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Dick Carter design boats

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Wellcome to share photos of cute Carter designed Racers....and souvenirs

I personaly skipped a Carter37 sistership of Ydra, One Ton 27.5 IOR in Europe in the old, very old times (70's)

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Wellcome to share photos of cute Carter designed Racers....and souvenirs

I personaly skipped a Carter37 sistership of Ydra, One Ton 27.5 IOR in Europe in the old, very old times (70's)

 

 

No pics, but I used to sail on a Carter 33 with a short stick that rated 1/2 ton. She was a really pretty boat. That was about '74 I think.

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Sorry, no pics but a lot of great memories. Aggressive ... flush deck 2 tonner built for Canada's Cup. Also all the NA 40s... Offshore One Design racing before it was "cool". I liked the Carter 37 One Ton a lot more than the Carter 33 (less tortured lines).

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What a mess :)))))))))))))))))))))

At that time we didnt use barber holers ;( The roof of your carter admiraler is typical and looks like the one of "Rabbit"

Do you had success with kohinoor ?

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Roger:

believe it or not AGGRESSIVE was the inspiration for the Valiant 40.

 

I sailed on a Carter 39 in Seattle RABBIT for two years. We smoked a lot of pot and we kicked a lot of ass.

One regatta we raced one race with four of us. There was a fifth guy below but he was still drunk from the night before.

And we one the race. I was a bit hung over too.. I'm certain we all were. Hung over but good sailors.

When there are only four of you you don't wait to see who's going to do it you know you have to do it. so it gets done.

 

I can remember waking up one morning on the starboard settee berth and I looked accross the boat there was a guy I had never seen before.

He had a blaser with a lot of gold on it pulled up over his legs, mini sleeping bag style. It turned out to be the Commodore of the Royal Vic's YC's blaser and he had just picked it up.

He had just stumbled onto the first boat he found with a vacant berth. He was a nice guy. We helped him on his way decked out in his Commodorish finery.

 

We played hard and we sailed hard.

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Ok, I'll tell you another story. I'm in the mood for looking back.

 

It was the Swiftsure Race of about 1975 RABBIT was the boat to beat and we were a great crew.

We were sitting on the boat on Friday about 10am smoking a joint, a fat one, when there appeared in the companionway an old guy in a blaser. It was the pre-race inspection.

The owner of the boat, holding the joint, was siting at the nav table so he just opened it up and dropped the still lit joint into the nav table.

We all sat there with ,I'm sure, very silly looks on our faces.

 

The old guy came about half way down the companionway, looked around and said, "You've beeen smoking that stuff!" and left. I guess we passed the inspection.

 

I don't recall any of us saying anything. I remember the smoke curling out of the chart table.

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Ok, I'll tell you another story. I'm in the mood for looking back.

 

It was the Swiftsure Race of about 1975 RABBIT was the boat to beat and we were a great crew.

We were sitting on the boat on Friday about 10am smoking a joint, a fat one, when there appeared in the companionway an old guy in a blaser. It was the pre-race inspection.

The owner of the boat, holding the joint, was siting at the nav table so he just opened it up and dropped the still lit joint into the nav table.

We all sat there with ,I'm sure, very silly looks on our faces.

 

The old guy came about half way down the companionway, looked around and said, "You've beeen smoking that stuff!" and left. I guess we passed the inspection.

 

I don't recall any of us saying anything. I remember the smoke curling out of the chart table.

 

Not to hijack, but that reminds me of the 1975 Mills Race on Lake Erie, sailing on my dad's Ranger 37. We finish second overall to the S&S 61 Kahili, breaking the course record (by a few minutes less than they did), and get back to the dock. My brothers and I are hanging around the cockpit smoking joints with some local young ladies late in the evening/early in the morning when my father returns to the boat from the YC bar somewhat in his cups. He pauses in the cockpit, partakes of the passing medicinals a few times while talking with us, and a few minutes later heads down below and passes out . In the morning, he had no recollection of it. The one and only time I ever smoked with my father. I miss those days, a lot different type of sailing.

 

I still think about the contrast between the traditional '72 Aggressive I, and the '75 Bruce King designed 37 foot bilge boarder Aggressive II. I don't know that you could get two boats designed to the same level rating rule more different.

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Roger:

believe it or not AGGRESSIVE was the inspiration for the Valiant 40.

 

I sailed on a Carter 39 in Seattle RABBIT for two years. We smoked a lot of pot and we kicked a lot of ass.

One regatta we raced one race with four of us. There was a fifth guy below but he was still drunk from the night before.

And we one the race. I was a bit hung over too.. I'm certain we all were. Hung over but good sailors.

When there are only four of you you don't wait to see who's going to do it you know you have to do it. so it gets done.

 

I can remember waking up one morning on the starboard settee berth and I looked accross the boat there was a guy I had never seen before.

He had a blaser with a lot of gold on it pulled up over his legs, mini sleeping bag style. It turned out to be the Commodore of the Royal Vic's YC's blaser and he had just picked it up.

He had just stumbled onto the first boat he found with a vacant berth. He was a nice guy. We helped him on his way decked out in his Commodorish finery.

 

We played hard and we sailed hard.

That is funny! Oh thank you!

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Roger:

believe it or not AGGRESSIVE was the inspiration for the Valiant 40.

 

I sailed on a Carter 39 in Seattle RABBIT for two years. We smoked a lot of pot and we kicked a lot of ass.

One regatta we raced one race with four of us. There was a fifth guy below but he was still drunk from the night before.

And we one the race. I was a bit hung over too.. I'm certain we all were. Hung over but good sailors.

