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    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

      Sailing Anarchy is a very lightly moderated site. This is by design, to afford a more free atmosphere for discussion. There are plenty of sailing forums you can go to where swearing isn't allowed, confrontation is squelched and, and you can have a moderator finger-wag at you for your attitude. SA tries to avoid that and allow for more adult behavior without moderators editing your posts and whacking knuckles with rulers. We don't have a long list of published "thou shalt nots" either, and this is by design. Too many absolute rules paints us into too many corners. So check the Terms of Service - there IS language there about certain types of behavior that is not permitted. We interpret that lightly and permit a lot of latitude, but we DO reserve the right to take action when something is too extreme to tolerate (too racist, graphic, violent, misogynistic, etc.). Yes, that is subjective, but it allows us discretion. Avoiding a laundry list of rules allows for freedom; don't abuse it. However there ARE a few basic rules that will earn you a suspension, and apparently a brief refresher is in order. 1) Allegations of pedophilia - there is no tolerance for this. So if you make allegations, jokes, innuendo or suggestions about child molestation, child pornography, abuse or inappropriate behavior with minors etc. about someone on this board you will get a time out. This is pretty much automatic; this behavior can have real world effect and is not acceptable. Obviously the subject is not banned when discussion of it is apropos, e.g. talking about an item in the news for instance. But allegations or references directed at or about another poster is verboten. 2) Outing people - providing real world identifiable information about users on the forums who prefer to remain anonymous. Yes, some of us post with our real names - not a problem to use them. However many do NOT, and if you find out someone's name keep it to yourself, first or last. This also goes for other identifying information too - employer information etc. You don't need too many pieces of data to figure out who someone really is these days. Depending on severity you might get anything from a scolding to a suspension - so don't do it. I know it can be confusing sometimes for newcomers, as SA has been around almost twenty years and there are some people that throw their real names around and their current Display Name may not match the name they have out in the public. But if in doubt, you don't want to accidentally out some one so use caution, even if it's a personal friend of yours in real life. 3) Posting While Suspended - If you've earned a timeout (these are fairly rare and hard to get), please observe the suspension. If you create a new account (a "Sock Puppet") and return to the forums to post with it before your suspension is up you WILL get more time added to your original suspension and lose your Socks. This behavior may result a permanent ban, since it shows you have zero respect for the few rules we have and the moderating team that is tasked with supporting them. Check the Terms of Service you agreed to; they apply to the individual agreeing, not the account you created, so don't try to Sea Lawyer us if you get caught. Just don't do it. Those are the three that will almost certainly get you into some trouble. IF YOU SEE SOMEONE DO ONE OF THESE THINGS, please do the following: Refrain from quoting the offending text, it makes the thread cleanup a pain in the rear Press the Report button; it is by far the best way to notify Admins as we will get e-mails. Calling out for Admins in the middle of threads, sending us PM's, etc. - there is no guarantee we will get those in a timely fashion. There are multiple Moderators in multiple time zones around the world, and anyone one of us can handle the Report and all of us will be notified about it. But if you PM one Mod directly and he's off line, the problem will get dealt with much more slowly. Other behaviors that you might want to think twice before doing include: Intentionally disrupting threads and discussions repeatedly. Off topic/content free trolling in threads to disrupt dialog Stalking users around the forums with the intent to disrupt content and discussion Repeated posting of overly graphic or scatological porn content. There are plenty web sites for you to get your freak on, don't do it here. And a brief note to Newbies... No, we will not ban people or censor them for dropping F-bombs on you, using foul language, etc. so please don't report it when one of our members gives you a greeting you may find shocking. We do our best not to censor content here and playing swearword police is not in our job descriptions. Sailing Anarchy is more like a bar than a classroom, so handle it like you would meeting someone a little coarse - don't look for the teacher. Thanks.
    • B.J. Porter

      Moderation Team Change   06/16/2017

      After fifteen years of volunteer moderation at SA, I will no longer be part of the moderation team. The decision to step aside is mine, and has been some time in the works but we did not wish to announce it in advance for a number of reasons. It's been fun, but I need my time back for other purposes now. The Underdawg admin account will not be monitored until further notice, as I will be relinquishing control of it along with my administrative privileges. Zapata will continue on as a moderator, and any concerns or issues can be directed to that account or to the Editor until further notice. Anyone interested in helping moderate the forums should reach out to Scot by sending a PM to the Editor account. Please note that I am not leaving the community, I am merely stepping aside from Admin responsibilities and privileges on the site.
kimbottles

Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

13,065 posts in this topic

Tricky:

Yes, he's back and making as much sense as ever.

But why quote him? I have him on ignore and I prefer it that way. When you quote him you undo that.

 

Roger that.

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I'm thinking that the template doesn't show the exact cabin side. ie the template stops short of the deck and the eyebrows aren't installed which makes the portlights look lower than they are.

