• Announcements

    • Zapata

      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Poda

Low-Buck Boat Projects

207 posts in this topic

So I got the idea for this thread as a one-stop shop for all the smaller projects from another site, and there was tons of good info there - I think the CA mentality here is a lot more conducive to "alternate methods" however and I'm willing to bet we have some creative tinkerers around here that have found cheaper (but emphasis on safe and reliable) solutions to the traditional "marine-grade" fare, or simply because you think you can do a better job than what's readily available.. I know some folk (including me) like to try to make things just to see if they can instead of buying even if it costs a little more, so let's see those too..

 

So let's see 'em.. A lot of us are frugal bastards so let's try to keep the total cost down to under $100 or so, although if you spent 5 bills building something that would cost 5 grand retail that would work too..

 

I'd start, but while I have a couple of projects in the starting phases I have nothing worthwhile to show, and no pics. I plan to remedy that this weekend and finish at least one of them to put up here..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take it back to Sailnet. :ph34r:

 

 

Just kidding, it's a good iea. I'd rather discuss it here than on Sailnet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take it back to Sailnet. :ph34r:

 

 

Just kidding, it's a good iea. I'd rather discuss it here than on Sailnet.

 

+1

 

Same.. that's why I'm starting it here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh man, bl's gonna be pissed.

 

I just replaced the rotted bilge cover in my C27 with Hardiboard. I have no idea if it will stand up to the pressure of being stepped on over time (so far it's fine) - but I sure as hell know it won't rot. Stained, it looks beautimus.

 

$9.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I should go on record and give BL the credit he's due for coming up with that idea.. don't want to step on any toes. Just figured the (relatively) different group of people could expand on what's over there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Made two of these out of some leftover 1/4 Starboard. Will be mounted down below to hold my spin and whisker pole so they aren't banging around when not in use .

post-45199-062318100 1301069445_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Made two of these out of some leftover 1/4 Starboard. Will be mounted down below to hold my spin and whisker pole so they aren't banging around when not in use .

 

I like! This has given me an excellent idea for my emergency oar, gaff, whisker pole and emergency VHF whip. I'll be able to suspend them above the quarterberth, keeping it useable as a bunk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. Took me about an hour to make, just have to drill holes and mount this weekend

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. Took me about an hour to make, just have to drill holes and mount this weekend

 

Just a thought. I mounted webbing to the overhead to hang rolled racing sails, keeps 'em out from underfoot on wednsdays. Screws and finish washers driven through the webbing into the overhead. Parachute buckles (push to connect, pinch to release like on your foulies pants shoulderstraps) do the holding. In this picture there is excess strap because these are sized for rolled main and jibs. I have straps for each end and the middle. In picture I have boom and spin pole stowed for winter.

post-7963-023248500 1301078410_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I should go on record and give BL the credit he's due for coming up with that idea.. don't want to step on any toes. Just figured the (relatively) different group of people could expand on what's over there.

 

Aaaa, just say "HTFU Snowflake" if he starts whining.

 

Are you Poda over at SN?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, over there I'm TintedChrome.. Used that nickname for years.. Poda came about a couple of weeks before joining SA as in inside joke with SWMBO, and it's stuck ever since.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cheapo ideas:

 

-for repacking a spinnaker, after you run each tape, flake that edge (like flaking any other sail) use a cheap $1 spring clamps to keep that edge oraganized while you work on the other edges. put the whole thing into the spin bag then reach in and dig out the clamps from the bag.

 

-$1 aluminum/plastic LED flashlights from home depot. small enough to fit in any pocket, bright for a long time on 3 little AAA batteries, and if they fall overboard, only $1. I keep a dozen in all sorts of nooks and crannies on my boat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cheapo ideas:

 

-for repacking a spinnaker, after you run each tape, flake that edge (like flaking any other sail) use a cheap $1 spring clamps to keep that edge oraganized while you work on the other edges. put the whole thing into the spin bag then reach in and dig out the clamps from the bag.

 

-$1 aluminum/plastic LED flashlights from home depot. small enough to fit in any pocket, bright for a long time on 3 little AAA batteries, and if they fall overboard, only $1. I keep a dozen in all sorts of nooks and crannies on my boat.

 

Tape 'em to pulpit, foredeck, stanchion aimed at jib luff for nite sailing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh man, bl's gonna be pissed.

 

I just replaced the rotted bilge cover in my C27 with Hardiboard. I have no idea if it will stand up to the pressure of being stepped on over time (so far it's fine) - but I sure as hell know it won't rot. Stained, it looks beautimus.

 

$9.

 

 

Hardi used to make roofing materials, until they found out too much moisture caused them to turn to mush. I saw a Hardi roof shingle that had a swamp cooler drip on it until it looked like wet graham cracker, it will rot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to get back on topic, my favorite low-buck projects fall in the category of "paint and preservation".

 

Something painted down to bare metal? Put some paint back on it. It not only improves appearance but reduces corrosion.

 

Wood worn to bare wood? Put on some varnish / Cetol / oil (or whatever you use).

 

Something need a bit of grease or oil? Put on a *little*. Outboard brackets, turnbuckles, cradles/jackstands etc. all like a little bit of the appropriate oil / grease / paint when required.

 

Looks better and lasts longer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I removed a bunch of teak that had no purpose other than for looks. Cost nothing, lighter boat, less maintenance. Does that count?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I removed a bunch of teak that had no purpose other than for looks. Cost nothing, lighter boat, less maintenance. Does that count?

 

My boat had a helmsman's seat that was never used. The top was decorated with teak slats screwed from below. The screws could hardly get a toehold in the thin teak and were always falling off. Last spring, I took them all off and replaced them with non-skid patches. I'm pleased; my crew was horrified.

