kimbottles

Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

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IB:

No, no, no.

They can come up with any gimzo they like but I want a rudder on the boats I design. Nice, big rudders.

 

I've told this story before but here we go again:

 

I was milling around the gas dock waiting my turn, doing slow circles.

I noticed a guy in a jet powered Bartender (Google it) he was having a wee bit of a struggle waiting.

As I slid by his stern he looked over to me and said, "Some days I'd like to have a rudder."

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IB:

No, no, no.

They can come up with any gimzo they like but I want a rudder on the boats I design. Nice, big rudders.

 

I've told this story before but here we go again:

 

I was milling around the gas dock waiting my turn, doing slow circles.

I noticed a guy in a jet powered Bartender (Google it) he was having a wee bit of a struggle waiting.

As I slid by his stern he looked over to me and said, "Some days I'd like to have a rudder."

For the guy who pioneered manifestly unsafe, lightweight cruisers with the Valiant 40, you sure are getting conservative. From attached rudder to skegs to spade to no rudder. It's is an obvious progression.

 

Next thing you will be telling us that there is no 4th mode and boats cannot sail dead downwind faster than the wind. Sheesh!

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Well, you can cheap out with those but I'd prefer the stainles ones.

Nobody ever said yachting was cheap.

 

Surface drives would be cool.

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Will you need an extra generator for the underwater lighting?

 

Also, those big flappy things in the air would be ideal for a projector screen. will you have full surround sound for the outdoor cinema?

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IB:

No, no, no.

They can come up with any gimzo they like but I want a rudder on the boats I design. Nice, big rudders.

 

I've told this story before but here we go again:

 

I was milling around the gas dock waiting my turn, doing slow circles.

I noticed a guy in a jet powered Bartender (Google it) he was having a wee bit of a struggle waiting.

As I slid by his stern he looked over to me and said, "Some days I'd like to have a rudder."

I kind of like playing in the marina when there is no wind, One day I saw a mate pottering on his boat when we were going out for a sail, Time for my "hand break turn" "opps, prop walk goes the other way, Oh well". crew gives me a funny look. Who says an H28 can't turn in it's own length, they are lie-ers I say. crew stops giving me that funny look.

 

Hey Kim, when It comes to the wiring I know a fella:

 

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IB:

No, no, no.

They can come up with any gimzo they like but I want a rudder on the boats I design. Nice, big rudders.

 

I've told this story before but here we go again:

 

I was milling around the gas dock waiting my turn, doing slow circles.

I noticed a guy in a jet powered Bartender (Google it) he was having a wee bit of a struggle waiting.

As I slid by his stern he looked over to me and said, "Some days I'd like to have a rudder."

I kind of like playing in the marina when there is no wind, One day I saw a mate pottering on his boat when we were going out for a sail, Time for my "hand break turn" "opps, prop walk goes the other way, Oh well". crew gives me a funny look. Who says an H28 can't turn in it's own length, they are lie-ers I say. crew stops giving me that funny look.

 

Hey Kim, when It comes to the wiring I know a fella:

 

Left hand drive in Noo Zooland?

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Is it too late to square rig the boat, kind of like a Maltese Pigeon?

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In a desperate attempt to save this thread I am happy to report we got the cockpit hatch hold-downs yesterday and I will be taking them up to the project Monday.

 

Jim and I really liked the idea of having hold-downs that would not tear up the back of your leg if you happened to come into contact with them as you moved around.

 

We both favored the soft rubber type of hold-downs but finding them without flimsy cheap metal brackets was difficult, finally found some very nice cooler replacement hold-downs made by Moeller and ordered them up. Got eight, two per hatch. Moeller called them a "T-Latch" part "185004-10 08030 Replacement kit, previous style". They are much better looking than the "new" style and better for this application.

 

The Phillips Head screw in the photo is through the hold down pin. The part even came with SS screws. These are the only pictures I happen to have with me.

 

SWMBO thought they were nice, so that pretty much settles the question on if they are classy enough for the project.

 

The last photo shows the metal alternative which I rejected right-away as being too clunky. I don't think I need to lock the cockpit hatches as I rarely ever lock my companionway hatch so what's the point.

