kimbottles

Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

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How do they assign you a PHRF for a one-off? What if they decide they don't want you to win, and make your value negative a zillion?

 

Or do you just go out and race and say, "I won 'coz I came over the line first"?

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Zedder:

Damn good question:

FRANCIS LEE is pretty unique.

We had a long discussion with one of the local PHRF guys. Sort of a "You show me your's first, then I'll show you mine" discussion. I ended up sending them the VPP's for Frankie. With the VPP's the committee took a look at the SC 70 NEPTUNE'S CAR and decided that we should be a -3 NFS and -7 WFS. I had thrown out a "0" as a place to start but I knew I was being self serving with that number. I think the committee did a good job and that is a fair rating to start with. It was not an easy task. There are no similar boats. A lot of head scratching was involved.

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Ok, for everyone reading between the lines: this is the second time Bob has mentioned the SC 70 in as many days.

 

Who is taking the official pool on whether Frankie is faster? (Do we break bets down into how many seconds per mile for force 2,3,4,etc?)

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No Zed. When we headed for the barn the SC70 was munching up a ways off to leeward of us. I don't think we would have won that race even if we had been in full race mode.

 

But I can always dream.

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In most of the photos we were sort of in the "group hug" mode of weight distribution. The cockpit held eight big guys with room to spare.

Cockpit as man cave?

 

A single number rating system, like PHRF, is a horses for courses situation. It will be interesting to find out what conditions give a big advantage, and which are less favorable. I'll bet the will be some conditions in which she is very hard to beat.

 

I was going to ask when the drawings for the aft cabin version will be available, but in decided it wasn't necessary to be a wise guy all the time.

 

This is going to be a boat that everyone is going to have an eye out for, sort of the way I still remember the first the I saw a 12 meter or Big Ti. Laude and honor all around.

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Tom:

If you study the photos carefully you will see eight big men (total weight about 1,600 lbs.) sitting in the cockpit That should give you a hint.

If you look at the pics of just me in the cockpit, the the seven men are below and you can see the slight change in trim.

If we had bveen racing we would have paid attention to trim. But we were not racing. We were just having fun and people congregated aft.

For reference Tom you might want to go back and look at the drawings posted erlier and see just how much of the bow was designed to be out. I think you will be surprised.

 

Center cockpit would fix that. Proa style. ;-) Beautiful boat, congratulations to all.

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Lot more rig on a SC 70 and a whole lotta years learning how to make them go.

 

No Zed. When we headed for the barn the SC70 was munching up a ways off to leeward of us. I don't think we would have won that race even if we had been in full race mode.

 

But I can always dream.

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Sometimes the dogs spend time in the dog house. It would take a bit of chop for FL send the hounds below though.

 

 

In most of the photos we were sort of in the "group hug" mode of weight distribution. The cockpit held eight big guys with room to spare.

Cockpit as man cave?

A single number rating system, like PHRF, is a horses for courses situation. It will be interesting to find out what conditions give a big advantage, and which are less favorable. I'll bet the will be some conditions in which she is very hard to beat.

I was going to ask when the drawings for the aft cabin version will be available, but in decided it wasn't necessary to be a wise guy all the time.

This is going to be a boat that everyone is going to have an eye out for, sort of the way I still remember the first the I saw a 12 meter or Big Ti. Laude and honor all around.

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Great time you guys, and great pics Boomer. Sounds like the boat meets or exceeds all expectations. I'll be looking forward to seeing Frankie sailing up to the shack, or maybe I'll just see her out sailing before that !

The performance of Bob's design simply blew me away, to say she exceeded my expectations is a massive understatement.

 

(I guess he does know how to design a boat. His thinking about boat design for the last 55 years seems to bear fruit.)

I guess we should keep him around a little longer. A guy keeps working at something, and after a while he gets pretty good at it.

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View more at the link below. Easiest to use the slide show. On the right just above the images click on the rectangle with the arrow in it to start slideshow. Also when viewing the album by image, by clicking on an image, then double clicking image the slideshow will start.