 

The photos where the template has been removed and the tape mimics the eyebrow shows the windows to be spot on. We are only seeing the cutout and not the full size of the deadlight including the frame so I think it'll look great.

 

We are just making up the eyebrows for Eclipse and the corner pieces are taking a while to get right. They have to fit a cabin side thats sloped and rounded and have to notched scarf joints for the eyebrows to meet on. Eclipse's cabin is wide and needs the eyebrows all the way around to reduce the box effect.

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Tricky:

Yes, but the effort will be worthwhile for those corner pieces. You can take my name in vain if you like while you are cutting them.

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I looked all over the boat and I really can't find any other place to put the panel where I can reach it from the helm. I will often be single handing this vessel so want to be able to start the engine from the aft steering cockpit. Even with SWMBO aboard I want to be able to reach the engine controls without bothering her. Likely well over half the sailing on this vessel will be just me, or just me and SWMBO.

 

There just does not seem to be any other place to put the panel that makes any sense.

 

 

Kim, have you thought about balancing out the engine panel with a small liquor cabinet on the other side of the cockpit? This is a symmetrical boat after all.....

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Just so long as you don't get mixed up while docking and grab for reverse and pick up a bottle of scotch by mistake. However, if this happens DO NOT put down the scotch, you will need it in a few seconds.

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I looked all over the boat and I really can't find any other place to put the panel where I can reach it from the helm. I will often be single handing this vessel so want to be able to start the engine from the aft steering cockpit. Even with SWMBO aboard I want to be able to reach the engine controls without bothering her. Likely well over half the sailing on this vessel will be just me, or just me and SWMBO.

 

There just does not seem to be any other place to put the panel that makes any sense.

 

 

Kim, have you thought about balancing out the engine panel with a small liquor cabinet on the other side of the cockpit? This is a symmetrical boat after all.....

 

Seems like a suggestion worth looking into.

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I think it is very fitting that the 5000th post on this thread came from the Maestro himself.

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I like your clear plastic hinged panel idea.

 

 

Another way to go is to recess and angle the panel slightly and then put a clear but fixed hood over it that allows your hand to reach in underneath. The hood can be rounded so it won't hurt so much when you scrape a shin on it, and can be low profile so that won't happen as often. This would keep most water out and would allow air circulation so any that does get in can evaporate.

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Great ideas guys. It just so happens that I have a very well detailed drawing of just such an installation angled even. Imagine that. It's almost like I have done this before.

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Engine panel..

 

Maybe put the key inside the cabin and have a savvy kid make up a touchscreen to control/monitor the engine. That kind of thing is getting easier to do these days.

 

Just thinking in text..

 

-jim lee

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Great ideas guys. It just so happens that I have a very well detailed drawing of just such an installation angled even. Imagine that. It's almost like I have done this before.

 

I always thought this was clever...sheltered yet available from the helm. It stays mostly dry and usually shaded.

 

Bob could learn from this innovative design.

 

;)

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Get rid of the tiller and use a binnacle like this. Forward is the right nipple, reverse the left.

 

6812.jpg

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I think it is very fitting that the 5000th post on this thread came from the Maestro himself.

 

Just what I was going to say. I mean after moi, who better?

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Engine panel..

 

Maybe put the key inside the cabin and have a savvy kid make up a touchscreen to control/monitor the engine. That kind of thing is getting easier to do these days.

 

Just thinking in text..

 

-jim lee

 

How did you know my youngest son was a programming wiz??

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Get rid of the tiller.....

 

WHAT??????

 

Take him to the gallows!!

 

(Don't even think of touching my beloved tiller!)

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Engine panel..

 

Maybe put the key inside the cabin and have a savvy kid make up a touchscreen to control/monitor the engine. That kind of thing is getting easier to do these days.

 

Just thinking in text..

 

-jim lee

 

How did you know my youngest son was a programming wiz??

 

There ya' go!

 

-jim lee

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Engine panel..

 

Maybe put the key inside the cabin and have a savvy kid make up a touchscreen to control/monitor the engine. That kind of thing is getting easier to do these days.

 

Just thinking in text..

 

-jim lee

 

Small hijack: Can we kick around more of this thinking out loud? For a TILLER-steered boat (pay attention KD), alternatives, please, to the oanel recessed down in the bowels of the footwell behind an ever foggier hinged plastic panel....? Discuss.

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Can I suggest NOT putting the engine panel in the cockpit. They are seldom really waterproof. If you must, put a hinged clear plexi panel over it with a small cutout for the key. At least it will last longer that way.

 

I looked all over the boat and I really can't find any other place to put the panel where I can reach it from the helm. I will often be single handing this vessel so want to be able to start the engine from the aft steering cockpit. Even with SWMBO aboard I want to be able to reach the engine controls without bothering her. Likely well over half the sailing on this vessel will be just me, or just me and SWMBO.

 

There just does not seem to be any other place to put the panel that makes any sense.

 

 

 

I like your clear plastic hinged panel idea.

