kimbottles

Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

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Great looking boat!

 

 

Er--- you can get paid to climb rocks?

 

Apparently she did a lot of guiding and teaching of rock climbing. At least that's what I understand.

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Is the headrom as great as it appears in this photo?8532161691_36c2f45ae0_b.jpg

 

Kai is 5'6" and he is sloughing down in this picture (which is an early fitting picture before they cut the companionway.)

 

I am 6'1" and I have full standing headroom. Bob designed the headroom around my 6'2" son "dbottles" (Derek).

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It's looking just like the drawings...imagine that :)

Great work.

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Great looking boat!

 

 

Er--- you can get paid to climb rocks?

 

Apparently she did a lot of guiding and teaching of rock climbing. At least that's what I understand.

 

That's easier to understand.........thanks!

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Kim, Bob et al, great project and great thread.

 

Somehow I missed this one, and now playing catch up, skimmed most and done detail up to page 6 so far... Will be catching up over tea breaks for the next week or so I guess. :huh:

 

The real bugger is the build technique is pretty similar to ours, although a few interesting changes; it's interesting to see the choices and reasons. I won't bother with most of the questions as they are out of date by months now, but might come back to a couple once I have read right through.

 

Anyway, she looks like she will be a stunning build, and I love the fact that she is all about the sailing.

 

Keep up the updates, and have fun!

 

Jess.

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Needed a place to run the traveler and mount the center placed electric winch

 

Really interesting to see how reverse German mainsheet systems are becoming more popular. The wonders of modern blocks. What sort of system are you planning?

 

And after sailing and owning Skerry Cruisers (Square Metre Boats) I am used to split cockpits. I rather like the way they work.

 

Aft cockpit for SWMBO and me, forward for the crew.

 

Nicely feudal. Got to keep the serfs where they belong. :lol:

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The crew starts out by cleaning the gluing surfaces up with acetone and it looks like it will take some time, so Neil and I drive up to Brandon's shop to see the bulb mold (well half of it anyway.)

 

(Brandon's very cool power cat was in the shop so we got a bit of a bonus. )

 

Your boat looks great with a deck, Kim, but of course I'm fascinated by the cat. I know you have mentioned it before, but can't recall the details and. My Cowmaran buddy has questions ...

 

Length? Beam? Weight? Cruise and top speeds? How do you get onto the foredeck, and once there, how do you avoid falling off?

 

She is 24' LOA 8.5' beam and cruises at 20 ish knots. It has curved foils which are mainly to make it more economical. I don't remember the weight, but she is fairly light. Brandon and I have been discussing a 35x10 version. Super simple just like this one, maybe twin 50's or something like that. Just in the conceptual stages right now. But my goal is to cruise at 18 knots and max about 25

 

Don't think there is any reason to go forward.

 

Thanks, Kim. IMO, anchoring and docking are a couple of good reasons to go forward. Accepting a tow might occasionally be a good reason.

 

There is discussion of a new, larger Cowmaran, but this one may be built here in Florida in a mini-storage warehouse. Warehousemaran doesn't sound right, so it will need a different kind of name.

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Is the headrom as great as it appears in this photo?8532161691_36c2f45ae0_b.jpg

 

Kai is 5'6" and he is sloughing down in this picture (which is an early fitting picture before they cut the companionway.)

 

I am 6'1" and I have full standing headroom. Bob designed the headroom around my 6'2" son "dbottles" (Derek).

 

Thanks Kim. She is a thing of beauty. Thanks to You, Bob and Great Dane for sharing the process.

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Yeah but, Yeah but Sons.... what do I do with my Planimeter ?? Where's mystery and magic in selecting an object and clickety click... presto there's the number ?? laugh.gif

 

If you are like me you put your planimieter in a drawer right next to your slide rule.... I'm a young 52 now!

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Needed a place to run the traveler and mount the center placed electric winch

 

Really interesting to see how reverse German mainsheet systems are becoming more popular. The wonders of modern blocks. What sort of system are you planning?

 

And after sailing and owning Skerry Cruisers (Square Metre Boats) I am used to split cockpits. I rather like the way they work.