 

There will not be much in this vessel worth stealing.

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I believe the cockpit hatch gasket material should be arriving soon if not already directly to the school (Jordan found and ordered it with direction from Jim). Then Jordan can fit it all together so when the T-latches are latched they put just the right amount of pressure on the gaskets to seal off the hatches but not over deform the gasket material. There is a fairly deep gutter running around the edge of the hatch openings so that should drain off any water before it builds up and challenges the gasket seal.

 

The last photo was taken before the openings got trimmed, now Jordan will trim the remainder to just the right height for the gasket to compress the required amount for a good seal. Here is another example where good craftsmanship comes to play. (Jordan is an excellent craftsman. )

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Have you considered inside hold downs, a line from the inside of the cockpit hatch to a cleat inside the cabin of the boat? There are no exterior hasps this way.

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I believe the cockpit hatch gasket material should be arriving soon if not already directly to the school (Jordan found and ordered it with direction from Jim). Then Jordan can fit it all together so when the T-latches are latched they put just the right amount of pressure on the gaskets to seal off the hatches but not over deform the gasket material. There is a fairly deep gutter running around the edge of the hatch openings so that should drain off any water before it builds up and challenges the gasket seal.

 

The last photo was taken before the openings got trimmed, now Jordan will trim the remainder to just the right height for the gasket to compress the required amount for a good seal. Here is another example where good craftsmanship comes to play. (Jordan is an excellent craftsman. )

 

My new locker lids arrive this morning. We will probably use the existing hardware but I'm interested by those T latches for below deck lockers. I have some large gasketed locker doors in the shower cubicle that need positive locking.

 

I've searched the Moeller Marine site but couldn't find them.

 

I don't suppose you have a link please Kim?

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Have you considered inside hold downs, a line from the inside of the cockpit hatch to a cleat inside the cabin of the boat? There are no exterior hasps this way.

No because I want to be able to open the hatch when I need to without going below to trip the line from the cleat. I will have "stuff" stored there I will want to access often.

 

My 30 Square Metre boat came with that kind of arrangement for the forward sail storage hatch and it was a PITA. I disabled it after about a week.

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I believe the cockpit hatch gasket material should be arriving soon if not already directly to the school (Jordan found and ordered it with direction from Jim). Then Jordan can fit it all together so when the T-latches are latched they put just the right amount of pressure on the gaskets to seal off the hatches but not over deform the gasket material. There is a fairly deep gutter running around the edge of the hatch openings so that should drain off any water before it builds up and challenges the gasket seal.

 

The last photo was taken before the openings got trimmed, now Jordan will trim the remainder to just the right height for the gasket to compress the required amount for a good seal. Here is another example where good craftsmanship comes to play. (Jordan is an excellent craftsman. )

 

My new locker lids arrive this morning. We will probably use the existing hardware but I'm interested by those T latches for below deck lockers. I have some large gasketed locker doors in the shower cubicle that need positive locking.

 

I've searched the Moeller Marine site but couldn't find them.

 

I don't suppose you have a link please Kim?

Last item on the list shown in the previous post, order them from Fisheries, ask for Matt, tell him you want what he got for Kim, he should know what you are talking about, note the part number. Here's the photo again. Last item. Maybe not in current catalog because they are the "old style", but fisheries can still get them.

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Tricky:

What are you doing Sunday for dinner? WHL will be here getting ready for our trip to PSC on Monday. If you came up I'd get a leg of lamb, good old baked dinner just like in the old country.

If you don;t come up it's spaghetti and meatballs. But my meatballs are very good. I'll be watching The Masters so the meat balls will be golf ball size.

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I believe the cockpit hatch gasket material should be arriving soon if not already directly to the school (Jordan found and ordered it with direction from Jim). Then Jordan can fit it all together so when the T-latches are latched they put just the right amount of pressure on the gaskets to seal off the hatches but not over deform the gasket material. There is a fairly deep gutter running around the edge of the hatch openings so that should drain off any water before it builds up and challenges the gasket seal.