 

A couple of years ago, I replaced two non-working instruments with one combo-instrument, which left a hole beside the companionway. This year, I'm thinking of filling it with a remote speaker for the VHF.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's good to see the "Low-Buck" love being spread. ;)

 

 

This is a bl -approved "Low-Buck" thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's good to see the "Low-Buck" love being spread. ;)

 

 

This is a bl -approved "Low-Buck" thread.

 

You mean I don't get to tell you to HTFU? There goes my attempt at being confrontational.. doh! Welcome aboard BL ;)

 

To get back on topic, I should be able to post pics in the next couple of days (if I can ever find the charger for my camera) - working on an ambient lighting system mounted on the lip behind the cabin berths for the boat, red or warm white selectable LED's with a DPDT switch at the panel.. 12 of each per fixture with a diffuser to give my modest cabin a glow to work in. Also going to be retrofitting two cabin lights (don't have them yet, but should have them in a couple of weeks) with the same red/white LEDs for when more lighting is required. Total cost of materials for 3 ambient fixtures (LED's, resistors, switches, housings), plus the two cabin lights is around $60.

 

Coming up next, the electrical panel, plus the compass modification to go from white incandescent to red LED lighting..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wanted refrigeration so I bought a "dorm room" refrigerator from Sears. Granted, the refrigerator wasn't <$100 but the West Marine catalog I have supporting the dinette table on top of the fridge sure was.

 

I converted the interior of one of the benches for my dinette to a battery compartment. The bottom of this compartment is, of course, bilge shaped. With marine-grade plywood and some fiberglass I was able to build a sturdy, flat battery platform to hold an additional 4 Group 27 batteries.

 

Repainting the original Edson steering pedestal cost me painters tape, sandpaper, and spray paint ... and sufficient hassle to make up for it.

 

I took an ammeter to my DC switchboard and recorded a profile (one DC load at a time) of the power consumption for every load on my boat. Come to find out ... that big, overhead light that fills my cabin with all the light I need ... is one of the most efficient lights I have on board. If you haven't done this yet, I'd really recommend it. You might be surprised which fan uses the least power.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to qualify my 'low buck' fix.

 

I rebuilt my dodger. I probably have less than $100 in material.

 

HOWEVER

 

My 'training' costs consist of virtually making the dodger twice. Plus, I bought a sailrite LSZ1-like sewing machine for $300.

 

for the ultimate in lowbuck, head on over to

 

http://thereifixedit...y/hall-of-fame/

 

 

dave-immaboat.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to qualify my 'low buck' fix.

 

I rebuilt my dodger. I probably have less than $100 in material.

 

HOWEVER

 

My 'training' costs consist of virtually making the dodger twice. Plus, I bought a sailrite LSZ1-like sewing machine for $300.

Any business oriented professional will tell you the $300 is charged off to physical plant capital costs and the training is just overhead. To figure out the portion of the cost you would assign to the project you'd divide the $300+ by the number of projects you expect to be able to do in the future.

 

I just cut the corner and married a seamstress. She's even been making full-size, finished nylon battle flags for the racing boats that ask for them.

 

post-19242-006238900 1301503308_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to qualify my 'low buck' fix.

 

I rebuilt my dodger. I probably have less than $100 in material.

 

HOWEVER

 

My 'training' costs consist of virtually making the dodger twice. Plus, I bought a sailrite LSZ1-like sewing machine for $300.

Any business oriented professional will tell you the $300 is charged off to physical plant capital costs and the training is just overhead. To figure out the portion of the cost you would assign to the project you'd divide the $300+ by the number of projects you expect to be able to do in the future.

 

I just cut the corner and married a seamstress. She's even been making full-size, finished nylon battle flags for the racing boats that ask for them.

 

post-19242-006238900 1301503308_thumb.jpg

 

I'm probably going to do 300 projects with this thing :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to qualify my 'low buck' fix.

 

I rebuilt my dodger. I probably have less than $100 in material.

 

HOWEVER

 

My 'training' costs consist of virtually making the dodger twice. Plus, I bought a sailrite LSZ1-like sewing machine for $300.

Any business oriented professional will tell you the $300 is charged off to physical plant capital costs and the training is just overhead. To figure out the portion of the cost you would assign to the project you'd divide the $300+ by the number of projects you expect to be able to do in the future.

 

I just cut the corner and married a seamstress. She's even been making full-size, finished nylon battle flags for the racing boats that ask for them.

 

post-19242-006238900 1301503308_thumb.jpg

 

I'd like a battle flag that shows a pair of blown-out beach shoes. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to qualify my 'low buck' fix.

 

I rebuilt my dodger. I probably have less than $100 in material.

 

HOWEVER

 

My 'training' costs consist of virtually making the dodger twice. Plus, I bought a sailrite LSZ1-like sewing machine for $300.

Any business oriented professional will tell you the $300 is charged off to physical plant capital costs and the training is just overhead. To figure out the portion of the cost you would assign to the project you'd divide the $300+ by the number of projects you expect to be able to do in the future.

 

I just cut the corner and married a seamstress. She's even been making full-size, finished nylon battle flags for the racing boats that ask for them.

 

post-19242-006238900 1301503308_thumb.jpg

 

I'd like a battle flag that shows a pair of blown-out beach shoes. :)

Did I mention they're not cheap? ;)

 

If you actually want one PM me and we'll figure something out, but she's made it clear to me that these are commissioned work - she does a professional job, and it takes her several hours to make one, so she ain't doing them for free.

 

I think she might even be referring to the one I asked for...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This project is probably not for everybody, but of all the ones I've done on this boat, this is the most useful.

 

It's just a set of companionway doors, complete with frame, that drops into the companionway opening.

No attachments, screws, hinges, etc on the boat.

 

A bit of 1/2" birch ply and scrap lumber were used as I had no real idea of what I was doing and

didn't want to waste good stuff. But they have proven to be very comfortable.

 

Note that the doors open all the way - not stopped by the cockpit seats.

That makes the first step a bit of a reach, but they are plenty sturdy enough to step on (and we do).

 

Total cash outlay was for hinges - about $15 each for good stainless.