When there are only four of you you don't wait to see who's going to do it you know you have to do it. so it gets done.

 

I can remember waking up one morning on the starboard settee berth and I looked accross the boat there was a guy I had never seen before.

He had a blaser with a lot of gold on it pulled up over his legs, mini sleeping bag style. It turned out to be the Commodore of the Royal Vic's YC's blaser and he had just picked it up.

He had just stumbled onto the first boat he found with a vacant berth. He was a nice guy. We helped him on his way decked out in his Commodorish finery.

 

We played hard and we sailed hard.

Good memories Bob :) !

Just stay that in France on those years, especially at "La Rochelle" we have had fabuleous boats and a lot of fun !

One night i got a young guy fastened to my mast, never met him ! He was from other boat's crew and his fellows thought he was too noisy :)

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Noryema VII (or VCX)

 

Was a wonderful cruising boat in the Med for two super joint-owners, secluded low depth anchorages ... if a bit "oily"

 

Now fully rebuilt in Sweden and gracing baltic waters.

 

 

No slouch eh !

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An other nice find on the Internet.

 

"NAIF" to Raul Gardini, a '73 44' amiraler of a contemporary style to the 39 and 43s.

Still racing and winning IOR meetings in the hands of Raul's son.

post-6361-076718400 1302346263_thumb.jpg

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I had some of the best times of my life on two Carter 39's. Rabbit before it went west and Phoenix. Little Chuck learned to walk on Phoenix on the delivery down from Marblehead. He would bounce between the settees with his life jacket on for padding and laugh every time he rebounded. Then there was the delivery up to Newport when Big Woody was trying to set up a date in Atlantic City with a radio patch. Every time Carter, in the quarter berth, would start to mumble he would stuff the pacifier back in and play with him. Sailing almost side by side with Mark Soverel for the entire SORC in 75.

 

My best memory of all was bringing the boat back from Nassau on a crystal clear day with about 15 knots from the south close reaching to fort Lauderdale. There were five or six boats all in a row, all from the same class with Proud Mary playing on the radio.

 

Good times.

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Can't think why the "doghouse" in fact, really a cabin trunk, would effect the rating unless that version was just heavier.

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Yeah heavier probably but the flush deck model was already designed to get the max CGF allowance, as I recall.

Thanks for posting the pics. It's fun to look at that old shape again.

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Ha, Blaze! the du Moulin's old boat!!

 

My dad did a bunch of Bermuda Races on her back in the day, good times I recall hearing!

 

Ha, Blaze! the du Moulin's old boat!!

 

My dad did a bunch of Bermuda Races on her back in the day, good times I recall hearing!

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Good evening,

 

There was also "Frigate". She was part of the British Admirals Cup team round about 1973 and in the South African team in 1975. She was about 12 meters in length.

 

"Chica Tica" a Carter 36 (or 37?) from Costa Rica won the 1976 Cape to Rio Race.

 

And don't forget "Vendredi 13", Carter's 128 foot three masted singlehander for Jean-Yves Terlain. She finished second in the 1972 OSTAR.

 

Regards,

 

Multisail.

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Bob:

 

Ok... I'll bite. In what sense was the Valiant 40 inspired by Aggressive I ? Ratios? I have to say that that is a "genetic" connection that never occurred to me.

 

I just remember how many boats of that era were designed with tumblehome... one of the more regressive design features ever... Although I believe most of the Carter ouvre was less extreme than other shops...

 

 

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Roger:

If you could get ahold of a set of AGGRESSIVE's lines you would find the midsection is almost an expact match to the Valiant 40. Almost. Of course I didn't just trace it but from the deadrise to the tumblehome I used that shape in the midsection.

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Roger:

If you could get ahold of a set of AGGRESSIVE's lines you would find the midsection is almost an expact match to the Valiant 40. Almost. Of course I didn't just trace it but from the deadrise to the tumblehome I used that shape in the midsection.

 

 

I still have the Lines of Aggressive.

After a night of heavy drinking, before one of the SORC races, I took full advantage of throwing up in sequence with the Gulf Stream waves, washing the flush deck clean.

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Good evening,

 

There was also "Frigate". She was part of the British Admirals Cup team round about 1973 and in the South African team in 1975. She was about 12 meters in length.

 

"Chica Tica" a Carter 36 (or 37?) from Costa Rica won the 1976 Cape to Rio Race.

 

And don't forget "Vendredi 13", Carter's 128 foot three masted singlehander for Jean-Yves Terlain. She finished second in the 1972 OSTAR.

 

Regards,

 

Multisail.

Frigate was impressive in solent, yeah. Any photos ? (beken)

Chica Tica was 36 f i think, phtos wellcome too :)

 

 

 

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Ok, I'll tell you another story. I'm in the mood for looking back.

 

It was the Swiftsure Race of about 1975 RABBIT was the boat to beat and we were a great crew.

We were sitting on the boat on Friday about 10am smoking a joint, a fat one, when there appeared in the companionway an old guy in a blaser. It was the pre-race inspection.

The owner of the boat, holding the joint, was siting at the nav table so he just opened it up and dropped the still lit joint into the nav table.

We all sat there with ,I'm sure, very silly looks on our faces.

 

The old guy came about half way down the companionway, looked around and said, "You've beeen smoking that stuff!" and left. I guess we passed the inspection.

 

I don't recall any of us saying anything. I remember the smoke curling out of the chart table.

 

 

Ah, sorry Bob, made a mistake about Rabbit ! In fact when i spoke about that boat i thought to RedRooster/Carter.....(Attached link design)

Red Rooster

Any information about this red one ? (Rabbit was white hull is not it ?)

