kimbottles

Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

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New tiller got fitted to tiller head this morning.

 

Then back to shop for epoxy coating (2) and varnish (12).

 

(It was shaped until it felt just right to hold.)

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New tiller got fitted to tiller head this morning.

 

Then back to shop for epoxy coating (2) and varnish (12).

 

(It was shaped until it felt just right to hold.)

Very nice.

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The boat isn't even ready yet?? OMG...

 

While those racing shots were cool, a nice long glamour/sales shot of her at dock/anchor would be nice.

 

We are all dreaming here, a good dream like overview of why this craft is so awesome, would be pretty,,,, awesome.

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Ya, that hit's the spot. Some cheesy 80's style walk around video would be super great if you have it.

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No problem Sailby:

http://damndelicious.net/2014/02/21/swedish-meatballs/

 

You can't muck this one up. The only thing I did different is that I added some red wine to the sauce. I add red wine to my pancakes.

This is perfect boat food. You can prepare it ahead of your cruise. Warm it up and serve it over egg noodles. I think it's one of those dishes that likes to sit a while and "set up".

 

They look and sound delicious Bob. Similar to Pop Losurdo's Italian meatballs passed down to me. His have no onions and about as much Parmesan as breadcrumbs. His little secret was to add some water to the mix to rehydrate the crumbs so they dont suck liquid from the meat. Works a treat, add as much water as you can but still have the consistency to form balls.

 

I am so onto these meatballs.

I like the idea of mixing up a big batch and freezing the uncooked meatballs for a quick meal later on.

 

I always make enough for 2 meals Hobot. I put half of the mixture in a ziplock before forming the balls.

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And the "to do" list just keeps getting longer. But we are pecking away at it slowly.

 

Added block under main-sheet winch clutch for better lead, pad-eye to allow fair-lead of main halyard to electric winch, solar vent in main cabin, padlock hasp so we could lock the boat, fitted the cabin floor boards one more time before final finishing, and visited the new tiller as she was getting her final coat of epoxy this weekend.

 

We also continued the varnishing of the fiddles (but I don't have any pictures of that task.)

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You must be swelling with pride to own such a thing of beauty.

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You must be swelling with pride to own such a thing of beauty.

More like quiet contentment.

 

After all I thought about this project for literally 50 years. It changed considerably during those 50 years as it took me a lot of time to sort out my thinking as I experienced more and more different boats. I just knew I wanted to build a simple sailboat for the pure pleasure of sailing, not corrupted by rating rules or the need to carry cruising stores.

 

It looks like the Maestro and I managed to pull it off with the help of a large group of very talented craftspeople.

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You must be swelling with pride to own such a thing of beauty.

More like quiet contentment.

 

After all I thought about this project for literally 50 years. It changed considerably during those 50 years as it took me a lot of time to sort out my thinking as I experienced more and more different boats. I just knew I wanted to build a simple sailboat for the pure pleasure of sailing, not corrupted by rating rules or the need to carry cruising stores.

 

It looks like the Maestro and I managed to pull it off with the help of a large group of very talented craftspeople.

 

I can understand that statement.

 

Speaking for myself, the older I get, the simpler my tastes become.

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You must be swelling with pride to own such a thing of beauty.

More like quiet contentment.

 

After all I thought about this project for literally 50 years. It changed considerably during those 50 years as it took me a lot of time to sort out my thinking as I experienced more and more different boats. I just knew I wanted to build a simple sailboat for the pure pleasure of sailing, not corrupted by rating rules or the need to carry cruising stores.

 

It looks like the Maestro and I managed to pull it off with the help of a large group of very talented craftspeople.

Not often we can achieve our long time dreams, especially as thoroughly as you have. Kudos to you, the Maestro and all involved in what will become a truly legendary boat I am sure. Your boys' grandchildren will be talking about it years from now (and probably sailing it). People on other boats will nod knowingly and comment: "Oh yeah, the Francis Lee, she's still beautiful." "That Perry character could be a curmudgeon but he sure could design a boat."

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You must be swelling with pride to own such a thing of beauty.

More like quiet contentment.

 

After all I thought about this project for literally 50 years. It changed considerably during those 50 years as it took me a lot of time to sort out my thinking as I experienced more and more different boats. I just knew I wanted to build a simple sailboat for the pure pleasure of sailing, not corrupted by rating rules or the need to carry cruising stores.

 

It looks like the Maestro and I managed to pull it off with the help of a large group of very talented craftspeople.