 

I do appreciate you input Zonk, Thanks!

 

How about two remote waterproof switches in the cockpit, one on a relay to power up the engine panel, and the other hot wiring the start switch?

You could key the power to the panel inside the boat, so no one could start without a key.

 

Yes, I have actually been thinking along that line today after reading Zonk's post.

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I like it Keith.

I can see the shaft coming out of her mouth. Maybe cast the whole thing in bronze if we have bow down trim.

 

If I was a bit sarcastic today I'm sorry. My humor left me today.

 

Kim:

We have handsome sons in common.

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Can I suggest NOT putting the engine panel in the cockpit. They are seldom really waterproof. If you must, put a hinged clear plexi panel over it with a small cutout for the key. At least it will last longer that way.

 

I looked all over the boat and I really can't find any other place to put the panel where I can reach it from the helm. I will often be single handing this vessel so want to be able to start the engine from the aft steering cockpit. Even with SWMBO aboard I want to be able to reach the engine controls without bothering her. Likely well over half the sailing on this vessel will be just me, or just me and SWMBO.

 

There just does not seem to be any other place to put the panel that makes any sense.

 

 

 

 

I like your clear plastic hinged panel idea.

 

I do appreciate you input Zonk, Thanks!

 

How about two remote waterproof switches in the cockpit, one on a relay to power up the engine panel, and the other hot wiring the start switch?

You could key the power to the panel inside the boat, so no one could start without a key.

 

Yes, I have actually been thinking along that line today after reading Zonk's post.

 

How do you monitor temp and oil pressure?

 

I experienced a fresh water coolant loss on a charter boat with the panel below decks. No topside indication as no temp alarm and sea water happily pumping out the exhaust. Crew went below and called out that there was some smoke in the cabin. When I pulled back the throttle, there was a loud bang and the engine quit catastrophically.

 

If you put the panel below, have very loud alarms. If we could have seen the gauge from the cockpit or had a working temp alarm, the charter company may have saved an engine replacement and we wouldn't have lost a day of sailing going back to base for a replacement boat.

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I like it Keith.

I can see the shaft coming out of her mouth. Maybe cast the whole thing in bronze if we have bow down trim.

 

If I was a bit sarcastic today I'm sorry. My humor left me today.

 

Kim:

We have handsome sons in common.

 

Bob,

 

Per your instructions I went and gave him a big hug today. He knew it was a Spike hug and he appreciated it. I have been thinking about Spike all day today like I did last year on April 2nd and will always do on April 2nd.

 

I have been saving a large Spike Burgee for the launch of the Sliver later this year (hopefully this summer.)

 

For those of you who do not know, we started the Sliver project just two years ago this last week, and then we lost Spike two years ago today.

 

So everyone needs to raise a glass to Spike tonight, may his spirit forever live in his father's splendid yacht designs. I know he lives in the Sliver project.

 

Here's to you Spike, I hope you and Frank are having a nice chat about interesting things where-ever the two of you are now.

 

Cheers to you both.

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Can I suggest NOT putting the engine panel in the cockpit. They are seldom really waterproof. If you must, put a hinged clear plexi panel over it with a small cutout for the key. At least it will last longer that way.

 

I looked all over the boat and I really can't find any other place to put the panel where I can reach it from the helm. I will often be single handing this vessel so want to be able to start the engine from the aft steering cockpit. Even with SWMBO aboard I want to be able to reach the engine controls without bothering her. Likely well over half the sailing on this vessel will be just me, or just me and SWMBO.

 

There just does not seem to be any other place to put the panel that makes any sense.

 

 

 

 

I like your clear plastic hinged panel idea.

 

I do appreciate you input Zonk, Thanks!

 

How about two remote waterproof switches in the cockpit, one on a relay to power up the engine panel, and the other hot wiring the start switch?

You could key the power to the panel inside the boat, so no one could start without a key.

 

Yes, I have actually been thinking along that line today after reading Zonk's post.

 

How do you monitor temp and oil pressure?

 

I experienced a fresh water coolant loss on a charter boat with the panel below decks. No topside indication as no temp alarm and sea water happily pumping out the exhaust. Crew went below and called out that there was some smoke in the cabin. When I pulled back the throttle, there was a loud bang and the engine quit catastrophically.

 

If you put the panel below, have very loud alarms. If we could have seen the gauge from the cockpit or had a working temp alarm, the charter company may have saved an engine replacement and we wouldn't have lost a day of sailing going back to base for a replacement boat.

 

The panel would stay on deck just under a plexiglass panel.

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Engine panel..

 

Maybe put the key inside the cabin and have a savvy kid make up a touchscreen to control/monitor the engine. That kind of thing is getting easier to do these days.

 

Just thinking in text..

 

-jim lee

 

Small hijack: Can we kick around more of this thinking out loud? For a TILLER-steered boat (pay attention KD), alternatives, please, to the oanel recessed down in the bowels of the footwell behind an ever foggier hinged plastic panel....? Discuss.