 

The last photo was taken before the openings got trimmed, now Jordan will trim the remainder to just the right height for the gasket to compress the required amount for a good seal. Here is another example where good craftsmanship comes to play. (Jordan is an excellent craftsman. )

 

My new locker lids arrive this morning. We will probably use the existing hardware but I'm interested by those T latches for below deck lockers. I have some large gasketed locker doors in the shower cubicle that need positive locking.

 

I've searched the Moeller Marine site but couldn't find them.

 

I don't suppose you have a link please Kim?

Last item on the list shown in the previous post, order them from Fisheries, ask for Matt, tell him you want what he got for Kim, he should know what you are talking about, note the part number. Here's the photo again. Last item. Maybe not in current catalog because they are the "old style", but fisheries can still get them.

Thanks Kim!

 

Tricky:

What are you doing Sunday for dinner? WHL will be here getting ready for our trip to PSC on Monday. If you came up I'd get a leg of lamb, good old baked dinner just like in the old country.

If you don;t come up it's spaghetti and meatballs. But my meatballs are very good. I'll be watching The Masters so the meat balls will be golf ball size.

Fabulous. I'm in.

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I'll head out to Silvana meats at 5am and pick up the leg. It's a sublime drive at that time of the morning as you wind your way around the many dairy farms. I'm going to come back as a dairy farmer. But with my karma I'll probably come back as a cow.

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Kim - that's how the little storage locker on my ATV latches. It works really well. The inside of it is the only clean plastic on the ATV. Had it since 2004. Lives outside.

 

Bob, a dairy farmer??? Are you a masochist?

Not many jobs are more demanding than being a dairy farmer.

I'd much rather be the cow than the dairy farmer.

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Ah! Fixed it for you Kim.

 

 

Have you considered inside hold downs, a line from the inside of the cockpit hatch to a cleat inside the cabin of the boat? There are no exterior hasps this way.

No because I want to be able to open the hatch when I need to without going below to trip the line from the cleat. I will have "stuff" beer stored there I will want to access often.

 

My 30 Square Metre boat came with that kind of arrangement for the forward sail storage hatch and it was a PITA. I disabled it after about a week.

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Ah! Fixed it for you Kim.

 

 

Have you considered inside hold downs, a line from the inside of the cockpit hatch to a cleat inside the cabin of the boat? There are no exterior hasps this way.

No because I want to be able to open the hatch when I need to without going below to trip the line from the cleat. I will have "stuff" beer stored there I will want to access often.

 

My 30 Square Metre boat came with that kind of arrangement for the forward sail storage hatch and it was a PITA. I disabled it after about a week.

Thank you Joli.......

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One thing about those very-secure T-locks is that they are outstanding at snagging lines - I have them on a cooler and they have better tenacity than some crew I've sailed with and seem to be able to actively find halyard tails. Just sayin' - before installation I'd be inclined to find a lower-profile solution, and fortunately the T-locks aren't expensive and can be re-purposed elsewhere if you can find something better.

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Any time Kim, I usually just say hey hun, would you...... and drinks appear magically but if you're single handing the boat it's best to have a stash nearby.

 

 

 

Ah! Fixed it for you Kim.

 

 

Have you considered inside hold downs, a line from the inside of the cockpit hatch to a cleat inside the cabin of the boat? There are no exterior hasps this way.

No because I want to be able to open the hatch when I need to without going below to trip the line from the cleat. I will have "stuff" beer stored there I will want to access often.

 

My 30 Square Metre boat came with that kind of arrangement for the forward sail storage hatch and it was a PITA. I disabled it after about a week.

Thank you Joli.......

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Bob, a dairy farmer??? Are you a masochist?

Not many jobs are more demanding than being a dairy farmer.

I'd much rather be the cow than the dairy farmer.

My old man was an agro scientist and worked on dairy farms in his youth. We were driving past a nice dairy farm one day and I mentioned that it was the only kind of farming that ever attracted me - all that nice stainless gear, cows etc.

 

He replied that it was the only form of slavery that was still legal.

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Lent Pete one of my Tokina 11-16/2.8's a few weeks ago....bet it hasn't come off his Canon since then.

