kimbottles

Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

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No Life Lines right? I know it is not customary on this kind of boat, but seems iike they would disappear at this scale.

 

Also wondering about how Frances Lee will compare to the rig donor Farr 40 in terms of speed potential. Sail Area/ displacement? Righting moment? Ballast ratio, etc. If you had to guess a PHRF rating, wha would it be?

Who cares about her rating? I told Bob to design her to go through the water not to any rating rule. The Farr 40 and the Perry Sliver are completely different vessels. The fact the Farr 40 rig fit nicely was simply good luck and cost less than an aluminum rig. Cheers!

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Tom:

What you propose re chopping off the stern would not work on this design. There is really no appreciable overhang aft. Or forward for that matter. This boat is already all sailing length. Nothing useless to chop off.

 

To do the chop of thing you would a stern with a long and elevated counter.

...

 

So if you chopped this one, you would wind up with a submerged transom. Of course, how could it be otherwise? Seems obvious now that you have pointed it out.

 

So what if Kim completely lost his marbles and said, "That was fun, Bob, but now let's do the same boat with a transom!" Would you change this one or start fresh?

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Whoo cares about her rating? I told Bob to design her to go through the water not to any rating rule. The Farr 40 and the Perry Sliver are completely different vessels. The fact the Farr 40 rig fit nicely was simply good luck and cost less than an aluminum rig. Cheers!

 

Academic question really-- I am the last person to care about ratings as such. Just interested in how the boat compares statistically to other large boats. Trying to get a sense of how powered up she is relative to other boats.

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Vincent:

I could post the polars if you like. But it would be PHRF so how the hell would we know the rating now? We are not mind readers.

As for comparing the numbers to the Farr 40 I rthink you can do that. All the rlevabntg numbers have been publuished for both boats. You may have to do some independant research on this.

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Now THAT's exciting. Reminds me of the feeling I get when putting components on a new bike frame for the first time.

 

Question for Bob & Kim - Isn't part of the allure of using a Farr 40 rig that you can get great deals on lightly used Farr 40 sails (like today, the day after Worlds)? I understand that the headsail would probably not work, but the mainsail would. Unless you have in mind a much less aggressive (less roachy) main.

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Now THAT's exciting. Reminds me of the feeling I get when putting components on a new bike frame for the first time.

 

Question for Bob & Kim - Isn't part of the allure of using a Farr 40 rig that you can get great deals on lightly used Farr 40 sails (like today, the day after Worlds)? I understand that the headsail would probably not work, but the mainsail would. Unless you have in mind a much less aggressive (less roachy) main.

Big weight difference so the Farr 40 mains appear to be a bit on the light side for the Francis Lee. Also the new cost on the one main I looked at was $18K so the "bargain" price was still considerably more than a new Dacron main.

 

It has come to my attention that a certain yacht designer was meddling with my stripes today......

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Who?

Me?

 

It wasn't like I was looking for an excuse to drive to Seattle first thing the morning while the salmon were jumping right outside my door.

 

Fact is that Scott, partner in the yard, spotted this anomolay in the ends of the boot stripe and called it to Kim's attention. The painters insisted they had done everything in accordance with the drawing ( on't they always) and Kim is loathe to come down on anybody. In his defence I will say that from certain angles this upsweep of the boot ends went away. But as soon as I went in the yard thois morning and saw the strip I said, "Fuck. That's not right." I said it exactly the same way that Olin Stephens would have said it. So I went and collected Scott and for half an hour we mucked around with masking tape until we were satisfied that it now looked right. We did not measure anything. We eyeballed everything.

 

This was the first time I had seen the boat since painting. It is spectacular.

 

I know it all sounds stupid but this is a very nice boat. It may not be perfect when it's done but that won't be because I did not try to make it perfect.

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Sculpin and I are visiting the yard this afternoon, so we will reserve judgment until we see it with our own eyes.

 

(It is kind of nice to be working with a yacht designer who will drop everything and drive for a couple hours just to make sure my vessel is as close to perfect as possible. I think I like that.)

