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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

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ckozel

Clipper round the world

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Lydia, your posting rate is not nearly good enough and it will be brought to OA's attention when she wins this leg !!! :rolleyes:

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Lydia, your posting rate is not nearly good enough and it will be brought to OA's attention when she wins this leg !!! :rolleyes:

I am back in the office tomorrow so rate might improve.

 

Just got an email from OA complaining that she is doing the bow on both watches and had two trips up the rig today.

 

Of course I said harden up, and that she know from sailing with me that bowman are not allowed sleep otherwise they get delusions of ability and think they should steer the yacht.

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Qingdao and Geraldton Western Australia vie for lead - 07 January 2012

Qingdao has been holding the lead in Race 7 through the last 24 hours but Geraldton Western Australia is gaining ground on the Chinese entry, despite their spinnaker damage, and now the two yachts, barely 20 miles apart geographically have been able to make contact with each other.

 

“We managed to raise Geraldton Western Australia on VHF so we were able to congratulate the crew on their spinnaker repairs,” says Qingdao’s skipper, Ian Conchie.

 

“We continued heading north west under white sails until lunchtime today when we hoisted the heavy spinnaker and bore away to try and make some ground on them to the west. The wind keeps changing direction so it is hard to decide if it is better to head west with spinnakers or north west with white sails.

 

“In the meantime we have received lots of messages to congratulate us on holding first place for 24 hours but, as I keep saying, there is a long way to go and with boats to the south and north of us only time will tell which was the right strategy to play. We continue to push hard buoyed by the exciting news that Qingdao has extended their sponsorship for another two races. We will continue to push to try and give them a result to celebrate as well,” concludes Ian.

 

After ripping their medium weight spinnaker right across the middle, the WA team’s sail repair team has swung into action.

 

“The last 24 hours have seen the crew pushing a needle through 24 metres of sail repair. Job completed and we’re just waiting for the right conditions to put up the ‘Luff Bluster’ aka medium weight kite,” says skipper, Juan Coetzer. “The crew have done a fantastic job and all put in overtime to get the task done as well as race the boat hard,” he continues.

 

The north east trade winds are now starting to benefit all of the teams. The yachts are approximately spread across a line running from north to south and at the southern end Derry-Londonderry’s crew are revelling in their third place and have really found their rhythm on board.

 

Mark Light says, “We are sailing very well as a team; our new leggers have shown great enthusiasm and been integrated well to the boat by the very reliable and hard working core crew on board. Lots of our sailing evolutions have gone very well and we seem to have a new sharpness and freshness all around. Add this to the fact that we seem to be making good decisions with regard to sail changes and strategies and we have a reason to be very pleased with our progress in this race!

 

“We have very consistent winds from the east north east and a lovely flat sea state. We are being helped along by the South Equatorial Current which is giving us a shove of about one knot, consistently shown by virtue of our Speed Over Ground higher than our boat speed - about ten knots at present. We are making a good direction, operating about 175nm north of our rhumb line and the intense convection activity, or squalls, has decreased substantially.

 

“On board we are all working hard, keeping our fingers crossed and hoping for a successful finish to this very long and very tactical Race 7,” concludes the skipper of the Northern Ireland team.

 

Just slightly further to their north east Visit Finland is nipping at their heels, with Welcome to Yorkshire and New York joining the group of four. They may well have a better angle on the wind than those to the north of the fleet.

 

“Today has been one of our best runs yet and spirits were high at the lunchtime meeting,” reports Olly Osborne on board Visit Finland. “The squally weather seems to be behind us for the time being and it is great to get our teeth into some reliable breeze. We are currently making a more southerly course which is historically devoid of much in the way of consistent wind, but so far so good as they say.

 

“So as the fleet shapes up for the dash westward toward the bottleneck at the Sarangani Strait it will be a very interesting week from a tactical perspective. The temperature has fallen slightly which is a great relief, and everyone is enjoying a bit of settled weather.”

 

While the weather is more settled, New York’s crew are still experiencing some ups and downs, according to skipper, Gareth Glover.

 

“The ups at crossing the Equator and getting back into the north of the world and downs that we sailed into a wind hole and sat there for over six hours in zero wind until we picked up the forecast north easterlies which we are sailing in,” he explains.

 

“We tried every sail to help us get moving from the wind hole including trying to fly all three kites but in zero wind not even the lightweight kite wound fill and we had to just sit there and watch on AIS as Derry-Londonderry and Visit Finland sailed around us. We are now travelling north west under heavyweight kite and with still 1,300 miles to our next waypoint we will make back the miles we have lost overnight and get into the top three yachts.”

 

No less determined are the crew of Welcome to Yorkshire who celebrated their Equator crossing with a traditional Neptune ceremony. The skipper of the English entry, Rupert Dean, describes the scene.

 

“Our second crossing was different to the first in that half of the crew had crossed before. Known as Shellbacks, they were not required by Neptune to take part in the dodgy rituals. Instead they played an active supporting role cooking up treats, making costumes, filming and washing the accused and decks (more on that later). The Shellbacks were Jim Stamp, Steve Reid, Hannah Richards, Ann Finch, Richard Simons, Richard Williams and Peter Crooke (all round the worlders), accompanied by Richard Gould and Les Hartley, who had been 'christened' previously on other boats.

 

“The accused, known as Pollywogs, were James Bruegger, Kim Rolfe, Matthew Diggle, Matt Cornall, Callum Girvan, Harriet Oglethorpe and Richard Hilson. They were gathered, cowering on deck to await the arrival of King Neptune (skipper), his Queen Amphritite (Ann) and Davy Jones (Steve). After they arrived, amidst much fanfare, the court kicked into action.

 

“Each of the accused was called forward to sit before Neptune, Amphritite and Davy Jones. After drinking a 'truth serum' (chicken Oxo, Branston pickle, chilli sauce and Worcester Sauce mix), they were given the opportunity to defend themselves against their crimes, the evidence for which was gleefully supplied by the Shellbacks. Chief among these, of course, was crossing the Equator without first seeking Neptune's permission. After all were – naturally – found to be guilty, each had to kiss the hands of Queens Amphritite and Davy Jones, before retreating to the poop deck to be covered with ladles of gunk (tomato juice and porridge oats). They were then washed off with buckets of sea water by the Shellbacks and proclaimed to be Pollywogs no more.”

 

There is just one team in the southern hemisphere now but Edinburgh Inspiring Capital is in no great rush to cross the Equator as they continue on their westerly course, says skipper, Gordon Reid.

 

“Last night the squalls continued, presenting us with some challenging conditions, frequent reefing in and out, and numerous head-sail changes between the Yankee 1 and the windseeker as we continued to make the most of the increased wind within the black squall clouds. The moon is almost full and the night sky is bright and full of stars.

 

“Today as the sun rose, unfortunately the wind eased again and we were left drifting in the current for hours, however as we passed under the mini high the wind returned and we now have the north easterly trades, flying under spinnaker at a tasty nine knots.”

 

From the most southerly to the most northerly yacht in the race and Gold Coast Australia has also overcome their sail problems, having spent time reworking a previous repair.

 

“Finally the winds that we have been searching for have arrived without squalls or storms. We are now sailing along at six degrees north, nicely powered up in the direction we want to go,” comments Richard Hewson. “To add to our luxury sail, the counter current that we were experiencing earlier this morning has turned around and is now flowing with us giving us another half a knot speed over ground.

 

“Our medium weight spinnaker has also successfully been re-repaired and is flying beautifully ahead of the yacht, powering her along at maximum speed for the ten to 12 knots of wind that we currently hold. Lisa Blair, Deb Miller, Deb Grant, Chris Hopkins and Brian Stamp took the arduous sewing in turns and bought the ol’ sewing machine back to life to run over the stitching a few more times. Fingers crossed, with the re-repairs it’s stronger than new and will hold up to the test for the next few weeks.”

 

The Tasmanian yachtsman, who had been bemoaning the dearth of wildlife in the early stages of this race, is happier with what he has been seeing in recent days.

 

“As we near the islands of one of the more remote regions of the Pacific there is an increase in the abundance of wildlife with daily sightings of dolphins, and flocks of birds dive bombing schools of fish. We also have the occasional bird trying to steal our Windex which we need to somehow disguise as a predator to scare them away in future. The increase in wildlife is a pleasure to watch and hopefully it remains like that for the future.”

 

It will be interesting to watch the race viewer over the next 12 to 36 hours as Singapore and De Lage Landen, who have continued to press northwards to position themselves for what they hope will be the best of the trade winds, begin to feel the benefits of them.

 

“After almost a week spent under the frustrating influence of the monsoon trough we are now feeling what could be the first signs of the north easterlies, and thank God for that. What an amazing afternoon spent reaching with the kite at speeds over ten knots at all times. The crew spirit is high and the will to fight for a podium position is stronger than ever. Let's wait and see what the next days will bring us,” Stuart Jackson tells the Race Office in his morning report.

 

Meanwhile on Singapore Ben Bowley says, “Our more northerly course is rewarding us with some good steady winds and being becalmed for hours on end is starting to become a thing of the past. It is sorely tempting to start to edge off to the west now that we have signs of the steady trades that have been so elusive this last week. The problem with heading to the west too soon is still present however; turn too soon and we are likely to pay the price further down the line in the form of some much lighter conditions.

 

“The plan has always been to head north until we find the strong trades but seeing most of the fleet start to curve off the west makes our resolution waver from time to time! Time will tell the best course of action but here's still hoping that a little investment now will pay dividends further down the line.

 

“Today has been another blisteringly hot and humid day. The last 24 hours have seen us switch between our light and medium weight spinnakers almost as often as there is a watch change due to the constant fluctuations in the breeze. This has served to make the crew super efficient at the evolution and kite packing now takes around ten minutes as opposed to nearly half an hour at the start of the leg,” signs off Ben.