 

Oh well, you asked...

 

Richard

post-36012-044720700 1301548639_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Son of a diddly... I like that! It's friggin' removeable! Took me a moment to understand what's going on there. Can you post a photo of the doors in the shut position?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This project is probably not for everybody, but of all the ones I've done on this boat, this is the most useful.

 

It's just a set of companionway doors, complete with frame, that drops into the companionway opening.

No attachments, screws, hinges, etc on the boat.

 

A bit of 1/2" birch ply and scrap lumber were used as I had no real idea of what I was doing and

didn't want to waste good stuff. But they have proven to be very comfortable.

 

Note that the doors open all the way - not stopped by the cockpit seats.

That makes the first step a bit of a reach, but they are plenty sturdy enough to step on (and we do).

 

Total cash outlay was for hinges - about $15 each for good stainless.

 

Oh well, you asked...

 

Richard

 

That's really nice work and, no reason to worship at the Church of Teak if you don't have to.

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This project is probably not for everybody, but of all the ones I've done on this boat, this is the most useful.

 

It's just a set of companionway doors, complete with frame, that drops into the companionway opening.

No attachments, screws, hinges, etc on the boat.

 

A bit of 1/2" birch ply and scrap lumber were used as I had no real idea of what I was doing and

didn't want to waste good stuff. But they have proven to be very comfortable.

 

Note that the doors open all the way - not stopped by the cockpit seats.

That makes the first step a bit of a reach, but they are plenty sturdy enough to step on (and we do).

 

Total cash outlay was for hinges - about $15 each for good stainless.

 

Oh well, you asked...

 

Richard

 

I love that.. Was it you that showed me that on plasticclassics when I was inquiring on best methods to redo my hatchboards and frames a while back ? You're right, it's not for everyone, but pretty handy for us cruisers. Great idea!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Son of a diddly... I like that! It's friggin' removeable! Took me a moment to understand what's going on there. Can you post a photo of the doors in the shut position?

 

 

Sure thing, Ajax.

 

You want to build the frame in place so it fits well. NO boat is that symmetrical!

Mill the side and bottom center pieces to size. Fit the sides and mark and cut the bottom angles.

Then fit the center piece between them, mark and cut.

Add the door jambs to the side pieces and fit the cross (inside and outside) braces.

Those cross pieces overlap onto the side pieces and provide the strength and stiffness.

 

Size and shape the doors so that the bottoms clear the cockpit seats - note the angled bottom edge.

I guessed wrong the first time, hence the double V of the filler blocks at the bottom (shrug).

 

There is also a vertical cover strip on the doors. Inside on one door, outside on the other.

(not installed yet in this pic) Seals up nicely when closed. A deadbolt on the inside of the

"outside" door keeps them closed.

 

Mortising the hinges would put the screws out of reach from the outside. Probably a good idea - someday.

 

The bottom of my doors and the V blocks are beveled to shed water. Works well.

post-36012-001108000 1301589066_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I love that.. Was it you that showed me that on plasticclassics when I was inquiring on best methods to redo my hatchboards and frames a while back ? You're right, it's not for everyone, but pretty handy for us cruisers. Great idea!

 

Yeah, I remember that, Poda.

Good to see ya here.

 

For all the rest of the silly things I've done to this boat check her web site...

http://www.home.earthlink.net/~capri26

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

saw this tip ,

 

Most any fabric store will have peel ply equivalent cleverly disguised as "dress lining material" in either nylon or polyester. Just avoid the stuff that has a fuzzy surface on one side, doesn't peel worth a dang.

peace,bigjohn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

maybe this will help?

 

Hell yeah, that helps. Great website BTW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

saw this tip ,

 

Most any fabric store will have peel ply equivalent cleverly disguised as "dress lining material" in either nylon or polyester. Just avoid the stuff that has a fuzzy surface on one side, doesn't peel worth a dang.

peace,bigjohn

 

Might want to avoid the big flowery patterns too.

Sometimes they leach through.

 

Could be embarrassing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Might want to avoid the big flowery patterns too.

Sometimes they leach through.

 

Could be embarrassing.

 

 

ha...:lol:or...very flattering...depends on ones perspective. B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's good to see the "Low-Buck" love being spread. ;)

 

 

This is a bl -approved "Low-Buck" thread.

 

Hey bl - what's up dude? Here I am watching your back and not even a word of thanks?

 

Now piss off newb and show us your admiral's through hulls.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh man, bl's gonna be pissed.

 

I just replaced the rotted bilge cover in my C27 with Hardiboard. I have no idea if it will stand up to the pressure of being stepped on over time (so far it's fine) - but I sure as hell know it won't rot. Stained, it looks beautimus.

 

$9.

 

 

Hardi used to make roofing materials, until they found out too much moisture caused them to turn to mush. I saw a Hardi roof shingle that had a swamp cooler drip on it until it looked like wet graham cracker, it will rot.

 

Damn. Luckily I just removed the swamp cooler from my C27 cabin. Hopefully that will buy me more time and I'm way less top-heavy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Admiring my ass is not the same as watching my back, smack, but thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Admiring my ass is not the same as watching my back, smack, but thanks.

 

Eww. Take it to Gay Cruising Anarchy, you two.:P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While were pinching stuff from other websites, take look at this one:

 

 

post-21762-063625800 1301999873_thumb.jpg

 

See what he has done?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While were pinching stuff from other websites, take look at this one:

 

 

post-21762-063625800 1301999873_thumb.jpg

 

See what he has done?

 

I'd love to see some details on how that one was done...

 

Admiring my ass is not the same as watching my back, smack, but thanks.

 

Good line, but - no!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While were pinching stuff from other websites, take look at this one:

 

 

post-21762-063625800 1301999873_thumb.jpg

 

See what he has done?

 

I'd love to see some details on how that one was done...