 

Aft cockpit for SWMBO and me, forward for the crew.

 

Nicely feudal. Got to keep the serfs where they belong. :lol:

 

Still messing around with the mainsheet system, maybe I will get it right someday.

 

Forward cockpit is really for the relaxation of guests who do not want to actively participate in the messy business of handling the jib sheets. But I kind of like your feudal idea.

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The crew starts out by cleaning the gluing surfaces up with acetone and it looks like it will take some time, so Neil and I drive up to Brandon's shop to see the bulb mold (well half of it anyway.)

 

(Brandon's very cool power cat was in the shop so we got a bit of a bonus. )

 

Your boat looks great with a deck, Kim, but of course I'm fascinated by the cat. I know you have mentioned it before, but can't recall the details and. My Cowmaran buddy has questions ...

 

Length? Beam? Weight? Cruise and top speeds? How do you get onto the foredeck, and once there, how do you avoid falling off?

 

She is 24' LOA 8.5' beam and cruises at 20 ish knots. It has curved foils which are mainly to make it more economical. I don't remember the weight, but she is fairly light. Brandon and I have been discussing a 35x10 version. Super simple just like this one, maybe twin 50's or something like that. Just in the conceptual stages right now. But my goal is to cruise at 18 knots and max about 25

 

Don't think there is any reason to go forward.

 

Thanks, Kim. IMO, anchoring and docking are a couple of good reasons to go forward. Accepting a tow might occasionally be a good reason.

 

There is discussion of a new, larger Cowmaran, but this one may be built here in Florida in a mini-storage warehouse. Warehousemaran doesn't sound right, so it will need a different kind of name.

 

I have always lead a bow line aft on my power cats because I single hand them most of the time. There are some little handrails on Brandon's cat on the blister cabin-top, but the side decks are very narrow. I would put a handrail down the middle of the foredeck for additional security while forward. We are doing that on the foredeck of the Sliver because of my desire to avoid lifelines.

 

Please forward details of Warehousemaran.....

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Forward cockpit is really for the relaxation of guests who do not want to actively participate in the messy business of handling the jib sheets. But I kind of like your feudal idea.

 

There are some classic six metres that really do the feudal thing well. 2 cockpits, with a strip of deck between the two. His majesty remains aft, in his splendour, while the hoi polloi [sic] scrabble about in the forward cockpit getting in each other's way, while getting soaked (no wetter keelboat in existence than a six). REALLY showing the staff who's boss.

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Presuming:

That's kind of the look I had in mind.

 

PE: Helmsman's cockpit also known as the Owner's Enclosure.

 

Ed

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Presuming:

That's kind of the look I had in mind.

 

PE: Helmsman's cockpit also known as the Owner's Enclosure.

 

Ed

 

Except I like to offer the helm to guests so I will have to let the rabble into the aft cockpit.

 

I enjoy sailing along with others at the helm on my boats.

 

The last couple races I did on the 30 Square Metre before I sold her I had someone else drive.

 

Sometimes it is just good to be crew.

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So exciting, Kim. I'm happy with you.

 

Will you tell us about the separation in the cockpit?

 

Needed a place to run the traveler and mount the center placed electric winch. And after sailing and owning Skerry Cruisers (Square Metre Boats) I am used to split cockpits. I rather like the way they work.

 

Aft cockpit for SWMBO and me, forward for the crew.

post-8115-0-79189800-1362703052_thumb.jpgpost-8115-0-20012500-1362703068_thumb.jpg

 

So why is GreatDane28 standing in my cockpit??

post-8115-0-12266400-1362703089_thumb.jpg

 

Oh yeah, he works there....

 

GreatDane28 is scoping it out for upcoming adventures on the water!

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So exciting, Kim. I'm happy with you.

 

Will you tell us about the separation in the cockpit?

 

Needed a place to run the traveler and mount the center placed electric winch. And after sailing and owning Skerry Cruisers (Square Metre Boats) I am used to split cockpits. I rather like the way they work.

 

Aft cockpit for SWMBO and me, forward for the crew.

post-8115-0-79189800-1362703052_thumb.jpgpost-8115-0-20012500-1362703068_thumb.jpg

 

So why is GreatDane28 standing in my cockpit??

post-8115-0-12266400-1362703089_thumb.jpg

 

Oh yeah, he works there....