 

You can find out how to get on board for the Clipper 13-14 Race at the London International Boat Show from now until 15 January. Visit us on stand G102 in the North Hall to meet former crew members and to discover more about the exciting new Clipper 70 fleet which will enter service in the next edition of the race. There are presentations each day at 12.15pm in the Knowledge Box, next to the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race stand.

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I know a lot of people do not rate this very high, but this leg is proving to be a good race.

 

Seems some of the other boats are more competitive now and that may be a few new leggers (as in Q's case, OA is obvioulsy adding speed) and/or the other punters having more experience on the boat and have stopped holding on for dear life and actually looking up and out.

 

Best leg so far and a few miles to go yet.

Looks like GC have screwed up and went too far north and now have to go higher to get around Palau and then back down to the gate at Sarangani.

They are about 9.2N and the gate looks to be about 5.

 

All other boats doing well in a good breeze and reasonable conditions it would seem.

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I know a lot of people do not rate this very high, but this leg is proving to be a good race.

 

Seems some of the other boats are more competitive now and that may be a few new leggers (as in Q's case, OA is obvioulsy adding speed) and/or the other punters having more experience on the boat and have stopped holding on for dear life and actually looking up and out.

 

Best leg so far and a few miles to go yet.

Looks like GC have screwed up and went too far north and now have to go higher to get around Palau and then back down to the gate at Sarangani.

They are about 9.2N and the gate looks to be about 5.

 

All other boats doing well in a good breeze and reasonable conditions it would seem.

 

+1

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Happy to be proven wrong.

GC have come screaming down to take back the lead, as I presume they had planned all along.

Seems the skipper knows a thing or 2 about ocean racing and tides. Well done.

 

Not sure what they are doing about the next section, some discussion about suspending racing to get through tricky bits.

 

Guess the loss of the Irish boat last time around is still a bit fresh.

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After the scoring gate they will motor for a bit in small groups with escort, you can guess why. Funnily no one wants to in the group with the American boat!

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Clipper 2011-12 Round the World Yacht Race fleet are currently on day twenty one of race seven, from the Gold Coast to Singapore.

 

Gold Coast Australia has swooped down from the north and into first place, making maximum use of the favourable current and nudging out Derry-Londonderry from the position they had been holding as race leaders.

 

But the team had something of a setback this morning when the yacht broached, breaking a spinnaker pole.

 

'The spinnaker pole is replaceable and we had the heavyweight spinnaker ready to fly again within the hour after doing some minor repairs, although we waited until the sun was properly up and there were no more rogue gusts before a re-hoist. Being Friday the Thirteenth we cannot be cautious enough!' says Richard Hewson, skipper of the Australian yacht.

 

Now with a little more than 100 miles to the gate, where the fleet will suspend racing to safely negotiate the poorly charted waters of the Celebes Sea, the ten teams are fully focused on achieving the best possible elapsed time.

 

They will resume racing as they exit the Sulu Sea. Each of the teams must report the times they cross the suspension and restart gates within three hours of doing so. The team that wins Race 7 will be the one whose time is the shortest for the first part of the race added to the time they take to reach the finish line in Singapore from the moment they start racing again.

 

In addition to the fixed navigation hazards, in these waters fisherman going about their daily lives also make for something of an obstacle course for the 68-foot racing yachts.

 

'Last night we saw the first of many Philippine fishing boats,' Richard reports. 'During the day their colourful paint patterns and interesting construction delight the crew, and at night they have a similar appearance of bright lights of various colours that rarely represent the correct navigation lights. They move randomly (as do we while we sail) and so it makes collision avoidance strategies interesting to say the least, especially when we have a squall charging down on us with a spinnaker up making our sail plan not very manoeuvrable. Still, the fishing boats have right of way so we are ready to drop the spinnaker in an instant to alter course if required,' he explains.

 

In addition to the boats the fisherman drop ‘fish aggravation devices’, three-metre cylinders attached to the sea floor on a two-kilometre line.

 

'The FADs are hard to see during the day when there is more than a one-metre swell and are unlit so are almost impossible to see at night. They act as artificial reefs in more ways than one as not only do they attract fish, but if you hit them in a sailing yacht at ten knots they have the possibility of doing lots of damage. So far today we have seen four FADs and we are keeping a close eye out for more as we sail down the Philippine coast.'

 

Gold Coast Australia’s crew are not the only team to have had a bit of bad luck on Friday the Thirteenth.

 

Geraldton Western Australia’s skipper, Juan Coetzer says their day 'Started off with a bang just before sunrise. We were holding off Qingdao quite nicely when there was banging underneath the boat.

 

'The helm at the time, Ian Geraghty, said he had looked behind the boat after the incident and saw a few logs adrift. This is what we must have hit.

 

'At the same time we got hit by a massive squall. The medium weight kite was up and we had 24 knots of apparent wind doing 12 to 14 knots boat speed. So, the crew jumped into action and dropped the kite as soon as possible. Thankfully it came down in one piece.

 

'The crew who weren’t on deck started in the rope locker, working their way to the aft end of the boat, looking for any possible holes or cracks in the hull. Fortunately all is well and, from a visual check over the side, all looks good as well. One of my standing orders is to check the bilges every hour and this is a good thing, because you can always spot a problem sooner than later.

 

'During this mayhem we managed to tidy up and hoist our heavyweight kite as we thought it may get a little winder today. Great all set, off to bed I go... I was just about to arrive in LaLa Land when there was another bang and the kite released itself from the pole. The crew did a great recovery, dropping, re-woolling and hoisting it again. All in a day’s work!'

 

 

Singapore - Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race - Karl Monaghan/onEdition

 

The current that has been proving so beneficial to Gold Coast Australia should soon start to help some of the other yachts. Singapore, to the north of the group including Geraldton Western Australia and Qingdao, may well be the first to hook into it which would please the team no end, according to skipper, Ben Bowley.

 

He says, 'Things are shaping up nicely for a very close section 1 finish at this up-coming gate. If we had extra 100nm I think there would be a chance for us to maximise on our position and move up into a top three spot; but as things stand now, the rate at which we are catching the guys ahead is not quite fast enough!

 

Spinnaker dramas and squally conditions have not helped our cause either. It appears that all our spectra loops around the boat and on our kites are starting to fail. The ‘cruise’ phase of this race will be a good opportunity to renew the lot and prevent any more ‘surprise’ kite drops. The squalls have been a mixed blessing; sometimes driving us in exactly the right direction at 14 knots and sometimes leaving us bobbing in light airs, forcing us to come up on the wind just to keep some air in the kite.

 

'Another factor serving to compound our anguish is the fact that all eyes are expectantly glued to the Course Over Ground and Speed Over Ground waiting for the magic switch in direction of the current from hindrance to help. I had hoped we would be starting to see this by now. By the looks of it we may end up running fairly deep downwind along the Mindanao coastline which will have the effect of slowing our progress somewhat. Crucially, so long as we put in a respectable finish in this part of the race, we still have every opportunity of coming into our home port standing on the podium. This is something we would dearly love to do and something that I feel that we deserve this race, given how well the crew have been sailing our big red bus these last two and a half weeks.'

 

By the 1200 UTC update Singapore had climbed to fourth place and appears to have finally found the lift from the current that they were looking for.

 

Seeing the Singapore team on the podium when the fleet arrives to a spectacular welcome in front of a VIP audience in Marina at Keppel Bay on 28 January would be a special moment. The team still has a chance to be the first since Clipper 07-08 to win a race to their home port – and only the third in the event’s history to achieve such a feat.

 

Their Chinese rivals, Qingdao, who are also just two miles ahead of them but slightly further to the south, are doing their best to prevent them getting there and, says skipper, Ian Conchie, 'We are continuing to push hard towards the gate. It’s been a busy 24 hours on board with lots of kite changes, lots of squalls and a few breakages to deal with.

 

'Today both the shackle that holds the top of the vang and a block that is part of the vang broke but with some lateral thinking and swift repair work it is all now fixed.

 

'All we can hope is that our competitors are getting the same mix of squalls and lulls as we are. The current plan is to keep heading west to try to take advantage of the current running down to the gate. Also the wind should back as we get closer allowing us to head more directly towards it.'

 

The teams are indeed getting the same treatment, including back marker Edinburgh Inspiring Capital.

 

'We are very much in the area of increased convection and are constantly being bombarded by one squall after another,' reports skipper, Gordon Reid. 'With sail changes a plenty, we are working hard just to keep the Purple Beastie moving in the challenging conditions.

 

'After hoisting the big guns (heavyweight kite) and flying it successfully through a nasty squall we noticed it had a small tear, probably as a result of yesterday’s shackle incident, so in the interests of maintaining our sails it had to come down for a quick repair. Now the wind has backed and we are back under white sails until the wind veers to allow a more favourable course.'

 

'We are battling ever changing conditions as we endeavour to keep Derry-Londonderry moving, at pace, in the right direction,' says Mark Light, skipper of the team representing the UK City of Culture 2013.

 

Having been ousted as the leading yacht, Mark continues, 'Being in top spot is definitely the place to be but it is not without its own pressures. We are constantly looking over our transom wondering if we are doing enough, or if other teams are in better conditions, or if we might make that mistake that will cost us. A quick reality check and we soon understand that these pressures are all self-imposed and we are, in actual fact, having a great race and making the most of the conditions presented to us. We know all the other teams are working incredibly hard to overtake us and with that in mind it only serves to enhance our own racing spirit and focus our minds further.'

 

The top five teams are so close in terms of distance to finish that the smallest mistake, misfortune of finding a wind hole or lapse in concentration will have big consequences.