 

 

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Ok, I'll tell you another story. I'm in the mood for looking back.

 

It was the Swiftsure Race of about 1975 RABBIT was the boat to beat and we were a great crew.

We were sitting on the boat on Friday about 10am smoking a joint, a fat one, when there appeared in the companionway an old guy in a blaser. It was the pre-race inspection.

The owner of the boat, holding the joint, was siting at the nav table so he just opened it up and dropped the still lit joint into the nav table.

We all sat there with ,I'm sure, very silly looks on our faces.

 

The old guy came about half way down the companionway, looked around and said, "You've beeen smoking that stuff!" and left. I guess we passed the inspection.

 

I don't recall any of us saying anything. I remember the smoke curling out of the chart table.

 

 

Ah, sorry Bob, made a mistake about Rabbit ! In fact when i spoke about that boat i thought to RedRooster/Carter.....(Attached link design)

Red Rooster

Any information about this red one ? (Rabbit was white hull is not it ?)

 

Red Rooster, one of my favourite boats ever. So nice, fast and clean, the early Carter boats struck in Europe not only by their hull shapes (which were quoted as "dinghy like" at the time (a time of mostly very deep underbody hulls), but the cleaness of their masts and rig.

 

IIRC, there was the original "Rabbit" smaller than most of the successful Class III -which were all close to what would become the One-Tonners - then 2 years later there was "Rabbit II", which at the time I felt as an AdmCup derivative of Tina, and was succesful but not head ans shoulders above the rest. All this is from a Euro perspective and the later Rabbit escaped us.

A number of those were built by A&R in Germany.

 

The earlier pic on Koh-I-Noor with her roller-refing boom is exemplary, as this developed, thanks to Dick Carter, into a fashion which was not too much to the liking of mast-men reduced to turning small handles between fingers, while releasing the halyard at a slow rate, neither fast not effective, specially if you added up these even smaller folding-into-the-boom handles to trim the main-foot. Fortunately, from the below-RORC classes, effective jiffy-reefing came back.

 

Dick Carter was no stranger on this side of the Atlantic before the first Rabbit, 2 years before he had skippered for a french owner a RORC trimmed Tripp-Medallist called "Astrolabe" and this somehow triggered a "Hood Sails" and roller-reefing craze.

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Frog:

I have to agree with you. RED ROOSTER was ,I think, the sexiest boat of it's day. The lines were drawn by Jim Hartvig Anderson just before Yves-Marie Tanton began doing all the hulls. As I recall.

I also thopught FROGATE was a great looking boat. Wish someone would dig up a pic of FRIGATE.

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Frog:

I have to agree with you. RED ROOSTER was ,I think, the sexiest boat of it's day. The lines were drawn by Jim Hartvig Anderson just before Yves-Marie Tanton began doing all the hulls. As I recall.

I also thopught FROGATE was a great looking boat. Wish someone would dig up a pic of FRIGATE.

 

Hi Bob,

 

Little did I expect to see an answer from you, Hv had a part of my mind in PNW today.

 

Agree about Frigate, do not know what was more striking in her, the yacht or her crew both put the standard very up. I'll try and dig a picture.

 

When she was sold around '76 she went to a french owner from nearby La Rochelle. In September '77 when all 3/4 tons were prepping their bottom for the Cup, she was relaunched from the quay just for the crane to tilt over and "land" on the splashing Frigate. She was holed and sank. IIRC she was hauled out and repaired but never raced again.

One can imagine the tense atmosphere when a similar crane launched tens of 3/4 ton contenders the next morning.

 

Not all boats have bad fate ! so here is a shot of 55' Coriolan II at her mooring in "Golfe du Morbihan", well maintained and very well sailed for years by a wealthy owner and ex-Star champion.

post-6361-056004400 1302455699_thumb.jpg

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Frigate had some very innovative deck gear.

 

All the halyards and other strings were led below deck and emerged through a row of circular holes in the aft end of the doghouse and to a row of Lewmar winches right across a sort of bench at the front of the cockpit. The round holes were actually jammers, which closed off by rotating a collar. Neat idea, and I believe the origin of SpinLock?????

 

Spinnaker poles also below deck, launched via a pair of 'torpedo tubes' in the front of the doghouse.

 

Four primary winches, the latest 3 speed Lewmar 55s, were all linked together with a huge bunch of shafts and gearboxes and clutches. A molehill (imagine a winch-handle socket set in the deck) was between each pair of primaries. This meant you could have 2 or 3 guys grinding with double handles to windward, with just the tailer to leeward.

 

The whole thing got completely locked up one day. Somebody had accidentally closed all of the clutches, meaning all the winches and molehills were connected, with both cross-boat shafts engaged as well. It began to get harder and harder to wind, as the shafts twisted, until everything seized up solid. Only fix was to go below with a screwdriver and hammer and drive out one of the pins in one shaft, when with a huge crash and spinning of parts it all unwound itself.

 

Happy days.

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Actually, the tubes jammers were first installed on the One ton Ydra. So the torpedo launching poles.

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I will never forget the crew shirts for "Wheelbarrow that came 2nd in the '79 Hobart. The shirts had a guy pushing a wheelbarrow with a HUGE penis & balls in the barrow hence "Wheelbarrow was a DICK Carter!

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I never sailed on a boat designed by Dick Carter, but in the '60's and early '70's my dad worked with Dick and they became good friends, and in the summer they would go away for a couple of week and let our family stay at their house in Nahant, MA. I was very young so don't remember it well, other than it was a great time with friends and family playing on their beach and riding big wheels around the house.

Closest thing I can offer to a 1st hand account of his boats, but we did hang out with Dick and his family.