 

Bluetooth all engine controls and gauges to your iPhone.

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I understand Angus Walters used to use Bluetooth on Bluenose...that's why the named it Bluetooth.

 

Bluenose was already taken.

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Thanks Kim.

Who's Frank?

I donlt know who he is but if he is with Spike tonight I can assure the you conversation will be stimulating.

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The glass has been raised over a simple dinner....chili and fresh crusty bread, then banana bread with coffee.

 

Somehow I think Spike would have approved.

 

G'nite Bob. Sleep well.

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Frank is Francis Lee Bottles, as I recall. Here's a glass to Spike, and to him.

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Ish:

Thanks. I'm a bit blinded tonight by my own memories. Nobody ever accused me of being "Mr. Sensitive".

 

I'm preparing for my wife to come home. She made a request for dinner, something I never seem to get right. But once again I have tried. Maybe this time.

She just came in.

Time for my bruta facia.

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Frank and Spike are gettting along extremely well, they are both very unique.

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How will the epoxy fairing be done? And what if you ever have to get to those bolts again?

 

BULB-TO-FIN-BOLT-DETAIL-Layout1-%281%29.gif

Question? I s the Fin Plate penetrating the Fin Flange? The drawing does not show it but I would rather see it.

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Cheers Spike. I had a garbage salad, kissd my wife and pet my dogs.

Maybe I'll give my cattle some beer.

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I did a blind taste test tonight between 7 year old and 12 year old rum and found I can't really tell the difference. But I have a glass of the 12 next to me now. To Frank and Spike, then to bed.

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How will the epoxy fairing be done? And what if you ever have to get to those bolts again?

 

BULB-TO-FIN-BOLT-DETAIL-Layout1-%281%29.gif

Question? I s the Fin Plate penetrating the Fin Flange? The drawing does not show it but I would rather see it.

 

Good question.

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Not sure what instrument systems are being considered, but is there a way to run engine instrumentation on NMEA, and automate it so that when you switch the engine on, revs and exhaust temp (say) are displayed on a couple of instruments? Then stick the panel below, and have a couple of buttons - engine on, engine off - next to the throttle lever. Nice IPX8 buttons.

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I'm baffled by this engine panel problem- I'm guessing it is the result of using a manufacturer supplied panel that is just not up to the job. Couldn't you just separate the functions, meaning the gauges from the buttons/keys. There should be no problem having gauges that are waterproof, so put them where you can see them. Then the buttons keys could be in a waterproof enclosure or remote or whatever. I've never seen engine throttle/shift controls be a problem- I'm partial to the Spinlock setup that uses a winch handle so you can remove the handle when sailing.

 

On a boat this perfect and custom this detail should be solvable. Of course it isn't my money <_<

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I am not sure there is an engine panel problem, right now we are having an interesting discussion on alternative ideas, all of which are interesting.

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Question? I s the Fin Plate penetrating the Fin Flange? The drawing does not show it but I would rather see it.

 

No, that is not the way the fin was engineered. The structure is all inside. The engineering was done to ABS standards.

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Tricky:

Yes, he's back and making as much sense as ever.

But why quote him? I have him on ignore and I prefer it that way. When you quote him you undo that.

Roger that.

 

Yes you Tricky Pig. It sounds like an SOS...

 

Your right, it's showtime, hurry hurry, step right up, introducing the star of our show, his name is...

Yes I'm back to remind you that bullshit does not pay.

 

It's just like old times, the dynamic duo, two old friends, why panic, you already know who's

fully capable, the two capped heroes, dial straight down the center eight-zero-zero, you can

even call collect, or just leave a post.

 

Sorry Kim, your build is fantastic, 1 hull 1 builder, quiet the dynamic duo.

 

Quick gotta move fast, gotta perform miracles, gee willikers Kim, holy bat syllables, look at

all the bullshit that goes on in Gotham when i'm gone.

 

Well not so much...

 

I've been sad and dueled with one other, holy bat crap, one was a winner.

 

Have Fun

 

RIP Sandi.

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We used a darker pen to outline the forward port location.

Jordan says he is cutting this week. Jordan loves to cut my boat.

 

He cut out the salon overhead hatch last week after he used the tool Brandon made to mold up the frame.

 

Jordan does very nice work.

 

 

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Poor Fred got the job of cutting out the peel-ply pieces and the last of the interior tabbing pieces. He also gets to cut out all of the exterior tabbing pieces. Fred gets to cut out a few zillion miles of fabric.

 

Then he gets to install them with Kai and Cooper's help.

 

Jordan was the top grad in 2011.

 

Cooper and Kai were the top grads in 2012.

 

We grab the top grads for the Sliver Project as they finish up school.

 

Once the school is finished with the Sliver Project I know where you can find some first class boat-building talent. Smart, energetic, easy to work with, if you are looking for recent graduate talent in boat-building you should check these guys out.