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'Meddling' in the pursuit of perfection? Sounds all good to me, guys.

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Truth be told I went to town to get sea scallops, Petrale Sole and a leg of lamb from the Central Market. I also like mingling with the Asian people there. I'm weird that way. There is something sexy about a Chinese gal advising you on Belgian beers. " You don't say?"

 

No, not really. I laid awake last night trying to justify not going to the boat and I couldn't find a way. So I got up this morning, said, "Fuck it", threw the dog in the car and went to Ballard.

To quote my all time fav movie, "the old country".

 

But as long as I was in town I might as well go to the Central Market.

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Thanks for the clarification. We've gotten used to the car mounted cleat. Why the difference between the A and the 2-handed boats?

Only thing I can think of is curved track on the A, never really figured out why just did what felt the best. On the N-20 ,I just always liked knowing where it ( the cleat) was, and being the skipper I always ran it. The A doesn't get played as much and I don't distance race....very far, but obviously I'm still the one running it when it does.

At least you can go to Ballarrrrrrrrrd when you want, Bob.....

 

:(:(

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Paul:

I feel your pain. As I drove by the Scandinavian Specialties store today I had a real craving for Rulepulse.. I settled for Dicks's cheeseburger. Close.

 

I did stop to let Ruby play at the dog park. Boy they sure has hell have mucked that place up. It's now the mud park. Back when it was just a park where we let our dogs run illegally it ws a nice green and grassy field. But they had to prove how smart they are, goevernment types,, you know them well, fence the place and ultimately aka "now" destroy the place. What the hell were they "protecting" if this is what's left of the grassy field? But here at the shack, on the beach I don't have to worry about that.

 

I don't have to worry about eating rulepulse either. Damn it.

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OK Bob, after considerable study I see you are right about the stripe, your version is better, we will have the yard carry on with it.

 

(Damn, the meddler wins!)

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OK Bob, after considerable study I see you are right about the stripe, your version is better, we will have the yard carry on with it.

 

(Damn, the meddler wins!)

Was there really ever any doubt? :)

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OK Bob, after considerable study I see you are right about the stripe, your version is better, we will have the yard carry on with it.

(Damn, the meddler wins!)

Was there really ever any doubt? :)

Not really, he does know what he is doing.......apparently.

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We had a few visitors last night, but none were as cute as Mrs. Black who agreed to pose on the bulb.....

 

Sculpin, Vincent DePillis, Blackjenner, Mrs. Black, GreenCard (who works at CSR) all took a look. I have had the good fortune to meet quite a number of anarchists because of this project.

 

I also took a picture of Sculpin standing on the bulb but I used his camera so he will have to post that one.

post-8115-0-85934500-1377997969_thumb.jpg

post-8115-0-26689800-1377997975_thumb.jpg

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Your a lucky man Kim...but then we create our own luck, right....

 

We want to see that pic of Mr. Sculpin....please don't be shy.

 

Nice to hear Vincent and Mr. & Mrs. Black came down...I would imagine Nigel is following the build closely.

 

BTW the progress is looking absolutely fantastic!

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Great photo fo Kerry on the keel. Both very pretty shapes.

 

Sculper came by the shack today. My dog threw up a salmon eyeball along with a few other things I didn't quite recoignize but smelled a lot like salmon.

Sculps and I had a nice visit. He left before I could feed him lunch. Maybe the eyeball thing was a bit much for his stomach. Got to admit it's not seal flipper pie.

I thought it was cool, "Hey look, an eyeball."

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It's a modified beaver tail Jose. We might slap a few Orcas but I don't think we can skewer any.

But with a white cream sauce, some lemon, a pinch of dill, some roasted red potatoes and sauteed asparagus you never know.

"White meat or dark meat?"

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Is Mrs Black very small or is that keel just real big.

 

It's the first time I've really realised the size of the keel, It's huge! unless of course Mrs Black is a very petite woman.

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Is Mrs Black very small or is that keel just real big.

 

It's the first time I've really realised the size of the keel, It's huge! unless of course Mrs Black is a very petite woman.