 

It’s something Gareth Glover’s team on New York is all too aware of as they hover in sixth place, waiting to pounce.

 

'The New York crew are still in the race,' writes this morning. 'Over the last day we have come north and picked up more wind and boat speed towards the gate.

 

'As all the skippers and crews know, a lot can happen in that time and we plan on working hard to get back into the top five and then top three by the gate. All that needs to happen is for them to find a wind hole or for us to find more boat speed and we can pull back the lost miles.'

 

Having seen how Gold Coast Australia has played the current, De Lage Landen may well find themselves in an advantageous position to the north of New York.

 

'In the last couple of days we have managed to make up some miles on the rest of the fleet which puts us back in the race for the podium,' notes skipper, Stuart Jackson. 'With less than 250 miles to go the crew is giving everything they’ve got to close the gap with the frontrunners even more. New York is the closest to us at this point and they are also just behind us in the overall ranking, so there is a lot at stake to make up some miles on them.'

 

 

New York - Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race - www.smileclick.co.nz/onEdition

 

New York and Welcome to Yorkshire have been penalised a point each following the Gold Coast stopover.

 

The rules of the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race are designed to foster safety at sea and develop high levels of seamanship by encouraging crews to sail conservatively as well as competitively. The Race Committee imposes penalties when teams exceed financial limits for sail and equipment repair and replacement that could have been avoided.

 

New York’s penalty point is for equipment damage while Welcome to Yorkshire’s is for sail repairs.

 

Welcome to Yorkshire and Visit Finland are also very close in terms of distance to finish but again there is a north-south divide, with the English team further to the north.

 

'With lighter winds forecasted to the southwest, we have taken the decision to head north a little in search of a stronger pressure gradient, which we hope will more than compensate for the extra miles sailed,' explains skipper, Rupert Dean.

 

'In a one design fleet such as this it's always difficult to overtake others on boat speed alone, necessitating a calculated strategy to out-flank them instead. Certainly that's what Gold Coast Australia has been dramatically doing to the fleet over the past week, with spectacularly successful results.'

 

While the teams are racing there is always an opportunity, no matter how busy they are, to mark special occasions.

 

'Today has been a particularly memorable one for one of our team: Peter Crooke is our first round the world crew member to have a birthday on board. He's been celebrating in some style with a delicious cake made on board, a homemade card and a large packet of cashew nuts from the team. We've got three more of these on this leg and it's always fun to make a fuss over shipmates celebrating special occasions far from home.'

 

At 40,000 miles, Clipper 11-12 is the world’s longest ocean race and the teams are now half way through their epic adventure, the maritime equivalent of climbing Mount Everest.

 

Calling at 15 ports on six continents, the race not only showcases the tourism offerings of the cities and states that host the event, but allows sponsors to develop trade links as well as cultural and educational connections.

 

In Canada the fleet will return to Halifax where they will be hosted by Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron as they prepare for their final transoceanic crossing of Clipper 11-12.

 

'We are delighted to be hosting the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race fleet at the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron and look forward to working with the race organisers to plan a memorable stopover,' says George Archibald, Commodore of the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron.

 

Fresh from a short yet challenging sprint from New York the crew members will receive a warm Canadian welcome on their arrival for the pit stop. The yachts are expected to arrive there between 11 and 12 June before beginning the race to Derry-Londonderry on 15 June.

 

'Everyone at the RNSYS is excited to be involved in such a major international event and the ten teams can be assured of a warm Nova Scotian welcome when they arrive ahead of their final transatlantic sprint next June,' he continues.

 

The fleet was previously welcomed by the RNSYC during the Clipper 07-08 Race.

 

Find out more about how to get on board for Clipper 13-14 and beyond by visiting the Clipper Race stand at the London Boat Show from now until 15 January. We are on stand G102 in the North Hall.

 

Positions at 1200 UTC, Friday 13 January

Boat - DTF*

1 Gold Coast Australia - 1,483nm

2 Derry-Londonderry - 1,493nm (+10nm DTL**)

3 Qingdao - 1,506nm (+23nm)

4 Singapore - 1,508nm (+25nm)

5 Geraldton Western Australia - 1,513nm (+31nm)

6 New York - 1,564nm (+81nm)

7 De Lage Landen - 1,569nm (+86nm)

8 Visit Finland - 1,630nm (+147nm)

9 Welcome to Yorkshire - 1,640nm (+157nm)

10 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital - 1,882nm (+400nm)

 

DTF* = Distance to Finish, DTL** = Distance to Leader. Full positions are updated every three hours and can be found here.

 

Clipper Round the World Yacht Race website

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RACE 7 - DAY 19 - by Lynne Coulsen (Qingdao)

 

Mistletoe Watch 19 Days in. Ni Hao all Qingdao virtual sailors from all us wet ones! Hope all is well in the land of three hourly race viewing and you are all smiling into the New Year

 

Mistletoe watch is

 

Sam L - Watch leader - UK (RTW)

James R - Assistant watch leader UK (RTW)

David H - Scottish (RTW)

Brett - Chinese (Leg 5)

Hale (Haa Ley) - Turkish (Leg 5)

and me, Lynne Aus (Leg 5)

 

We'll be changing our seasonal name soon so we are working on that presently.

 

We have a very international watch as well as the five distinct nationalities, most of us have lived and worked in different countries or been brought up in them. Our dialect of the moment comes straight from the mouth of the last speaker and we have several "pigeon" languages going at once. "Tell to me how many knots we are making?" being a prime example! The "please and thank yous" do not always happen where you expect them if at all; but the intent is just magic, as are hand signals and body language. Our personal space as strangers was gone by the time we had finished "feeding the fish" all those weeks ago.

 

Day times are concentrated on the race, making all we can of helm and trim, as well as adding in extra activities such as splicing and whipping. Sharing activities to the best of our abilities means the girls are hanging onto the spinnaker sheet for 30 minutes whereas the boys manage an hour. Brett is doing great bread and we are anxiously awaiting more fish from David (no pressure mate).

 

The three newbies for Leg 5 are all now good in the upwind helming department for an hour each shift under the calm (most of the time) direction of Sam or James. This means some helmsick moments for the RTWs in those conditions. But downwind under the kite with some narrow margins and lumpy water the helm belongs to the experts until the conditions even out a bit reading for teaching/learning.

 

Sleeping during the day sucks! We have a big industrial fan in the ghetto and mostly can have the hatch open and Sam H will rig up a "scoop" to catch some breeze too. We are mostly sweating in underwear - I'm lying on two towels or have a wet one on me - haven't touched my expensive sleeping bag yet!

 

Night time When we can we get a hot drink in or water/squash/cordial. The watch have taken to Turkish Apple tea like ducks to water and even swear it keeps us regular! It won't be lasting until SNG that's for sure! We also get a little more time for comparing notes on childhood, marriage and our international influences.

 

Adapting Rod Stewart's "I am sailing" to current pastimes is also a regular - 'I am burning/sleepy/hungry'!

 

We seem to be looking at the end of the squalls patch that were making each evening and night seem like Groundhog Day! Sail changes and a good soaking several times a night often put dinner on hold!

 

Thank God there are no mirrors on board as I have taken to whipping out a purple shower cap as the dark clouds get closer - I think if I was RTW I'd have to chop the hair off at the next port - a day and half to dry is just nuts!

 

Squall management 101 (aka mariners version of the Hoki Koki)

 

You put one reef in

 

One reef out

Reef in

Reef out

The rain is all about

You reassess you course having turned around that's what it's all about

Put the yankee 2 down

Put the yankee 2 up

Ease, grind

Ease, grind

 

Enough to blow your mind!

 

Do another radar watch and turn around.

 

That's what it's all about!

 

Ending today, Brett and I have done Downwind Helming Part 1 with David; we've had issues with kites catching on the split pins on the shrouds so we have fixed four and had three in the saloon at the same time taking up most of our off watch!

 

As I watched everyone getting ready for watch tonight, Sam had started his radar and AIS checks early; David and James were discussing the independent state of Kazakhstan (sp?); Hale and Brett were joking about what they would look like if the wore each other’s specs (as you do), and I realised I was singing out loud to James Taylor's "California" at the dinner (OMG the cats are out and no one blinked!)

 

Summary: happy (knackered) little vegimites

 

Bye Bye <- good for five languages!

 

OA

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Thanks Ozzie.

You may not see these comments for a while, but thanks for the update from the boat.

 

Purple shower cap is in stark contrast to the image we have on the SA Calendar (that I still have not seen here yet)!!!

Pics of that would be good.:P

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A bit disappointing, even more so for the other boats that may have had a chance to improve their placings.

 

 

Gold Coast Australia wins Race 7 after Race Committee shortens course - 19 January 2012

Gold Coast Australia has claimed victory in Race 7 of the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race after the Race Committee made the decision to shorten the course in the stage from the Gold Coast to Singapore.

 

Extremely light winds which would have prevented the race management team from setting a fair course for the second stage of Race 7, combined with an increased threat of piracy in the Singapore Straits in the light conditions over the Chinese New Year, led to the tough decision. The positions of the yachts at the Celebes Sea Gate, which marked the end of the first phase of the race from Australia, will be taken as the final standings for Race 7.

 

Race Director, Joff Bailey, told the teams at 0700 UTC today, "Race 7 to Celebes Sea Gate from the Gold Coast was certainly long enough at 3,200nm to qualify as a serious race. It was run fairly, you all had chances to make gains and losses and see your tactics play out and I believe it was one of the most interesting races we have run."