 

GreatDane28 is scoping it out for upcoming adventures on the water!

 

Sailor-mom you should be very proud of your son! He is a great guy and very nice to have on the project. Apparently you did well when you raised him. Kim

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More information on the Non Profit School building the Sliver Project can be found here:

 

http://www.nwboatschool.org/ & https://www.facebook.com/NWBoatSchool

 

Lots of very cool boats get built there out of wood.

 

(Donations to help them train future boat-builders are always welcomed at this non profit school.)

post-8115-0-26081800-1362760514_thumb.jpg

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KIm,

What happened to your BB 10?

The Sliver is very much like the Ray Hunt series like the 510. Same concept but softer chines and a better keel. She should be a blast. Congratulations for building her.

Tom

post-9897-0-32122500-1362761342_thumb.jpg

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Hyd:

"Softer chines"? SLIVER has no chines whatsoever. It's a round bilge boat.

Good call on that Hunt DE. Looks like a great boat. Do you have any dimensions for it?

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KIm,

What happened to your BB 10?

The Sliver is very much like the Ray Hunt series like the 510. Same concept but softer chines and a better keel. She should be a blast. Congratulations for building her.

Tom

 

The BB-10 belongs to my brother Kirk.

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PE: Helmsman's cockpit also known as the Owner's Enclosure.

Could get some enclosure badges made. A very exclusive club "I've helmed Silver" *

members_badges.jpg

 

I did hear about one boat where all guests received a little lapel pins of the device/symbol that was on the spinnaker. One of those fun touches - like having a ship's cocktail, or ship's writing paper: Onboard Silver. Lat _____ Long _____ Off_____ *

 

Except I like to offer the helm to guests so I will have to let the rabble into the aft cockpit.

 

I enjoy sailing along with others at the helm on my boats.

Very nice. If you get yourself one of these, you can always get people back forward where they rightfully belong. Once they've sampled the sybaritic delights aft.... :o^_^

livestock-prods.jpg

 

(Forgotten what she's really going to be called. Very sorry.)

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Kim & Bob,

 

Congratulations! One more step in the process of building what will clearly be one of the most beautiful boats ever!

 

Beau

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Calling her "Sliver" works fine for now.

 

After all she is a class boat a "Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor".

 

Sail # USA 1

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Bob, love your work. As a life long 110er (notice my Avatar) I'd like to Thank you for your update of a Ray Hunt 510. Rounded to please the eye and capturing the simplicity and beauty of the sliver length to beam, the enclosed cockpit, the foredeck longer than J updated for keel and rig while are all classic of the Ray Hunt boat. Hip, Hip...!

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Material Question for Bob and the Builders

 

Why the use of thickened epoxy rather than one of the adhesives like Plexus?

 

We used to also use a Scott Bader material called Crestomer, great for bonding bulkheads etc. No need to tab afterwards

 

great looking boat by the way...

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Mudder:

I can't answer your question. The structural details were spec'd by our engineer Tim Nolan and he worked with the builders to coime up with the exact materials that the yard was comfortable with. I just said, "Make it look like this and make it float here." Oh yeah, "And make it not fall apart."

 

I like tabbing. It spreads the loads out. No tabbing would make me nervous.

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Mudder:

I can't answer your question. The structural details were spec'd by our engineer Tim Nolan and he worked with the builders to coime up with the exact materials that the yard was comfortable with. I just said, "Make it look like this and make it float here." Oh yeah, "And make it not fall apart."

 

I like tabbing. It spreads the loads out. No tabbing would make me nervous.

 

Good questions Mud,

 

Tim Nolan who is a very experienced marine engineer and has engineered far larger and more complex vessels was quite specific about how he wanted the strength elements handled. He explained much of his reasoning to me and it all made complete sense to me.

 

The other very experienced people who contributed to these issues were Jim Franken and Russell Brown. Both expert boat builders with vast experience in laminates and this kind of construction.

 

I have complete faith in all of their abilities to steer the project right.