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Wellcome to share photos of cute Carter designed Racers....and souvenirs

I personaly skipped a Carter37 sistership of Ydra, One Ton 27.5 IOR in Europe in the old, very old times (70's)

 

Chorus ;)

 

If you have $ 500,000 to spare, you can have a go at Rothschild's lifestyle on Gitana.

 

broker's website

 

Much better than a Beneteau at the same price

 

edit: go and look for 62' Abeking & Rasmussen

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Actually, the tubes jammers were first installed on the One ton Ydra. So the torpedo launching poles.

 

My favorite of Ydra !

 

YdraDC.jpg

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Yesterday we had almost the entire crew of RABBIT back together, I had not seen the owner in 30 years. He is a recluse. Unfortunately the occasion was my son's wake but it sure was nice to see old crew members.

It was one of those crews where very little had to be said. We considered 6 guys to be a normal crew.

 

That is a great shot of YDRA and one I had not seen before.

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I never sailed on a boat designed by Dick Carter, but in the '60's and early '70's my dad worked with Dick and they became good friends, and in the summer they would go away for a couple of week and let our family stay at their house in Nahant, MA. I was very young so don't remember it well, other than it was a great time with friends and family playing on their beach and riding big wheels around the house.

Closest thing I can offer to a 1st hand account of his boats, but we did hang out with Dick and his family.

Cool. When I was 7 my family lived in Nahant just down the road from that house (it overlooked "40 steps" I remember. We lived right next to the library). I first learned to sail in Nahant Harbor. That's cold water especially having moved there from South Carolina.

 

I did get to sail some on a Carter 36. It was Blaze out of New Orleans renamed Insanity and sailed down here in Corpus. That boat would eat it's crew. I believe the bulkheads pulled away from the hull and it is sitting on the hard over in Rockport at House of Boats.

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I will never forget the crew shirts for "Wheelbarrow that came 2nd in the '79 Hobart. The shirts had a guy pushing a wheelbarrow with a HUGE penis & balls in the barrow hence "Wheelbarrow was a DICK Carter!

 

Dick Carter was always "thrifty." Thus, the '69 Admiral's Cup and Fastnet crew uniforms on RED ROOSTER were white T-shirts on which Jim Hartvig Anderson had written the name of the boat with felt tip pen. Unfortunately, Jim misspelled the name, and we walked around Cowes all week wearing RED ROOTER shirts.

 

Before the Fastnet start, Dick handed out "rations." We each got a spoon, a small jar of P-nut butter, and a red apple.

 

ROOSTER never had a depth sounder. Dick Carter knew the Solent like the back of his hand. We carried a 12 foot "sounding" pole, marked in one foot increments for probing the shoals over which we sailed, keel and rudder up, and drawing three feet. At one point we sailed between NORYEMA and PROSPECT, both of which were aground. Dick smiled and didn't say a thing.

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Ah, the good ol' days... Stearn twin-stays, reefs while carrying genoas, booms far shorter than the spin poles, and all those winches...

My, how far we have come!

Good memories.

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Dick Carter was always "thrifty." Thus, the '69 Admiral's Cup and Fastnet crew uniforms on RED ROOSTER were white T-shirts on which Jim Hartvig Anderson had written the name of the boat with felt tip pen. Unfortunately, Jim misspelled the name, and we walked around Cowes all week wearing RED ROOTER shirts.

 

Before the Fastnet start, Dick handed out "rations." We each got a spoon, a small jar of P-nut butter, and a red apple.

Tad Palmer (his father, Bill, owned Shenandoah) told me about that! lol.gif

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Let's talk big boat...

Yes, let's talk.

Imagine this...

We had 6 months to design and build the lighest 128' boat possible. for Jean-Yves Terlain. With a turn key contract of only $360,000.00. Wow!

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Let's talk big boat...

Yes, let's talk.

Imagine this...

We had 6 months to design and build the lighest 128' boat possible. for Jean-Yves Terlain. With a turn key contract of only $360,000.00. Wow!

 

The only few things I know from V13 are the endless stories from a close friend who, as a young designer, was chief-foreman or whatever at the building yard.

Having later become a top composite specialist he could go the whole night about Tecimar early sandwich process, and (IIRC) infusing resin with big syringes.

Whenever we worked on a new project, references to V13 would come every now and then.

Quite a benchmark apparently !

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Whatever happened to Dick?

 

I remember the first time we sailed Rabbit. We were going upwind in about 8 knots and he kept looking at the quarter wave and then his watch. Finally, I asked him what he was doing. He replied that the boat was overweight. I never got an answer I could understand about the relationship between the frequency of the quarterwave and displacement.

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Whatever happened to Dick?

 

I remember the first time we sailed Rabbit. We were going upwind in about 8 knots and he kept looking at the quarter wave and then his watch. Finally, I asked him what he was doing. He replied that the boat was overweight. I never got an answer I could understand about the relationship between the frequency of the quarterwave and displacement.

 

The skeg, in front and above the articulate part of the rudder ended at the waterline. If the skeg was a little under water, the boat was heavier.

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Pedro, aja,

 

I grew up in Nahant just three houses over from Dick's place (over Saunder's Ledge). I remember him as, "the guy who designed boats". I can't tell you how many times my friends and I got chased off the trampoline in his backyard in the middle of the night by him and his dog.

 

Our local hang out was the library or the wharf depending on the weather -so we just may have crossed paths.

 

Never did sail any of his boats, but he did buy our house when we moved out of town in '78.