 

I can understand that statement.

 

Speaking for myself, the older I get, the simpler my tastes become.

 

Ditto. It fits with an old line about how you spend the first 1/2 of your life acquiring "stuff" and the second 1/2 getting rid of it.

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just giving another visual perspective of Francis Lee;

 

IMG_20140614_112643966_zps00e078c9.jpg

 

posted this elsewhere awhile back....couldn't get anyone's attention back there and was about to pull out the cellphone and start dialing numbers.

 

(Bow guys are always on ignore!)

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just giving another visual perspective of Francis Lee;

 

IMG_20140614_112643966_zps00e078c9.jpg

 

posted this elsewhere awhile back....couldn't get anyone's attention back there and was about to pull out the cellphone and start dialing numbers.

 

(Bow guys are always on ignore!)

 

Do you have free long distance on your cell plan?

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Happiness is no more plywood below. Foam core cherry and ash cabin sole thanks to Turn Point Design in Port Townsend.

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Happiness is no more plywood below. Foam core cherry and ash cabin sole thanks to Turn Point Design in Port Townsend.

Looks very smart, Kimb.

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Happiness is no more plywood below. Foam core cherry and ash cabin sole thanks to Turn Point Design in Port Townsend.

They look beautiful Kim how do they compare price wise Just a rough ratio, 2 times, 3 times?

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Happiness is no more plywood below. Foam core cherry and ash cabin sole thanks to Turn Point Design in Port Townsend.

They look beautiful Kim how do they compare price wise Just a rough ratio, 2 times, 3 times?

Compare with what? The bare rough plywood? Non foam core?

(Actually I would not know because I never looked at anything else.)

 

But I can report after carrying the plywood up to the garage and the new soles down to the boat the new ones are quite a bit lighter!!

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Happiness is no more plywood below. Foam core cherry and ash cabin sole thanks to Turn Point Design in Port Townsend.

They look beautiful Kim how do they compare price wise Just a rough ratio, 2 times, 3 times?

 

"If you have to ask the price, you can't afford it"

-- attributed to J.P. Morgan, in response to a question about the cost of maintaining a yacht

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Kim,

 

Can you share the thinking behind the raised edge that follows the base of the bunks? Originally, I assumed that that plank followed the longitudinal that makes up the settee base, but looking at the panels in picture 1, it is intentional and a raised edge in a flat sole panel.

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Kim,

 

Can you share the thinking behind the raised edge that follows the base of the bunks? Originally, I assumed that that plank followed the longitudinal that makes up the settee base, but looking at the panels in picture 1, it is intentional and a raised edge in a flat sole panel.

 

 

IB

 

I think you'll find that's just an illusion created by the sunshine on the edge of the panel. It appears to be flat when you look at earlier pics.

 

I see the raised edge under the shelves on either side. I suspect that stops stuff from sliding out from under...good idea!

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I see the the slight upward cant on the two outside strips of the main floor area as well. Most evident in image 4.

 

Did the floor end up being not as thick as originally intended due to the stiffness of the composite construction?

 

Starkindler

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Kim,

 

Can you share the thinking behind the raised edge that follows the base of the bunks? Originally, I assumed that that plank followed the longitudinal that makes up the settee base, but looking at the panels in picture 1, it is intentional and a raised edge in a flat sole panel.

 

 

IB

 

I think you'll find that's just an illusion created by the sunshine on the edge of the panel. It appears to be flat when you look at earlier pics.

Look at the top panel in pic 1 (stacked panels in the truck). Starting with and counting the plank with the lifting ring and moving to the right, the 5th plank outer edge appears to be raised about 1/2-3/4" . This tapered plank also appears to be on the other companionway panel and on the outer edge of both main cabin panels.

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What kind of finish did you put on the sole? It looks like a matte varnish.

Brandon and the guy sprayed on a polyurethane clear coating.

 

How did the nonskid idea work out?

Have not yet tried it.

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The raised edges hide the flanges of the 316SS keel floors. I wanted to leave them exposed but SWMBO wanted them covered. So we simply added the little wedge for the entire length which worked great because it did match the keepers under the galley shelves.

 

SWMBO gets what SWMBO wants......that's how I have had a peaceful, calm and delightful life for the last 47 years.

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Sorry, but your SWMBO made the correct decision.

 

I hate when that happens, but being able to deal with it means that I am at 34 years of peace and still counting. :)

 

BTW, beautiful floors.