 

During the race the lead changed hands a number of times as the ten internationally-backed yachts fought for supremacy with Geraldton Western Australia, Qingdao and Derry-Londonderry all taking their turn to lead the fleet. Gold Coast Australia's tactic of heading much further north than the other nine teams before hooking in to a favourable current allowed them to swoop into the lead in the final miles before the Celebes Sea Gate, which has now become the Race 7 finish line.

 

They beat Derry-Londonderry into second place by just an hour and 19 minutes, and Geraldton Western Australia claimed third place three hours and 15 minutes behind the Northern Ireland entry. Both teams have recorded their best results of the campaign.

 

It was a closely fought race, with both Qingdao and Singapore, who were aiming to be on the podium when the fleet arrives in Marina at Keppel Bay, both in contention for one of the top three places. They finished fourth and fifth respectively; Qingdao's result is a campaign-best result for the Chinese team.

 

Completing the finish order, De Lage Landen finished sixth, followed by New York, Visit Finland, Welcome to Yorkshire and Edinburgh Inspiring Capital.

 

It is the team's sixth victory of the Clipper 11-12 Race. The result consolidates Gold Coast Australia's dominance of the competition and the team is now 20 points ahead of closest rivals, Visit Finland. Dutch entry De Lage Landen remains in third place overall.

 

The fleet will now proceed to Batam, Indonesia, where they will muster ahead of a spectacular ceremonial arrival in Marina at Keppel Bay, Singapore on Saturday 28 January.

 

Ms Wang Look Fung, Director, Group Corporate Affairs at Keppel Corporation, Singapore's Team Sponsor and Host Port Sponsor for the Singapore stopover, said, "Many Keppelites and Singaporeans are all eagerly awaiting the arrival of the Clipper Race fleet into Marina at Keppel Bay. The international event will certainly lend colour and vibrancy to Keppel Bay's appeal as a waterfront lifestyle hub with our luxurious homes, a marina playground, and a host of other waterfront amenities including Singapore's only RYA-accredited Keppel Bay Sailing Academy."

 

Race 7 Finishing Order (All times UTC):

 

1. Gold Coast Australia 13/01/2012 21:55

2. Derry-Londonderry 13/01/2012 23:14

3. Geraldton Western Australia 14/01/2012 02:29

4. Qingdao 14/01/2012 03:13

5. Singapore 14/01/2012 03:25

6. De Lage Landen 14/01/2012 09:36

7. New York 14/01/2012 12:24

8. Visit Finland 14/01/2012 20:22

9. Welcome to Yorkshire 15/01/2012 03:22

10. Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 16/01/2012 15:51

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A bit disappointing, even more so for the other boats that may have had a chance to improve their placings.

 

 

Gold Coast Australia wins Race 7 after Race Committee shortens course - 19 January 2012

Gold Coast Australia has claimed victory in Race 7 of the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race after the Race Committee made the decision to shorten the course in the stage from the Gold Coast to Singapore.

 

Extremely light winds which would have prevented the race management team from setting a fair course for the second stage of Race 7, combined with an increased threat of piracy in the Singapore Straits in the light conditions over the Chinese New Year, led to the tough decision. The positions of the yachts at the Celebes Sea Gate, which marked the end of the first phase of the race from Australia, will be taken as the final standings for Race 7.

 

Race Director, Joff Bailey, told the teams at 0700 UTC today, "Race 7 to Celebes Sea Gate from the Gold Coast was certainly long enough at 3,200nm to qualify as a serious race. It was run fairly, you all had chances to make gains and losses and see your tactics play out and I believe it was one of the most interesting races we have run."

 

During the race the lead changed hands a number of times as the ten internationally-backed yachts fought for supremacy with Geraldton Western Australia, Qingdao and Derry-Londonderry all taking their turn to lead the fleet. Gold Coast Australia's tactic of heading much further north than the other nine teams before hooking in to a favourable current allowed them to swoop into the lead in the final miles before the Celebes Sea Gate, which has now become the Race 7 finish line.

 

They beat Derry-Londonderry into second place by just an hour and 19 minutes, and Geraldton Western Australia claimed third place three hours and 15 minutes behind the Northern Ireland entry. Both teams have recorded their best results of the campaign.

 

It was a closely fought race, with both Qingdao and Singapore, who were aiming to be on the podium when the fleet arrives in Marina at Keppel Bay, both in contention for one of the top three places. They finished fourth and fifth respectively; Qingdao's result is a campaign-best result for the Chinese team.

 

Completing the finish order, De Lage Landen finished sixth, followed by New York, Visit Finland, Welcome to Yorkshire and Edinburgh Inspiring Capital.

 

It is the team's sixth victory of the Clipper 11-12 Race. The result consolidates Gold Coast Australia's dominance of the competition and the team is now 20 points ahead of closest rivals, Visit Finland. Dutch entry De Lage Landen remains in third place overall.

 

The fleet will now proceed to Batam, Indonesia, where they will muster ahead of a spectacular ceremonial arrival in Marina at Keppel Bay, Singapore on Saturday 28 January.

 

Ms Wang Look Fung, Director, Group Corporate Affairs at Keppel Corporation, Singapore's Team Sponsor and Host Port Sponsor for the Singapore stopover, said, "Many Keppelites and Singaporeans are all eagerly awaiting the arrival of the Clipper Race fleet into Marina at Keppel Bay. The international event will certainly lend colour and vibrancy to Keppel Bay's appeal as a waterfront lifestyle hub with our luxurious homes, a marina playground, and a host of other waterfront amenities including Singapore's only RYA-accredited Keppel Bay Sailing Academy."

 

Race 7 Finishing Order (All times UTC):

 

1. Gold Coast Australia 13/01/2012 21:55

2. Derry-Londonderry 13/01/2012 23:14

3. Geraldton Western Australia 14/01/2012 02:29

4. Qingdao 14/01/2012 03:13

5. Singapore 14/01/2012 03:25

6. De Lage Landen 14/01/2012 09:36

7. New York 14/01/2012 12:24

8. Visit Finland 14/01/2012 20:22

9. Welcome to Yorkshire 15/01/2012 03:22

10. Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 16/01/2012 15:51

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A bit disappointing, even more so for the other boats that may have had a chance to improve their placings.

 

 

Gold Coast Australia wins Race 7 after Race Committee shortens course - 19 January 2012

Gold Coast Australia has claimed victory in Race 7 of the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race after the Race Committee made the decision to shorten the course in the stage from the Gold Coast to Singapore.

 

Extremely light winds which would have prevented the race management team from setting a fair course for the second stage of Race 7, combined with an increased threat of piracy in the Singapore Straits in the light conditions over the Chinese New Year, led to the tough decision. The positions of the yachts at the Celebes Sea Gate, which marked the end of the first phase of the race from Australia, will be taken as the final standings for Race 7.

 

Race Director, Joff Bailey, told the teams at 0700 UTC today, "Race 7 to Celebes Sea Gate from the Gold Coast was certainly long enough at 3,200nm to qualify as a serious race. It was run fairly, you all had chances to make gains and losses and see your tactics play out and I believe it was one of the most interesting races we have run."

 

During the race the lead changed hands a number of times as the ten internationally-backed yachts fought for supremacy with Geraldton Western Australia, Qingdao and Derry-Londonderry all taking their turn to lead the fleet. Gold Coast Australia's tactic of heading much further north than the other nine teams before hooking in to a favourable current allowed them to swoop into the lead in the final miles before the Celebes Sea Gate, which has now become the Race 7 finish line.

 

They beat Derry-Londonderry into second place by just an hour and 19 minutes, and Geraldton Western Australia claimed third place three hours and 15 minutes behind the Northern Ireland entry. Both teams have recorded their best results of the campaign.

 

It was a closely fought race, with both Qingdao and Singapore, who were aiming to be on the podium when the fleet arrives in Marina at Keppel Bay, both in contention for one of the top three places. They finished fourth and fifth respectively; Qingdao's result is a campaign-best result for the Chinese team.

 

Completing the finish order, De Lage Landen finished sixth, followed by New York, Visit Finland, Welcome to Yorkshire and Edinburgh Inspiring Capital.

 

It is the team's sixth victory of the Clipper 11-12 Race. The result consolidates Gold Coast Australia's dominance of the competition and the team is now 20 points ahead of closest rivals, Visit Finland. Dutch entry De Lage Landen remains in third place overall.

 

The fleet will now proceed to Batam, Indonesia, where they will muster ahead of a spectacular ceremonial arrival in Marina at Keppel Bay, Singapore on Saturday 28 January.

 

Ms Wang Look Fung, Director, Group Corporate Affairs at Keppel Corporation, Singapore's Team Sponsor and Host Port Sponsor for the Singapore stopover, said, "Many Keppelites and Singaporeans are all eagerly awaiting the arrival of the Clipper Race fleet into Marina at Keppel Bay. The international event will certainly lend colour and vibrancy to Keppel Bay's appeal as a waterfront lifestyle hub with our luxurious homes, a marina playground, and a host of other waterfront amenities including Singapore's only RYA-accredited Keppel Bay Sailing Academy."

 

Race 7 Finishing Order (All times UTC):

 

1. Gold Coast Australia 13/01/2012 21:55

2. Derry-Londonderry 13/01/2012 23:14

3. Geraldton Western Australia 14/01/2012 02:29

4. Qingdao 14/01/2012 03:13

5. Singapore 14/01/2012 03:25

6. De Lage Landen 14/01/2012 09:36

7. New York 14/01/2012 12:24

8. Visit Finland 14/01/2012 20:22

9. Welcome to Yorkshire 15/01/2012 03:22

10. Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 16/01/2012 15:51

 

"Extreme chance of piracy in Singapore Straits" You gotta be kiddin ! Have any of you Euro fags sailed Asia ? I've cruised and chartered my own yacht, raced in all the regional regattas and crewed seismic and supply boats in Asia for the past 40 years without one incident ! On the contrary, fishing boats enjoy a chat and most often will give you a basket of their catch. You wimps need to HARDEN THE FUCK UP !.