 

 

 

He just parcel taped over the canvas dodger, laid it up with polyester and mat and choppy. When he flicked it off he cut out the windows glassed in a bit of conduit across the front edge for stiffness, gave it a good sand and painted it blue, same colour as canvas. Looks good and cheap to build. Windows were made out of flexible clears.

 

 

 

Cut and paste from the website I saw it on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While were pinching stuff from other websites, take look at this one:

 

 

post-21762-063625800 1301999873_thumb.jpg

 

See what he has done?

 

I'd love to see some details on how that one was done...

 

 

 

He just parcel taped over the canvas dodger, laid it up with polyester and mat and choppy. When he flicked it off he cut out the windows glassed in a bit of conduit across the front edge for stiffness, gave it a good sand and painted it blue, same colour as canvas. Looks good and cheap to build. Windows were made out of flexible clears.

 

 

 

Cut and paste from the website I saw it on.

 

huh?

 

maybe I'm being a bit dense this morning and need more coffee, but am I looking at a hard dodger or a regular frame-and-canvas dodger?

 

The discription makes it sound like he used the existing frame-and-canvas dodger as a mold for the hard dodger, is that true? if so, doesn't that mean you have to pay for a frame-and-canvas dodger anyway just to get the mold? that's not cheap in the least...

 

-M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While were pinching stuff from other websites, take look at this one:

 

 

post-21762-063625800 1301999873_thumb.jpg

 

See what he has done?

 

I'd love to see some details on how that one was done...

 

 

 

He just parcel taped over the canvas dodger, laid it up with polyester and mat and choppy. When he flicked it off he cut out the windows glassed in a bit of conduit across the front edge for stiffness, gave it a good sand and painted it blue, same colour as canvas. Looks good and cheap to build. Windows were made out of flexible clears.

 

 

 

Cut and paste from the website I saw it on.

 

huh?

 

maybe I'm being a bit dense this morning and need more coffee, but am I looking at a hard dodger or a regular frame-and-canvas dodger?

 

The discription makes it sound like he used the existing frame-and-canvas dodger as a mold for the hard dodger, is that true? if so, doesn't that mean you have to pay for a frame-and-canvas dodger anyway just to get the mold? that's not cheap in the least...

 

-M

 

It is if you use someone else's dodger. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pulling a shape from stuff is a great way to get a "free" mold. I hadn't thought of using a dodger to get a "mold" for a hard dodger, very cool.

 

Another trick I've used is to take common stuff and cut it up, duct tape it together, smear it with bondo, sand to shape, and then take the mold. We did this for one of those cool hard dodgers that look like a giant air scoop. We took a large plastic trash barrel, cut it up and nailed it to a sheet of plywood to make it hold its shape. Added some bits of other plastic junk and were able to get the female mold from the pile of trash. The mold took a bit of work to make "nice" because we didn't spend enough time on the bondo on the male plug. But, it gave us one of those cool Volvo Race looking windowless hatch sized dodgers with about two days work, plus we got the mold.

 

More recently we needed some small scoops to drain water from the anchor locker on S'agapo. The old ones were stainless and tended to bleed rust after a while. We used the old one as a male mold and made new ones from epoxy and glass. You can see it here:

 

http://web.me.com/beau_vrolyk/Sagapo/News_%26_Updates/Entries/2011/2/26_New_drain_cowls_for_the_anchor_locker.html

 

Fun stuff, fiberglass.

 

BV

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pulling a shape from stuff is a great way to get a "free" mold.

yup....true that, free mold ore even skip mold just just flop the hole part.

I have seen nice carbon race canoes flopped off of another heavier canoe as a male mold.Cover canoe with heat shrink plastic...lay up carbon ...pop...layup inside ...paddle.

I have been thinking lately about using this method to pop a racing skiff.Any one done this?

peace

bigjohn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No cupholders??

 

I used plastic tonic bottles cut in 1/2 and screwed to the inside bulkhead. They even cant as I put washers on both sides. Only lost 2 in 12 seasons for lack of a glass. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While were pinching stuff from other websites, take look at this one:

 

 

post-21762-063625800 1301999873_thumb.jpg

 

See what he has done?

 

I'd love to see some details on how that one was done...

 

 

 

He just parcel taped over the canvas dodger, laid it up with polyester and mat and choppy. When he flicked it off he cut out the windows glassed in a bit of conduit across the front edge for stiffness, gave it a good sand and painted it blue, same colour as canvas. Looks good and cheap to build. Windows were made out of flexible clears.

 

 

 

Cut and paste from the website I saw it on.

 

huh?

 

maybe I'm being a bit dense this morning and need more coffee, but am I looking at a hard dodger or a regular frame-and-canvas dodger?

 

The discription makes it sound like he used the existing frame-and-canvas dodger as a mold for the hard dodger, is that true? if so, doesn't that mean you have to pay for a frame-and-canvas dodger anyway just to get the mold? that's not cheap in the least...

 

-M

I'm guessing the old dodger was stuffed, this was the cheap replacement. I thought it was a very cool idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to bump this thread again (why - because we LIKE it!)

 

The electrical panel in my boat HAD a single small bulb behind it for back lighting.

WAY down at the bottom.

 

Not only was it too dim to see, but the shadows of switches and breakers meant

most of the panel was completely blank in the dark.

 

When I redid the electrical panel location, I also redid the back-lighting.

 

These are flexible LED strips - ghetto lights - from the local Auto Zone.

They can be cut apart (3 diodes minimum) and wires soldered to the shortened

pieces to fit anywhere you need some light. I've located small strips where

they can light the entire panel evenly - no shadows!

These are white, but they also come in red, green, and blue.

 

About $19 for two one-foot long strips, a small 12v battery pack and push button switch.

post-36012-061142200 1302890200_thumb.jpg

post-36012-067574100 1302890215_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool stuff Cavelamb!! I've decided to go all-LED on my boat, and I started Thursday by converting my compass from incandescent to LED lighting..