 

Starkindler

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The raised edges hide the flanges of the 316SS keel floors. I wanted to leave them exposed but SWMBO wanted them covered. So we simply added the little wedge for the entire length which worked great because it did match the keepers under the galley shelves.

 

SWMBO gets what SWMBO wants......that's how I have had a peaceful, calm and delightful life for the last 47 years.

Makes perfect sense.

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Sorry, but your SWMBO made the correct decision.

 

I hate when that happens, but being able to deal with it means that I am at 34 years of peace and still counting. :)

 

BTW, beautiful floors.

 

Starkindler

I am not sorry, taking care of her yields massive dividends.

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Sorry, but your SWMBO made the correct decision.

 

I hate when that happens, but being able to deal with it means that I am at 34 years of peace and still counting. :)

 

BTW, beautiful floors.

 

Starkindler

I am not sorry, taking care of her yields massive dividends.

Smart man.

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Tiller progress, laminates all glued up and measured against the temporary tiller, now into the shaping phase.

 

Just wanted to make mention.

 

Bill, the tiller guy? He has a beautiful workbench. I keep going back to look at it. And a clear pane window right there, at the end of it? I'd love to be a fly on the wall of that shop.

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Tiller progress, laminates all glued up and measured against the temporary tiller, now into the shaping phase.

Just wanted to make mention.

 

Bill, the tiller guy? He has a beautiful workbench. I keep going back to look at it. And a clear pane window right there, at the end of it? I'd love to be a fly on the wall of that shop.

Bill is in great demand for his furniture and cabinetry. We are very lucky to be one of his customers.

 

Btw, you are seeing a very small slice of his shop in those pictures, he has a large full on professional wood shop with a couple employees.

 

He does very high end work and he and his family are really nice and good people.

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Kim,

 

Can you share the thinking behind the raised edge that follows the base of the bunks? Originally, I assumed that that plank followed the longitudinal that makes up the settee base, but looking at the panels in picture 1, it is intentional and a raised edge in a flat sole panel.

 

 

IB

 

I think you'll find that's just an illusion created by the sunshine on the edge of the panel. It appears to be flat when you look at earlier pics.

 

I see the raised edge under the shelves on either side. I suspect that stops stuff from sliding out from under...good idea!

 

Basically the bottom of a boat is not flat. If you want the sole low it must conform to the shape.

 

 

 

Happiness is no more plywood below. Foam core cherry and ash cabin sole thanks to Turn Point Design in Port Townsend.

They look beautiful Kim how do they compare price wise Just a rough ratio, 2 times, 3 times?

Compare with what? The bare rough plywood? Non foam core?

(Actually I would not know because I never looked at anything else.)

 

But I can report after carrying the plywood up to the garage and the new soles down to the boat the new ones are quite a bit lighter!!

 

Sorry Kim, compared to a more trad plywood Teak and Holly or similar?

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Sorry Kim, compared to a more trad plywood Teak and Holly or similar?

I really don't know because I did not price anything else, I just asked Brandon and Carter to make these for me. Brandon and Carter have been a MAJOR source of great work on the Sliver Project. I suspect if you did foam core teak and holly it would be about the same, the wood costs were minor compared to the fabrication.

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What's up next for Francis Lee? Is it getting time to head up to the islands?

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What's up next for Francis Lee? Is it getting time to head up to the islands?

Nope, we are busy trying to get her finished! She is fully functional on deck, but lots of trim pieces and details to finish below. Got several subcontractors working away on various items. I am varnishing the new tiller.

 

We want to have her mostly finished for the Perry Rendezvous in late August where we plan to do a simple christening ceremony on Saturday afternoon. Of course boats are never "finished" but we should be fairly well along and she should be fairly presentable by then.

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Not often we can achieve our long time dreams, especially as thoroughly as you have. Kudos to you, the Maestro and all involved in what will become a truly legendary boat I am sure. Your boys' grandchildren will be talking about it years from now (and probably sailing it). People on other boats will nod knowingly and comment: "Oh yeah, the Francis Lee, she's still beautiful." "That Perry character could be a curmudgeon but he sure could design a boat."

 

+1 to that.

 

The Francis Lee is a unique and beautiful boat. She is a wonderful example of what can be done by thinking outside the box, and by applying a lot of rigorous and critical analysis of how to make it all work.

 

Huge congratulations to all involved in creating a boat which is already on its way to becoming a legend.

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"by applying a lot of rigorous and critical analysis of how to make it all work."

 

Right. Yeah, I did that.