 

If you want a very clever very experience guy, Fred would be a good choice. He has shown lots of valuable creativity on the project.

 

But you have to wait a few more months until they are finished with the Sliver Project.

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I bought a single lever shift/throttle control a few weeks ago only to find it did not fit the thickness of the bulkhead. Then I found a very nice dual lever control which looked much better and I decided to try a separate shift & throttle on this boat. I don't think I have ever had separate levers on a sailboat, have had them on powerboats, but not sailboats. I like trying new things out.

 

Jordan measured carefully to make sure we would have full throttle throw and then he........cut another hole in the boat.

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Strap hold-downs....these shots were taken looking direct down into the cockpit lockers.........(which are really not lockers at all as we are leaving all of the spaces below open and plan to experiment with canvas bags to hold the little bits and pieces one usually puts into cockpit lockers.

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Meanwhile the perfection crew is making all of the tabbing below decks very pretty before they finish painting down below.

 

And as I was looking around down below I think I saw Tara hiding out way up in the bow......it is a good thing she is small because there is not much room forward of the owners cabin.

Tara is a current year student who has opted to spend much of her elective time helping us on the project. We like Tara.

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I am glad the port cut out is marked up with black pen, it ensures the correct part is thrown out when done.

 

I would like to know more about the tool used for the overhead hatch. I have a FG cambered deck and a flat metal hatch, the gap is made of wood. Then end result is 3 materials that move in different ways and leaks that can never be stopped.

 

If I sail the boat up to Hadlock and leave it on the dock with a $20 bill do you think Jordan will fix up my hatch? I would even buy him lunch at the Ajax (well, maybey just coffee).

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A hatch that doesn't ultimately find a way to leak? I would also be interested in such an invention.

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I am glad the port cut out is marked up with black pen, it ensures the correct part is thrown out when done.

 

I would like to know more about the tool used for the overhead hatch. I have a FG cambered deck and a flat metal hatch, the gap is made of wood. Then end result is 3 materials that move in different ways and leaks that can never be stopped.

 

If I sail the boat up to Hadlock and leave it on the dock with a $20 bill do you think Jordan will fix up my hatch? I would even buy him lunch at the Ajax (well, maybey just coffee).

 

$20 would get the hatch removed - of course, you'd have a bigger leak, then ;)

 

The tool for the hatch was a female open mold cut by Turn Point from MDF - the camber of the deck was built in to the perimeter. The surface of the tool was cleaned up and covered with the same sticky-back teflon release film we used on the deck mold, then a single layer of ~6oz. twill-woven glass cloth was laid up into the mold, then a small fillet of epoxy applied in the corners to allow secondary laminates to conform a little easier. The the surface of that cloth was epoxied to the deck, after I cut out the opening and chamfered the inside. Several layers of 10oz. glass cloth were laid up (literally, up) onto the flimsy twill layer and the foam core of the deck before the tool was removed. The final layer of cloth laps out onto the inside surface of the deck. The flange nets about 3/16", more in the corners.

 

More holes got cut today: one for the bearing of the under-deck jib furler, and one for the instrument panel. Plus the penultimate bulkhead-to-deck tabbing, and a whole bunch of sanding (all upside down and mostly awkward, of course...)

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I read that procedure twice and was starting to get it, then tried for a third time and it made less sense than on the second pass. Might be bedtime.

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Thanks, I think I got it. The fact that a mold was made to be used once for a single small part on a one-off boat speaks to the quaility of this project. Unless my deck camber is the same, and the hatch is the same size, I am out of luck on this one.

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I read that procedure twice and was starting to get it, then tried for a third time and it made less sense than on the second pass. Might be bedtime.

you can see the mold still in place on top of the house in some of kim's photos from last week, and removed from the deck, purple-side-up on the deck in the photos from this week. it's hard to condense what i did over the course of several days into one paragraph! If only I had a digital version of the section drawing...

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Tom:

I can't believe you have never been around a hatch that doesn't leak. You need to get out more.

The PERRYWINKLE was built in 1978. The foredeck hatch never leaked. That's just one.

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Hey Kim, will you be painting the deck then mounting hardware or mounting the hardware, masking then painting?

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Great Dane, thanks for your input. I'll go back and look at the pictures.

 

Bob, I was taking a little artistic license there. I have been around some non-leakers, but the leakers tend to draw my attention more. Especially when they're right over my head and I'm trying to sleep, or on a boat I was trying to sell as a broker and had obviously been leaking for some time without attention. But don't you mean the hatch on Perrywinkle has not leaked yet? ;)

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Hey Kim, will you be painting the deck then mounting hardware or mounting the hardware, masking then painting?

Don't know for sure but I suspect paint and then mount. Details like these have not yet been fully explored.

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Tom:

No , I mean the hatch on the PERRYWINKLE is not leaking now.

We are getting into Sillyland here. Of course in time any hatch will most probably leak. But is "in time" 15 years, 35 years or 50 years? Even if it's 15 years I think that is reasonable.