Kerry is 5'5".

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Bob, did you outsource the hydrodynamics on the fin/bulb? Kind of looks like a stinger on the end of bulb? More of a rough water shape?

 

I'm imagining the tip vortex trying to wrap itself around the bulb, dissipating as it approaches the stinger....

 

Kim, you're used to pretty tight angles upwind with the metre boats you've been sailing, what differences besides lack of oscillating downwind do you anticipate with this fin? What is the AR of the fin itself- 1:3 ish? 30 squares are more like 1:1, no? Any specific reasons for the sweep? Is that a slight ridge on the top of the bulb? Kind of an extension of the TE? Seductive shape.

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I did the bulb myself with the help of Ivan Erdevicki in Monte Negro. Ivan and I do a lot of work together. He did all tthe engineering on ND's boat. So, now that you mention it, I gues you could say I outsourced it. Yeah, that's it. I "outsourced" it. You can say that if you like. I coillaborated with an "outsource". The shape is mine. Ivan made it possible to build. Later Jim Franken aded his two cents to the effort with 3D models and some minor alterations o the structure.

 

It's a modified beaver tail. The casting process knocked the outer edges of the square beaver tail we had designed. But I looked at the shape we had, sort of a delta beaver tail and I liked it. We could have built the corners up with

bondo but they would have been very vulnerable so I decided to leave the shape as it. It looks good to my eye. Of course I could have an "outsource" check it out but I trust my own eye. The challenge with the bulb was to do an L bulb as Kim was against a T bulb. I would have preferred theT bulb but with kelp around here Kim liked the L bulb.

 

I think the tip vortex will be taken care of just fine. Sweep is not an independant consideration. In this case the sweep satisfied several things we had to accomodate. Yes, there is a very subtle "spine" to the top. It is as you say, a very seductive shape.

 

Floater:

The boat is 62' long! Look at all the drawings posted. The keel will look just right when it is on the boat. It is just right.

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That stern shot looks soooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeet!

 

I love it when I impress myself.

I love it when I chase the nay sayers away.

Geez, Bob! To say you have a boat booty fetish is an understatement.

 

Fine example by a master draftsman by the way.

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Bob, did you outsource the hydrodynamics on the fin/bulb? Kind of looks like a stinger on the end of bulb? More of a rough water shape?

I'm imagining the tip vortex trying to wrap itself around the bulb, dissipating as it approaches the stinger....

Kim, you're used to pretty tight angles upwind with the metre boats you've been sailing, what differences besides lack of oscillating downwind do you anticipate with this fin? What is the AR of the fin itself- 1:3 ish? 30 squares are more like 1:1, no? Any specific reasons for the sweep? Is that a slight ridge on the top of the bulb? Kind of an extension of the TE? Seductive shape.

With my Swede 55, which also had the rudder well separated from the keel, we found we could backup well and parallel park rather easily. This fin is considerably more performance orientated than the Swede's keel, so I expect the Francis Lee will sail better than the Swede on all points of sail.

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Thank you SC. Yes, I admit I am a fanny man when it comes to boats.

 

I am waiting for the day when I can ride in a chase boat and drool over myself watching the stern of Francis Lee slide by.

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Sweep is not an independant consideration. In this case the sweep satisfied several things we had to accomodate.

 

Bob,

 

Could we get a little background (or even pointers/suggestions to other references) on sweep?

 

My anecdotal observation is swept keels seemed to be all the rage, from at least swept leading edges (everybody) to the shark-fin S&S and C&C keels from the 70s (and of course on Shaw's P30 ...) and now everyone does straight leading edges, often with bulbs.

 

Straight would seem the obvious way to do it - subsonic airplane wings are straight. (probably shows how little I know)

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Thank you SC. Yes, I admit I am a fanny man when it comes to boats.

 

I am waiting for the day when I can ride in a chase boat and drool over myself watching the stern of Francis Lee slide by.

 

Better make sure you have plenty of horsepower on the transom of that chase boat. Just sayin'.

 

The Francis Lee certainly has some serous balls. (balls not cut off, as they say in Everett.)