Yeah, and I watched him do it even though I had no idea what he was doing.

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Sorry Kim, compared to a more trad plywood Teak and Holly or similar?

I really don't know because I did not price anything else, I just asked Brandon and Carter to make these for me. Brandon and Carter have been a MAJOR source of great work on the Sliver Project. I suspect if you did foam core teak and holly it would be about the same, the wood costs were minor compared to the fabrication.

 

Sorry if I wasnt clear (it happens sometimes). I was referring to traditional ply holly and Teak boards.

"by applying a lot of rigorous and critical analysis of how to make it all work."

 

Right. Yeah, I did that.

 

I'm sure you gave a rather good impression Bob!

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"Yeah, and I watched him do it even though I had no idea what he was doing."

 

I'm reminded of that famous quote by some sculptor. I don't actually remember the exact quote but when asked how he could so accurately create a bust of Lincoln he answered something like, "I just take away all the clay that doesn't look like Lincoln."

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"Yeah, and I watched him do it even though I had no idea what he was doing."

 

I'm reminded of that famous quote by some sculptor. I don't actually remember the exact quote but when asked how he could so accurately create a bust of Lincoln he answered something like, "I just take away all the clay that doesn't look like Lincoln."

 

This is why we call you the "Maestro" Bob. You know how to do stuff that not many of us know how to do.....

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I blame Bob for introducing Vegemite into my diet.

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"Yeah, and I watched him do it even though I had no idea what he was doing."

 

I'm reminded of that famous quote by some sculptor. I don't actually remember the exact quote but when asked how he could so accurately create a bust of Lincoln he answered something like, "I just take away all the clay that doesn't look like Lincoln."

 

I think that would be Michelangelo, though obviously not in reference to Lincoln.

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"Yeah, and I watched him do it even though I had no idea what he was doing."

 

I'm reminded of that famous quote by some sculptor. I don't actually remember the exact quote but when asked how he could so accurately create a bust of Lincoln he answered something like, "I just take away all the clay that doesn't look like Lincoln."

I think that would be Michelangelo, though obviously not in reference to Lincoln.

 

"I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free."

-- Michelangelo (1475 - 1564)

 

"In every block of marble I see a statue as plain as though it stood before me, shaped and perfect in attitude and action. I have only to hew away the rough walls that imprison the lovely apparition to reveal it to the other eyes as mine see it."

-- Michelangelo

 

"I choose a block of marble and chop off whatever I don't need."

-- Auguste Rodin (1840 - 1917)

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I like the Rodin quote best. "The Thinker" and all that. I often think of the sculpture while taking a dump. It's an effective pose. Great museum in Paris.

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I like the Rodin quote best. "The Thinker" and all that. I often think of the sculpture while taking a dump. It's an effective pose. Great museum in Paris.

yeah, not as well known as some other Parisian museums, but well worth the visit.

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So now that you've been out a few times, do you have a good idea of your heel polars yet?

 

Just fuckin with ya.

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5768:

If we/I have learned anything about FRANCIS that is at odds with the VPP studies it is that the boat never feels tender. In fact it feels stiff. I was anticipating a boat that would have to be worked hard to keep it on it's feet meaning compromises in trim made to keep the boat upright. But this is not the case. We just strap her in, hold on and enjoy the ride. We sail; FRANCIS to the very best VMG's. We pay minimal if any attention to heel angle.

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FRANKIE is usually heeled over around 15 degrees. We have seen as much as 30 on rare occasion, but she usually smokes along in the 10-20 degree range. She is much stiffer than I had anticipated. This is very good because SWMBO like anything up to around 20 degrees and then she gets grumpy. (Not as grumpy as Bob, but grumpy nevertheless.)

 

There are so many surprises with this vessel. Fortunately they are all very nice surprises. She has turned out to be much better than we had hoped for in many ways. I keep saying she is very well behaved because frankly (pun somewhat intended) I was not expecting that she would be so calm and well mannered. I was expecting the speed (and we got more than expected, especially upwind where she is a freight train in a blow) but I expected that speed would come at a cost like Bob says. But not so, she does everything very very well in the nicest no-drama way. (I could go on and on, but I fear I am just boring you all.)

 

Maybe there is value in having an OLD grumpy designer design your once in a lifetime custom vessel, it seems like he put everything he ever learned over a long distinguished career into this design. He sure as hell got it spot on.

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Thanks Kim.

 

I think your "no drama" comment sums up Frankie's behavior very succinctly.