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Where is Lydia?

 

Can't stomach the food !!

Next year is my sailing year and I get a new boat for that!

 

Of course I am at work paying for it now.

I don't get to go to Qingdoa either thanks to the shift in the Etchell Worlds dates.

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Wait until the dead of night and ........................

 

Enjoy and good luck. Podium for you on this leg.

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Off again tomorrow

The biggest deal of the last leg was squalls- this time we'll be going into it

Only 1 person out of 13 I'm not on the same page with so I'm delighted & looking forward to the next 23 days :)

 

Come on Ozee, we need some dirt and gossip.

Did they steal your socks, have bad personal habits, refuse to be on time for watch change...........

 

Can't all be beer and skittles.

 

Good luck on a podium finish.

 

Enjoy every minute.

At least you don't have car parking issues!!smile.gif

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Thanks DtM :)

Leka I got a good boat! Besides drunk 20-30 year olds which is just boring, there doesn't seem to be too much going down, we have lost a few to shoulder surgery this leg & I ended up asking for some Physio for a shoulder too. I hear but not confirmed there are some/1 going as they don't think they'll get any more out of the next few legs which would happen in any race 1/2 way & I have heard some/1 going as they are not happy. Again just heard board having meetings to clear the air... All normal in the middle of something like this plus humans!

Challenges for next leg... Barely any kitework if any; some uncharted waters to avoid; some disputed sovereignties; wind over current at the end of Tawainwith big messy waves with no backs, guess the racing might get slow in favour of no breakages cross everything we want 10 boats out the other end unlike "the professionals" who do ocean racing ;) xxx

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Thanks DtM :)

Leka I got a good boat! Besides drunk 20-30 year olds which is just boring, there doesn't seem to be too much going down, we have lost a few to shoulder surgery this leg & I ended up asking for some Physio for a shoulder too. I hear but not confirmed there are some/1 going as they don't think they'll get any more out of the next few legs which would happen in any race 1/2 way & I have heard some/1 going as they are not happy. Again just heard board having meetings to clear the air... All normal in the middle of something like this plus humans!

Challenges for next leg... Barely any kitework if any; some uncharted waters to avoid; some disputed sovereignties; wind over current at the end of Tawainwith big messy waves with no backs, guess the racing might get slow in favour of no breakages cross everything we want 10 boats out the other end unlike "the professionals" who do ocean racing ;) xxx

 

Hey Ozee

 

Just looked at the race tracker.

 

You guys should probably tack soon, what with that island in front of you and all.

 

ps mr adventure claims to be losing weight at a rate of knots. not sure about his diet, but have been instructed to invite him over for duck. he appears to have suffered a relapse of his long dormant one design syndrome, however getting our arses handed to us at the the worlds might be that which'll heal what ails him.

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Ouch! This is not going to be easy to deal with.

 

 

'Helicopter to airlift injured crew member from Gold Coast Australia - 18 February 2012

A search and rescue helicopter has been dispatched from Taiwan to airlift an injured crew member from Gold Coast Australia, one of the ten 68-foot yachts competing in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race.

 

Tim Burgess, 30, a researcher from Petersham, NSW, Australia, has broken his left leg above the knee. The incident happened on the foredeck during a headsail change.

 

Skipper, Richard Hewson, informed the Race Office by telephone at 0200 UTC. He reported that Tim was in good spirits and had been given morphine and was being looked after by nurses and fellow crew members, Deborah Miller, from Surfers Paradise, Gold Coast, and Deborah Grant, from Malanda, Queensland.

 

De Lage Landen, which was eight miles away from Gold Coast Australia at the time, had already diverted to assist if necessary as they have two doctors among the crew. The Race Office has asked De Lage Landen, to stay with Gold Coast Australia while they proceed towards Tan Shui in Taiwan, as requested by the Taiwanese Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC).

 

If it is possible in the tough conditions, the helicopter will airlift Tim from the yacht and take him to hospital in the capital, Taipei.

 

The Clipper Race fleet is currently battling strong north easterly headwinds of approximately 30 knots after passing through the Luzon Strait to race up the east coast of Taiwan to Qingdao, China. The sea state is extremely challenging, with steep four-metre waves.

 

Gold Coast Australia was approximately 600 miles from the finish line when the incident happened. The rest of the crew on board are safe and well.'

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We came last but loved it- feel about 90 everything hurts - have done over 50 hours helming under storm jib & 3 reefs. Not sure if it's helming or hanging on! Need 12/24 sleep! If any pics come thru check the salt on foulies for those who actually get kn front of the mast!

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Hey Ozee it is time for some in depth reporting from you. :rolleyes:

First night in my own bed last night - work this am - on the way!

 

CLIPPER 11-12

QINGDAO STOPOVER

 

* Spectacular farewell ceremony held in Qingdao

* Drummers and thousands of spectators send off fleet

* Race Committee postpones Race 9 start due to poor visibility

 

The Clipper 11-12 Race fleet has departed Qingdao today. The spectacular welcome ceremonies the individual teams received upon their arrival at the Olympic Sailing Centre was exceeded by an even more lavish departure ceremony shown live on Chinese television.

 

The red carpet was rolled out for the ten skippers and crew from the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race fleet. Draped in their yellow silk ceremonial cloaks and white hats, each skipper was presented with a colourful combat flag displaying the name of their team.

 

Ian Conchie, skipper of home port entry Qingdao reflects on his days in port saying, "The interest from everybody has been amazing. Whether it has been from the officials, the media or the many residents that have stopped us in the street, everyone has just been so interested in getting to know us and find out more about the Clipper Race."

 

Amongst the Chinese dignitaries attending the departure ceremony was Madam Zang, Honorary Chairman of Qingdao Yachting Association, who wished the teams good luck on the forthcoming race. She said, "The arrival of the fleet adds to the dynamism of Qingdao, the Sailing Capital of China, and offered an opportunity to citizens to experience the charm and excitement of this top global sailing event. I wish you a safe and fast voyage across the Pacific Ocean."

 

The Clipper 11-12 Race fleet then left the marina to the sound of drums and thousands of cheering locals, as well as the sights of dragon dancers and fireworks. However, an icy blast brought snow showers sweeping across the Olympic Sailing Centre just before the boats slipped their lines and headed out for the start line in reducing visibility.

 

"Between setting the start line and the ten minute signal, visibility on the water deteriorated to less than half a mile. At times we could not see the pin end of the start line. After a short postponement to see if conditions improved, I decided that it was unwise to start the race with the low visibility," says Race Director Joff Bailey.

 

The ten Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race entries are now making their way to a waypoint approximately 25nm offshore. When conditions allow, the nominated lead skipper Ben Bowley from Singapore will line the yachts up and start Race 9. This is now expected to be Monday morning (local time).

 

The fleet is expected to arrive in Oakland, California between 1-7 April and will be hosted by the 2012 Strictly Sail Pacific Boat Show in Jack London Square. The winning team of Race 9 will be presented with the "Strictly Sail Pacific Clipper Cup" on the opening day of the show, 12 April.

 

ENDS

 

Standings after Race 8 Points

1 Gold Coast Australia 83 points

2 Visit Finland 59 points

3 De Lage Landen 57 points

4 Singapore 46 points

5 New York 44 points

6 Geraldton Western Australia 43 points

7 Derry-Londonderry 40 points

8 Welcome to Yorkshire 39 points

9 Qingdao 35 points

10 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 17 points

 

Once Race 9 starts, full positions are updated every three hours and can be found at www.clipperroundtheworld.com.

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CLIPPER 11-12

RACE 9: QINGDAO TO SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

DAY 1

 

* Delayed Race 9 underway as Clipper 11-12 fleet races towards

mighty Pacific Ocean

* Le Mans start in improved conditions

* Crews settle back into life at sea after unforgettable stopover

in Qingdao

 

Race 9 of the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race is now in full

swing after a Le Mans start for the ten international teams taking part

in the 6,000-mile journey to Oakland, California. Yesterday the Race

Committee decided to postpone the start due to difficult weather

conditions and poor visibility as fog blanketed the fleet just five

minutes from the start in Qingdao.

 

After a spectacular visit and farewell ceremony held in China's Olympic

Sailing City, where drummers and thousands of spectators flocked to wish

the teams well, the Race Director instructed the fleet to begin motoring

towards a waypoint 25 miles offshore where it was hoped more favourable

conditions would be found.

 

Lead skipper, Singapore's Ben Bowley, judged the conditions appropriate

this morning and the race got underway at 0235 UTC (1035 local time)

today.

 

In a Le Mans start the yachts form up in a straight line with their

mainsails hoisted and their headsails hanked on and ready to go. On each

of the yachts the crew wait aft of the coffee grinder for the start

signal, at which point they race forward to hoist the headsails and trim

them as quickly as possible.

 

At this stage of the race, more than half way through their 40,000-mile

circumnavigation, the crews are developing into experienced sailors and

rivalry between the teams is fierce. There are still seven more stages

to be contested and Geraldton Western Australia's crew have proved that

a couple of good results can really make a difference when the

competition is this tight. At the start of Race 7 they were ninth, now

beginning Race 9 they are sixth overall and within a whisker of

overtaking New York for fifth place.

 

As the crew settle into life at sea again, on board the Western

Australia entry, skipper Juan Coezter and his team started well and

trimmed quickly to give themselves a slight advantage.

 

Juan reports that despite the challenging weather they will face on this

leg, he and his team are looking once more to capitalise on their

inspiring pace of the last two races.