 

This is the original bulb.. When I picked up the compass from tigerregis it was new and unused but had been sitting for a couple of years. I knew from research that the Contest 101's with a red card came with a white bulb, and I wanted to switch it to red. Plus, the original bulb didn't work when I hooked it up to a 12v source.

 

So first things first, disassembled the compass and pulled the bulb and wires.. Plan is to use existing wiring and cut off the bulb.

post-48404-025197200 1302904575_thumb.jpg

 

For the LED to fit snugly in the bulb's original location I took some 1/8th inch shrink tubing, cut off a wee bit, and put it on the LED. It was still loose, so I took a second piece, and shrank it over the first. Perfect - wasn't moving anywhere.

post-48404-096177600 1302904591_thumb.jpg

 

The leads need to be bent back so it'll fit under the cover, and when using one 2v LED some resistance needs to be added to stop it from burning out. So after doing some math I soldered on a 1k ohm resistor, and soldered on the leads.

post-48404-008035900 1302904706_thumb.jpg

 

Fed the wire back through the compass, snug-fit the shrink-wrapped LED. Confirmed that the the combination of the shrink tubing and leads leading back kept it all rock solid.

post-48404-064692100 1302904858_thumb.jpg

 

Put it all back together, hooked it up to a 12v source again, and presto.. Looks a lot better and more legible in person but you get the idea. I took it apart again to black out the portion of the casing that is glowing red above the card, but don't have pics of that..

post-48404-068341600 1302905091_thumb.jpg

 

LED: 50c

Resistor: 1c - Seriously..

Wire: already had

 

Total cost: 0.51c..

 

We'll see how it holds up over a season.. but even if I have to rethink and redo it, it won't break the bank..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

LED: 50c

Resistor: 1c - Seriously..

Wire: already had

 

Total cost: 0.51c..

 

 

 

$.51? I dunno. That might be hard to beat for a low bucks project.

 

What is that? .00051 boat units?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My boat came with no onboard water system to speak of, though the plumbing was in place between the front and rear sinks. One manual sink handle was missing and the other inop. PO had mounted a water pump in the head area under the sink so I plumbed it into the existing sytem after removing the other sink pump. Got some kitchen dish sprayers at Lowes and left the hoses long enough for the aft galley sink sprayer to reach the cockpit to wash off people and bird poo. The fwd sprayer will reach out the front hatch for anchor and deck rinsing. It would be real easy to plumb in a propane camp shower and have hot water at both sprayers. (bought a Zodi brand but have yet to use it.) For water sourcing I have a 6 gallon "Aquatainer" from wally world and ran the hose from the pump out if the finger hole in the cabinet door, under the v berth matress to the other side. Water can lives next to the porta pottie. Everthing is easy to get too and works pretty well. Not the cheapest route for a new install but it was mostly in place already. Just redneck enough for me to keep my credentials :0)

Regards,

INFIDEL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

LED: 50c

Resistor: 1c - Seriously..

Wire: already had

 

Total cost: 0.51c..

 

 

 

$.51? I dunno. That might be hard to beat for a low bucks project.

 

What is that? .00051 boat units?

but he did forget about the $.01 for the 2 pieces of shrinkwrap. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another little trick on the electrical panel...

Auto Zone has switches that are a direct replacement for the ones in my electrical panel.

The lighted ones have an incandescent bulb - which is WAY to bright and too hot to touch after a while.

But a 220 ohm resistor in series with the GROUND tab on the switch (pin 3 I believe) will dim the

bulb down nicely. That pin is the return path for the bulb only. So any time power is on to the

switch, it glows.

 

I put a blue one in the Panel Lights location.

When the battery switch is turned on that switch is super easy to locate...

 

Less than $5...

 

 

PS: just wanted to try out my new avatar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Hidden by cavelamb, April 18, 2011 - duplicate post

Another little trick on the electrical panel...

 

Auto Zone has some switches that are a direct replacement for the ones in my electrical panel.

 

The lighted ones have an incandescent bulb - which is WAY to bright and too hot to touch after a while.

But a 220 ohm resistor in series with the GROUND tab on the switch will dim the bulb down nicely.

That pin is the return path for the bulb only. So any time power is on to the switch, it glows.

 

I put a blue one in the Panel Lights location.

When the battery switch is turned on that switch is super easy to locate...

 

One for the Cabin Lights might be a helpful too?

 

Less than $5 each...

 

 

PS: just wanted to try out my new avatar.

Share this post


Link to post

New galley extension/ poor man's nav station: Ignore the dust, runs, and general sloppiness of the workshop.boatprojects2011006.jpg

boatprojects2011007.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I have folding table envy.

Yours is bigger than mine (the shame of it all!)

 

This was actually the first project I attempted on my boat.

Straight out of Matte's "Finely Fitted Yacht"

 

The surface is Starboard and it slides out for easy cleaning.

Baltic Birch base, Mahogany edges, and West Resin .

post-36012-074875700 1303418569_thumb.jpg

post-36012-051716400 1303418582_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New galley extension/ poor man's nav station: Ignore the dust, runs, and general sloppiness of the workshop.

 

I'm sorry,but I dont think I can.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I have folding table envy.

Yours is bigger than mine (the shame of it all!)

 

This was actually the first project I attempted on my boat.

Straight out of Matte's "Finely Fitted Yacht"

 

The surface is Starboard and it slides out for easy cleaning.

Baltic Birch base, Mahogany edges, and West Resin .

 

Nice! I love the inset of Starboard. You just gave me a hell of an idea. My galley has a pull-out cutting board made of the original mahogany. It's filthy, and even if I do clean it up, the thought of food particles and bacteria embedding in it gives me salmonella just thinking about it. I could dig a large rectangle out of it, and inset an HDPE cutting board into it. Safer, easy to clean and cheap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I have folding table envy.

Yours is bigger than mine (the shame of it all!)

 

This was actually the first project I attempted on my boat.

Straight out of Matte's "Finely Fitted Yacht"

 

The surface is Starboard and it slides out for easy cleaning.