 

Romain

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This is the shot that does it for me:

 

post-8115-0-19185600-1377662437_thumb.jp

 

The view from directly to windward while she's charging past.

 

The photo had me singing an old song:

 

"The Tennessee Stud was long and lean
The color of the sun and his eyes were green
He had the nerve and he had the blood
There never was a horse like Tennessee Stud"

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Paul:

I feel your pain. As I drove by the Scandinavian Specialties store today I had a real craving for Rulepulse.. I settled for Dicks's .

Is Dick's any good?

 

I have seen it often on trips to Seattle, but could never bring myself to ordering a "Dick Cheeseburger". I'm sure it is probably good, (has to be with a name like that - plus its been around forever) but I don't think I could order one and keep a straight face.

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Paul:

I feel your pain. As I drove by the Scandinavian Specialties store today I had a real craving for Rulepulse.. I settled for Dicks's .

Is Dick's any good?

 

I have seen it often on trips to Seattle, but could never bring myself to ordering a "Dick Cheeseburger". I'm sure it is probably good, (has to be with a name like that - plus its been around forever) but I don't think I could order one and keep a straight face.

 

A "Dickburger" - I'd buy one just so I could say I had. :D

 

There are some truly great signs out there. My all time favourite was on one of the buildings of the old shipyard at the bottom of St. Georges St. in North Van - "Erection Shop" in letters 6' high. It had been there for decades but some corporate drone finally had it changed to "Assembly Shop" because "ships are no longer erected". Pissed off a LOT of people.

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The challenge with the bulb was to do an L bulb as Kim was against a T bulb. I would have preferred the T bulb but with kelp around here Kim liked the L bulb.

 

I'm with Kim on the "L" over "T" bulb. But I sail in Maine and even that keel won't loose pots.

 

And you haven't laughed until you've seen the asshole who kept you up all night with drunken whooping and loud music (in a quiet, pristine little island cove) get their anchor line wrapped around their T bulb in a 2 knot current. The 20 degree list wasn't just the hangover...

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Paul:

I feel your pain. As I drove by the Scandinavian Specialties store today I had a real craving for Rulepulse.. I settled for Dicks's .

Is Dick's any good?

 

I have seen it often on trips to Seattle, but could never bring myself to ordering a "Dick Cheeseburger". I'm sure it is probably good, (has to be with a name like that - plus its been around forever) but I don't think I could order one and keep a straight face.

I have never had one, but "Dick's" is an institution around here. A family owned small chain of drive ins(instead of calling it fast food).

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Zedder:

I used to have a program written by Dr. Dave Vacanti, that evaluated sweep. I used it on a lot of boats. Essentially the lower the aspect ratio the greatewr the required optimal sweep. Ok, I got that.

The problem with these prgrams for sailboats is that sailboats operate over a wide range of speeds. Also factor in Upwind and Downwind keel requirements. Do it very carefully. This is critical and very, very difficult.

It's a complex problem.

 

Dicks:

When I lived in Ballard I lived about 1.5 miles from Dicks. The burgers are basic and good. They are not gourmet. But after two weeks out of town, on my way home from the airport at 10pm I would often stop by Dicks before going home. It was the taste of Ballard. I still like anice, fresh Dick's Delux.

 

But I do prefer an In and Out cheese burger. But we don't have In and Out in Seattle.

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Zedder:

I used to have a program written by Dr. Dave Vacanti, that evaluated sweep. I used it on a lot of boats. Essentially the lower the aspect ratio the greatewr the required optimal sweep. Ok, I got that.

The problem with these prgrams for sailboats is that sailboats operate over a wide range of speeds. Also factor in Upwind and Downwind keel requirements. Do it very carefully. This is critical and very, very difficult.

It's a complex problem.

 

Dicks:

When I lived in Ballard I lived about 1.5 miles from Dicks. The burgers are basic and good. They are not gourmet. But after two weeks out of town, on my way home from the airport at 10pm I would often stop by Dicks before going home. It was the taste of Ballard. I still like anice, fresh Dick's Delux.