 

"This afternoon the wind has filled in and Ben did an amazing job of

lining us all up and organizing the count down."

 

As he and his crew enjoy an exhilarating power reach Juan adds, "It's

going to be a drag race to the next virtual mark."

 

The yachts have maintained their line-abreast formation spread across 20

miles from north east to south west with very little between them in

terms of distance to finish. But, as Gold Coast Australia's skipper,

Richard Hewson, remarks, that finish line is a long way away.

 

The Tasmanian yachtsman was up the rig repairing a snapped topping lift

as the race started and the team found themselves ten lengths behind as

Race 9 got underway.

 

"There is still 5,600 miles to go in the race so ten boat lengths is

quite insignificant and already we have caught up to the majority of the

fleet and racing hard to get into the lead before we round the south

western edge of Japan and begin making our way across the North Pacific

Ocean," he comments.

 

"Due to the distance of this race and the conditions we may face, this

race is more about preservation and endurance than boat speed. You need

to finish the race to win it so we will be focusing on safety while

still keeping the best course and speed towards the finish line that we

can safely maintain," Richard adds.

 

On board Derry-Londonderry, skipper Mark Light, says, "Here we are

again, back on the water, this time heading south easterly out of the

Yellow Sea. Thank you to all who contributed to a fantastic stopover in

Qingdao. It was a spectacular welcome, we experienced superb hospitality

throughout and we were given an equally brilliant send off!

 

Commenting on tactics for the Le Mans start Mark explains, "Generally

the boat that hoists and trims the quickest will surge forward into

cleaner air and gain the first advantage. We managed to start fairly

well and have already made a couple of places. In these races it is very

important not to lose ground and split with the rest of the fleet in the

first few days and so far so good. Although pretty cold and wet it is

great to be racing again!"

 

New York skipper, Gareth Glover, agrees, saying "After a great stopover

in Qingdao we were all happy to get racing again but not in the very

cold wind and rain and poor visibility on the start line. It was hard to

make out the start boat and the line and any other yachts that were

around!

 

"After a few hours motoring south the wind picked up and a Le Mans start

was called. We all made a clear start and are now making ten knots to

the next waypoint with Gold Coast Australia and Visit Finland on our

port side."

 

New York and Derry-Londonderry are with a group of five teams that are

maintaining a central position within the span of the fleet as they race

south east towards the southern tip of Japan. With them are Welcome to

Yorkshire, Singapore, Visit Finland and Edinburgh Inspiring Capital.

 

As the Finnish entry's tactics come into play, skipper, Olly Osborne,

says, "It's good to be racing again and we are making good speeds

towards our waypoint off Japan. The decision to head further offshore

seems to have paid off as we are now into some good breeze and have

hopefully avoided the worst of the fish farms in the shallower water.

 

"The Le Mans start went very well and proved to be an unusual and

exciting way to start this long race, with the teams each trying to

outhoist each other in the bid to outmanoeuvre the pack. Thoughts on

board are now turning toward the weeks ahead, and the scale of what we

are likely to encounter makes for a slightly pensive mood. But the

conditions are due to improve and we are off to a good start."

 

Meanwhile, on board Edinburgh Inspiring Capital, skipper Gordon Reid,

says, "After enjoying a truly awesome welcome ceremony including the

skipper's gift of a regal gold cape with a groovy red velvet lining, and

the fabulous hospitality of the people of Qingdao, it was time once more

to step up to the mark, with a fantastic leaving ceremony, including

another outing for the skipper's cape we were waved off to a chorus of

100 drummers and fireworks as we left the marina.

 

"We made our way to the waypoint in the hope that the visibility would

improve and we could start racing, dodging fish farms, fishing boats and

a whole host of other shipping in the fog as we went. Early this morning

as the fog lifted, we lined up for a Le Mans start and got off the line,

flying in 15 to 20 knots of breeze on a fast reach, quickly topping ten

knots VMG (Velocity Made Good.)"

 

Eager to gain a place on the podium, Gordon adds, "It's great to be

underway and racing again. We are all looking forward to racing across

the planet's biggest ocean and what I am sure will be the many

challenges that lie ahead. To all of our friends and family back home,

thank you for your continued support and remember, just like we do on

the 'Purple Beastie', keep the faith!"

 

"This is it, the big one! After a fantastic stay in Qingdao, the Welcome

to Yorkshire team is on its way again, this time to San Francisco Bay,

some 6,000 miles away," enthuses skipper, Rupert Dean.

 

"We left Qingdao yesterday with happy memories we will treasure forever.

The weather, however, was less kind. Sleet, snow, bitter cold and

terrible visibility dictated the postponement of the start in waters

festooned with ships. Totally the right call, therefore, to motor sail

in the right direction overnight and start the race with the first Le

Mans start of this magnificent round the world yacht race.

 

With better winds and visibility, the Welcome to Yorkshire team did

themselves good credit in an exciting start. We are now racing, line

abreast with the rest of the fleet on the way to the first waypoint off

Japan, the Saya Misaki light."

 

With the teams battling to steal a march on their competitors, Rupert

knows there is all to play for.

 

"Tactically, this first stage is very much a boat speed drag race," he

says. "With fresh reaching conditions, good progress is being made under

full main, staysail and Yankee 1. The crew is adjusting well to the on

board routine and we are racing hard, proudly waving the English flag

for our Welcome to Yorkshire sponsor."

 

The race across the Pacific looms large in the minds of the people from

all walks of life who are taking part in the Clipper Round the World

Yacht Race. They are all too aware of the isolation and potentially

savage conditions that could be encountered in the vast expanse of the

world's largest ocean.

 

"I think that many of us are looking at this leg as the biggie; with not

only the most miles but also some of the most challenging conditions we

are likely to face," explains Singapore skipper, Ben Bowley. "It has to

be remembered that when we transited the Southern Ocean, it was at the

start of the Southern Hemisphere summer; whereas with this leg we are

crossing just at the end of the winter.

 

"Conditions are already a lot colder and this has come as a bit of a

shock having been encamped in a nice warm hotel room for the last two

weeks! Our kettle is rarely off the boil right now and we hope that by

consuming gallons of tea we shall be able to keep our hands and brains

warm enough to keep us one step ahead of the game, oh, and of course out

of the way of hundreds of fishing boats!"

 

With the team fuelled by all the tea in China and inspired by their

visit to Qingdao, Ben adds, "Qingdao was most definitely the greatest

welcome we have had since race start and for that we would like to thank

all those involved in putting on such a spectacular show. I think that

culturally, too, China has been our most fascinating taste yet of

another nation's rich and diverse peoples and history.

 

"We have a long way to go yet but with all the boats still essentially

in a line abreast, everyone is pushing hard to get an early advantage.

>From here to the bottom of Japan is looking like being a drag race so

focus must be at it absolute highest to prevent our competitors sneaking

ahead. This is easier said than done in the freezing, foggy and gusty

conditions we are all experiencing presently."

 

After what can only be described as a rock star reception in Qingdao,

the home port yacht's skipper, Ian Conchie, says, "Heading out into

thick fog off the harbour entrance was a memorable end to what has been

a truly memorable stopover. I cannot thank the people of Qingdao and the

organisers of the stopover enough for their hospitality.

 

"Whilst we were all disappointed not to have a normal start and give the

spectators a good show, postponing the start was the safe and

seaman-like thing to do as the visibility was so poor. This turned out

to be great for the crew as it gave them a nice gentle re-introduction

to life on board although this morning a few crew members have succumbed

to the dreaded seasickness and cold.

 

"In the Le Mans start and it looked great to see all the fleet lined up.

We did well getting the sails up quickly but Geraldton Western Australia

managed to get their headsails trimmed a little quicker so gained an

early advantage. Since then we have been duelling with De Lage Landen

and the whole fleet is very close still, heading for the next waypoint

at the edge of Japan."

 

Meanwhile, on board De Lage Landen, after scoring their first victory in

the race to Qingdao and enjoying the grand celebrations in port, skipper

Stuart Jackson reports that the delay has also given the new joiners in

his crew a chance to settle in to their battle rhythm.

 

"The farewell from Qingdao proved to be equally as impressive as the

arrival ceremony. With hundreds of drummers and speeches from

dignitaries we slipped lines to fireworks and then disappeared into the

fog! As we motored overnight to regroup for a Le Mans start this morning

it gave the crew a chance to settle into the routine of life on board

before being under race conditions, although not everyone has been

immune to sea sickness, only a few are suffering slightly!

 

"Having a different style of start was new for all the crew so added

some extra excitement and apprehension to proceedings. We have now been

racing for a couple of hours and all the yachts are making great speed

towards the south of Japan, which we will hopefully reach in a few

days."

 

As the teams leave behind a memorable stopover and their visiting

friends and family, thoughts are firmly on the race ahead.

 

Clipper Race Director, Joff Bailey, comments, "This is a notoriously

challenging leg of the race and the crews will be looking forward to

arriving in California. This is one of the toughest and longest stages

of the race. In previous editions the crews have taken quite a pounding

on their Pacific crossing, so they will all be looking forward to the

warm welcome awaiting them in Oakland.

 

"I am really pleased that 2012 Strictly Sail Pacific Boat Show will be

hosting the Clipper Race fleet in Jack London Square; it's the perfect

event to showcase our global race fleet."

 

The fleet is expected to arrive in Oakland in San Francisco Bay between

1 and 7 April. The Race 9 winning team will be presented with the

Strictly Sail Pacific Clipper Cup on the opening day of the show, 12

April.