Baltic Birch base, Mahogany edges, and West Resin .

Nice work!

I like the Starboard nav-flap by the companionway as well.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I have folding table envy.

Yours is bigger than mine (the shame of it all!)

 

This was actually the first project I attempted on my boat.

Straight out of Matte's "Finely Fitted Yacht"

 

The surface is Starboard and it slides out for easy cleaning.

Baltic Birch base, Mahogany edges, and West Resin .

Nice work!

I like the Starboard nav-flap by the companionway as well.

 

 

 

 

Aw, thank you.

I like it too, but I didn't build it myself.

It was there when I bought the boat.

 

But I don't think it would be a big expensive project.

I've seen a lot of variations on that theme as well.

 

The real beast would be running all the wiring!

 

Some pics of that thing...

post-36012-034662400 1303505839_thumb.jpg

post-36012-063324600 1303505845_thumb.jpg

post-36012-084465900 1303505855_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I have folding table envy.

Yours is bigger than mine (the shame of it all!)

 

This was actually the first project I attempted on my boat.

Straight out of Matte's "Finely Fitted Yacht"

 

The surface is Starboard and it slides out for easy cleaning.

Baltic Birch base, Mahogany edges, and West Resin .

 

Nice! I love the inset of Starboard. You just gave me a hell of an idea. My galley has a pull-out cutting board made of the original mahogany. It's filthy, and even if I do clean it up, the thought of food particles and bacteria embedding in it gives me salmonella just thinking about it. I could dig a large rectangle out of it, and inset an HDPE cutting board into it. Safer, easy to clean and cheap.

 

Maybe it's jut me, but I'm real hinkey about cutting up any of the existing stuff that came with the boat.

All the replaced parts are in the pergitory closet in the garage - awaiting the second coming, I guess.

But they are there if someone down the line want's to put it back in stock shape.

 

I guess what I'm getting at it that it would be easier (for me at least) to just make a new slide with the starboard surface

that fit in place of the old slide out thing.

 

A light plywood base, side rails routed to shape and slotted for the starboard to slide into, and it's done...

I'm anal about epoxy coating my wood work (hey, it's a boat) and especially anything that would come in contact

(and absorb?) food-like substances. SO much easier to clean.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New galley extension/ poor man's nav station: Ignore the dust, runs, and general sloppiness of the workshop.

 

I'm sorry,but I dont think I can.

 

It looks better than mine...

 

I clean up at the end of the project.

(but I often have a dozen projects running at once)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I have folding table envy.

Yours is bigger than mine (the shame of it all!)

 

This was actually the first project I attempted on my boat.

Straight out of Matte's "Finely Fitted Yacht"

 

The surface is Starboard and it slides out for easy cleaning.

Baltic Birch base, Mahogany edges, and West Resin .

 

Nice! I love the inset of Starboard. You just gave me a hell of an idea. My galley has a pull-out cutting board made of the original mahogany. It's filthy, and even if I do clean it up, the thought of food particles and bacteria embedding in it gives me salmonella just thinking about it. I could dig a large rectangle out of it, and inset an HDPE cutting board into it. Safer, easy to clean and cheap.

 

You'd be surprised - most woods have a pretty good natural antibacterial property; I seem to recall oak was best - must be the tannins.

 

http://faculty.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/faculty/docliver/Research/cuttingboard.htm

 

Starboard doesn't have that property, and, as the article notes, once worn with knife cuts, it was nearly impossible to clean plastic cutting boards, while the wood ones renewed their natural antibacterial action. There are Microban-treated cutting boards available, but I'd rather gain my antibacterial properties naturally, thank you very much.

 

The Starboard matches up nicely with a Herreshoff-style interior, though ;-)

 

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'd be surprised - most woods have a pretty good natural antibacterial property; I seem to recall oak was best - must be the tannins.

 

http://faculty.vetme...uttingboard.htm

 

Starboard doesn't have that property, and, as the article notes, once worn with knife cuts, it was nearly impossible to clean plastic cutting boards, while the wood ones renewed their natural antibacterial action. There are Microban-treated cutting boards available, but I'd rather gain my antibacterial properties naturally, thank you very much.

 

The Starboard matches up nicely with a Herreshoff-style interior, though ;-)

 

Mike

 

Hmmm, interesting point about the tannins.

 

As for "cleaning" a scored cutting board, an orbital sander with 220 grit works fine (well, for removing the scratches).

Makes a ratty old piece of cutting board look real nice again...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'd be surprised - most woods have a pretty good natural antibacterial property; I seem to recall oak was best - must be the tannins.

 

http://faculty.vetme...uttingboard.htm

 

Starboard doesn't have that property, and, as the article notes, once worn with knife cuts, it was nearly impossible to clean plastic cutting boards, while the wood ones renewed their natural antibacterial action. There are Microban-treated cutting boards available, but I'd rather gain my antibacterial properties naturally, thank you very much.

 

The Starboard matches up nicely with a Herreshoff-style interior, though ;-)

 

Mike

 

Hmmm, interesting point about the tannins.

 

As for "cleaning" a scored cutting board, an orbital sander with 220 grit works fine (well, for removing the scratches).

Makes a ratty old piece of cutting board look real nice again...

Actually, no it doesn't. It looks great to the eye, but once the board's contaminated sanding it won't do a damn thing to clear it up. Vinegar, alcohol or high temperatures will; sanding will just spread the bacteria out. Sort of like trying to sand off silicon sealants and caulk. Hardwood cutting boards are the best; not only are they less likely to get cut up, but yes, the tannins will kill off bacteria fairly efficiently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'd be surprised - most woods have a pretty good natural antibacterial property; I seem to recall oak was best - must be the tannins.

 

http://faculty.vetme...uttingboard.htm

 

Starboard doesn't have that property, and, as the article notes, once worn with knife cuts, it was nearly impossible to clean plastic cutting boards, while the wood ones renewed their natural antibacterial action. There are Microban-treated cutting boards available, but I'd rather gain my antibacterial properties naturally, thank you very much.