 

That all said, I think the thickened epoxy is more of a filler to land the tabbing on and less about adding strength. The entire engineering of this project was to make a one piece structure inside the boat to spread the rather large keel loads over a large area. Tabbing seems to be much stronger especially when using foam core composite bulkheads than edge gluing.

 

All of the experienced people who have visited the project have comment on how well engineered she is and how stiff she will be.

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huntress.bmpRay Hunt made a series of "10" designs. We have a fleet of 210s at Gibson Island (Md) and love the boats. Ray even designed a 210 style 12 meter (before Easterner) with a swept bulb keel and a huge chain girth penalty that limited her sail area. Still, it might have been a fast boat!

Here is a Hunt (modern) design very similar to Sliver (Silver?)http://classicsailboats.org/?p=1585

Then there was Huntress - a 410. Maybe a little less successful design.

post-9897-0-04163100-1362775929_thumb.jpg

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huntress.bmpRay Hunt made a series of "10" designs. We have a fleet of 210s at Gibson Island (Md) and love the boats. Ray even designed a 210 style 12 meter (before Easterner) with a swept bulb keel and a huge chain girth penalty that limited her sail area. Still, it might have been a fast boat!

Here is a Hunt (modern) design very similar to Sliver (Silver?)http://classicsailboats.org/?p=1585

Then there was Huntress - a 410. Maybe a little less successful design.

 

I have always liked Ray Hunt designs......

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Me too. I had the use of a 210 when I spent the summer working for Carter.

I put an add in the local paper saying I was a church mouse poor young yacht designer and I wanted a free boat for the summer.

A lady called and said I could use her 210. It was called DAISY. I loved it.

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Grinder guy:

You are not far off but ICON is a much beamier boat. So, with that in mind, I didn't need to pinch the bow of the SLIVER. SLIVER is skinny.

It's almost the opposite. I needed to push volume into both ends.

With ICON I was trying to design the ultimate light air boat.

 

So, no, the SLIVER's bow is not like ICON's. Similar? ok, similar.

But I really like the fact that you are looking hard at the shapes.

Come on up to the beach shack and I'll overlay the two shapes for you

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A 210 or your boat when finished may exhibit the same behavior when trying to plane. The bow is up and seems to be planing but the stern sinks. Still pretty fast and though boats plane on their midsections, without buoyancy aft they don't break away.

The other interesting thing about sailing the 210 (or a boat shaped like yours) is the lack of noise from no stern wave. The boat seems "slow" because you don't have the wave sound for speed reference. But it's a rocket upwind.

I look forward to seeing pictures of Sliver sailing!

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One other thing. The curved mast. Sorry that didn't happen. Besides the Fat Head aerodynamics it gives (without the excessive roach requiring runners and no perm backstay), my theory is that When the boom was eased, the hook tightened the leech, providing some "vang" action (before boats had vangs)

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One other thing. The curved mast. Sorry that didn't happen. Besides the Fat Head aerodynamics it gives (without the excessive roach requiring runners and no perm backstay), my theory is that When the boom was eased, the hook tightened the leech, providing some "vang" action (before boats had vangs)

 

I think it would have looked really cool too, but in all practicality because of the stiffness of modern sailcloths I think a bendy rig would be harder to tune upwind and downwind. The luff tension varies greatly with backstay ease and tuning the rig to match the luff round is a little more difficult..

 

With the carbon mast and boom, if anything you need to ease a little vang downwind.

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One other thing. The curved mast. Sorry that didn't happen. Besides the Fat Head aerodynamics it gives (without the excessive roach requiring runners and no perm backstay), my theory is that When the boom was eased, the hook tightened the leech, providing some "vang" action (before boats had vangs)

 

I think it would have looked really cool too, but in all practicality because of the stiffness of modern sailcloths I think a bendy rig would be harder to tune upwind and downwind. The luff tension varies greatly with backstay ease and tuning the rig to match the luff round is a little more difficult..

 

With the carbon mast and boom, if anything you need to ease a little vang downwind.