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I'll tell you my favorite Dick Carter story:

 

I left his office and returned to Seattle. I had already started the Valiant 40, CT54 and Islander 28 designs. I had shown Dick my concept for a "fast" double ended cruising boat and he had pretty much laughed it off. About two or three years after the Valiant was introduced I ran into Dick at the Nap Show and I said hello and he got a big grin on his face and said "You were right!" That meant a lot to me.

 

I'd love to talk to him again.

He always wore a blue button down collar shirt, grey wool slacks and a blaser that looked like he had slept in it. He drove an old VW bug that for some reason I had to drive it one day when I discovered that only one windshield wiper worked. I'm sure Dick never noticed that.

 

When I told him I was quitting he invited me into his house. It was really what I would call a Greek revival mansion. An invite into the house was rare. Yves-Marie, Chuck Paine and Mark Lyndsey had a pool going for how much Dick would offer me to stay. A nice, big fat raise would have been nice. This was my first trip in the house. I sat down and launched into a long explanation of why I tthought it was time for me to move on. Dick listened quietly. When I was done he stood up, reached out his hand and said "Well, good luck."

 

I wish we could get Yves-Mari to tell some of his stories.

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I'll tell you my favorite Dick Carter story:

 

I left his office and returned to Seattle. I had already started the Valiant 40, CT54 and Islander 28 designs. I had shown Dick my concept for a "fast" double ended cruising boat and he had pretty much laughed it off. About two or three years after the Valiant was introduced I ran into Dick at the Nap Show and I said hello and he got a big grin on his face and said "You were right!" That meant a lot to me.

 

I'd love to talk to him again.

He always wore a blue button down collar shirt, grey wool slacks and a blaser that looked like he had slept in it. He drove an old VW bug that for some reason I had to drive it one day when I discovered that only one windshield wiper worked. I'm sure Dick never noticed that.

 

When I told him I was quitting he invited me into his house. It was really what I would call a Greek revival mansion. An invite into the house was rare. Yves-Marie, Chuck Paine and Mark Lyndsey had a pool going for how much Dick would offer me to stay. A nice, big fat raise would have been nice. This was my first trip in the house. I sat down and launched into a long explanation of why I tthought it was time for me to move on. Dick listened quietly. When I was done he stood up, reached out his hand and said "Well, good luck."

 

I wish we could get Yves-Mari to tell some of his stories.

 

Tx Bob and Y_M for those memories.. Lets go again, about his boats (yours too :)), w'll never be boared

 

 

 

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I'll tell you my favorite Dick Carter story:

 

I left his office and returned to Seattle. I had already started the Valiant 40, CT54 and Islander 28 designs. I had shown Dick my concept for a "fast" double ended cruising boat and he had pretty much laughed it off. About two or three years after the Valiant was introduced I ran into Dick at the Nap Show and I said hello and he got a big grin on his face and said "You were right!" That meant a lot to me.

 

I'd love to talk to him again.

He always wore a blue button down collar shirt, grey wool slacks and a blaser that looked like he had slept in it. He drove an old VW bug that for some reason I had to drive it one day when I discovered that only one windshield wiper worked. I'm sure Dick never noticed that.

 

When I told him I was quitting he invited me into his house. It was really what I would call a Greek revival mansion. An invite into the house was rare. Yves-Marie, Chuck Paine and Mark Lyndsey had a pool going for how much Dick would offer me to stay. A nice, big fat raise would have been nice. This was my first trip in the house. I sat down and launched into a long explanation of why I tthought it was time for me to move on. Dick listened quietly. When I was done he stood up, reached out his hand and said "Well, good luck."

 

I wish we could get Yves-Mari to tell some of his stories.

 

 

I was under the impression that Carter was the designer (more like “ghost designer” like a ghost writer) of at least the first large Christine (built and owned by Fred Preiss) in Marina del Rey if not both of them. Is any of that accurate or have I been misinformed?

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Vandal:

Boy, you got me there. I'm going to say no but I will defer to Yves-Marie on that one. I remember that boat.

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I was under the impression that Carter was the designer (more like “ghost designer” like a ghost writer) of at least the first large Christine (built and owned by Fred Preiss) in Marina del Rey if not both of them. Is any of that accurate or have I been misinformed?

Both boats were/are 'Carter' designs, but I wonder who drew the lines,

The original 84' 'Christine' was certainly the coolest Carter ever built.

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Vandal:

Boy, you got me there. I'm going to say no but I will defer to Yves-Marie on that one. I remember that boat.

 

I raced on and against the original Christine "back in the day", and don't recall her ever being described as a Carter design. Most of the scratch sheets she's listed on simply called her a "custom" 84.

 

Begs the question... just who *did* design her?

 

Is this the 2nd boat? http://www.christinecharters.com/OurYacht.htm

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Begs the question... just who *did* design [Christine]?

I always heard that the owner designed her.

 

It has happened more than once where an owner commissions a design then proceeds to modify it so much that the designer disassociates himself from the project.

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Vandal:

Boy, you got me there. I'm going to say no but I will defer to Yves-Marie on that one. I remember that boat.

 

I raced on and against the original Christine "back in the day", and don't recall her ever being described as a Carter design. Most of the scratch sheets she's listed on simply called her a "custom" 84.

 

Begs the question... just who *did* design her?

 

Is this the 2nd boat? http://www.christinecharters.com/OurYacht.htm

 

I understand that Fred always held himself out as the designer of both boats, but I also think he must of had some serious help. The help I heard he had was from Carter. I don’t know if the designer wanted to disassociate himself with one or both designs or part of the deal was that the designer did not claim credit for the designs, but I had always heard that the “ghost designer” was Carter. I don’t know what the first Christine rated IOR but I assume it was way north of the Maxi band of 70.05.