 

The Starboard matches up nicely with a Herreshoff-style interior, though ;-)

 

Mike

 

Hmmm, interesting point about the tannins.

 

As for "cleaning" a scored cutting board, an orbital sander with 220 grit works fine (well, for removing the scratches).

Makes a ratty old piece of cutting board look real nice again...

Actually, no it doesn't. It looks great to the eye, but once the board's contaminated sanding it won't do a damn thing to clear it up. Vinegar, alcohol or high temperatures will; sanding will just spread the bacteria out. Sort of like trying to sand off silicon sealants and caulk. Hardwood cutting boards are the best; not only are they less likely to get cut up, but yes, the tannins will kill off bacteria fairly efficiently.

 

Sorry Mike, I meant cleaning off the CUTS, not the germs...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One Low-buck project I didn't want to see was cabin lights and fans powered with speaker wire...

 

I't being replaced with proper wire and fuse box.

 

Have you looked at yours???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One Low-buck project I didn't want to see was cabin lights and fans powered with speaker wire...

 

I't being replaced with proper wire and fuse box.

 

Have you looked at yours???

 

Yup.. on mine it was horrendous enough that I removed every wire on the boat. I'm starting from scratch. There isn't an ounce of copper or a single boat-related electrical component in there right now. Next step is the mast - some idiot wired up the old steaming light with that clear translucent-jacketed speaker wire... :rolleyes: When I was looking at it and bent it to see how flexible it was about 2 ft from the end, the ENTIRE CABLE snapped in my hand, it was that corroded.. :blink: jacket, copper, and all. Clean break like it was the lead in a pencil.

 

I have a term for when things like this happens- BALLS!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you guys priced speaker wire lately? I want to know where they were finding speaker wire cheap enough that it was a significant savings over the proper stuff...

 

(Yes, I know it used to be cheap, but these days nothing made out of copper is inexpensive.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you guys priced speaker wire lately? I want to know where they were finding speaker wire cheap enough that it was a significant savings over the proper stuff...

 

(Yes, I know it used to be cheap, but these days nothing made out of copper is inexpensive.)

 

"Oh, just grab that old role of speaker wire we have been tripping over for the last five years."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please do not tell me the dog is in that little box.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please do not tell me the dog is in that little box.

 

I just spit root beer all over my mac, dammit!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Come on, look at the expression on the dog's face- he knew what was coming.

I kept telling him, "poop deck is just a phrase! crap in the cockpit one more time, and I'm gonna keep you in a box!"

NOW he believes me.

 

Seriously, the dog still fits under the new box.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So where do dogs... go when cruising on boats anyway?

 

I looked into that a bunch when we got a dog.

 

The internet (which tells no lies) said that a piece of astro-turf/green porch carpet sprinkled with ode-de-puppy-pee would give the signal to the dog to do business there.

 

Then you take the soiled carpet and toss it overboard to clean it off.

 

you either tie a line around a corner (with a sheet bend obviously), or put a big grommet in the corner of the carpet and tie off to that.

 

We only had one chance to use it. it worked, the dog peed where required, and it drained off the deck. a bucket of seawater later and nobody was any the wiser.

 

-M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So where do dogs... go when cruising on boats anyway?

 

I looked into that a bunch when we got a dog.

 

The internet (which tells no lies) said that a piece of astro-turf/green porch carpet sprinkled with ode-de-puppy-pee would give the signal to the dog to do business there.

 

Then you take the soiled carpet and toss it overboard to clean it off.

 

you either tie a line around a corner (with a sheet bend obviously), or put a big grommet in the corner of the carpet and tie off to that.

 

We only had one chance to use it. it worked, the dog peed where required, and it drained off the deck. a bucket of seawater later and nobody was any the wiser.

 

-M

 

You can shorten the design process by omitting the carpet and tying the line directly to the dog.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

M-

 

You had that big dog out on your boat? Wow.

 

He speaks the truth folks. There is a liveaboard couple in Annapolis on a large catamaran. They have a piece of Astro up on the bow and that's where the dog goes. They said it only took a day or too to train their dog.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Low-buck Sunday at stately Jones manor:

 

http://docksixchroni...uck-sunday.html

 

You know, that idea of a work surface on the ice chest...vely intelesting.

 

Why not DIY? Make a wood top that fits your chest (??) and goop it on.

 

It might not be as sturdy as a metal box, but it would be a heck of a lot

more useful than the plastic top alone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look at the top of my freezer in that pic. Installing a nice top would ruin the hard-earned project patina.

Now, a butcherblock top on a boat ice chest... that has marketing possibilities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look at the top of my freezer in that pic. Installing a nice top would ruin the hard-earned project patina.

Now, a butcherblock top on a boat ice chest... that has marketing possibilities.

 

I used a freezer top as a darkroom bench for many years. It had an interesting multicoloured shimmer from all the chemicals, but nothing like the geological depth of yours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been contemplating this one for a while.

The stock cabin table for the Capri 26 drops down to make the entire cabin into a bed.

That would have been great when I was 25!

But at 61? I'd rather have an open passageway to get forward.

 

Anyway, two years ago I started making alternative tables for the boat.

Since I wasn't using the big bet option, I made a smaller table that didn't take up so much room.

Later I took that one down and rigged it with fold-down sides (like the stock table).

 

So last night, after a nice sail, we pulled the table out and brought it home for the next level.

 

I wanted to add the white laminate top (right now it's just West / varnish finish) and fiddle rails.

The laminate is no big deal. Cheap and easy enough.

 

But the fiddle rails... Aye, there's the rub.

 

I had bought a 4 quarter mahogany 1 x 8 about 12 feet long back when doing the shelves fiddles,

so there was plenty left from that (about half in fact). The mahogany cost $40.