 

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/boomerdepp/sets/72157642853589933/

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Depends on where your at in the NW and what time of year. The NW is generally considered a light air venue, but pre-frontal, frontal, and post frontal conditions can bump it up. South Sound is usually the lightest, with Center Sound getting a bit more wind. North Sound all of Admiralty Inlet can get a bit more wind then Center Sound, especially in the afternoons in the summer. The Straits can generally be calm or calm in the morning and blowing gangbusters in the afternoon, especially from Dungeness to Pt. Wilson and the entrance to Admiralty Inlet. If one wanted more consistant wind in the NW, Port Townsend would be a good place to live or keep a boat, especially if one like a small town boatbuilding community atmosphere. Though there are a wide range of people and professions in Port Townsend. But generally the Puget Sound is a light air venue and hope for frontal conditions to bump it up a notch or two.

 

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The boat is simple, clean and perfect. It's good to see Bob smile like that.

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Sweet pix Boomer.

 

The ones with the Cascades (?) in the background really do it for me. I think I'm going to have to frame a print.

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Thanks Zed, still have a bunch more to edit and add to that album and will do so through the week.

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Very light here most of the time.

SWMBO likes light air sailing, she does not like fuss and muss sailing (hence she does not go with us when we race.)

 

So one of the important design issues was to have a vessel that performed well in our light air because I like having her aboard for day-sailing.

 

Sure looks like Bob nailed the light air issue.

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Beautiful photos especially with the snow covered peaks. Are those the Cascades or the Olympics?

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Beautiful photos especially with the snow covered peaks. Are those the Cascades or the Olympics?

Mainly the Olympics, just a hint of Cascades over downtown Seattle in the shot with Mt. Rainier off her bow.

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There's a frightening amount of scope for more sail area between the masthead and anchor roller when you're cracked off a bit in the light stuff. You'll properly fuck off then. I would be tempted to use a sail maker who's done that sort of stuff before for that.

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There's a frightening amount of scope for more sail area between the masthead and anchor roller when you're cracked off a bit in the light stuff. You'll properly fuck off then. I would be tempted to use a sail maker who's done that sort of stuff before for that.

The sailmaking brothers Schattauer and I are discussing that very issue........

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Are you trying to build a sail that will go upwind, or more of a fetching/reaching sail?

 

She looks in the pics like she was trundling along OK upwind with what you've got.

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Bloke:

As you say, we don't need any help upwind. I think Kim's next sail will be an asym for off the wind.

Kim got his PHRF rating yesterday. 21 NFS, -3 WFS. I think I posted some wrong numbers the other day. Although the -3 may change depending on the exact chute Kim gets.

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I was wondering if you'd be looking at a tight luffed, flat, probably high cut sail in dacron/mylar/kevlar/spectra/whatever, that you can use when it's too tight for a traditional nylon aysm.

 

I don't think it would be good for your rating, but would be good for cruising progress on the light days.

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Given the ease that she builds and carries speed, and how far forward the apparent wind angle was even under white sails when we cracked off, Kim will have an interesting discussion in deciding what shape the asymm should have and for what wind angle.

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Are you trying to build a sail that will go upwind, or more of a fetching/reaching sail?

 

She looks in the pics like she was trundling along OK upwind with what you've got.

Reaching, of course. Something like a code0 or such. On a free hoisted furler.

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I have no idea what Kim plans. We need a good reaching sail. The boat pulls the AWA well forward very easily.

I have no set plans, just exploring options.

 

I do not care what it does to the rating, I only want the Frankie to sail very well, after all she was conceived "for the pure pleasure of sailing."

 

We will race her because racing seems to sharpen up the sailing skills of everyone aboard. I will leave the handicap math to those who care about such things.

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Are you trying to build a sail that will go upwind, or more of a fetching/reaching sail?

 

She looks in the pics like she was trundling along OK upwind with what you've got.

Reaching, of course. Something like a code0 or such. On a free hoisted furler.

Yup. I think she'll meet or exceed most 'normal' multihull speeds... at least for all but the raciest multihulls. This will be especially true in lighter airs where FL doesn't have the stickiness of a multihull. An extra knot even, of boat speed in light air really starts pulling the apparent wind fwd significantly.

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Given the ease that she builds and carries speed, and how far forward the apparent wind angle was even under white sails when we cracked off, Kim will have an interesting discussion in deciding what shape the asymm should have and for what wind angle.

Or maybe two masthead asymmetrical chutes, one fuller for running down and something like a code0 for close reaching?

 

All in good time gentlemen, first we have to sort her out and get to know her sailing characteristics. (We already know her structure and build details well.)

 

I spent some time in her cockpit yesterday whipping all of the sheet and other line ends. Also put the fractional heavy air 1.5 ounce asymmetrical kite aboard. It takes up all of one of the forward "empty" compartments, but it is soft enough I suspect someone could sleep on it. Guess we don't need those pipe berths after all.

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I'd lean towards the flatter chute. Probably best to try out the non masthead chute out that Kim has now and see how that works. Then make a decision. I think a versatile sail would be nice.

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Bob and Kim. Many congratulations. Proud moments. Have you thought of putting in for a trial IRC number? Wouldn't cost much, and very interesting to see what on earth they make of her. You'll get lots of entertaining entry traps in the spreadsheet as well, along the lines of "is this figure correct? The beam should be bigger" and so on.

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Ed:

No, we have not considered that. Lots of little things to do on the boat now and that would be way, way down the priority list if it made it onto the list at all. But I agree with you, it would be very interesting.

It's fun to consider racing the boat but that was never Kim's intention. I think his local club has some racing and I suspect before long Kim will give it a go. He has two great sons for crew. Derek is a whizz, one of those very calm guys who just knows how to make a boat go.

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Ed:

No, we have not considered that. Lots of little things to do on the boat now and that would be way, way down the priority list if it made it onto the list at all. But I agree with you, it would be very interesting.

It's fun to consider racing the boat but that was never Kim's intention. I think his local club has some racing and I suspect before long Kim will give it a go. He has two great sons for crew. Derek is a whizz, one of those very calm guys who just knows how to make a boat go.

After seeing how well she sails we will race her, if for nothing else than to sharpen our sailing skills.

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Are you trying to build a sail that will go upwind, or more of a fetching/reaching sail?

 

She looks in the pics like she was trundling along OK upwind with what you've got.

 

Reaching, of course. Something like a code0 or such. On a free hoisted furler.
Yup. I think she'll meet or exceed most 'normal' multihull speeds... at least for all but the raciest multihulls. This will be especially true in lighter airs where FL doesn't have the stickiness of a multihull. An extra knot even, of boat speed in light air really starts pulling the apparent wind fwd significantly.

Once upon a time, I was racing on a friend's Tartan 33. A Rozinante started in the non-spin class ahead of us. By the windward mark, we had passed her, and then some, but I noticed on the run while we were busy with the chute, she crept up on us, no fuss, no muss, no light sails. Narrow has its benefits.

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Running late gotta be down to the boat in 15 minutes...later...

 

13357794713_4a8cf9a464_o.jpg

I love all the action shots but this is my favorite. I imagine what a feeling it must be to look out the window and see her waiting patiently, loyally, rain or shine, for a chance to go for a run with her proud owners...

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Running late gotta be down to the boat in 15 minutes...later...

 

13357794713_4a8cf9a464_o.jpg

I love all the action shots but this is my favorite. I imagine what a feeling it must be to look out the window and see her waiting patiently, loyally, rain or shine, for a chance to go for a run aground with her proud owners...

 

 

Sorry Kim, I couldn't resist. Thats what would happen on my sailing grounds. Boat looks great and thanks for that shot of the red ketch, what was its name? That boat really inspired me to think out of the box. I think Steve Clark the Little Americas Cup fame has it now.

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Ed:

No, we have not considered that. Lots of little things to do on the boat now and that would be way, way down the priority list if it made it onto the list at all. But I agree with you, it would be very interesting.

It's fun to consider racing the boat but that was never Kim's intention. I think his local club has some racing and I suspect before long Kim will give it a go. He has two great sons for crew. Derek is a whizz, one of those very calm guys who just knows how to make a boat go.

After seeing how well she sails we will race her, if for nothing else than to sharpen our sailing skills.

Ha, ha. As if there was ever any doubt!

 

Boat is fast. Any other boats around? Oh yeah...lets race.

 

Go for it Kimb.

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Jody:

Right.

There is lot on RED ROOSTER on the Carter thread over on SA. It's a great thread.

 

I can't imagine sailing Frankie without targeting everything moving on the bay. Sailing the 70' ULDB MERIDIAN with my wife and kids my wife asked in an annoyed tone, "Why do you have to come so close to other boats?"

I told her, "If I was on that boat and MERIDIAN was overtaking me I'd want to have a good, close look."

 

So, I think we owe it to the other boats to give them a good close up of Frankie. They are not going to chase us down for a look.

I'm almost 68 but somewhere deep inside is a smart alec kid.

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Jody:

Right.

There is lot on RED ROOSTER on the Carter thread over on SA. It's a great thread.

 

I can't imagine sailing Frankie without targeting everything moving on the bay. Sailing the 70' ULDB MERIDIAN with my wife and kids my wife asked in an annoyed tone, "Why do you have to come so close to other boats?"

I told her, "If I was on that boat and MERIDIAN was overtaking me I'd want to have a good, close look."

 

So, I think we owe it to the other boats to give them a good close up of Frankie. They are not going to chase us down for a look.

I'm almost 68 but somewhere deep inside is a smart alec kid.

LOL. Reminds me of a 'cruise' I took my wife on many years ago.

 

"Why are you trying to catch them? It's not a race."

 

Yeah, right.

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Sailby:

Right on. It's always a race.

 

Sorry dear. It's not me. It's the laws of physics. Moving objects attract each other. Nothing I can do.

Physics!

Science!

Men with screw drivers. Turning things.

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Are you trying to build a sail that will go upwind, or more of a fetching/reaching sail?

 

She looks in the pics like she was trundling along OK upwind with what you've got.

Reaching, of course. Something like a code0 or such. On a free hoisted furler.

Yup. I think she'll meet or exceed most 'normal' multihull speeds... at least for all but the raciest multihulls. This will be especially true in lighter airs where FL doesn't have the stickiness of a multihull. An extra knot even, of boat speed in light air really starts pulling the apparent wind fwd significantly.

 

You think? I always considered 9-10 knots normal on our F-27.

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Running late gotta be down to the boat in 15 minutes...later...

 

13357794713_4a8cf9a464_o.jpg

I love all the action shots but this is my favorite. I imagine what a feeling it must be to look out the window and see her waiting patiently, loyally, rain or shine, for a chance to go for a run aground with her proud owners...

 

 

Sorry Kim, I couldn't resist. Thats what would happen on my sailing grounds. Boat looks great and thanks for that shot of the red ketch, what was its name? That boat really inspired me to think out of the box. I think Steve Clark the Little Americas Cup fame has it now.

 

She is "Red Herring" and one of my favorite vessels. Yes, Steve has her. Nice guy, we trade messages. She was conceived and built by his father.

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Jody:

Right.

There is lot on RED ROOSTER on the Carter thread over on SA. It's a great thread.

 

I can't imagine sailing Frankie without targeting everything moving on the bay. Sailing the 70' ULDB MERIDIAN with my wife and kids my wife asked in an annoyed tone, "Why do you have to come so close to other boats?"

I told her, "If I was on that boat and MERIDIAN was overtaking me I'd want to have a good, close look."

 

So, I think we owe it to the other boats to give them a good close up of Frankie. They are not going to chase us down for a look.

I'm almost 68 but somewhere deep inside is a smart alec kid.

Me too.....

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13395862113_509c2985fc_k.jpg

 

My personal favorite. I agree with boomer about not liking shots from windward but I like this one.

 

The mountains are breathtaking to a New Englander.

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Keith:

We get a bit used to mountain vistas like that. They are just there. We can't do anything about them.

I just look up and say "Shitski, that's cool." I stare out my front windows at the Olympics you see in that pic.

Damn mountains blocking my view!

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Jody:

Right.

There is lot on RED ROOSTER on the Carter thread over on SA. It's a great thread.

 

I can't imagine sailing Frankie without targeting everything moving on the bay. Sailing the 70' ULDB MERIDIAN with my wife and kids my wife asked in an annoyed tone, "Why do you have to come so close to other boats?"

I told her, "If I was on that boat and MERIDIAN was overtaking me I'd want to have a good, close look."

 

So, I think we owe it to the other boats to give them a good close up of Frankie. They are not going to chase us down for a look.

I'm almost 68 but somewhere deep inside is a smart alec kid.

Me too.....

Not that deep...

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IMAGE_76.jpgJody:

Right.

There is lot on RED ROOSTER on the Carter thread over on SA. It's a great thread.

 

I can't imagine sailing Frankie without targeting everything moving on the bay. Sailing the 70' ULDB MERIDIAN with my wife and kids my wife asked in an annoyed tone, "Why do you have to come so close to other boats?"

I told her, "If I was on that boat and MERIDIAN was overtaking me I'd want to have a good, close look."

 

So, I think we owe it to the other boats to give them a good close up of Frankie. They are not going to chase us down for a look.