Frankly,,,,,,,I'd like a little drama once and a while. Maybe chute up in 30 knots will provide it some day. But, probably not.

 

Nothing like that adrenalin rush you get when the spreaders hit the water, chute starts flogging and you realize you have no steerage because the rudder is out of the water. " I've got it!"

But I'm not sure I need to do it anymore.

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As much as I like smoking it downwind, there is nothing like the feeling of getting the boat into the groove upwind. balancing the heel with the AWA and the speed, and then it just clicks into place, like I imagine Francis does very easily. I'm looking forward to my boat being able to heel over more than 12 degs just for that feeling.

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As much as I like smoking it downwind, there is nothing like the feeling of getting the boat into the groove upwind. balancing the heel with the AWA and the speed, and then it just clicks into place, like I imagine Francis does very easily. I'm looking forward to my boat being able to heel over more than 12 degs just for that feeling.

FRANKIE goes up wind very well, especially when her creator is driving. I think she likes him.

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Just out of interest Kimb, what the highest TWS you've been out sailing Francis Lee in? Have you reefed down yet?

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Just out of interest Kimb, what the highest TWS you've been out sailing Francis Lee in? Have you reefed down yet?

Max we have seen was maybe high 20's TWS. I have yet to pull in a reef. I have flattened the main a couple times, but no reefs.

 

It looks like she can carry the full main to around 30.

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Just out of interest Kimb, what the highest TWS you've been out sailing Francis Lee in? Have you reefed down yet?

Max we have seen was maybe high 20's TWS. I have yet to pull in a reef. I have flattened the main a couple times, but no reefs.

 

It looks like she can carry the full main to around 30.

 

You have half a planet of lead on a mile-deep bulb. You will probably be able to carry full main to around 300knots <_<

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Just out of interest Kimb, what the highest TWS you've been out sailing Francis Lee in? Have you reefed down yet?

 

Max we have seen was maybe high 20's TWS. I have yet to pull in a reef. I have flattened the main a couple times, but no reefs.

It looks like she can carry the full main to around 30.

You have half a planet of lead on a mile-deep bulb. You will probably be able to carry full main to around 300knots <_<

That is exactly why I ask Bob for ten feet of draft. I knew we needed some help with stability with such narrow beam.

 

Bob really worked hard on the hull shape to add as much form stability as possible, the carbon mast helps, the concentration of weight low helps, we did everything we could to add stability. Seems as if we were successful.

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well, it's possible to have too much stability - at least for a given rig.

 

loads on the rigging are primarily determined by stability, the greater the stability, the greater the loads.

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well, it's possible to have too much stability - at least for a given rig.

 

loads on the rigging are primarily determined by stability, the greater the stability, the greater the loads.

Yup, all true.

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well, it's possible to have too much stability - at least for a given rig.

 

loads on the rigging are primarily determined by stability, the greater the stability, the greater the loads.

 

Which explains the much higher loads that can happen on multihulls because their initial stability is far higher than monohulls. A narrow, relatively "tender" mono will easily absorb a gust by heeling over (if only briefly), whereas the multi either accelerates quickly in response or something is more likely to break.

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I spent the day shaping and fitting the fiddles. Now I just have to mask off everything, hide the cushions and epoxy them in place using spring boards to keep them under pressure until they cure. Maybe tomorrow. I understand the mixing tubes of West System Six10 are good for that operation. I had to relieve the ends of the mounting slots to fit the tabbing and reinforcing that holds the interior together. Took my time and they came out well. Nice tight fits. I have gained some patience in my old age!

(ignore the funny red spot, it is some sort of problem with the camera.)

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I spent the day shaping and fitting the fiddles. Now I just have to mask off everything, hide the cushions and epoxy them in place using spring boards to keep them under pressure until they cure. Maybe tomorrow. I understand the mixing tubes of West System Six10 are good for that operation. I had to relieve the ends of the mounting slots to fit the tabbing and reinforcing that holds the interior together. Took my time and they came out well. Nice tight fits. I have gained some patience in my old age!

 

(ignore the funny red spot, it is some sort of problem with the camera.)

Good job, Kimb.

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GreatDane28 came over and we installed a B&G Triton wind instrument package on the FRANCIS LEE yesterday. Various crew had complained about the lack of wind readout so even though I am not a big fan of instruments I want to keep the crew (especially WHL) happy.

 

The electric winch sure made taking GreatDan28 up the mast an easy task and he is no small fellow!

