chorus1

Dick Carter design boats

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In 1990, VENDREDI 13 was used on a French humanitarian mission to transport scientific and engineering books/journals from Brest, France, to cities behind the Iron Curtain: Constanta (Romania) and Sevastopol, Yalta and Odessa, all in the Ukraine.

 

She can be seen beginning at 0:52 in the video.

 

http://www.ina.fr/video/CAC92042455/vendredi-13-video.html

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Yes, fibreglass

 

A close friend, who was an engineer in V13 build team, wrote me a report on the build a year ago (Sorry Catherine, I've not finished putting it up right)

 

Just a sum-up

 

The hull was built upside down on a stringers and battens plug.

Vacuum was made between in-house produced latex sheets

They also produced foam strips in house for the core (skins were out of fibreglass).

Those strips, C-wrapped in glass matt, were then planked leaving multiple "glass-ribs" where resin would also pour-in

Resin was injected through a giant syringe in a myriad of points.

 

Therefore my friend said that it was not so much a sandwich hull but a H section hull-panels structure, with foam acting just as a temporary support.

Total panel thickness was 50mm when patrol-boats the process had been developed for were 40mm only..

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Hello please apologize for my poor english . I used to sail on a Carter 37 built in Greece ,formerly Pen ar Vir owned by french industrialist Pierre Bonnet . A friend of mine ,Jean Alain Goenvec ,bought it in 1977 (?) ,and renamed it Linuen . Our first cruise was on Galician coast in Spain .Linuen did many races with good success in Brittany with a Proctor mast strong enough to support the Empire State Buiding and Hood sails . Then Linuen departed for Marseille ,and started a new life doing a lot of Med regattas ,and especially La Nioulargue (now Les Voiles de St Tropez) which she won at least two times in her class . She was turboed with a taller three spreaders mast , larger chutes and so on...During summer ,Linuen did cruise extensively : modern amenities were not onboard (no oven ,no cabins ,no shower..) but it was a fantastic boat to helm and sail ,nursing the winches farm...It was always a pleasure to be quicker and more close to the wind than larger cruising boats and to enjoy this marvelous balance on the helm and the ability to be close hauled going windward in a decent breeze . The Carter 37 was THE perfect boat to race (Giraglia ,Croisiere Bleue..) and after the arrival ,start a small cruise with a bunch of friends and children . She was sold 6 or 7 years ago ,and i suppose she's still in Med . I'll post pictures when i find it . Thank you for all your contributions to this thread , and best regards for Catherine Carter!

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Hello please apologize for my poor english . I used to sail on a Carter 37 built in Greece ,formerly Pen ar Vir owned by french industrialist Pierre Bonnet . A friend of mine ,Jean Alain Goenvec ,bought it in 1977 (?) ,and renamed it Linuen . Our first cruise was on Galician coast in Spain .Linuen did many races with good success in Brittany with a Proctor mast strong enough to support the Empire State Buiding and Hood sails . Then Linuen departed for Marseille ,and started a new life doing a lot of Med regattas ,and especially La Nioulargue (now Les Voiles de St Tropez) which she won at least two times in her class . She was turboed with a taller three spreaders mast , larger chutes and so on...During summer ,Linuen did cruise extensively : modern amenities were not onboard (no oven ,no cabins ,no shower..) but it was a fantastic boat to helm and sail ,nursing the winches farm...It was always a pleasure to be quicker and more close to the wind than larger cruising boats and to enjoy this marvelous balance on the helm and the ability to be close hauled going windward in a decent breeze . The Carter 37 was THE perfect boat to race (Giraglia ,Croisiere Bleue..) and after the arrival ,start a small cruise with a bunch of friends and children . She was sold 6 or 7 years ago ,and i suppose she's still in Med . I'll post pictures when i find it . Thank you for all your contributions to this thread , and best regards for Catherine Carter!

Camille, j'ai couru contre Pen Ar Vir une semaine de la Rochelle sur Coq Gaulis (C37 coque jaune) et partage exactement votre point de vue sur ce bateau magique de l'époque .

Demi-coque du Carter 37 : http://www.demi-coques.fr/demi-coques/demicoquestandart?start=19

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Jean-Alain GOENVEC is one of my very good friend who pushed me to buy ELDORADO in 1997 ex-OBSESSION, now MUSTANG. Thierry OLLAT is the new owner of LINUEN, berthed in Port Saint Louis du Rhône near MARSEILLE for large repairing after she fell down on earth.

Useful link : http://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/One%20Tonner/OCarter%2037.htm

Kind Regards to all

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Hello please apologize for my poor english . I used to sail on a Carter 37 built in Greece ,formerly Pen ar Vir owned by french industrialist Pierre Bonnet . A friend of mine ,Jean Alain Goenvec ,bought it in 1977 (?) ,and renamed it Linuen . Our first cruise was on Galician coast in Spain .Linuen did many races with good success in Brittany with a Proctor mast strong enough to support the Empire State Buiding and Hood sails . Then Linuen departed for Marseille ,and started a new life doing a lot of Med regattas ,and especially La Nioulargue (now Les Voiles de St Tropez) which she won at least two times in her class . She was turboed with a taller three spreaders mast , larger chutes and so on...During summer ,Linuen did cruise extensively : modern amenities were not onboard (no oven ,no cabins ,no shower..) but it was a fantastic boat to helm and sail ,nursing the winches farm...It was always a pleasure to be quicker and more close to the wind than larger cruising boats and to enjoy this marvelous balance on the helm and the ability to be close hauled going windward in a decent breeze . The Carter 37 was THE perfect boat to race (Giraglia ,Croisiere Bleue..) and after the arrival ,start a small cruise with a bunch of friends and children . She was sold 6 or 7 years ago ,and i suppose she's still in Med . I'll post pictures when i find it . Thank you for all your contributions to this thread , and best regards for Catherine Carter!

Camille, j'ai couru contre Pen Ar Vir une semaine de la Rochelle sur Coq Gaulis (C37 coque jaune) et partage exactement votre point de vue sur ce bateau magique de l'époque .

Demi-coque du Carter 37 : http://www.demi-coques.fr/demi-coques/demicoquestandart?start=19

 

Hum, sry thought she was better Pordin Nancq with Vanek brothers :)

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Did the Carter 36 share any DNA from that design? It is a similar vintage. Loved racing on that boat!

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Sailman:

I don't recall a Carter 36. As I recall the 37 was the one tonner built in Greece. I still have the brochure I'm sure. If there was such a boat, the 36, it would have come after I left and I'd think all Carter designs shared "DNA" of some degree.

 

Come to think of it, maybe the boat you are referring to is the boat we called the "Texas One Tonner". It was a newer design to the Carter 37. After GANBARE won the One Ton North Americans I was given the job of taking GANBARE's rating certificate and reconstructing the hull lines. Then, with that as a bench mark, Dick and Yves-Marie came up with a new approach to our next one tonner. But in the interest of accuracy I had better let Yves-Marie tell that story.

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Sailman:

I don't recall a Carter 36. As I recall the 37 was the one tonner built in Greece. I still have the brochure I'm sure. If there was such a boat, the 36, it would have come after I left and I'd think all Carter designs shared "DNA" of some degree.

 

Come to think of it, maybe the boat you are referring to is the boat we called the "Texas One Tonner". It was a newer design to the Carter 37. After GANBARE won the One Ton North Americans I was given the job of taking GANBARE's rating certificate and reconstructing the hull lines. Then, with that as a bench mark, Dick and Yves-Marie came up with a new approach to our next one tonner. But in the interest of accuracy I had better let Yves-Marie tell that story.

 

You could recreate a full set of lines from an IOR certificate?

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Jon:

Yes I could. The IOR certificate gave you points in space that described the hull shape. (See my GOB article on the IOR) There is no magic here. It's basically a connect the dots exercise. No, you could most probably not do it. But someone skilled in drawing hull lines with a good eye could do it. Meat and potatoes.

 

Would the re-created hull be exactly the same? Nope. But armed with the IOR cert and a collection of photographs a skilled man could get close. It wasn't like GANBARE was a totally foreign shape. It was pure IOR with some twists added by Doug Peterson most importantly including a re-shuffling of some of the hull/rig ;proportions.

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The (only ?) and most successful european Texas one-ton.

 

Originally "Windsprite of Hamble" for Bruce Banks, Plastrend hull finished in Hamble.

Still racing in the Irish sea, from Wales, as "Mischief of Mersea" , after a distinguished east-coast career with her second owner.

Was also recently at the Morbihan classic festival as a representative of the 70's

 

Interestingly, after a so-so '74 OTC, Bruce Banks moved out of the One Ton rating and then met a number of successes in the RORC races, winning the '75 championship.

 

I believe that the Belgian "Breyell" (cold moulded at Souter's) and "Eleuthera" (built at Lallow's) were along the same lines.

post-6361-0-19065600-1452421034_thumb.jpg

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Seems like it would have been the Texas One Ton but the one I sailed on had a different cabin top. It was the old "Vodka".

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Jon:

Yes I could. The IOR certificate gave you points in space that described the hull shape. (See my GOB article on the IOR) There is no magic here. It's basically a connect the dots exercise. No, you could most probably not do it. But someone skilled in drawing hull lines with a good eye could do it. Meat and potatoes.

 

Would the re-created hull be exactly the same? Nope. But armed with the IOR cert and a collection of photographs a skilled man could get close. It wasn't like GANBARE was a totally foreign shape. It was pure IOR with some twists added by Doug Peterson most importantly including a re-shuffling of some of the hull/rig ;proportions.

 

Armed with an IOR cert, if you laid the points down in section at the corresponding stations, it is almost hard to not come up with a reasonable facsimile of the lines plan - without it looking goofy.

 

Some things like the stern tuck or transom detail you'd have to have photos or seen in person in order to get right, but on the whole the IOR cert was all you needed to get pretty darn close. I made a decent wood half model of the Ganbare 35 I sailed on years ago - just from the cert.

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John Carter's Crocodile was a US built boat IIRC

 

Damn those were good looking boats.

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A design office collects Rating certificates. Be 12M. or I.O.R. I remember the recreation of Intrepid based on the certificate and hundreds of photos. Reverse engineering. For I.O.R for example, the boat is designed around specific station location. It is not necessary to design the whole boat, but of course you can fair the lines in between the measurements points. Example: Ragtime. If the lines plan might not be 100% correct, the I.O.R part of it is.

post-32003-0-43617500-1452459183_thumb.jpg

 

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John Carter's Crocodile was a US built boat IIRC

AKA Carter 36, AKA Texas 1-Tonner. Sorc in 75, but the photo is from next year's Edgarton Race Week.

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I recreated GANBARE's lines while I stood about 6' ,away from Yves-Marie. Maybe less. The work spaces in Carter's "tower" were confining. I had Yves-Marie looking over my should frequently making sure I was on track.

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The Carter 36/Texas One Tonner. After studying Ganbare and with the idea of a new production vehicle for the then very popular O.T class, and a client from Chicago, the ball was launched. Essentially, the boat followed the new trend of lighter displacement with more in sail area displacement ratio; pushed even further on the 36 by taking advantage of a broad maximum measurement beam.

If you follow my blog, I wrote something about it under the Post: Carter 36 Texas One Ton.

post-32003-0-31065700-1452613307_thumb.jpg

 

 

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The Carter 36/Texas One Tonner. After studying Ganbare and with the idea of a new production vehicle for the then very popular O.T class, and a client from Chicago, the ball was launched. Essentially, the boat followed the new trend of lighter displacement with more in sail area displacement ratio; pushed even further on the 36 by taking advantage of a broad maximum measurement beam.

If you follow my blog, I wrote something about it under the Post: Carter 36 Texas One Ton.

attachicon.gifcartertexas1.JPG

 

 

The Carter 36 is raced on had a different cabin top, it was more of a blister type. Could it have been a one off?

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Seems like it would have been the Texas One Ton but the one I sailed on had a different cabin top. It was the old "Vodka".

Salman,

 

 

You're right BII was the old Vodka. It was that ugly green before we painted it. We always called it Carter 36. But does look like that Texas 1 ton.

 

Matt

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I think it was stubbier. Definitely 1window wedge shaped.

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great_salt_pond.jpg?1395403304

 

Sailman,

 

The only image I could find of BII. Looks like the old gang at Block Island Race week. Except there is no cigarette in Dennis's hand.

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great_salt_pond.jpg?1395403304

That's the old girl! Lots of good memories on BII and BIII.

 

Sailman,

 

The only image I could find of BII. Looks like the old gang at Block Island Race week. Except there is no cigarette in Dennis's hand.

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Moody.... Revolution and Ginkgo were (at the time) considered rule beaters (not by everyone I'm sure) in that they eliminated the trunk cabin and had no standing headroom. Just like Cascade they were exploiting a loophole in the newish IOR rule, a hole that would be understood and closed quite soon.

Understand that flush-decks may have shocked but these two boats were not the only ones.A lot of boats had it in '73 from the S&S "Morning Cloud III" or "Prospect IV", to the Carter "Naif" and of course the several Carter 39sAlready in '71 "Morning Cloud II" now "More Opposition" or the Carters "Orca 43" and "Belita VII" had started thetrend.As early as '72 we had it in the 1/4 tonners, remember Ben Hall's winning Ecume.IIRC there was no rating advantage in a flush-deck (Bob Perry and YMT will know more), of course it was lighter than a deck + trunk cabin combo, but above everything it was much better for the crew and their ropes.While there was a minimum headroom rule for the Ton Cups, I do not think IOR ever implemented it.
Can any one out there tell me anything about a boat built in the Netherlands (Belita) and raced in NZ by the Dutch later raced in Vic and was part of the RVYC I have just aquarried this boat and its in nead of a lot of love it probably would have ended up as scrap metal if I hadnt have rescued it.

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First time posting, but plenty of looks - this one got me motivated!

 

" Alsager ", formerly " Cepheus III ". 1968, built in Holland in Corten steel (Rabbit II design). She hasn't been raced in many years, but I have sailed her to Cabo and back, and she sees plenty of action within the Bay/Delta and at least one annual trip out the Gate. Once my little guy is older maybe she'll race again.

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Hi, in in an earlier blog I referred to a Dick Carter designed yacht The Belita, it's the boat in my profile picture witch I have just acquired, I was told it was built in the Netherlands, it's a steel hull and was raced by the Duch in NZ befor it was raced in a Sydney to Hobart race, it then went to Melbourne and joined the RYCV it's racing number was R2913. The yacht is in poor condition at present and needs a new skin on the keel and a total refitt, it's currently on hard stand and I am seeking any information on the boat and weather or not it is worth getting syndicate of like minded people together to bring this boat back to its fomer glory. As I am a novice at this any assistance would be most appreciated. PS can any one explain why the keel is hollow there is no ballast.

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Hi, in in an earlier blog I referred to a Dick Carter designed yacht The Belita, it's the boat in my profile picture witch I have just acquired, I was told it was built in the Netherlands, it's a steel hull and was raced by the Duch in NZ befor it was raced in a Sydney to Hobart race, it then went to Melbourne and joined the RYCV it's racing number was R2913. The yacht is in poor condition at present and needs a new skin on the keel and a total refitt, it's currently on hard stand and I am seeking any information on the boat and weather or not it is worth getting syndicate of like minded people together to bring this boat back to its fomer glory. As I am a novice at this any assistance would be most appreciated. PS can any one explain why the keel is hollow there is no ballast.

I just sent you a PM. I was able to contact Frans Maas via email for info on my boat. Dick Carter drew the lines and sail plan, and Frans Maas drew the steel construction and interior plans. In regards to the keel, on my boat the top 2' or so is hollow.

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Thanks Uncle Buck for your response. I'm still finding my way around this site and still trying to work out how to upload photo, hence the profile photo change that shows the boat in better condition than it is at the present time. I hope some one out there recognizes the hull and can give me some history on the boat, regarding the empty keel some one has drilled holes in the skin so it appears to be hollow all the wat down.

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Thanks chorus, I was told that my Belita is1V and she still carries her Royal Yacht Club of Victoria number on her stern R2913

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Thanks Moody Frog, I was up the other night till 3am, going through all the Dick Carter Threads it makes for fascinating reading, what a wealth of know age. I'm still waiting for someone who has some history on my boat, there carn't be to many steel Tina's out there especially in Australia.

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Thanks Moody Frog, I was up the other night till 3am, going through all the Dick Carter Threads it makes for fascinating reading, what a wealth of know age. I'm still waiting for someone who has some history on my boat, there carn't be to many steel Tina's out there especially in Australia.

 

.......and weather or not it is worth getting syndicate of like minded people together to bring this boat back to its fomer glory

Hi Globetrotter,

 

Well done mate on giving this Tina a chance. It is not a matter IF you have to restore it - you MUST.

 

You'll find that there are quite a few steel sister ships because Frans Maas started building in GRP much later. Admittedly not in Oz.

 

I grew up on one of these puppies and as Moody has suggested, go through this thread with a fine tooth comb to read up on all that has been said about Dick Carter's Tina.

 

Between the lot of us and maybe some outside assistance we may be able to help you to put this one back together :-)

 

Are you saying that the keel is an empty shell without lead in it ?

 

Please keep us updated of your progress.

 

Good luck !

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Thanks for your encouragement anarchist. I will do my utmost to see this yacht gets back in the water and back to its former glory, as to how this is going to happen I'm still working on that, any suggestions would be gratefully revived thanks again and I will keep you posted.

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Yes, fibreglass

 

A close friend, who was an engineer in V13 build team, wrote me a report on the build a year ago (Sorry Catherine, I've not finished putting it up right)

 

Just a sum-up

 

The hull was built upside down on a stringers and battens plug.

Vacuum was made between in-house produced latex sheets

They also produced foam strips in house for the core (skins were out of fibreglass).

Those strips, C-wrapped in glass matt, were then planked leaving multiple "glass-ribs" where resin would also pour-in

Resin was injected through a giant syringe in a myriad of points.

 

Therefore my friend said that it was not so much a sandwich hull but a H section hull-panels structure, with foam acting just as a temporary support.

Total panel thickness was 50mm when patrol-boats the process had been developed for were 40mm only..

Dick called me today. He is working on the book. Has finished the Red Rooster chapter and is starting on Vendredi 13. We talked about the Tecimar building method, essentially a Srcimp; a vacuum bagged infusion way ahead of everything else at the time.

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Globetrotter,

 

Congrats on buying your steel TINA, BELITA VI! My father asked me to convey his best wishes to you and hopes that after all the dust has settled from the refit, that you enjoy many years of fine sailing aboard your boat.

 

The black and white photo is of TINA in Copenhagen during the 1966 One Ton Cup. My father is walking on top of TINA's coach roof. The color photo was taken the day after TINA won the Cup. Her owner Ed Stettinius is standing by her stern. The light blue boat is ROBIN, designed and skippered by Ted Hood, which came in second.

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The Annual VELAFestival, held every May in stunningly beautiful Santa Margherita, Italy, will be celebrating some of the most important fiberglass boats in history this year. http://www.velafestival.com/category/plasticfantastic/ YDRA's pretty sister-ship, TOMIRA, a Carter37, will be there, along with boats by the usual suspects (S&S, Arpège etc). I understand that the Italian yard ALPA was one of the first (if not the first?) to manufacture fiberglass boats in Europe over 50 years ago.

 

More on TOMIRA, YDRA, TINA and NAIF: http://www.velafestival.com/plasticfantastic-canados-37-la-scheggia-di-vallicelli/

More on ALPA: http://www.velafestival.com/plasticfantastic-il-cantiere-alpa/

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Globetrotter,

 

Congrats on buying your steel TINA, BELITA VI! My father asked me to convey his best wishes to you and hopes that after all the dust has settled from the refit, that you enjoy many years of fine sailing aboard your boat.

 

The black and white photo is of TINA in Copenhagen during the 1966 One Ton Cup. My father is walking on top of TINA's coach roof. The color photo was taken the day after TINA won the Cup. Her owner Ed Stettinius is standing by her stern. The light blue boat is ROBIN, designed and skippered by Ted Hood, which came in second.

 

Behind Tina in pic #1, Mainsail 4172 is "Maryka" , H. Rouault skipped by YM Tanton

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Globetrotter,

 

Congrats on buying your steel TINA, BELITA VI! My father asked me to convey his best wishes to you and hopes that after all the dust has settled from the refit, that you enjoy many years of fine sailing aboard your boat.

 

The black and white photo is of TINA in Copenhagen during the 1966 One Ton Cup. My father is walking on top of TINA's coach roof. The color photo was taken the day after TINA won the Cup. Her owner Ed Stettinius is standing by her stern. The light blue boat is ROBIN, designed and skippered by Ted Hood, which came in second.

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Catherine for forwarding my information on to your farther. I wasn't aware of the history of this yacht when I first saw her advertised on Ebay, the winning bidder got cold feet and backed out when they inspected her, I was given two days to remove her from the hard stand yard were she had been for some years, now my task is what to do with her deck has been modified in fibre class and a meter added to her cabin in front of the mast and the cabin raised to creat a crusing yacht, the Frount cabin interia has been removed to replace the rusted section of the hull. As a novic at this, I'm asking this forum were do I go from here do I strip out the new work and bring it back to 1966 -8 or do I keep going and finish it of with a new modern intearia design, as eather proposition will need to be funded and managed by like minded people so I'm asking, I'm willing to sell part of this yacht to raid capital for this project any offers or suggestions would be gratefully recived.

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I saw that boat on ebay and this thread got me motivated. But the boat has been modified to be more of a cruiser and was described as such.

I wasn't prepared to place a bid!

You're a braver man than me. I wish you lots of luck!

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Thanks Airborne, Im probably more a romantic more than brave, I fell in love with her lines she looks so beautiful in the photo and I thought she deserved another chance. You know the saying fools jump in were angles fear to tread. I've put my toe in the water, who knows what adventure this will lead to. I'm sure many a sailor would never have left the port, had they had know what laid ahead, but are better men for the experience.

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Ok I'll see what I can do I've had trouble uploading photoes to this forum but I'll try again

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Thanks Airborne, Im probably more a romantic more than brave, I fell in love with her lines she looks so beautiful in the photo and I thought she deserved another chance. You know the saying fools jump in were angles fear to tread. I've put my toe in the water, who knows what adventure this will lead to. I'm sure many a sailor would never have left the port, had they had know what laid ahead, but are better men for the experience.

This thread is full of romance!

To see your boat restored and launched will bring a tear to your eye. And there will be a number of sailors on the bay who will take a distant interest in your progress.

But, without trying to discourage you, you will need deep pockets and lots of patience. Also this thread wiil get you access to a wealth of knowledge.

 

Good luck!

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Thanks AO, I don't intend doing this project on my own, I don't have the expertise that this project deserves, there are better equipped people out there that do ,and I am willing to do what ever needs to be done to see this survivor of the past lives to sail another day, if it is meant to be it will happen. Here is what was advertised on Ebay: The yacht was being changed from racing to cruising yacht. New Fibreglass cabin has been made higher for more comfort. Outside hull has had professional boat builder do repairs. It has been striped out on the inside and needs a complete fit out (this was not true)all parts come with the boat ( not all interior part were able to be shipped with the yacht) and will only be sold as a complete unit . This includes sails (main sail was not usable ) rigging (not all there) and aluminum mast, motor Etc. Has spar sails full history and Documents GM -HM series engine (not true it was a yanmar two cylinder) the person who was doing the project was a fully qualified person. This is part of a deceased estate and must be sold.

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GT !

Take this answer for a European view, which it is.

 

Here, in order to fetch max value in view of resale, such a "classic" yacht should be restored as close as possible to her original years - bar detail equipment such as electronics, engine or ST winches - this would include plywood deck - possibly teak clad - short trunk wooden roof and wooden coamings, up to original name, hull colours and sail number.

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GT !

Take this answer for a European view, which it is.

 

Here, in order to fetch max value in view of resale, such a "classic" yacht should be restored as close as possible to her original years - bar detail equipment such as electronics, engine or ST winches - this would include plywood deck - possibly teak clad - short trunk wooden roof and wooden coamings, up to original name, hull colours and sail number.

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GT !

Take this answer for a European view, which it is.

 

Here, in order to fetch max value in view of resale, such a "classic" yacht should be restored as close as possible to her original years - bar detail equipment such as electronics, engine or ST winches - this would include plywood deck - possibly teak clad - short trunk wooden roof and wooden coamings, up to original name, hull colours and sail number.