 

ENDS

 

Positions at 1200 UTC, Monday 5 March 2012

 

Boat DTF*

1 Gold Coast Australia 5,426nm

2 Singapore 5,429nm (+3nm DTL**)

3 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 5,429nm (+3nm)

4 Welcome to Yorkshire 5,429nm (+3nm)

5 Visit Finland 5,429nm (+3nm)

6 Derry-Londonderry 5,429nm (+3nm)

7 New York 5,429nm (+3nm)

8 Geraldton Western Australia 5,430nm (+4nm)

9 Qingdao 5,431nm (+5nm)

10 De Lage Landen 5,432nm (+6nm)

 

*DTF = Distance to Finish, **DTL = Distance to Leader

post-23213-079358800 1331068209_thumb.jpg

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Starting the 20/20 hindsight...

Huge difference between those going Round The World (RTW) & us "leggers", the RTW's had to be really driven to do it for whatever reason; promised my dad before he died; no other way to go. Those who didn't have that drive ended up getting off between legs 3-5, whereas groundhog day for me was - how many squalls can there be between here & Singapore or if i don't know if I'm helming or hanging on there are only 7 more days of this left before Qingdao!

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Welcome to Yorkshire deals with 'the mother of all wraps' - 06 March 2012

 

Gold Coast Australia has pulled ahead of the tightly packed fleet taking part in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race. The ten yachts are still roughly in a line running north east to south west as they race through the East China Sea towards the southern tip of Japan and the open Pacific Ocean.

 

It has been a busy 24 hours for the Australian entry which has experienced a night of sail changes and dodging the East China Sea’s local fishing boats for the second time in this series.

 

Skipper, Richard Hewson, says, “Yesterday afternoon the wind veered as predicted and we set our heavyweight spinnaker allowing us to pull away slightly from the rest of the fleet who were at the time still very tightly bunched. After the sun set and at watch change a combination of gusty winds, freezing conditions, fog and a few nervous crew gave us enough reason to drop the spinnaker and run with the Yankee 1 throughout the night.

 

“This would be a decision we would definitely not regret as throughout the night there were a number of close encounters with unlit nets and vessels that did not show up on radar or AIS. After one such encounter I was called on deck as our speed had significantly decreased and the helmsman was having trouble maintaining course. We discovered that we were trailing a large net or line and had no option but to sail head to wind and try to shake the net off the keel and rudder. After ten minutes and various attempts, which included sailing the 68-foot yacht backwards like a dinghy, we finally managed to shake off the most significant part of the net, though I would not be surprised if there are still remnants under the hull. We will not be able to determine this until the weather further abates.”

 

Richard adds, “The manoeuvre of shaking the nets cost us a lot of time, and allowed the other yachts to catch up, though I'm sure they all had their fair share of obstacles last night. Later in the morning as the winds moderated we saw Welcome to Yorkshire sail across our bow with their kite up, a looming sight, seeing the pink yacht sailing under full sail in the mist. As the wind began to abate and the sky cleared slightly we also set our heavyweight spinnaker and have been heading east at good speed ever since.”

 

"A very fast start to this race sees Derry-Londonderry up into the top four leading boats and flying along under full main and heavyweight spinnaker at average speeds of eleven knots,” reports the Northern Irish entry’s skipper, Mark Light.

 

“An exciting night found us deep downwind with our Yankee 1 flying. It is against race rules to pole out this large headsail so to gain some more ground downwind we decided to ‘goose-wing’, or sail with the Yankee flying on the opposite side to the mainsail without the use of a pole. This requires a high degree of precision from the helm in order to keep both sails full.”

 

Commenting on the busy waters that surround China and Japan, Mark adds, “All was going well until we were greeted with the sight that no yachtsman wants to see, the bow of a huge tanker appearing out of the gloom!

 

“This monster ship, although close, seemed to be clearing down our starboard side then all of a sudden and to my horror, turned straight towards us! I immediately turned to starboard sharply, heading up into wind and pulling our Yankee across to the correct side to take serious avoiding action.

 

“We cleared by 200 to 300 metres then watched as Singapore had to do exactly the same severe manoeuvre clearing by only 100 metres or so. This was way too close for comfort! I learnt after that Gold Coast Australia had to crash tack to avoid the same vessel.”

 

Singapore skipper, Ben Bowley, describes the same heart-stopping incident, saying, “A combination of freezing fog, fishing boats, large commercial vessels has made navigation a little hazardous. We elected to spend the night under white sails even though the wind was just about ok for the heavy kite. In retrospect this was an excellent idea because having to make sudden course alterations under spinnaker with new inexperienced crew, at night, would have been more stress than I think we could have managed! We set up to hoist the kite at first light today only to find ourselves ensnared in yet another fishing fleet and a huge tanker had decided to make a large course alteration directly toward us. This is the absolute last thing you ever want to see bearing down on you out of the fog: 100,000 tons of steel and oil. We took evasive action and ended up less than 200 metres past his stern. Not the best way to start the day.

 

"After this we were able to gybe over and finally get the kite hoisted. The rest of the day has been spent constantly tweaking ‘Vicky’ [sticky Vicky – the crew’s nickname for the spinnaker due to the amount of repair tape she now sports] to get the best possible course and speed out of the boat. We've had some fantastic surfing conditions and the boat has been flying along. The sun had even made a few brief appearances and conditions have been conducive to coaching up some of the new leggers at helming under spinnaker. I'm sure tonight shall bring more nautical dodgems but for now we are happy to be seeing VMG (Velocity Made Good) of generally over ten knots.”

 

Things have not quite been going to plan on board Welcome to Yorkshire. The team was neck and neck with Gold Coast Australia in the lead at the midnight position report but shortly afterwards found themselves grappling with what skipper, Rupert Dean, describes as “the mother of all wraps”: the team’s heavyweight spinnaker wrapped around the inner forestay in tricky helming conditions.

 

Describing the scene, Rupert reports, “Our precious sail was trapped 80-foot up the rig with no means of getting it down. Chris Leivers and Jim Stamp bravely volunteered to go up to unwrap it, a feat made impossible by the 20 plus knots apparent wind blowing across the sail, big waves and the sheer size and power of the sail. Before returning to the deck, Chris unclipped the double halyard to bring it down with him. At least that would mean two less lines for it to tangle around.

 

“Thoughts now turned to more extreme measures. Cutting the sail down was one we didn't wish to pursue. Another possibility was to remove the entire inner forestay from the rig, lowering it and the sail together to be unwrapped on deck, again a far from simple operation in a big seaway. In the end we gybed the mainsail, which we needed to do anyway to attain better VMG, and deliberately steered the boat deep downwind, to encourage the kite to unwrap itself with the wind blowing the other way. Mercifully it worked and, with a bit of tugging from the foredeck, the sail at last slid down the stay onto the deck.

 

“For the Welcome to Yorkshire crew and me this was the worst spinnaker wrap we had ever experienced. Dealing with it was pretty stressful and very tiring. Thankfully the crew, sail and boat are all in one piece, we haven't lost too many miles on the opposition and we are fit to race again.”

 

Crew taking part in the Clipper Race can sign up to take on the whole 40,000-mile circumnavigation or one or more of the individual legs of the race. The extreme challenge of racing across the planet’s largest ocean is hugely popular and consequently a large number of new crew took their places amongst the teams in Qingdao at the start of the transpacific race. As they find their sea legs and get up to speed this provides an additional challenge for the teams, particularly in heavy weather.

 

On board New York, skipper Gareth Glover, explains, “The wind filled in, turned and started to come from our stern. Kite or pole out the head sail was the call, and with a lot of new crew on board we went for a poled out Yankee 2 which worked well, and most of the fleet must have been thinking the same as most were under the same sail plan as we were. They were still in range on AIS but the visibility was still down to only a few miles at best.

 

“As first light came we decided to go with our heavyweight kite which gives us more boat speed but there is a limit to the crew who can helm in around 20 knots of wind, running deep downwind with the pole far forward. It was going well until the kite clipped the back edge on the rig and ripped down the side. The crew are now working on repairing the kite so we can get it back flying again. It was great to see how the crew who have been on from the start helped the new crew get on with getting it all sorted fast and safely to get us racing again.”

 

Every facet of life on board an ocean racing yacht requires teamwork and the crew that works best together is very often the team that comes out on top.

 

As they weave their way through cargo ships and fishing fleets, Edinburgh Inspiring Capital’s skipper, Gordon Reid, notes, “For some of our new joiners it has been a tough few days, given the freezing temperatures and the slightly lumpy sea state. Everyone on the crew now seems to be settling into life on board and we are all looking forward to passing Japan and making our way into some nice deep blue ocean once more.

 

“With the wind veering slowly towards the north, we gybed across on to a port tack early this morning and now that the wind is a lot more consistent in its direction and speed we are going for a spinnaker hoist. This should set us up nicely for the Sata Misalki mark and allow us to come back on the breeze as it continues to veer. As we approach the next mark it will hopefully start to warm up a little in the Kuroshio (Black Snake) current which flows north from the warmer South China Sea along the south coast of Japan.”

 

Gordon adds, “With over 5,000 miles still to go the fleet are very much still in a tight group and regular banter is exchanged between the skippers as we navigate our way south east and onwards.”

 

Qingdao’s crew have spent the last 24 hours completing a series of sail changes to gain ground on their competitors, mindful of the new hands on board.

 

Skipper, Ian Conchie, says “With plenty of wind we spent the night with the Yankee 1 and full main and managed to hold some good speed. I decided not to hoist the kite in the night as the conditions were not ideal for a first kite run with new crew. This may have cost us some distance but it’s a long way to go and we didn't want to risk damage too early on.

 

“We hoisted the kite just before lunch today and as the fog lifted we could see both Visit Finland and De Lage Landen in the flesh rather than just as targets on the radar system. The fleet is still fairly close; all of us are in VHF range of each other and Skipper FM is full of chat and warnings of ships and fishing boats although, listening to the conversations, it seems that some of the fleet have had more issues than us with the shipping.