One other thing. The curved mast. Sorry that didn't happen. Besides the Fat Head aerodynamics it gives (without the excessive roach requiring runners and no perm backstay), my theory is that When the boom was eased, the hook tightened the leech, providing some "vang" action (before boats had vangs)

 

I think it would have looked really cool too, but in all practicality because of the stiffness of modern sailcloths I think a bendy rig would be harder to tune upwind and downwind. The luff tension varies greatly with backstay ease and tuning the rig to match the luff round is a little more difficult..

 

With the carbon mast and boom, if anything you need to ease a little vang downwind.

With the mast BUILT in a curve (as they were), luff tension would be normal upwind and down. They generally weren't bent to the curve, which was just in the top but made that way. Making the luff curve would drive a sailmaker nuts and the sail would get much fuller when more perpendicular to the fore and aft curve (another reason why they did it?).That pre curve would make the mast bendier, being already out of column? Anyway it was a short lived thing and looked cool.

On some 12 meters,some luff curve was unmeasured (the top girth was unrestricted I think?) so "free" area could have been gained by the pre bent topmast (plus some aerodynamic efficiencies), hence Lionheart's hooked fiberglass topmast. The rule was changed to eliminate that I think.

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The idea of a bend in the mast disappeared when we found a used carbon fibre Farr 40 mast at a fraction of the cost of a new one and Bob determined it would fit the boat very well. Sometimes we just have to follow the practical route.

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Hyder:

Yes, it did look cool and that's why I drew it that way. I was trying to get the look of the Skerry Cruisers rig.

But the sailmaker did not like it at all. In time he suggested we look at the Farr 40 rig and given there were two rigs available at very resonjable cost we elected to go that way.

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One other thing. The curved mast. Sorry that didn't happen. Besides the Fat Head aerodynamics it gives (without the excessive roach requiring runners and no perm backstay), my theory is that When the boom was eased, the hook tightened the leech, providing some "vang" action (before boats had vangs)

 

I think it would have looked really cool too, but in all practicality because of the stiffness of modern sailcloths I think a bendy rig would be harder to tune upwind and downwind. The luff tension varies greatly with backstay ease and tuning the rig to match the luff round is a little more difficult..

 

With the carbon mast and boom, if anything you need to ease a little vang downwind.

One other thing. The curved mast. Sorry that didn't happen. Besides the Fat Head aerodynamics it gives (without the excessive roach requiring runners and no perm backstay), my theory is that When the boom was eased, the hook tightened the leech, providing some "vang" action (before boats had vangs)

 

I think it would have looked really cool too, but in all practicality because of the stiffness of modern sailcloths I think a bendy rig would be harder to tune upwind and downwind. The luff tension varies greatly with backstay ease and tuning the rig to match the luff round is a little more difficult..

 

With the carbon mast and boom, if anything you need to ease a little vang downwind.

With the mast BUILT in a curve (as they were), luff tension would be normal upwind and down. They generally weren't bent to the curve, which was just in the top but made that way. Making the luff curve would drive a sailmaker nuts and the sail would get much fuller when more perpendicular to the fore and aft curve (another reason why they did it?).That pre curve would make the mast bendier, being already out of column? Anyway it was a short lived thing and looked cool.

On some 12 meters,some luff curve was unmeasured (the top girth was unrestricted I think?) so "free" area could have been gained by the pre bent topmast (plus some aerodynamic efficiencies), hence Lionheart's hooked fiberglass topmast. The rule was changed to eliminate that I think.

 

They certainly would have been interesting rigs to build.. especially the wooden ones. I hadn't thought of that idea of the sail getting fuller by the luff curve setting up against the straighter side of the mast when the boom was out; I couldn't find anything on it but it makes sense. I think the luff tension would need to be eased markedly.

 

Kim, did your 30 square have a bent mast and if so can you give us an insight into its construction?

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What skinny boats look like when they're going........The Baltic Classic Circuit.....

 

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On some 12 meters,some luff curve was unmeasured (the top girth was unrestricted I think?) so "free" area could have been gained by the pre bent topmast (plus some aerodynamic efficiencies), hence Lionheart's hooked fiberglass topmast. The rule was changed to eliminate that I think.