+1

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No unfortunately not, the only way I can think of getting that is by contacting the origanal wining bidder, that backed out of the sail, the reason he backed out was, he was to busy to inspect the yacht and sent his wife instead, she took one look and decided that the yacht would take up all of her husbands free time to repair it and decided the yacht wasn't worth it, I wonder if he had have told her he would rename it after her, would it have made a diferance, I did and it worked wonders.

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Hey GT, do you still have a shortcut to the now ended Ebay listing?

 

GT a previous owner of your yacht was Doug Anderson, a member of Royal Yacht Club of Victoria. Don't know if he is still with us but RYCV might be able to put you in touch.

I saw Belita at the factory in Moorabbin a couple of years ago - you have a big job ahead of you but she has a superbly built and very fair hull so should be worth the effort.

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Thanks Sportscar, Moody Frog had sent me your blog on a a new find Tina that you posted and I was intending to contact you to get more history on Belita V11. I know this project is big and there are a couple of ways it can go, if I can get enough interest and raise capital to strip all the latest improvements and bring it back to as original as posable that would be the best outcome, failing that. I just put it back together and get it sea worthy using whats existing and what I can beg borrow and cajole and just enjoy her as she is I've done that with my current 45 year old FG bluebird (Pepper) that I bought as an abandon vessel for $300, I took her out last Sunday in Pitwatter with my 39 year old son and we had a ball in 20 not winds. Thanks again and keep in toutch.

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Today I located the 1968 Frans Maas built (steel) Carter ( Tina type) One Tonner Belita V1 in a yard in suburban Melbourne, AUS.I remember her sailing out of Royal Yacht Club of Victoria, Williamstown under the ownership of Doug Anderson in the late seventies to mid eighties and I would love to hear from anyone with any knowledge of her earlier or more recent history.

 

She has been undergoing somewhat of a transformation, sadly now halted by the passing of her current owner. He has built a new GRP deck, taking the superstructure a metre or more forward of the mast (it used to end just aft of the mast with distinctive twin forward cabin windows) He has also raised the cabin height to give her a more voluminous interior with a more cruising oriented layout and has moulded a roomier GRP cockpit with raised coamings.

 

She still has her original B & G electronics and her Proctor mast. The boat is stripped but all the gear is still there, tracks, winches, deck fittings etc.

 

 

attachicon.gif1968 Carter 1 Ton Belita V1 (1).JPG attachicon.gifBelita - Copy.jpg

attachicon.gifBelita V1.jpg

Here you go GT, see also this thread Posts # 1165 from Moody Frog and 1169 from Laser 1 for some of Belita's history.

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Yes SC, that the post MF alerted me too and it gave me goose bumps as I was reading it, I would love to hear more stories from people that sailed here and those that sailed against her as I think she was the only steel Tina in Australia.

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Hey GT, do you still have a shortcut to the now ended Ebay listing?

Globetrotter

Today, 09:15 AM

No unfortunately not, the only way I can think of getting that is by contacting the origanal wining bidder, that backed out of the sail, the reason he backed out was, he was to busy to inspect the yacht and sent his wife instead, she took one look and decided that the yacht would take up all of her husbands free time to repair it and decided the yacht wasn't worth it, I wonder if he had have told her he would rename it after her, would it have made a diferance, I did and it worked wonders.

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Oh dear, I now see your predicament :-(

 

But to have bought this classic icon at that money ....... pffff ...... how much would shipping to Europe cost ?

 

And as for your question where to run with this ? Pic 1 is your only answer.

 

Belita%201_zpsjsoac79z.jpg

 

Belita%2010_zpsajvtxose.jpg

 

Belita%203_zpscjxmynbz.jpg

 

Belita%204_zpsopamsnqw.jpg

 

Belita%208_zpsjpf8an52.jpg

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IMHO Globe Trotter, the mods to the roof and cockpit are not too good and quite complicated.

 

If you look at the enclosed pic of a Tina being finished at Maas, the original was much simpler and elegant.

 

I have tried sending you (at the address on your profile) a Maas brochure from the time, with side and plan drawings, hopefully you'll get it.

post-6361-0-69100300-1454579829_thumb.jpg

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If you look at the enclosed pic of a Tina being finished at Maas, the original was much simpler and elegant.

 

 

But that's the long cabin version ...... wrong pic JP! .... lol

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If you look at the enclosed pic of a Tina being finished at Maas, the original was much simpler and elegant.