Say what you mean.

 

At 35 years old the simple little alu hatch on the Perrywinkle is holding out just fine. In the PNW a leaky hatch, especially over a berth, would be hard to tolerate.

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Tom:

I can't believe you have never been around a hatch that doesn't leak. You need to get out more.

The PERRYWINKLE was built in 1978. The foredeck hatch never leaked. That's just one.

It's the 2/100 rule.

 

If you have a good experience, you tell 2 people.

 

If you have a bad one, you tell 100.

 

People remember the bad examples easier.

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BJ:

I didn't know that rule. But I make a point of writing to people who provide me good service. The response is generally the same, "We seldom here from people who are happy with our product."

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It's not a rule I follow personally but one that is reality for many in business.

 

I always make it a point to commend good service and to tell people my good stories.

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Tom:

I can't believe you have never been around a hatch that doesn't leak. You need to get out more.

The PERRYWINKLE was built in 1978. The foredeck hatch never leaked. That's just one.

It's the 2/100 rule.

 

If you have a good experience, you tell 2 people.

 

If you have a bad one, you tell 100.

 

People remember the bad examples easier.

 

I think the ratio is much higher for a leaking hatch...

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BJ:

I didn't know that rule. But I make a point of writing to people who provide me good service. The response is generally the same, "We seldom here from people who are happy with our product."

I do the same thing. We are all quite ready to complain, but rarely take the time to send praise. The wonderful benefit besides feeling like you did the right thing is the relationships you build. And from that it is surprising the bonuses you sometimes get. Back in the day when you would check in for flights at the counter, by not being a dick and adding a couple of compliments I would frequently get upgraded to Business Class. More recently, I sent an Email to a local craft brewer telling them how much I enjoyed their new Strong Ale. They sent me coupons for two more boxes of the stuff.

 

"It's nice to be nice to the nice."

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On two trips to Oakland I ended up with a Hertz car that looked like the car the mailman would drive. I'm certain is was the very same car.

I wrote a letter and complained.

The next time I rented from Hertz they gave me a free Lincoln Town car as punishment.

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I get a sticky bun every morning at a wonderful local bakery in Portland. One day I got one that was perfect so I wrote them the following and enjoyed doing so, even though it was a bit over the top. They told me they enjoyed it as well. I wrote this four years ago, and still get one every day, though have never received another perfect one. I'm not complaining.

 

 

"To everyone at Standard Bakery-

One morning a while back I took a bite out of one of your sticky buns and had a revelation. It was my third or fourth bite, I was drinking Bakery Blend as well and working on the computer, when it dawned on me that this particular sticky bun was perfect- by that I mean that the sugar/salt ratio was perfect, the dough was not towards bread or towards muffin, but was exactly bun. The crust was not too hard or too soft, it left just the right tension between outer and inner that defines crust. The nuts were . . . . . well the nuts were not there because I eat my sticky bun plain. In fact I eat a plain sticky bun seven days a week generally, and have been doing so for longer than all but one or two of the good folks at the counter have been working at Standard. They tolerate me asking for a plain sticky bun rather than a morning bun without nuts because I'm polite, I suppose, and I certainly am consistent.

The perfection of this particular sticky bun brought me up short. I stopped looking at the computer, closed my eyes, and took another small bite and chewed slowly. I noticed the warm feel of my skin, my breathing, and had a blessed moment of rapture at just being alive. What a profound thrill.

Be assured that my sticky bun is a treat every day- they are reliably delicious, which makes it easy to be faithful. I do not seek a center bun, or an edge, or a corner, or ask for one less or more sticky. I'm content with the range and variety. Very rarely have I detected maybe a little too much salt, or possibly the fat not completely mixed, or a crust so deep or hard as to be an issue. In fact, I will tell you that the difference between reliably delicious and perfection is very subtle, and not within your control. I don't think a perfect sticky bun every day is possible, nor even desirable.

I figure each of us has our own way of picturing perfection. Attribute perfection to God, if you will, and describe this higher power any way you want. Maybe perfection is the result of a rare alignment of cosmic forces, planes of shifting energy suddenly, in this case, coming together on an axis that passed through your establishment in the pre-dawn hours and touched the hands of a baker or the oven and left a perfect bun, or maybe several, or even a tray (has anyone else reported a perfect bun?). I only ask you to recognize that perfection is possible, for I have tasted it, and am telling you.

To me, my perfect sticky bun means this: I remember the wonderful woman that helped raise me, and who had a baker's touch inherited from her baker father. She could make a simple biscuit from flour, milk and Crisco that showed me what love offered every time I ate one. I think she wanted to get in touch with me near her birthday, and used a sticky bun to say hello.

Perfect- and for that I am extremely grateful to you all."

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Tucky, that's a remarkably poetic and beautiful letter.

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Shitski:

I've never had a sticky bun. Not that kind.

Now I really want one.

 

Well done Tuckenheimer.