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Aw come on now ... Kim's boat was "Officially" declared boat porn by all of us, long before it appeared in this article. :P

 

Kim, my Uncle who was very special to me, died recently. He too was a deep thinking and quiet man, but was extremely witty and positive of word, when he did speak. A very intelligent, loving man of uncommon integrity. Your Dad and my Uncle would have gotten along well, me thinks.

 


Sliver (Francis Lee) is officially Boatporn: http://boatporn.tumblr.com/


I wonder if Frank would be proud. He was a quiet thoughtful man, but often it was hard to know what he was thinking.

Boomer, it looks like the photo of Sliver in the article was shot by a Canon Rebel IOS T1. No idea who photo credit goes to. Is it yours?

Lent Pete one of my Tokina 11-16/2.8's a few weeks ago....bet it hasn't come off his Canon since then.

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Pete's T1i with one of my Tokina 11-16's at 16mm....so it's all Pete....I would have shot at 12-14mm and cropped the image.

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Pete's T1i with one of my Tokina 11-16's at 16mm....so it's all Pete....I would have shot at 12-14mm and cropped the image.

 

Seriously!!!

 

you wouldn't get enough light in or hold it that still!

 

Bullshit.

 

Hey Boomer my Sister passed away... It sucks.

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Sorry for your loss Dale....remember the good times and cherish them.

 

The nice thing with ultra wides, even an over the hill old gummer, with shaking hands like yourself can get a shot.

 

Try doing that with any 300-800mm lens and let me know how it turns out. :lol:

 

NW School of Wooden Boat Building at Port Hadlock from across the bay.

 

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Monday.

 

We have cut outs for the port-lights. (However in a display of kindness Jordan decided to give the fun of cutting holes in my boat to Fred.)

 

The program is to do a rough cut and then finish it with a router using the Jim designed and Brandon CNC cut templates to give us an accurate clean cut out. Then Fred routers out some of the foam to allow for the mounting surface and such. the tempered glass will go in from the outside and rest on the lip left in by Fred as he does the prep.

 

Jim says there is a special port-light glue by Sikaflex and they also publish a guide for installing glued glass, so we will get a copy and use it.

 

Now what are we going to do with the cutouts? There must be some clever use we can come up with for them.

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The deck to hull to bulkhead tabbing is finished and now the fairing begins. Lots of effort has been applied to making the joins and overlaps very clean and smooth.

 

In the bow-on shot you can see the starboard side has yet to get the top filler coat of epoxy that the port side has received.

 

We discussed the "HIN #" issue today. Apparently every professionally manufactured hull has to have a "hull identification number" permanently stamped into the hull on the transom and down below in a hidden spot in case someone removes the visibly number.

 

The specific instructions say to put it on the upper right corner of the transom. But of course we have no transom. So we are kind of thinking up near the sheer-line near the point of the stern on the starboard side......

 

Now how should we do the HIN? We can't very well stamp them in using a die set. Silly regulations!

 

 

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As we noted last week (or was it the week before?) we rejected the manufactured exhaust outlets and decided to get some fiberglass tubes and make our own to get a smooth outlet and lower the drag (to say nothing about eliminating the ugly protrusion of the pre-made exhaust outlets.

 

Fortunately Fisheries happily took back the pre-made ones, but I suspect I am a good customer there as I seem to visit and buy something from them every week for the project.

 

I guess if I were a decent photographer I would have taken a picture of the outside view so you could see how nice and smooth it now is, maybe next time I am there.

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Although we have a Japanese diesel engine (Yanmar) it came with a Germany instrument panel which I saw for the first time today. Pretty straightforward and I noted there was extra weather protection for the key!

 

The Germans in their usual display of good planning/engineering included a template for the panel cutout with the instructions.

 

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Now how should we do the HIN? We can't very well stamp them in using a die set. Silly regulations!

You grind away a little of the hull, apply numbers and glass over with clear epoxy about 1/4" thick?

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Cockpit hatch hinges are all mounted on the hatches and the gasket material has arrived so the careful fitting of the hatches onto the cockpit seat will commence soon. Then the hold downs will be added at the right location to offer just enough gasket compression to seal the opening without over stressing the gasket material.