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And as long as he was here we installed the cherry fiddles on all of Tim Nolan's structural shelves using spring boards as braces until the West System Six10 epoxy cures.

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Then to top off the day I installed the new tiller.

 

She is slowly shaping up, which is good because we want her to look decent for the Perry Rendezvous next month.

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Looking good, KB.

 

Those "spring boards" go by the name of "go bars" in the English speaking woodworking trades, from the 17th Century French "goberge" I'm told. See the attached photo. Boatwrights and drooling naval architects can call them what they damned well please, but owners should be more deferential to tradition. :blink:

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Very nice, Kimb.

 

One point though. I'd have liked to see those tiller head cheeks with a bit more of refined shape - perhaps more in keeping with that fine new tiller.

 

I think you originally had a radiused, cut-away version IIRC. Just sayin.

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Very nice, Kimb.

 

One point though. I'd have liked to see those tiller head cheeks with a bit more of refined shape - perhaps more in keeping with that fine new tiller.

 

I think you originally had a radiused, cut-away version IIRC. Just sayin.

Wm Walker (the tiller maker) and I had quite a discussion about that idea yesterday evening as we sat in the cockpit together admiring his handiwork. One idea was to follow the bottom of the tiller shape and remove the excess SS that protrudes below.........

 

....it is all under consideration. Lots of subtle changes are under consideration for future enhancements. This vessel is not finished and will likely never be finished.

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Looking good, KB.

 

Those "spring boards" go by the name of "go bars" in the English speaking woodworking trades, from the 17th Century French "goberge" I'm told. See the attached photo. Boatwrights and drooling naval architects can call them what they damned well please, but owners should be more deferential to tradition. :blink:

I've always know them as 'toms' for whatever reason. That's what all the tradesmen called them when I was but an apprentice.

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Looking good, KB.

 

Those "spring boards" go by the name of "go bars" in the English speaking woodworking trades, from the 17th Century French "goberge" I'm told. See the attached photo. Boatwrights and drooling naval architects can call them what they damned well please, but owners should be more deferential to tradition. :blink:

I've always know them as 'toms' for whatever reason. That's what all the tradesmen called them when I was but an apprentice.

 

Well, there's English speaking and then there's New Zealand.

 

 

 

Ducking.

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We have DATA!

 

NMEA 2000 is super easy to install. Just have the WIFI GPS unit left to install and hook up.

 

OK, it is pretty cool, but I am still going to sail by the telltales. The rest of the crew can worry about SOG, COG, etc.

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And as long as he was here we installed the cherry fiddles on all of Tim Nolan's structural shelves using spring boards as braces until the West System Six10 epoxy cures.

Looks nice! Are you going to install fiddles for the settee cushions too?

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We have DATA!

 

NMEA 2000 is super easy to install. Just have the WIFI GPS unit left to install and hook up.

 

OK, it is pretty cool, but I am still going to sail by the telltales. The rest of the crew can worry about SOG, COG, etc.

 

I'm tempted to say "sacrilege!!"

 

… but they are useful for racing.

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And as long as he was here we installed the cherry fiddles on all of Tim Nolan's structural shelves using spring boards as braces until the West System Six10 epoxy cures.

Looks nice! Are you going to install fiddles for the settee cushions too?

 

Nope, I don't like grooves in the back of my legs. (They have Velcro to keep them in place.)

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How are you going to cheack your heal polars without one of those stupid little spirit levels?

 

There is a stupid little spirit level on the companion way slider so SWMBO can tell me when I am heeling the boat too much.

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How are you going to cheack your heal polars without one of those stupid little spirit levels?

 

There is a stupid little spirit level on the companion way slider so SWMBO can tell me when I am heeling the boat too much.

In my experiance the mrs will tell you that the boat's healing too much when her book and the sun cream are floating in the remains of her drink in the leward corner of the cockpit. So she's doesn't need the spirit level.

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It will be good to have data to measure small changes in trim when racing. I will continue to sail by the telltails primarily. I just don't know any other way. It will be nice to know our AWA's. Might give me something new to brag about.

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How are you going to cheack your heal polars without one of those stupid little spirit levels?

 

There is a stupid little spirit level on the companion way slider so SWMBO can tell me when I am heeling the boat too much.

In my experiance the mrs will tell you that the boat's healing too much when her book and the sun cream are floating in the remains of her drink in the leward corner of the cockpit. So she's doesn't need the spirit level.

Actually the spirit level is so I can prove to SWMBO that we are NOT heeling past 15 degrees.