 

Kim:

That looks about right. Given the sweep of the tiller it's going to require some timing but nothing you haven't done many times before.

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Got a picture via text from Jordan this morning.

 

I like the look.

Very similar to the setup on my old C&C 29-2 with tiller steering. With practice, you can do all the throttle and shifting with one foot.

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Ish:

That's what I figure too. One hand on the tiller, one hand on your beer, one foot on the controls. Kim has an end tie. No problemo.

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I learned to drive in a 1970 volkswagen van, it was a manual with a 3 ft tall shift lever mounted on the floor. I quickly learned to shift with my right foot. The idea was to able to eat with one hand, steer with the other, and clutch and shift with my feet. In a teenage way I thought it would impress the chicks, needles to say it did not work out that way.

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Ish:

That's what I figure too. One hand on the tiller, one hand on your beer, one foot on the controls. Kim has an end tie. No problemo.

I use my feet for all sorts of operations, this should be a breeze.

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Jebus Tucky, that homage to the perfect sticky bun was beautiful.

I had a similar relationship with a cherry pastry when I worked in Germany. A girl would come every morning to the office, selling pastries, sandwiches, etc. They had these damned flaky cherry pastries that were extremely good. I would always buy two because, well because they were tasty. I do remember 1 or 2 coming close to perfection, just crispy enough yet delectably flaky. Cherry filing not too sweet. Never had a perfect one though. I also didn't eat them as long as you have eaten the sticky buns, probably not a bad thing. Shit, I would kill for one of those things right now.

 

 

 

Now can we have more photos please?

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You will have to ask GreatDane28 for more photos, I won't be back up there until next Monday.

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BJ:

I didn't know that rule. But I make a point of writing to people who provide me good service. The response is generally the same, "We seldom here from people who are happy with our product."

I do the same thing. We are all quite ready to complain, but rarely take the time to send praise. The wonderful benefit besides feeling like you did the right thing is the relationships you build. And from that it is surprising the bonuses you sometimes get. Back in the day when you would check in for flights at the counter, by not being a dick and adding a couple of compliments I would frequently get upgraded to Business Class. More recently, I sent an Email to a local craft brewer telling them how much I enjoyed their new Strong Ale. They sent me coupons for two more boxes of the stuff.

 

"It's nice to be nice to the nice."

 

My wife was traveling once and got behind some poor guy who was having a crappy trip. Missed connections, delays, and a cross country trip that was only half way done but had been going on for about 14 hours. But he was being a complete ahole, berating the woman behind the counter even though it wasn't her fault and being as obnoxious as possible. After he got on his way, my wife was talking to the woman behind the counter and told her she had handled it really well, my wife would have probably throttled him if she had been on the receiving end of that tirade. The woman smiled and said, "Oh, it's easy when he's flying to Seattle but his bags are going to Phoenix!"

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I learned, log ago, to never assume you have the power over a simple clerk.

 

It's amazing how they can be helpful, or not, based on how you treat them.

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Damn you all, you buggers!

 

It's Thursday today. So 24 hours until Friday morning and my "pastry day"! I'm the only one in the shed on a Friday, so the morning consists of catching up on some of the paperwork and ordering all the bits and bobs we will be feeding to the boat next week to keep her moving forward. I love the bustle during the week of machinery, jobs getting done, the boat changing constantly, balancing a dozen jobs at once; but Friday mornings have also become a bit of a favourite time to sit back and think about what we are aiming for, do some background reading and surfing on product design and generally get a grip. Those hours are accompanied by good coffee, my own music choice and two pastries from the selection at the local bakery on my walk to work.

 

It's gonna feel like a long wait for tomorrow morning.

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Tucky, thank you. That bit on the sticky bun was sublime. Reading that was a perfect way to start my morning... Of course, I'll have to go find a cinnamon roll or some such thing now.

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Got a picture via text from Jordan this morning.

 

I like the look.

Just like my old C&C Redwind 30 ... not my old boat, but found the shot on the web. Hinterholer recessed the levers into a pie shaped opening. Worked just fine then, I am sure it will work fine now. I remember a discussion about the engine panel. No panel on this boat. Listened to the sound of the engine and boat speed to gauge RPM's. I am sure a new diesel has all the alarms, but this Atomic-4 didn't have any.

 

 

 

 

 

cockpit_11.jpg

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I'm mixed on the recessed controls. Recessing them makes it harder to reach with your foot but it does help protect them from erant lines in the cockpit. Although given the cockpit and the lever location on the Redwing I don;t think they could have done it any other way. On Kim's boat the levers are tucked out of the traffic pattern. I think my own preference would be the Spinlock single lever type that is removable.

 

That Redwing 30 is one of my all time favorite boats.

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Joli:

I realize that you are joking but with the sail drive well forward and the big rudder well aft added to the fact that we have a bow on each end I predict that this will be my very best boat in handling under power ever. No question.