 

And the soft patch in the forward cockpit sole over the engine has been fabricated and is now getting the hold-down holes positioned (with a template of course).

 

Because this is a soft patch and not a normally used hatch, we will have it held down with fastenings that screw up from inside the engine room to leave the top clear of any hardware. The hatch to cockpit sole joint will be sealed with some sort of sealant to add to the weather proofing.

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And for you traditional wood construction fans here is the backbone of the extended Hansen Forest Service boat being built next to our project.

 

Purple Heart stem!!

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Now how should we do the HIN? We can't very well stamp them in using a die set. Silly regulations!

You grind away a little of the hull, apply numbers and glass over with clear epoxy about 1/4" thick?

We discussed that very plan this morning, it seems to be the leading option right now.

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Now how should we do the HIN? We can't very well stamp them in using a die set. Silly regulations!

You grind away a little of the hull, apply numbers and glass over with clear epoxy about 1/4" thick?

We discussed that very plan this morning, it seems to be the leading option right now.

I have a refinement.

 

1) Route out a section to contain the numbers.

2) Lay in solid brass letters and numbers.

3) Epoxy over this and polish to a high shine.

 

It will look awesome.

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Now how should we do the HIN? We can't very well stamp them in using a die set. Silly regulations!

You grind away a little of the hull, apply numbers and glass over with clear epoxy about 1/4" thick?

We discussed that very plan this morning, it seems to be the leading option right now.

I have a refinement.

 

1) Route out a section to contain the numbers.

2) Lay in solid brass letters and numbers.

3) Epoxy over this and polish to a high shine.

 

It will look awesome.

Yeah, that was Bruce's idea, but he was going to use a bronze plate with the numbers stamped in and epoxy over that. Are you sure you and Bruce don't talk?

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I think the point of the HIN transom number is so it is difficult to hide because it should be easy to find. They always put them in the same place so officials will know where to look for them. If they look in the expected place and don't see anything they should immediately become suspicious that the number has been removed (or perhaps modified).

 

You already have a problem because the number won't be in the expected place (because your boat doesn't have the expected place due to its design).

 

I think they want it to be engraved so it can still be read even if it is painted over. The epoxy window is too easily painted over I think. A Dremel with a router accessory and a custom template? You have to do this at least twice.

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Reality is that HIN's are very easy to change, many manufacturers just rivet them on before the boat leaves the factory, the fact is Fiberglass is so easy to repair.......

Just ensure that it is within the required distance from the shear (had to recall some boats once where it was too far down......)

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"Now what are we going to do with the cutouts? There must be some clever use we can come up with for them."

 

 

That oval looks about the right size for a drinks tray. Give it to a student as a minor project. Timber trim, a veneer on the top, and 3 recesses cut into the surface, one for the bottle of your choice, and then a tumbler either side. Should work out quite nicely...

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"Now what are we going to do with the cutouts? There must be some clever use we can come up with for them."

 

Do you mean the base for the commemorative plaques you are going to give to the build team?

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Make plaques for the 5 most important members of the team. Re-trim, finish off with the boat's paint scheme.

 

or...

 

Make Moon-Eyes out of them and mount on the bow.

 

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Make plaques for the 5 most important members of the team. Re-trim, finish off with the boat's paint scheme.

 

or...

 

Make Moon-Eyes out of them and mount on the bow.

 

attachicon.gifmoon eyes.png

Wow, the five most important members of the team? Not possible, there are more than five.....way more than five.

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Make plaques for the 5 most important members of the team. Re-trim, finish off with the boat's paint scheme.

 

or...

 

Make Moon-Eyes out of them and mount on the bow.

 

attachicon.gifmoon eyes.png

Wow, the five most important members of the team? Not possible, there are more than five.....way more than five.

Looks like you gotta cut more holes...

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Looks like you gotta cut more holes...

 

Which brings us back to the previous discussion of how many portlights. Do 3 more per side and maybe it won't be a cave down there.

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Yeah, and a bunch below the sheerline too, so short people can see out.