 

After she was sold, I heard the first Christine was hit by a bolt of lightning either in Mexico or the Med.

 

The new Christine has been for sale or charter since soon after she was launched in or around 1995 (that is her on that website). She was sitting at the end of “C” Basin where I used to work on a previous occupant of that slip.

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I never sailed on a boat designed by Dick Carter

 

Fortunately I did.

 

I grew up on a Tina. Dad bought her in 1970 and owned her for the best part of 20 years.

 

GRP short cabin top version.

 

We raced her hard with the family inshore, offshore and even transatlantic in later years.

 

He never should have sold her (ehm...Lets say I would love to own her now).

 

Quote Moody Frog....who wants a bendytoy :lol:

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Let's talk big boat...

Yes, let's talk.

Imagine this...

We had 6 months to design and build the lighest 128' boat possible. for Jean-Yves Terlain. With a turn key contract of only $360,000.00. Wow!

 

 

Good evening,

 

There must be lots of good V13 stories.

Please let us have a few of them.

 

Regards,

Multisail.

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to re-ask a quesiton asked earlier, what did become of Dick Carter?

 

Also, thanks for the pic of Crocodile on p1. That boat is pretty enough to be in Larry's thread! For whatever reason, I always thought Carter drawn boats had great style.

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Begs the question... just who *did* design [Christine]?

I always heard that the owner designed her.

 

It has happened more than once where an owner commissions a design then proceeds to modify it so much that the designer disassociates himself from the project.

 

Yeah... knowing Fred, that's the likely scenario. He had a vision of what he wanted to build, probably got professional help for the big parts, but modified/tweaked/ad-hoc'd it along the way.

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That's my memory also. Fred designed the boat.

 

The last time I talked to Dick, about four years ago,he was busy studying Reneseance music and acapela singing. It took me a while to track him down and I have not been able to reach him since. I hate to see him forgotten.

I do know his son, Elliot, checks in here from time to time but I don't think he posts.

 

I think Yves-Marie could tell us some wonderful Carter stories starting with the phone call in the middle of the night , from a phone booth, broke, in a snow storm when Yves-Marie landed in the US.

I want to hear that one again.

 

Nobody who worked for him is going to shit on him. He was odd but in a very likable way.

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After she was sold, I heard the first Christine was hit by a bolt of lightning either in Mexico or the Med.

 

 

I thought that she was crushed by a barge in the Canal

while in transit to the Med.

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Another vote for any/all V13 stories - that thing must have been a BEAST to sail ! Can only wonder what structural issues lead one to install it in a parking lot.

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I'll tell you my favorite Dick Carter story:

 

I left his office and returned to Seattle. I had already started the Valiant 40, CT54 and Islander 28 designs. I had shown Dick my concept for a "fast" double ended cruising boat and he had pretty much laughed it off. About two or three years after the Valiant was introduced I ran into Dick at the Nap Show and I said hello and he got a big grin on his face and said "You were right!" That meant a lot to me.

 

I'd love to talk to him again.

He always wore a blue button down collar shirt, grey wool slacks and a blaser that looked like he had slept in it. He drove an old VW bug that for some reason I had to drive it one day when I discovered that only one windshield wiper worked. I'm sure Dick never noticed that.

 

When I told him I was quitting he invited me into his house. It was really what I would call a Greek revival mansion. An invite into the house was rare. Yves-Marie, Chuck Paine and Mark Lyndsey had a pool going for how much Dick would offer me to stay. A nice, big fat raise would have been nice. This was my first trip in the house. I sat down and launched into a long explanation of why I tthought it was time for me to move on. Dick listened quietly. When I was done he stood up, reached out his hand and said "Well, good luck."

 

I wish we could get Yves-Mari to tell some of his stories.

 

 

I am game Bob. Good old times .

The best : to be 25 years old again. Against the best.

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I was under the impression that Carter was the designer (more like "ghost designer" like a ghost writer) of at least the first large Christine (built and owned by Fred Preiss) in Marina del Rey if not both of them. Is any of that accurate or have I been misinformed?

Both boats were/are 'Carter' designs, but I wonder who drew the lines,

The original 84' 'Christine' was certainly the coolest Carter ever built.

 

i have no knowledge of it. Read it once that Carter designed her. She looked a bit like a Carter of the time.

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On the return leg in the '69 Fastnet, we had RED ROOSTER's keel fully retracted the 138 revolutions of the keel winch. It was blowing half a gale, and under spinnaker, ROOSTER was rolling both rails under. Dick seemed to think it was quite normal.

 

We finished at Plymouth in the early morning zephyrs, after which it glassed off. ROOSTER won not only the Fastnet, but anchored the winning American Admiral's Cup Team.

 

But not so fast. There was a protest. The Plymouth Lighthouse keeper, in charge of finish times, didn't have a second hand on his watch. All recorded times were to the nearest minute. Protest disallowed.

 

Dick was pleased and proceeded to Plymouth's Golden Cockerel Pub, where he convinced the pub owner to donate several hundred Golden Cockerel lapel pins. He then bought a can of red spray paint and painted all the Golden Cockerels red.

 

That afternoon, before the Awards Presentation, Dick handed out all the freshly minted RED ROOSTER lapel pins to friends,competitors, even the Plymouth Mayor. It was fine moment indeed. Dick may have imbibed. Because the last I saw him he was asleep in a bosun's chair at ROOSTER's masthead, where celebrants had hoisted him for all to honor.

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Another vote for any/all V13 stories - that thing must have been a BEAST to sail ! Can only wonder what structural issues lead one to install it in a parking lot.

Where to start a legend?