 

But I do prefer an In and Out cheese burger. But we don't have In and Out in Seattle.

Kid Valley...........

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Zedder:

I used to have a program written by Dr. Dave Vacanti, that evaluated sweep. I used it on a lot of boats. Essentially the lower the aspect ratio the greatewr the required optimal sweep. Ok, I got that.

The problem with these prgrams for sailboats is that sailboats operate over a wide range of speeds. Also factor in Upwind and Downwind keel requirements. Do it very carefully. This is critical and very, very difficult.

It's a complex problem.

 

Dicks:

When I lived in Ballard I lived about 1.5 miles from Dicks. The burgers are basic and good. They are not gourmet. But after two weeks out of town, on my way home from the airport at 10pm I would often stop by Dicks before going home. It was the taste of Ballard. I still like anice, fresh Dick's Delux.

 

But I do prefer an In and Out cheese burger. But we don't have In and Out in Seattle.

Kid Valley...........

+1

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Zonks:

you got it.

 

In and Out burgers.

They come from California. How can they not be good?

"Two, cool shorts sittin' side by side.":

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Good song Bob. Represents the drive in era. Reminds me of another Beach Boys tune. I was 7 in 1960 but my older cousins tell me the story of my sister peeling out of the parking lot of the Frisko Freeze drive in, frequently. My cousins were talking about it at a family gathering and my dad overheard, and yes he took the T-Bird away, at least for a little while. No telling what my brother did with dad's '53 vette. I know some people don't like them but I sure like the Beach Boys.

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Floater:

The boat is 62' long! Look at all the drawings posted. The keel will look just right when it is on the boat. It is just right.

 

 

Yea I know, It's just that I only ever see this boat on my 15.4" screen. It's not untill I see a photo like that that the scale of the boat sinks in. I was not questioning your keel size.

 

Blackjenner: 5'5" and easy on the eye's = win! at least thats what I think of my 5'2" girl.

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Zedder:

I used to have a program written by Dr. Dave Vacanti, that evaluated sweep. I used it on a lot of boats. Essentially the lower the aspect ratio the greatewr the required optimal sweep. Ok, I got that.

The problem with these prgrams for sailboats is that sailboats operate over a wide range of speeds. Also factor in Upwind and Downwind keel requirements. Do it very carefully. This is critical and very, very difficult.

It's a complex problem.

I have been wondering about the same thing Zonker was wondering about for a while.

 

My Hobie Adventure Island has a slot and a daggerboard that is supposed to sit vertical in the slot. It is able to pivot back a bit if you run aground, so it has adjustable sweep.

 

I figured the same as Zonk, that straight down would be best upwind. I don't begin to understand why, but that is definitely not the case in all conditions. Sometimes it goes better with the board swept back.

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Tom, if you like to think about which way the flow across your foil might be going, here's something that might amuse-

 

http://www.spieltek.com/SunbirdSoaring/SoaringArticle/SoaringArticles.htm

 

Well, this was pretty amusing:

 

Schuemann Article: This is an autoextracting Zip file (over 8 MB).

This file is of higher resolution. Download to a folder then double-click

to extract. This takes a while to download (over 55 minutes @25.5 kps).

Open .tif files in Photo-Paint and print at high quality.

 

Remember when 56k was awesome speed?

 

It was also funny that someone took the time to make the article into a PDF, but no one has taken the time to run the text through an OCR program, extract the images, and just publish it in a web format. Web cluelessness amuses me. ;)

 

I downloaded the PDF and it looks like the kind of thing that needs to wait until well after my second cup.

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Not to be snarky, but I'm grateful that it was put on to the web at all.

 

But I'm a Gutenberg Project guy.....

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If the answers to keel design were all as simple as checking a graph all keels would look the same.

 

I've told this story before:

As I sat in the 474 at Narita I looked down the tarmak at the other planes all lined up at their gates. I noticed the variety of sweep angles on the tails. I thought to myslf, "Someone is guessing."

And those are commercial jets that operate in very consistant performace envelope. Sailboats have to be effective over an extremely wide set of conditions and speeds.

Finding the right shape for upwind that's the right shape for downwind and reaching from .25 kts to 20 kts is a real challenge.

 

I could tell again the "Roman the rocket scientist" yacht design story but I'll save it. And yes, Roman was a real rocket scienist with thick glasses and a Polish accent.

 

One thing that struck me with the big AC cats was that with all their money, experts and science getting the boats to foil right ws pretty much a hands on set of trials and redesigns after the boats were launched.

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On the off chance some of you are going to the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Show next weekend, Bruce Blatchley the contemporary instructor of the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding will be giving a presentation on the Perry Sliver Project he headed up.

 

The presentation will be at 2:30pm on Saturday Sept 7th and held in the Explorer Classroom at the Northwest Maritime Center.

 

Here is the flyer about the event:

 

http://woodenboat.org/festival/festival-public/activity/Event_Detail.aspx?processID=699

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nice work..keep it up. Bob, you are right. The AC is a big CF..they are just guessing. However, it reminds me a bit of the 1988 Cup if I remember which was a huge mismatch. ( I was just a teenager) This 72' foiling cat thing is gonna be a show..or not. Big huge foiling cats are big fun, but out of touch for the real world.

 

Kim, I still have every intent to buy and build me a PT11 nesting dinghy...it is just not #1 on the priority list right now..should be big fun.

 

Oh..the Sliver project looks great...thanks for the updates! B)

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If the answers to keel design were all as simple as checking a graph all keels would look the same.

 

I've told this story before:

As I sat in the 474 at Narita I looked down the tarmak at the other planes all lined up at their gates. I noticed the variety of sweep angles on the tails. I thought to myslf, "Someone is guessing."

And those are commercial jets that operate in very consistant performace envelope. Sailboats have to be effective over an extremely wide set of conditions and speeds.

Finding the right shape for upwind that's the right shape for downwind and reaching from .25 kts to 20 kts is a real challenge.

 

I could tell again the "Roman the rocket scientist" yacht design story but I'll save it. And yes, Roman was a real rocket scienist with thick glasses and a Polish accent.

 

One thing that struck me with the big AC cats was that with all their money, experts and science getting the boats to foil right ws pretty much a hands on set of trials and redesigns after the boats were launched.

Interesting. Seems to me there's a huge difference between foiling - and foiling fast.

 

The trade off for speed vs stability (reducing drag).

 

The science got them flying. The refinements got them flying fast.

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Continuing the completely off topic hijack, the "speed wall" that Sailrocket kept hitting turned out to be caused by foil ventilation, solved by a simple fence (after many attempts at changing size and shape of the foil).

 

My take on that is that they still don't know what the "right" foil for setting a record is in that boat. They just know why they were hitting a wall and how to fix it and the foil they used was good enough.

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Great photo fo Kerry on the keel. Both very pretty shapes.

 

Sculper came by the shack today. My dog threw up a salmon eyeball along with a few other things I didn't quite recoignize but smelled a lot like salmon.

Sculps and I had a nice visit. He left before I could feed him lunch. Maybe the eyeball thing was a bit much for his stomach. Got to admit it's not seal flipper pie.

I thought it was cool, "Hey look, an eyeball."

 

Bob, I've never had seal flipper pie, that is a Newfoundland thing. I was bemused (as I think also was your wife!) at your enthusiasm for a barfed up salmon eye.

 

Thanks again for the hospitality though, I very much enjoyed meeting you and Jill. And for the record I was 20 minutes late picking up she who is the boss of me, so my departure timing wasn't too rushed.

 

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Your a lucky man Kim...but then we create our own luck, right....

 

We want to see that pic of Mr. Sculpin....please don't be shy.

 

Nice to hear Vincent and Mr. & Mrs. Black came down...I would imagine Nigel is following the build closely.

 

BTW the progress is looking absolutely fantastic!

OK, here is the pic but Kerry is much better looking than I.

My tape measure claims the span from my toes to finger tips is 7' 2".

post-25282-0-27534700-1378247864_thumb.jpg

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Sculp, great pic...finally we have some perspective from another normal anarchist like the rest of us, and not the larger than life humans designing/building/owning the boat. :rolleyes:

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Per Sculpins pic, in the early days when then keel was being considered a

as a possible fuel tank...would it have been larger or a different shape?

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Hobot:

No, same fin design.

 

Went down to CSR this morning, again. Round three of the bootstripe battle. Kim met me there and with the patient painter we got it just right this time.

 

Looking at the Fuji 35 sitting next to FRANCIS LEE I realized why getting this simple straight stripe right was so difficult.

There is very little shape to the boat. It's so narrow that you see from one end of the stripe to the other from a wide range of perspectives.

Think of it like this: Imagine a 62' long picture window, one pane of glass, vertical. Now imagine trying to lay out two perfectly parallel lines 4" apart on that pane of glass.

There is zero tolerance for error.

Look at the fat Fuji. You can't see one end of the boat from the other. Half the stripe is always hidden. Lots of room for error.

FRANCIS LEE is not a flat pane of glass but it's as close as you can come with a sailboat hull due to its extremely narrow beam.

 

Next paint challenge will be the cove stripe. It is not parallel to the sheer. It's not parallel to anything. I have laid it out on the drawing and the yard will work from my drawing. But I have no doubt it will require tweaking to get right.

I can't wait to tweak.

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BTW, I have no idea if she has a planar sheer or not, but her sheer look just about perfect to my eye.

 

Good thing the School built her like Violet's Grandpa drew her.

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The running lights took some cleaning and some sealing, I don't think it was designed for a salt water environment but it sure looks great....it has a mini Dorade vent built into the back of the light compartment. I have been looking at how to get the bulb directly centered behind the Fresnel lens for better projection of light. It might take a little fiddling, but it will be worth it.

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Yum, looks like running lights for dinner!

 

No planar sheer on this one. Planar sheers don't work well with double enders for reasons I have explained ad nauseum here. In short if this sheer were planar it would kick up aft like a dog in heat.

Not the look I was after. I was after a subtle sheer that would go with the narrow beam.

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Hey Kimb,

 

Does SWMBO know you're working on that in the house??? I also see you have the correct binoculars for working on small finely detailed parts.

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Think of it like this: Imagine a 62' long picture window, one pane of glass, vertical. Now imagine trying to lay out two perfectly parallel lines 4" apart on that pane of glass.

 

 

Time for my Stupid Question of the Day.

 

I imagine doing that task with one of those cool laser-level tools from Home Despot. It will shine a perfectly level red line, then another one parallel to it. It would also do it onto a curved surface, like a hull.

 

Why would that be a wrong answer?

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Think of it like this: Imagine a 62' long picture window, one pane of glass, vertical. Now imagine trying to lay out two perfectly parallel lines 4" apart on that pane of glass.

 

 

Time for my Stupid Question of the Day.

 

I imagine doing that task with one of those cool laser-level tools from Home Despot. It will shine a perfectly level red line, then another one parallel to it. It would also do it onto a curved surface, like a hull.

 

Why would that be a wrong answer?

 

Is the boat sitting absolutely, perfectly level on both axes? Is some slight widening of the boot stripe toward the bow desired? These are a few thoughts that come to mind...

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Think of it like this: Imagine a 62' long picture window, one pane of glass, vertical. Now imagine trying to lay out two perfectly parallel lines 4" apart on that pane of glass.

 

 

Time for my Stupid Question of the Day.

 

I imagine doing that task with one of those cool laser-level tools from Home Despot. It will shine a perfectly level red line, then another one parallel to it. It would also do it onto a curved surface, like a hull.

 

Why would that be a wrong answer?

 

Is the boat sitting absolutely, perfectly level on both axes? Is some slight widening of the boot stripe toward the bow desired? These are a few thoughts that come to mind...

 

The fancy level tool is designed to answer that first question.

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The stripes were laid out with a laser level initially. I know this is the PNW but we do know about laser levels.