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Indeed! I would fly to the west coast and strangle both you and Kim if you added a bow thruster. But this is CA where the absurd resides occasionally.

Joli:

I realize that you are joking but with the sail drive well forward and the big rudder well aft added to the fact that we have a bow on each end I predict that this will be my very best boat in handling under power ever. No question.

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"occasionally"? Have you checked the other threads recently, Somewhere in here is a movie, kind of like PULP FICTION. We have Ish with his sheep girfriend. We have Amati with squirrels fulll of helium singing Das Reingold. We have our favorite pom Dylan telling stories of when he rode the western range with bleeding blisters. I'm always good for some pie stories. kdh has math formulae, that I think he is making up as he goes, dancing in his head all the time and Tom is working on the all time record for whining. Joil keeps flashing us pics of his wife half dressed. (and we appreciate that. Yes we do.) And who the hell knows what Olaf and Anom are going on about at any given time. If I left you out of the list you're just going to have to try harder. God help the poor guy that has the balls to bring up sailing.

 

There is a movie in here.

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I'm mixed on the recessed controls. Recessing them makes it harder to reach with your foot but it does help protect them from erant lines in the cockpit. Although given the cockpit and the lever location on the Redwing I don;t think they could have done it any other way. On Kim's boat the levers are tucked out of the traffic pattern. I think my own preference would be the Spinlock single lever type that is removable.

 

That Redwing 30 is one of my all time favorite boats.

I have broken shift levers and had removable ones get pulled out of the control head at the wrong time. I always thought the Spinlock is a great way to go. Lots of spare control levers on the boat! At least the lver controls are tucked away nicely.

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Bob, do you really think we should consider the hydraulic thruster or should we just stick with that electric one we were looking at last week? I do kind of like the idea of the disappearing one that sucks back up into the hull when not in use, but I am not too keen on all of that structure getting in the way of the forward sauna.

 

Oh, and thanks for the drawings of the pilot house, I am glad we decided to go with it before the crew got too far along with the cockpit combings, SWMBO was happy to see you had included the sofas she likes in the drawings. I really rather go with settees, but she really had her heart set on those leather sofas, I guess we can always tie them down somehow to keep them from sliding around.

 

I do think it was a good idea to raise the boom up a few feet to accommodate the fly bridge, Once we decided to go with the pilot house it became kind of necessary to eliminate the outside steering aft and get it up on top where we had some visibility. And with the new engines configured we really don't need all of that sail area.

 

Do you really think the twin MTU's will get her up on plane fast enough? We could go up one more size from the series 900 to the series 1800's if that will make sure she can hit that 30 knot goal within the 12 second time frame.

 

Sorry for all of the last minute changes Bob, but after seeing how well that MacGregor handled I really do think it was best to change course and get away from that silly daysailor idea.

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Forget all that other shite.

Let's go full speed ahead on the twin MTU's. We can stagger them in them hull to make room for both of them. Then we can get some five blade Italian custom props. Think of the money you will save on sails.

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Well, you can cheap out with those but I'd prefer the stainles ones.

Nobody ever said yachting was cheap.

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I really think you should install a combining gearbox and one big surface piercing prop to better compliment the long narrow look. Fin stabilizers are an excellent idea! It will help reduce that nasty "heeling" which sailboats are known for. How many satcom domes will you need for the satellite TV service?

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Darn it! I forgot about those domes, Bob where are going to put them? I think we already used up the spreader space with the high security cameras and the remote mini-guns. Got to be ready for when we anchor off Ballard!

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I found out that some of these big boy yachts actually have empty satcom domes just for the "Wow, look at me factor!" I didn't know they did that but at least it might help save weight aloft. (You know, for performance reasons... kinda)

 

Sliver is really well suited to a tandem installation of those MTU's!

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The dinghy garage will make a few odd bumps on the back, but just tell people they are IOR leftovers.

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Sliver is really well suited to a tandem installation of those MTU's!

I am a little worried about the torque twist when we rev them up, I hope the boat doesn't turn turtle.

 

HEY!! Empty fake domes for capsize floatation!!

 

That should work!

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I just finished my taxes this morning, my brain is fried, can you tell?

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What instruments are you thinking? Or are you going with yarn and a simple mast head fly?

 

wind-vane-important_-800x800.jpg

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I thought it was just me. :unsure:

I just finished my taxes this morning, my brain is fried, can you tell?

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This year it isn't the 'doing' of taxes, it'll be the 'paying' of taxes... oh well, that's a Good Thing .... kinda, sorta, in a way....

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Relax you guys. We have plenty of room for a mizzen and we can stack domes all over it.

We can even get one of those Direct Interface Lat Long domes, the DILL Dome.

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This year it isn't the 'doing' of taxes, it'll be the 'paying' of taxes... oh well, that's a Good Thing .... kinda, sorta, in a way....

Yes, as I was writing tax checks this morning I kept reminding myself what my Tax Professor (Mike Diamond) always said: "If you are paying taxes it is a good thing."

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