 

But the little table is all curvy and rounded in places! Can't just saw out fiddles like they did in the

old days when good wood was plentiful.

 

So I'm back to laminating fiddles.

A few pics may help explain the how and why.

 

First is the table - upside down for the moment.

Second it the first run fiddle layup for the table.

 

Third is a shot of the shelf fiddles layup.

Last is the finished shelf fiddle.

 

The shelf fiddles are gently bowed to match the inboard edge of the shelf (well duh!)

So no big problems laminating them using West 105.

 

But as you can see, the table fiddles are deeply bent (outta be right at home here, huh?)

The idea is to make up an upside down "L" shaped piece that exactly fits around the edge of the table.

Three layers for the taller outer edge (about 3/32" thick each) and three shorter layers for the inner part

that sits up over the table surface. The idea is an upside down "L" shaped piece.

 

Since there will be a lot of spring back when they come off the jig, I've used real glue for this one.

T-88 by System 3 - good stuff Maynard.

 

Counting ripping and planing the strips, making the jig and gluing up the first part, we have about

2 hours in this project so far. I figure it will top 20 before done.

 

But the price is for sure right....

post-36012-060920100 1304731770_thumb.jpg

post-36012-051536900 1304731787_thumb.jpg

post-36012-032733200 1304731796_thumb.jpg

post-36012-046677200 1304731804_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I'm reporting this pretty much in real-time...

 

When we got home from dinner I took the raw lamination off the jig and routed the outer two edges (top and bottom).

The inner edge, being so low, will take a special router setup. That can wait for daylight.

 

A bit of sanding to smooth things up a bit and back in the jig for the night...

 

I think one of the most important things I've learned making things is that it's ok if something doesn't work out right

now and then. It's ok. Really. Don't feel the need to beat myself up, or blame somebody else.

 

If you can't allow yourself to make mistakes, you can't allow yourself to try to do new thing...

 

For what it's worth.

post-36012-078322100 1304826415_thumb.jpg

post-36012-030417500 1304826430_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hate you people that know how to work with wood so well. I'm envious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hate you people that know how to work with wood so well. I'm envious.

 

"Don't hate be because I'm beautiful".

 

I don't have any choice in this, Ajax.

I couldn't possibly pay someone to do it for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Luckily, in Annapolis we have a chandlery called Bacon's Sails. They are absolutely loaded with good stuff for cheap. New, used, whatever. I was suffering from a chronic cleat shortage. I picked up these crazy 60's teardrop cleats for $4.00 each. I figure they're "historically correct" for my 60's boat. I also grabbed a used Lifesling in very good condition for $55.00 West Marine wanted $55.00 for a stupid flag mount. $19.55 for the exact same brand at Bacon's. I think I can be classified as a "yacht" now. tongue.gif

 

I mean, I really needed a flag mount so I can fly the national ensign. I wouldn't want to get mistaken for a Kiwi boat at the Coronado Worlds next month. wink.gif

post-42428-016393600 1304880625_thumb.jpg

post-42428-055136700 1304880637_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Luckily, in Annapolis we have a chandlery called Bacon's Sails. They are absolutely loaded with good stuff for cheap. New, used, whatever. I was suffering from a chronic cleat shortage. I picked up these crazy 60's teardrop cleats for $4.00 each. I figure they're "historically correct" for my 60's boat. I also grabbed a used Lifesling in very good condition for $55.00 West Marine wanted $55.00 for a stupid flag mount. $19.55 for the exact same brand at Bacon's. I think I can be classified as a "yacht" now. tongue.gif

 

I mean, I really needed a flag mount so I can fly the national ensign. I wouldn't want to get mistaken for a Kiwi boat at the Coronado Worlds next month. wink.gif

 

I need a good bosuns chair - and it's only seven month until Christmas!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the "special" router fence for routing the edge of inside curves.

And the inside curve itself...

post-36012-070590400 1304882962_thumb.jpg

post-36012-094298300 1304882972_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Luckily, in Annapolis we have a chandlery called Bacon's Sails. They are absolutely loaded with good stuff for cheap. New, used, whatever. I was suffering from a chronic cleat shortage. I picked up these crazy 60's teardrop cleats for $4.00 each. I figure they're "historically correct" for my 60's boat. I also grabbed a used Lifesling in very good condition for $55.00 West Marine wanted $55.00 for a stupid flag mount. $19.55 for the exact same brand at Bacon's. I think I can be classified as a "yacht" now. tongue.gif

 

I mean, I really needed a flag mount so I can fly the national ensign. I wouldn't want to get mistaken for a Kiwi boat at the Coronado Worlds next month. wink.gif

 

What's that brown stuff you're floating in? :ph34r:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Luckily, in Annapolis we have a chandlery called Bacon's Sails. They are absolutely loaded with good stuff for cheap. New, used, whatever. I was suffering from a chronic cleat shortage. I picked up these crazy 60's teardrop cleats for $4.00 each. I figure they're "historically correct" for my 60's boat. I also grabbed a used Lifesling in very good condition for $55.00 West Marine wanted $55.00 for a stupid flag mount. $19.55 for the exact same brand at Bacon's. I think I can be classified as a "yacht" now. tongue.gif

 

I mean, I really needed a flag mount so I can fly the national ensign. I wouldn't want to get mistaken for a Kiwi boat at the Coronado Worlds next month. wink.gif

 

What's that brown stuff you're floating in? :ph34r:

 

 

They call that the "Brown Water Navy"... ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've all noticed the dirty looking water lately. I'm guessing it's the runoff from the Susquehannna River since they've opened the flood gates or whatever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bay has been really silty this spring. Doing the Annapolis NOODs a couple weekends ago, after a tack and going leeward to skirt the genoa my foot got dunked when the toerail went under. My shoe was leaving dirt all over the foredeck until it dried out.

 

I'd wait for it to settle out before going for a swim... or at least for it to warm up some.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You sure it was dirt??:ph34r:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites