and I thought about Mr. Perry's sail trim position. Got a bit confusing so maybe someone could fill me in on the correct commands for trimming these puppies,,,,,,,,,

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My God! Look at all the strings!

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OK, Bob hear you loud and clear:

 

Maybe we don't have a keel yet, but we have keel floors and a support for the jacking mast step (well most of the floors anyway, got to wait for the Chockfast to harden before Fred can peel off the masking of the surrounding floors to finish up that last floor.)

 

(And to think I thought I wanted wood floors.....well I did until Tim straighten my thinking out. Something about keel loads crushing the wood.....)

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Looks great Kim. Looking at the width of tabbing for when the deck goes on,that is gonna be one strong deck. What is it 4" 6"?

Thanks again for the updates.

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