 

 

But that's the long cabin version ...... wrong pic JP! .... lol

 

 

I noticed it, but the aft part of it is the same as the short trunk as are the cockpit finishes I believe. :P

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Detail but ...

 

I notice, on the transom pic, that the OZ racing number is R 2913 which uses the same digits as Mr Bouman's RORC number 1293, which he had on both "Belita VI" and "Belita VII" the Carter 43.

 

Typical of the day, sails were durable and a HOOD suit a big investment, you would unstitch the numbers and re set them, I remember negotiating the number of a new boat for the owner to be able to re-use the 1 year old sails of the previous one. :)

 

Discussion made me find a pic of "Belita VI " in her Dutch years, that's for you to dream Globetrotter

post-6361-0-84053900-1454587113_thumb.jpg

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From the photos you can see her present state, I'm open to any comments on what to do next.

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From the photos you can see her present state, I'm open to any comments on what to do next.

Cut off all the junk above deck level

Reinstate deck with large hatch just in front of the mast.

Reinstate teak/mahogany toe rail, 1/2" wide approx 2.5" high.

Reinstate short cabin top mahogany or similar to Tina spec.

Reinstate cockpit coaming mahogany or similar incl. 2 stainless steel foundations for primary winches & 2 in aft corner for secondaries.

Reinstate cockpit incl aft lazarette.

 

Finish interior : galley left - chart table right + quarter berth - saloon : 2 lower bunks/seats - 2 upper bunks - fo'c's'le : twin pipecots.

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+ 1 !!

 

See Tina's original arrangement and accommodation pics enclosed.

 

Fore cabin was bare already

Settee slides out from settee width to berth width, wooden backrest hinges for better comfort in upper berth.

Galley is basic but enough for a nice peanut butter party <_<

Cavalier Seul is a bit better: two burners ! but enough room to fit a gimballed oven !

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Thanks Laser1 & Moody Frog, your right about the sail type, she still has some of those old Hood sails. Thanks also for the information and photoes on Maas, he went to a lot of effort to achieve a high standard of finish to the interia of the steel Tina's, the GF look stark in comparison, any photos of the internals of the Tina's would help the actual plans would be a bonus. Thanks again to this Forum it's a goldmine of information.

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GT!

Next time I'm at my father's house, I'll look through his TINA file for more interior/deck shots. We can also help you out with lines plans and hopefully a construction plan too. Some tidbits for now:

1. Sandy Weld, my father and Sammy Sampson on TINA during the '66 OTC.

2. Dad sorting out the main while sailing from Breskens to Copenhagen. Ed Stettinius' daughter at the helm.

3. TINA's nav. table.

4. My father and Sandy adjusting TINA's backstay.

5. TINA racing during the OTC.

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From the photos you can see her present state, I'm open to any comments on what to do next.

Cut off all the junk above deck level

Reinstate deck with large hatch just in front of the mast.

Reinstate teak/mahogany toe rail, 1/2" wide approx 2.5" high.

Reinstate short cabin top mahogany or similar to Tina spec.

Reinstate cockpit coaming mahogany or similar incl. 2 stainless steel foundations for primary winches & 2 in aft corner for secondaries.

Reinstate cockpit incl aft lazarette.

 

Finish interior : galley left - chart table right + quarter berth - saloon : 2 lower bunks/seats - 2 upper bunks - fo'c's'le : twin pipecots.

 

+1 !

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Recently I have been so lucky as to acquire a Carter 37 currently named "Miles"yet is the former "Hylas". Any additional pictures from the past would be very welcome :)

 

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That week(and the week after) I am in France with my wife, so Miles will (unfortunatel) not participate.

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Bossil, Congradulations, Miles looks beautiful. She looks like she has many a mile left to enjoy her.

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Congrats Bosail,

 

 

Any additional pictures from the past would be very welcome :)

 

In case you did not go through all pages of this looong thread:

 

Here is a link to the earliest discussion about "Hylas", first of the Carter 37s, and her very famous commissioning owner, with even a direct link to David Edward's son.

 

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=120735&page=8#entry4457417

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Could this be a refurbished 1972 Ydra?? The photo was taken last September in Travemunde, N.Germany

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Hope not. That cabin takes away one of the best parts of the original.

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