 

Maybe a transparent glass insert in the bottom...

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Yeah, and a bunch below the sheerline too, so short people can see out.

 

Maybe a transparent glass insert in the bottom...

There ya go....

Halogen lights in the keel too, so you can see where yer goin'.

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Yeah, and a bunch below the sheerline too, so short people can see out.

 

Maybe a transparent glass insert in the bottom...

There ya go....

Halogen lights in the keel too, so you can see where yer goin'.

And a headlight in the forward bottom edge for that dangerous spade rudder. And an extra depth transducer. Coz Bob won't put in a skeg.

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Could ya hang a disco ball from the spreaders too?

Yeah! It could double as the radar reflector!

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It would dazzle and confuse any pirates too....Just point your 10 million candlepower spot at it.

(you do have a couple of those, dontcha?)

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It would dazzle and confuse any pirates too....Just point your 10 million candlepower spot at it.

(you do have a couple of those, dontcha?)

Or a laser. :)

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Don't the frikking laser beams go on the pet sharks?

Or a 1400mw hand held unit that goes in my hand. :ph34r:

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I had a board meeting at the School last night so I got a rare midweek visit in. Fairing of the exterior deck tabbing continues. It is starting to get nice and smooth. (But of course Bruce says we have a long way to go, that's what you get with a foreman who is a perfectionist.)

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The ports treatment looks good now that they have back-filled the area that had the foam removed with solid epoxy so they can do the insets. The glass will be inserted from the outside and will be tempered. The crew is making templates so I can give the glass people a nice cutting pattern to use.

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Wait. So these will be non-opening. I recall seeing some really nice bronze oval portholes. I must have missed a design change somewhere.

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Wait. So these will be non-opening. I recall seeing some really nice bronze oval portholes. I must have missed a design change somewhere.

+1 ?

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Wait. So these will be non-opening. I recall seeing some really nice bronze oval portholes. I must have missed a design change somewhere.

 

I'm guessing Kim couldn't get over the weight of them. :D

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The engine room soft patch with captive fastenings is coming along nicely. Just needs the edges treated and then paint.

 

It is designed to have hidden fastenings from the outside with bolt access in the engine room. I went into the engine room via the cockpit hatches and confirmed the ease of accessing the bolts. We don't expect to use the patch very often as we have good engine access from the cockpit hatches and from the hatch under the companionway ladder. The patch will be sealed around the edges with sealer.

 

I picked up the patch and was surprised at its light weight. We are making as many items in composite as possible to keep the weight down. Companionway slider, drop boards, ladder, berth and settee flats, cockpit combings. All will be composite.

 

Now I am looking for a lightweight solution for the cabin sole. We have temps in there now made of 3/4 plywood, hardly a lightweight solution.

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Wait. So these will be non-opening. I recall seeing some really nice bronze oval portholes. I must have missed a design change somewhere.

 

I'm guessing Kim couldn't get over the weight of them. :D

Actually it was the look that turned me away from them. They are pretty clunky looking when put up alongside all of the lightweight items in the boat. I discussed it with Bob a couple months ago and he helped me realize this was the wrong boat for them. So they are back in my garage looking for a new boat to call home.

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BJ:

I originally designed the boat for fixed oval deadlights that I drew full size on the deck lines. These will be slightly recessed into the cabin trunk and have a very clean look. That's what I was after.

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If we ever pull the engine again on Joli it's going to get a soft patch. Last time we cut out the cockpit sole we just glassed back in, the "work to do list" was long enough that this wasn't doable .

 

Kim will it through bolt from below? Are we looking at the bottom of the patch?

 

 

The engine room soft patch with captive fastenings is coming along nicely. Just needs the edges treated and then paint.

 

It is designed to have hidden fastenings from the outside with bolt access in the engine room. I went into the engine room via the cockpit hatches and confirmed the ease of accessing the bolts. We don't expect to use the patch very often as we have good engine access from the cockpit hatches and from the hatch under the companionway ladder. The patch will be sealed around the edges with sealer.

 

I picked up the patch and was surprised at its light weight. We are making as many items in composite as possible to keep the weight down. Companionway slider, drop boards, ladder, berth and settee flats, cockpit combings. All will be composite.