The lighest fiberglass piece in the world ? 89,000lbs at launching. 128' long, 10' draft. canoe body 2' deep and 3 masts. Infused in one piece (1972) by Tecimar.

Bendy boat, Shortly after trials we added a centreline glassed-in plywood piece with a cap on top.

What I remember the most, is the way the boat got into vibration between all the triangulation; masts, triadics, backstay, forestay, hull, keel; all in resonnance, at the dock. Not at sea. Too many other forces were involved to get a frequence.

Later the boat became the first Club Med. sailing all over . The boat added in the process 30,000lbs of added displacement in terms of accommodation and what not. To the end of her she must have sailed 100 of thd's miles. She is a museum now. parked. But resurrected using the hull for mold to become Friday Star . A Super Mega yacht.

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V 13.

 

After the build and launch of V13 my friend left for a "very 70's like" several years sabbatical on his 31' steel boat, with his wife and little daughter and then with a born-aboard son.

He kept an eye, and often a hand, on V13 which was cruising the same waters (on a shoestring) with future OSTAR winner Yvon Fauconnier who had a girl of the same age onboard (ORMA racer Karine Fauconnier).

 

Back to the boat: when we worked together, he kept telling us how unhappy he was that a central roof (or kind of an agricultural version of it) had been added. In all projects we did together he kept moaning about "steps fucking any sandwich-panel advantage", he was charging the ultimate demise of the hull on this commercial triggered mod.

 

Those were the 70's days too, with a gypsy boatbuilder moving from sandwich on V13 to Bob Dylan's wooden schooner in Bequia, where the day's pay was to be smoked for a good part.

 

Last time I saw V13 was in 1990 in Brest, she had been chartered by the town council, got new sails and was sailed by volunteers to the newly freed countries in the Adriatic and Black Sea, full of books to be given to local libraries.

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Carter 39 built in 2 versions in Greece - flush deck & doghouse. The doghouse rated better IOR and hence won more silver, I believe.

Love the tumblehome. Photographed in New York, long ago.

 

Wasn't the boat that LeBlanc (Rahgahh) pulled off the scap heap and rebuilt a Carter 39?

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Apart from 3 or 4 Tina's in Breskens Joop Bouwman, who first had a Tina 'Belita', built a flush deck Carter 43'. Must have been early to mid '70's

 

There was also an identical sistership in orange/grey/blue-ish horizontal stripes but the name of that one escapes me.

 

Moody Frog, you were around then as well I believe so would you be able to fill in the blanks ? Also there was a really beautifull 43 foot short cabin top,

dark blue boat called 'Calirohoee'. French (or French spoken Belgian owned) This looked a bit like a scaled up version of a Tina but I don't think it was a Carter design.

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Another vote for any/all V13 stories - that thing must have been a BEAST to sail ! Can only wonder what structural issues lead one to install it in a parking lot.

Where to start a legend?

The lighest fiberglass piece in the world ? 89,000lbs at launching. 128' long, 10' draft. canoe body 2' deep and 3 masts. Infused in one piece (1972) by Tecimar.

Bendy boat, Shortly after trials we added a centreline glassed-in plywood piece with a cap on top.

What I remember the most, is the way the boat got into vibration between all the triangulation; masts, triadics, backstay, forestay, hull, keel; all in resonnance, at the dock. Not at sea. Too many other forces were involved to get a frequence.

Later the boat became the first Club Med. sailing all over . The boat added in the process 30,000lbs of added displacement in terms of accommodation and what not. To the end of her she must have sailed 100 of thd's miles. She is a museum now. parked. But resurrected using the hull for mold to become Friday Star . A Super Mega yacht.

 

Thanks, I thought that was the same boat ( OSTAR compeititor turned Club Med vessel ) - didn't the original skipper lose an arm or something ? - and still raced ? ( no single-handed jokes, guys, that's just wrong...)

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Apart from 3 or 4 Tina's in Breskens Joop Bouwman, who first had a Tina 'Belita', built a flush deck Carter 43'. Must have been early to mid '70's

 

There was also an identical sistership in orange/grey/blue-ish horizontal stripes but the name of that one escapes me.

 

Moody Frog, you were around then as well I believe so would you be able to fill in the blanks ? Also there was a really beautifull 43 foot short cabin top,

dark blue boat called 'Calirohoee'. French (or French spoken Belgian owned) This looked a bit like a scaled up version of a Tina but I don't think it was a Carter design.

 

 

 

What about Tina ? Does she sails yet ? She was my first design's love when i saw her at fasnet arriving in England !

 

Tina21966.jpg

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What about Tina ? Does she sails yet ? She was my first design's love when i saw her at fasnet arriving in England !

 

 

Tina's are hot property in France. Loads of money is spent either on refits or keeping them up to date.

 

Some years ago they organized Tina's cup. Only Tina's racing each other and my dad was invited to sail on his old boat.

 

Persephone (as she is now called) competed in Fastnet 2009 and did quite well.

 

3 are currently on the market : http://www.yachts-classiques.com/offres/offres.php3

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Apart from 3 or 4 Tina's in Breskens Joop Bouwman, who first had a Tina 'Belita', built a flush deck Carter 43'. Must have been early to mid '70's

 

There was also an identical sistership in orange/grey/blue-ish horizontal stripes but the name of that one escapes me.

 

Moody Frog, you were around then as well I believe so would you be able to fill in the blanks ? Also there was a really beautifull 43 foot short cabin top,

dark blue boat called 'Calirohoee'. French (or French spoken Belgian owned) This looked a bit like a scaled up version of a Tina but I don't think it was a Carter design.

 

Hi there,

 

While I do not remember the other multicolour Carter 43', I do remember "Callirhoe", The owner a quite nice gentleman was definitely Belgian, I am 99% sure that she was a Carter, I would say a 40' a bit like "Candide" in Marseilles, a short early 70s series following the Tinas and Rabbit II before the move to the flush-deck style "Orca" "39", "Naif" etc ... (of course all this is seen from the water not the design office). Will look in the Fastnet results, she did quite well IIRC.

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Going out on a limb, but didn't a Carter, German built, old 1 Tonner

win the Worlds or NAs at least one year? I thought and this is going

back to the late 70s, that it became the prototype for the Texas Carter

One Tons.

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What about Tina ? Does she sails yet ? She was my first design's love when i saw her at fasnet arriving in England !

 

 

Tina's are hot property in France. Loads of money is spent either on refits or keeping them up to date.

 

Some years ago they organized Tina's cup. Only Tina's racing each other and my dad was invited to sail on his old boat.

 

Persephone (as she is now called) competed in Fastnet 2009 and did quite well.

 

3 are currently on the market : http://www.yachts-cl...res/offres.php3

 

Meant Tina herself :)

 

 

 

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Thanks, I thought that was the same boat ( OSTAR compeititor turned Club Med vessel ) - didn't the original skipper lose an arm or something ? - and still raced ? ( no single-handed jokes, guys, that's just wrong...)

 

 

Shark, you're thinking about Alain Colas's Club Med, in the next Ostar. It was a 4 mast, 74 meters vessel. It arrived second behind Eric Tabarly's Pen Duick6.

Alain Colas lost a foot on his previous boat (Tabarly's tri ex Pen Duick 4, then Manureva) anchor chain around his foot...then he has his foot reattached to his leg.

this happened before the Ostar on Club Med.

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There was an ali Carter one tonner "Waianiwa" built in NZ by McMullem & Wing for Chris Bouzaid, who one the cup in Sydney 1974??.

 

It had a pivoting keel with a shaft running up thru the cabin turned by a worm gear on the cabin top by a winch handle.

 

I will try a track down some photos.

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Come on Yves-Marie. Tell us the middle of the night snow story please.

 

 

Bob ! A little too long to tell within this format. The chain of event is interesting...

You will have to wait for the book.

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I want to know the story too.

 

I'll see if I can get some of my pictures into a format that will allow posting.

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Come on Yves-Marie. Tell us the middle of the night snow story please.

 

 

Bob ! A little too long to tell within this format. The chain of event is interesting...

You will have to wait for the book.

 

Are you planning on putting out a book? Did you design the Dyer Flyer?

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Come on Yves-Marie. Tell us the middle of the night snow story please.

 

 

Bob ! A little too long to tell within this format. The chain of event is interesting...

You will have to wait for the book.

 

Are you planning on putting out a book? Did you design the Dyer Flyer?

 

Yes. And yes.

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Come on Yves-Marie. Tell us the middle of the night snow story please.

 

 

Bob ! A little too long to tell within this format. The chain of event is interesting...

You will have to wait for the book.

 

Are you planning on putting out a book? Did you design the Dyer Flyer?

 

Yes. And yes.

Great news. I have a Dyer Flyer, love sailing it.

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That's my memory also. Fred designed the boat.

 

The last time I talked to Dick, about four years ago,he was busy studying Reneseance music and acapela singing. It took me a while to track him down and I have not been able to reach him since. I hate to see him forgotten.

I do know his son, Elliot, checks in here from time to time but I don't think he posts.

 

I think Yves-Marie could tell us some wonderful Carter stories starting with the phone call in the middle of the night , from a phone booth, broke, in a snow storm when Yves-Marie landed in the US.

I want to hear that one again.

 

Nobody who worked for him is going to shit on him. He was odd but in a very likable way.

 

Dick moved to England. He passed away about thre years ago. One of the last cases I handled before retiring from law was for Dick Carter. He was the designer of the NA 40 and one went down at sea when the spar went throught the mast step and out the bottom. It wasn't Dick's fault the builder just didn't follow the specs and used a fiberglass mush for the mast step. We had to fight hard to get Dick out though. He was so demoralized that he never designed another boat.

Dick was a great guy and a close friend

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Jim:

I'm very sorry to hear that.

 

Radical:

The German one tonner you must be thinking about is YDRA and no she was not the prototype for the Texas one tonners. YDRA was the prototype for the Greek built Carter 37's.

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I'm saddened to think that Dick had to go through that. He was talented enough that some of the other designers of offbeat IOR boats would bash him from time to time. His boats were fast and handled well, unlike some of the beasts I encountered later.

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As a tribute to Dick Carter and Tina's breakthrough, here are some shots from a book which was the bible of any wannabe crew in the late 60s.

 

It was comparing Tina's hull form, to a modern euro design in the middle, and a classic German or Swede design (right), all racing in the '66 OTC which Tina won, then showing how smooth Tina's progress in the chop was.

 

The first upwind photo is defiitely how I remember the Tinas: clearly showing their forefoot when going upwind.

 

I guess the middle boat may trigger remembrances with Yves-Marie, as I&P designed her (Maryka/Arabel) one year after "Merle of M" with lots of similarities.

 

Actually what led me to dig that book out was that today on the way back from the office, I drove by the harbour and what is the best restoration yard in France and ... here was the I&P: one of two of the boats, I sailed, I'll remember fondly for ever ! She is far for perfect, but not too bad and going for a full refit :)

 

PS: sorry for mixing up I&P into a Carter thread.

post-6361-022858900 1302802609_thumb.jpg

post-6361-077916300 1302802630_thumb.jpg

post-6361-082523800 1302802649_thumb.jpg

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