I'm almost 68 but somewhere deep inside is a smart alec kid.

 

 

This is a great hand drawn interior and exterior perspective of the RED ROOSTER that I just love. I feel guilty when doing my computer renders to think that work like this was all conceived and executed with merely a sharp mind and sharp pencils. Well maybe some soft pastel markers as well.

 

http://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-fExHyRl5FKY/UsSkEUdtfKI/AAAAAAAAIuY/PFIKEuxZsD8/s2048-no/IMAGE_76.jpg

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Yeah but,,,,,,,the boat looks too fat for my eye. RED ROOSTER was slimmer than that. The fore deck was longer. Your 3D rendering would have been spot on.

 

But you are right, it's a great drawing.

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Sailby:Right on. It's always a race.Sorry dear. It's not me. It's the laws of physics. Moving objects attract each other. Nothing I can do.Physics!Science!Men with screw drivers. Turning things.

Or using winch handles to turn things......

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IMAGE_76.jpgJody:

Right.

There is lot on RED ROOSTER on the Carter thread over on SA. It's a great thread.

 

I can't imagine sailing Frankie without targeting everything moving on the bay. Sailing the 70' ULDB MERIDIAN with my wife and kids my wife asked in an annoyed tone, "Why do you have to come so close to other boats?"

I told her, "If I was on that boat and MERIDIAN was overtaking me I'd want to have a good, close look."

 

So, I think we owe it to the other boats to give them a good close up of Frankie. They are not going to chase us down for a look.

I'm almost 68 but somewhere deep inside is a smart alec kid.

 

 

This is a great hand drawn interior and exterior perspective of the RED ROOSTER that I just love. I feel guilty when doing my computer renders to think that work like this was all conceived and executed with merely a sharp mind and sharp pencils. Well maybe some soft pastel markers as well.

 

http://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-fExHyRl5FKY/UsSkEUdtfKI/AAAAAAAAIuY/PFIKEuxZsD8/s2048-no/IMAGE_76.jpg

 

The new computer renderings are phenomenal things - who needs photographs of real life objects? ;)

 

That said, the old hand drawings are art in a way a computer image can never be.

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Yeah but,,,,,,,the boat looks too fat for my eye. RED ROOSTER was slimmer than that. The fore deck was longer. Your 3D rendering would have been spot on.

 

But you are right, it's a great drawing.

 

That is clearly an "eyeballed" perspective view. Some aspects of it don't look right to me either - the CB perspective is all messed up for one.

 

The right way to do a drawing like that is to project the lines into 3D like Bill Garden's perspective views. That's why he always labels them with where the clam's eye is, because he knows exactly since he did the math.

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Narrow is good.

When she was built and featured in more then a few magazines, for once in my life I seriously lusted.

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Great pictures Boomer! Thanks for sharing them.

Thanks Joli and your welcome. Took a day off from editing yesterday, but will be adding more to that album as I finish up a batch.

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IMAGE_76.jpgJody:

Right.

There is lot on RED ROOSTER on the Carter thread over on SA. It's a great thread.

 

I can't imagine sailing Frankie without targeting everything moving on the bay. Sailing the 70' ULDB MERIDIAN with my wife and kids my wife asked in an annoyed tone, "Why do you have to come so close to other boats?"

I told her, "If I was on that boat and MERIDIAN was overtaking me I'd want to have a good, close look."

 

So, I think we owe it to the other boats to give them a good close up of Frankie. They are not going to chase us down for a look.

I'm almost 68 but somewhere deep inside is a smart alec kid.

 

 

This is a great hand drawn interior and exterior perspective of the RED ROOSTER that I just love. I feel guilty when doing my computer renders to think that work like this was all conceived and executed with merely a sharp mind and sharp pencils. Well maybe some soft pastel markers as well.

 

http://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-fExHyRl5FKY/UsSkEUdtfKI/AAAAAAAAIuY/PFIKEuxZsD8/s2048-no/IMAGE_76.jpg

 

I used to drool over Stephen Davis' and Bruce Bingham's renditions.

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I just finished Bob's article on Dick Carter. It's definitely worth a repost here. Beyond his work with Carter, we glimpse a nascent and romantic Perry. Reminded me of wandering into New Bedford at the age of 17 and taking a room at the old YMCA. My apprenticeship came on the decks of otter trawlers on Georges Banks.