 

[Pedant point] Lionheart and Australia's -(KA 5, when they copied it) masts weren't prebent. Curve in the glass topmast all came from luffcurve in the main/leech tension. You can see in the first photo the black aluminium mast and the lighter topmast, despite them not flying a mainsail with the luff curve.

1980Lionheart.jpg 1980australia_lionheart.jpg 1980australia_freedom.jpg

 

[/Pp]

AIUI, Skerrycruisers may have prebent masts.

 

DSC_0120.JPG

Photo: http://captainjpslog.blogspot.co.uk

 

post-419-0-83574100-1362846783_thumb.png

Photo - Peter Brookes

Not sure how prevalent they actually are, though.

 

Salts.jpg

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Kim, did your 30 square have a bent mast and if so can you give us an insight into its construction?

 

 

No, my 1995 Beck &Sohne built Reimer designed 30 had an aluminum mast which I could bend with the back stay a bit, but nothing like the Skerry Cruiser bends you see on some boats. My buddy George has a wood mast with considerable bend built in on his 1936 Becker designed 30. It certainly looks radical and attracts attention.

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Boy, that video is something else. There are some very beautiful boats in that group. I love the boat with the hard dodger just aft of the main cabin trunk. I've never seen that detail before.

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Boy, that video is something else. There are some very beautiful boats in that group. I love the boat with the hard dodger just aft of the main cabin trunk. I've never seen that detail before.

 

There's still time to add one to the aft cockpit on Sliver...

 

Make the aft cockpit that much more "royal" ;-)

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Rat:

I'm not sure how that little space between the dodger and the cabin trunk works. Id have to see that close up. I love the look.

Looks like they sell a lot of Epiphanes in Sweden.

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Guest multitranslation

how many bows can one boat have? <_<

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Rat:

I'm not sure how that little space between the dodger and the cabin trunk works. Id have to see that close up. I love the look.

Looks like they sell a lot of Epiphanes in Sweden.

 

There is an Alden ketch down here with one of those dodgers, called Saona.

Belongs to a friend.

I could take some pics and PM them if you want.

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Will try and find a pic but I saw a boat recently that had a Volvo 70 style Cuddy / hard dodger that was on slides just like the main hatch so it could be moved fwd out of the way in good weather. It looked interesting.

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Rat:

I'm not sure how that little space between the dodger and the cabin trunk works. Id have to see that close up. I love the look.

Looks like they sell a lot of Epiphanes in Sweden.

 

There is an Alden ketch down here with one of those dodgers, called Saona.

Belongs to a friend.

I could take some pics and PM them if you want.

 

Hey Olaf! We ALL want to see those pictures, please post them here instead of the PM. Thanks!

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Got an e-mail from the boss at Pacific Fishermen today.

 

He titled it: "It's a Thing of Beauty". Here are the pictures he sent.

 

I will try and get more next week when I get over there again.

 

All primed in the Green Zinc Primer and ready for the next step: encapsulation and fairing.

 

Working on getting the ballast bulb mold finished and down to the lead foundry.

post-8115-0-73120300-1362869374_thumb.jpg

post-8115-0-88297800-1362869385_thumb.jpg

post-8115-0-43975100-1362869394_thumb.jpg

post-8115-0-55462200-1362869403_thumb.jpg

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What skinny boats look like when they're going........The Baltic Classic Circuit.....

There are some really nice boats up there. Short season - June to August, with sunshine that lacks the horsepower in the Med. And also unlike the Med, it's about people who love boats, and not about big swinging dicks proving how much cash they've got.

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What skinny boats look like when they're going........The Baltic Classic Circuit.....

There are some really nice boats up there. Short season - June to August, with sunshine that lacks the horsepower in the Med. And also unlike the Med, it's about people who love boats, and not about big swinging dicks proving how much cash they've got.

 

I sailed in a week long regatta in 2008 out of Sandhamn in a 30 Square Metre Class, the other classes, 15, 22, 40, 55, 75, 95 and one 150 boat were vessels to behold!!

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I tried to send the link on my iPad. She is a Rhodes, not an Alden.

I can't get the link to download on my apple thing, so I am unsure if it works.

Anyhow, I will get more pics of the "Chevy Truck" doghouse later in the week.