 

Now I am looking for a lightweight solution for the cabin sole. We have temps in there now made of 3/4 plywood, hardly a lightweight solution.

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Now I am looking for a lightweight solution for the cabin sole. We have temps in there now made of 3/4 plywood, hardly a lightweight solution.

 

Make them in composite and paint them with non-skid. Worked pretty well for us. Strong, light and no varnish.

 

Or you could go all out and make the composite panels with teak and holly veneer.

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If we ever pull the engine again on Joli it's going to get a soft patch. Last time we cut out the cockpit sole we just glassed back in, the "work to do list" was long enough that this wasn't doable .

 

Kim will it through bolt from below? Are we looking at the bottom of the patch

 

 

 

Yes, bolt from below you are looking at the bottom.

 

 

Now I am looking for a lightweight solution for the cabin sole. We have temps in there now made of 3/4 plywood, hardly a lightweight solution.

 

Make them in composite and paint them with non-skid. Worked pretty well for us. Strong, light and no varnish.

 

Or you could go all out and make the composite panels with teak and holly veneer.

I am considering just that!

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BJ:

I originally designed the boat for fixed oval deadlights that I drew full size on the deck lines. These will be slightly recessed into the cabin trunk and have a very clean look. That's what I was after.

Sometimes it just pays to do it the way Bob designed it. He was right about the port-lights, once I held the bronze ones up to the cabin side I knew they were not right for this vessel.

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Well you can always use the bronze ones as tropies for the Sliver One Design races. They'll look good with the winning boat's name, "Francis Lee", etched in flowery script on the glass, mounted to a varnished teak or mahogany plaque, and nailed to your wall...

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Well you can always use the bronze ones as tropies for the Sliver One Design races. They'll look good with the winning boat's name, "Francis Lee", etched in flowery script on the glass, mounted to a varnished teak or mahogany plaque, and nailed to your wall...

It will be hard to lose the races when the one design class consists of one vessel.

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It's a fabulous boat and I think at this stage, words are failing us.

Time to relax in the fabulosity of the vessel.

 

When all words fail you use "zax". It is really helpful in SCRABBLE.

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Well you can always use the bronze ones as tropies for the Sliver One Design races. They'll look good with the winning boat's name, "Francis Lee", etched in flowery script on the glass, mounted to a varnished teak or mahogany plaque, and nailed to your wall...

It will be hard to lose the races when the one design class consists of one vessel.

 

Well, yeah.

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Well you can always use the bronze ones as tropies for the Sliver One Design races. They'll look good with the winning boat's name, "Francis Lee", etched in flowery script on the glass, mounted to a varnished teak or mahogany plaque, and nailed to your wall...

It will be hard to lose the races when the one design class consists of one vessel.

First at the start, first around the mark, and first across the line. What's not to like, Kim?

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It's a fabulous boat and I think at this stage, words are failing us.

Time to relax in the fabulosity of the vessel.

 

When all words fail you use "zax". It is really helpful in SCRABBLE.

That's good because we're not accepting `fabulosity'. -_-

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Now I am looking for a lightweight solution for the cabin sole. We have temps in there now made of 3/4 plywood, hardly a lightweight solution.

 

Make them in composite and paint them with non-skid. Worked pretty well for us. Strong, light and no varnish.

 

Or you could go all out and make the composite panels with teak and holly veneer.

Or go different. Bamboo veneer?

 

Solid-Bamboo-Flooring_large.jpg

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We have bamboo floors in much of our house, and we like them, but I still like the composite idea, lightweight.

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If you can forgive me for another tangent: putting the fabulosity aside for a moment, we had discussed the highly entertaining Stuart McLean of CBC's Vinyl Cafe a few pages back. Turns out today is a milestone birthday for Stuart (apparently with a 6 in it) and a friend of his wrote this lovely song.

 

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BJ:

I originally designed the boat for fixed oval deadlights that I drew full size on the deck lines. These will be slightly recessed into the cabin trunk and have a very clean look. That's what I was after.

 

Yes! That is proper.

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