Great read: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/15289336/Cruising%20forum/Bob%20Perry%20article%20on%20Dick%20Carter%203-1989.pdf

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Not sure what "nascent" means. I'll Google it.

Dick daughter found that old article and sent it to Dick and me about three months ago. I hadn't seen it in years. When I read it now it seems pretty good. I don;pt read anything I think needs to be changed. I had a long phone conversation with Dick three weeks ago when out of the blue he called me. What an honor. What a long strange trip.

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Well, I have insufficient superlatives. Let's just say it's quite a vicarious thrill to see that beautiful craft on the water. The thrill being tempered by the envy stemming from the longest winter in memory here in Ontario.

 

Congratulations Kim, kudos for your vision and patience. Mr. Perry: A lifetime of great skill and artfulness clearly manifested in a stunning new boat.

 

Best wishes for many years of safe, exciting sailing.

 

I am waiting now for first-hand commentary from the now-famous SWMBO.

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Jesus Christ Bob, that thing is utter porn.

Well, well done.

Jesus it's just perfect.

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Ice:

Thanks. It's close to perfect so far. I'll wait a year so the boat has plenty of time to prove it can do everything we had in mind. I'd like to de-brief Kim after he has had the chance too sail the boat by himself a few times. In the summer we have some beautiful long days with daylight lasting to almost 9pm. The winds will be light and I imagine Kim will enjoy those evenings gliding along in Frankie pretending he's not racing.

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Ice:

Thanks. It's close to perfect so far. I'll wait a year so the boat has plenty of time to prove it can do everything we had in mind. I'd like to de-brief Kim after he has had the chance too sail the boat by himself a few times. In the summer we have some beautiful long days with daylight lasting to almost 9pm. The winds will be light and I imagine Kim will enjoy those evenings gliding along in Frankie pretending he's not racing.

We get daylight until almost 10pm in Blakely Harbor in late June.

 

You can bet I will be sailing her often.

 

Well, I have insufficient superlatives. Let's just say it's quite a vicarious thrill to see that beautiful craft on the water. The thrill being tempered by the envy stemming from the longest winter in memory here in Ontario.

 

Congratulations Kim, kudos for your vision and patience. Mr. Perry: A lifetime of great skill and artfulness clearly manifested in a stunning new boat.

 

Best wishes for many years of safe, exciting sailing.

 

I am waiting now for first-hand commentary from the now-famous SWMBO.

She loves the cockpit.

 

And she finally had to admit that the Frankie is really not "too big". ("Why 62?" she kept asking; because it is the longest boat I think I can handle by myself.)

 

She has tried out just about all possible sitting places in the forward cockpit. She finds the lack of lifelines to be strange (although we didn't have any on the 30 square metre either.)

 

She likes the fact that the interior is an enlarged version of the Swede55 (our last cruising boat) which she liked a lot.

 

More after she goes sailing with us. She is not a racer and she prefers light air and no more than 15 degrees of heel. She loves light air sailing which we gets lots of around here, especially in the Summer.

 

Her name is Susan. But she will always be SWMBO to me (she likes that nickname, she thinks it appropriate.)

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Narrow is good.

When she was built and featured in more then a few magazines, for once in my life I seriously lusted.

I still lust for Red Herring, I would love to add her to my boat collection.

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She would be a fine speed machine to add to your collection.

 

 

Back then when I first saw the pictures, my first thoughts were LFH's sailing machine and then read that was an inspiration as well.

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Back then when I first saw the pictures, my first thoughts were LFH's sailing machine and then read that was an inspiration as well.

The "Sailing Machine" was a major inspiration for the Sliver too. As was Red Herring of course.

 

But the main inspiration was Garden's "Oceanus".

 

Bob improved on those (and other) inspirations greatly.

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More images added to album. Once again easiest to use the slide show. On the right just above the images click on the rectangle with the arrow in it to start slideshow.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/boomerdepp/sets/72157642853589933/

 

 

13462306695_a00abd1d75_k.jpg

Great images, Boomer.

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When's the coffee table book coming out?

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Thanks guys!

 

Kim wants to wait a while on a book. Still have more images to edit. Will keep adding more to the album as I do a batch. Just added some more over the past hour.

 

13474872533_bc0e3d2a4d_k.jpg

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I was going to shoot and splice some video clips, but didn't take the time before the wind went light.

 

There will be more shooting opportunities and we will get some spliced clips to put into a short video.

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