 

The boat is levelled Sal and I do not want the bootstripe to widen at the bow or the stern, I want it to appear dead flat and straight, from all angles. That's key. We now have what we want. It required adjusting about 8' of stripe in the bow and 6' in the stern. The final stern stripe adjustment was made in the last 18". I'm a nit picker. It's a three hour turnaround trip from the shack to CSR and I sure as hell am not going to make the trip and not get the stripe right.

 

If I had left the stripe as first laid out, every time I would have seen the boat the damn stripe would have jumped out at me. It would have been all I saw. Everyone associated with this project is striving for perfection. Gratefully we have a kind client who doesn't mind paying for perfection.

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Is the aversion to the traditional widening at bow and stern due to the near-plumb stems?

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Figgers:

Not for me. To my eye a flattish sheerline looks best with a flat boot stripe, Many of my designs have shaped boostripes. It just looks better on some boats. I didn't see it on FRANCIS LEE. This beautiful hull doesn't need much dressing up. The proportions speak for themselves.

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Hey Kimb,

 

Does SWMBO know you're working on that in the house??? I also see you have the correct binoculars for working on small finely detailed parts.

 

That can't be as bad as when I rolled my little Yamaha CS200 into my apartment in San Jose, so could pull the heads and barrels to clean up the bore from a minor seize.

 

Oh, the cookie sheet? I'm using it right now so I don't get oil on the carpet.

 

Good thing she loved me. :)

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If your wife says "honey, come move the transmission so I can have a bath", you might be a redneck.

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Hey Kimb,

 

Does SWMBO know you're working on that in the house??? I also see you have the correct binoculars for working on small finely detailed parts.

When she married me I was a full time bicycle racer and my bicycles were all over the house. The running light servicing was quite minor to those days.......raining like crazy here right now......with more promised to come this afternoon.

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The stripes were laid out with a laser level initially. I know this is the PNW but we do know about laser levels.

 

 

I don't really understand why you have to adjust a line that is already straight in order to make it appear straight. I know you explained it, but still don't get it. Hey, I live in a trailer in rural Florida, what can I say?

 

I would like to see the laser line projected onto the taped lines to see what you had to do. Pictures - for when 1,000 words would not do it. ;)

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Tom:

You don't have to understand it.

I remain convinced the the original line was not accurate regardless of how they arrived at it. Everyone tells me it was accurate. My eye says different. I have tremendous faith im my own eye. I have to.

Now it is correct and that's all I care about.

 

I used to tell my helpers, "I am not interested in long and drawn out explanations of why you did it wrong. Just fix it."

 

I have obsessed over this stripe long enough. Mission accomplished.

 

Scaffolding in place for deck painting to begin. More details to obsess over. Goody.

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The stripes were laid out with a laser level initially. I know this is the PNW but we do know about laser levels.

 

 

Hey, I live in a trailer in rural Florida, what can I say?

 

I'm sorry? ;)

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Think of it like this: Imagine a 62' long picture window, one pane of glass, vertical. Now imagine trying to lay out two perfectly parallel lines 4" apart on that pane of glass.

 

 

Time for my Stupid Question of the Day.

 

I imagine doing that task with one of those cool laser-level tools from Home Despot. It will shine a perfectly level red line, then another one parallel to it. It would also do it onto a curved surface, like a hull.

 

Why would that be a wrong answer?

 

Optical illusions? Straight lines don't always LOOK straight. Google greek columns - they had to be tapered to look straight.

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If your wife says "honey, come move the transmission so I can have a bath", you might be a redneck.

 

:lol: :lol: Foxworthy should pay you for that one.

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Figgers:

Not for me. To my eye a flattish sheerline looks best with a flat boot stripe, Many of my designs have shaped boostripes. It just looks better on some boats. I didn't see it on FRANCIS LEE. This beautiful hull doesn't need much dressing up. The proportions speak for themselves.

Heel of hand -> forehead.

 

Bootstripe is a function of topsides. Consistent topsides, consistent stripe. Duh.

Don't know why I thought it had anything to do with overhangs.

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