 

There is also an old blog, google Saona Ketch, it's near the top.

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Got an e-mail from the boss at Pacific Fishermen today.

 

He titled it: "It's a Thing of Beauty". Here are the pictures he sent.

 

I will try and get more next week when I get over there again.

 

 

I'm glad you posted this kimb. I had the Baltic video going on the other monitor and had completely forgotten which thread I was reading.

 

Congratulations on another milestone passed.

 

Now I'm going to watch that video again...

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Got an e-mail from the boss at Pacific Fishermen today.

 

He titled it: "It's a Thing of Beauty". Here are the pictures he sent.

 

I will try and get more next week when I get over there again.

 

 

I'm glad you posted this kimb. I had the Baltic video going on the other monitor and had completely forgotten which thread I was reading.

 

Congratulations on another milestone passed.

 

Now I'm going to watch that video again...

 

That is a great video!!

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I've been busy so had a few pages to catch up. I have the following comments:

 

Wow,

 

Wow,

 

Heheh,

 

Wow,

 

Cool,

 

Gorgeous,

 

Wow.

 

 

That is all.

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Got an e-mail from the boss at Pacific Fishermen today.

 

He titled it: "It's a Thing of Beauty". Here are the pictures he sent.

 

I will try and get more next week when I get over there again.

 

All primed in the Green Zinc Primer and ready for the next step: encapsulation and fairing.

 

Working on getting the ballast bulb mold finished and down to the lead foundry.

 

 

 

You were right when you said you thought you found the right fabricator. Nice work.

 

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More information on the Non Profit School building the Sliver Project can be found here:

 

http://www.nwboatschool.org/ & https://www.facebook.com/NWBoatSchool

 

Lots of very cool boats get built there out of wood.

 

(Donations to help them train future boat-builders are always welcomed at this non profit school.)

 

One good thing to know about the boat school is that you can take a short term summer class on a number of subjects. It's a great way to treat yourself to a wonderful time - great teachers, great spot, great classes. I took a 10-day class building a Whitehall with Ray Speck who was mentioned earlier in the thread. Although I had been a professional woodworker for many years, Ray opened up a whole new world of woodworking. I still remember the thrill when the absolutely lovely form of the Whitehall came off the strong back.

 

Give yourself a treat, check out summer at the boat school.

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Kim, with the encapsulation of the keel how do they propose to deal with the bolt holes, do you know? It seems to me to be the weak point for egress. I am sure they have a plan, they always seem to but I cant imagine it.

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Kim, with the encapsulation of the keel how do they propose to deal with the bolt holes, do you know? It seems to me to be the weak point for egress. I am sure they have a plan, they always seem to but I cant imagine it.

 

That will be handled by a professional yard with many keels under their belt. I will see if I can get more details from them.

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Calling her "Sliver" works fine for now.

 

After all she is a class boat a "Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor".

 

Sail # USA 1

 

As much as I'm sure this is sarcasm; looking at the amount of work done on the design and molds of this boat, could hull #2 be build for half the price? There may be someone out there who would pay a good price for a Silver AND to keep the school busy for another year?

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Calling her "Sliver" works fine for now.

 

After all she is a class boat a "Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor".

 

Sail # USA 1

 

As much as I'm sure this is sarcasm; looking at the amount of work done on the design and molds of this boat, could hull #2 be build for half the price? There may be someone out there who would pay a good price for a Silver AND to keep the school busy for another year?

 

No, the molds did not survive the process. They were not designed to be multi use.

 

The School wants to build smaller boats so the projects don't last thru multiple class years. They took this project on to prove they were capable of such a project.

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Kim, with the encapsulation of the keel how do they propose to deal with the bolt holes, do you know? It seems to me to be the weak point for egress. I am sure they have a plan, they always seem to but I cant imagine it.

 

See Jim's drawing attached

KEEL BOLT DETAIL.pdf

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I just finished milling up a new set of Teak eyebrows for my boat. The shape is similar, but the scale is way different.

 

Also, I need a hat like that.

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Looks great! Have you decided what you are going to paint her with? Are you going to put cork decks or something on her?

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