 

“We continue to head towards the southern tip of Japan and if we keep our current speed should round the corner sometime tomorrow. I think the whole fleet is praying for a change of wind when we get there though as currently it is showing a beat up the coast of Japan and, with the memories of the seas off Taiwan still in everyone’s minds, we are hoping for better conditions.”

 

In the meantime, though, according to Geraldton Western Australia’s skipper, Juan Coetzer, “It is still a drag race to the first virtual mark, weaving and dodging through fishing fleets, lobster pots, and high speed container ships.

 

“Last night the new crew on board experienced their first headsail change of this race, from a Yankee 1 to a Yankee 2 and this morning Nik Brbora had to go up the mast to clean our wind indicator as the pollution in China has caked our indicator black and at night you cannot see the reflectors which means we couldn’t use the wind instruments at night.”

 

De Lage Landen’s skipper, Stuart Jackson, reports that his team are glad to be racing after the foggy and snowy departure from Qingdao.

 

“We got off to a great start and it was good to get going to stave off the very cold conditions that we were experiencing! It was also the first taste of true ocean racing life for our new crew, and old, who are settling down for our long journey to San Francisco.”

 

“Everyone seems to be finding their feet on board today as the early fatigue of getting back into a watch system wears off,” reports Visit Finland skipper, Olly Osborne.

 

As the Finnish team continues to jockey for position Olly adds, “We have made some good distance since we started yesterday and the whole fleet is still very close. Most boats are in sight of one another and the competition is heating up as we all charge east under our heavyweight spinnakers.”

post-23213-060511900 1331149994_thumb.jpg

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Gold Coast still showing the way here.

 

OA, Hope you have recovered from your sail by now.

We have changed countries so have been away from the screen for a bit.

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Really cool to see the crew come off the dock last night at Jack London. Congrats to you all on your ocean crossing. Sorry US Customs took so long....

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Hey Ozee,

 

Unless I have missed it.

 

Where is your report !!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Seems like this last leg was long and hard (like Lydia, or so he says !!!).

 

I miss your putting the daily reports up here so now I have to go to the race website.

 

daniel

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Edit, just saw there is already a thread on it.

 

3 Injured as Wave Overtakes Yacht in Round the World Race

 

For a sailor on the ocean, there is perhaps nothing more bone-chilling than the sight of a skyscraper-size wave gathering to engulf your boat.

 

A crew of 13 seafarers experienced that on Saturday when an enormous wave crashed into their yacht, seriously injuring three people onboard during a storm in the Pacific Ocean, some 400 miles off the California coast. The wave hit the vessel with such force that it swallowed up the 68-foot boat’s steering wheel and mounting as well as some of its communications equipment, the authorities said.

 

“The sea was alive with rage,” said Juan Coetzer, the South African skipper of the yacht, the Geraldton Western Australia, one of 10 yachts participating in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race that began last July in Southampton, England.

 

“Just before the sun came up, a monstrous foaming swell broke over our stern,” he went on, adding: “We had no steering, and crew were falling all over the boat.”

 

 

 

By Sunday afternoon, the United States Coast Guard was on its way to rescue the injured crewmembers, most of whom are not professional sailors. According to a statement from Clipper Ventures — the company that organized the race – the injured include Jane Hitchens, 50, a doctor, and Nik Brbora, 28, a software engineer, both from England, as well as Max Wilson, 62, from Australia. A fourth man, Mark Burkes, 47, also from England, was not seriously injured, as was originally believed.

 

“We understand that one person is more severely injured than the other two, but we’re not exactly sure what the injuries are,” Petty Officer Third Class Barry Bena, a Coast Guard spokesman, said by telephone.

 

An earlier rescue effort by the Air National Guard’s 129th Rescue Wing was foiled when weather conditions prevented the team from parajumping to the scene from a search-and-rescue aircraft. Instead, medical supplies were dropped to the boat, which the Coast Guard calls the Clipper Venture 6. Another rescue vessel was then diverted from Alameda, Calif., to help the injured boaters. That vessel, the Coast Guard Cutter Berthoff, is carrying a Jayhawk helicopter.

 

Petty Officer Bena said around 3 p.m. that the rescue boat was in range but was still waiting for better weather conditions before a rescue swimmer would be sent in to assess the situation and determine what further action to take.

 

He said the crew’s own actions did not seem to be at fault in the accident. “The weather can become unpredictable at any moment,” he added. “They can only do so much. Beyond that, it’s just out of their control.”

 

The racing yachts were on the sixth leg of seven on their yearlong, 40,000-mile international sea adventure. The next part of the race is scheduled to take them through the Panama Canal, up between the Caribbean nations of Cuba and Haiti, and eventually to New York. From there, the participants will begin the final leg of their journey, and head back to England, arriving in July of this year. This is the eighth round-the-world race that Clipper Ventures has organized since 1995.

 

As of Sunday afternoon, Clipper Ventures said, all but one of the other nine vessels in the race had arrived safely at Oakland, Calif., where they will remain until the next leg of the race begins April 14.

 

“The North Pacific has lived up to its expectations,” Ian Conchie, the skipper of another racing yacht, the Qingdao, said in a statement after arriving on dry land for the first time in weeks. “Anyone who thought this would be full of champagne and sunny sailing doesn’t realize what the North Pacific in winter can be like.”

 

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Hey Ozee,

 

Unless I have missed it.

 

Where is your report !!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Seems like this last leg was long and hard (like Lydia, or so he says !!!).

 

I miss your putting the daily reports up here so now I have to go to the race website.

 

daniel

been slack 7 struggling to get into "normal" life - will start the dailies again if you want

:)

Whats in my report?

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Can we have a report on your experiences on your two legs please.

 

You can have a sealed version as well if you like !!!!

 

d

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Can we have a report on your experiences on your two legs please.

 

You can have a sealed version as well if you like !!!!

 

d

OK...

2 watches 4/24 on & off except a dog leg where everyone was awake from 11am-3pm most of the work go done in this time, during the dog leg one watch wold do 2 hours up on deck & then we'd swap. Not all the boats do it this way.

 

We had 13 on the boat so...

Skipper didn't routinely helm unless we couldn't manage the sail changes with only 5, he did stay up with us when it was hairy & basically slept on the floor fully dressed when it was crap weather - described his role as the bus driver so we did the work

 

1 mother (cooking & sleeping all night)may get called up to give us a hand

1 on helm

1 always in a harness - they went up pole for the shift & in the case of anyone going over we are all able to walk down the freeboard & do the business

1 had cleaning duties

1 had engineering duties

 

 

 

The hardest physical things were

1 squalls from Aus-Singers

2 wind against tide from Singers - Qingdao

 

Aus-Singers...

Squalls

Basically it was groundhog day mainly evenings & nights as the water sucked into clouds cooled - you could see them coming

 

We had 1 person on radar watch as well judging the size & reporting where & how far away

 

On this leg we were going down wind with kite up - so as soon as clouds were likely it would be up the pole ready for a drop & basically you stayed up there until the drop & then until they were ready for you to come down & someone was keeping an eye on you, someone else easing the winch.

 

I didn't helm too much as everyone was nervous they or I would screw up (thats my only regret out of the whole thing that i didn't insist & just have someone sitting beside me - I'll probably never do that again)

 

Basically just before the squall hit we took it all down & then put it all back up in varying stages depending on wind speed.

 

Was very warm on this leg so we didn't wear foulies just got drenched about 4-6 times on the night 4/24 shifts, hung your clothes up & put another outfit on when you woke up - 3 shorts & t shirts on the go, rinsed every night & yes we had shower gel & shampoo on deck. I have thick long hair which i would have cut off if I was going around the world & i used to pop a (purple of course) shower cap on as the wind got up ready for the rain. usually the rain was going sideways & hurt like stink but you were so involved in getting the sails down there wasn't too much of a fuss about that.

 

My shoulder started to play up coming into Singers, from getting myself onto the pole (I'm older than Tuffie) & when we got there I found out that 3 people had been taken off other boats & had rotator (sp) cuff surgery. I played the old lady card & asked for physio so I got a massage every day on insurance & didn't have to go to the spa for that!

 

Hands peeled, feet peeled, yachtie bottie peeled.

 

I lost about 6kg in 32 days but must have gained some muscle somewhere. Don't bother with the expensive sport bras ladies cause they don't fit after 1/2 way & be prepared to sleep & be seen in all your underwear - all black looks matching & not dirty. Bamboo stuff is great, has time to dry - the technical quick dry stuff just feels slimy all the time.

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Squall management 101 (aka mariners version of the Hoki Koki)

 

You put one reef in

One reef out

Reef in

Reef out

The rain is all about

You reassess you course having turned around

that's what it's all about

 

Put the yankee 2 down

Put the yankee 2 up

Ease, grind

Ease, grind

Enough to blow your mind!

Do another radar watch and turn around.

That's what it's all about!

 

Shower cap photo too big to attach!

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Geraldton Western Australia expected in port early this morning local time - 02 April 2012

 

The end of the Pacific Ocean is in sight for the battered, weary but very determined crew of Geraldton Western Australia after two dramatic days on board their 68-foot ocean racing yacht. The team is expected to arrive in Jack London Square, Oakland, at approximately 1am tomorrow, (0800 UTC/0900 BST) after a gruelling 6,000-mile journey across the vast, forbidding expanse of the world’s largest ocean.

 

On Saturday, as they were 400 miles off the California coast,a huge wave broke across the back of the boat injuring four of those on board. Last night the two most seriously injured, Jane Hitchens, 50, a doctor from Kent, UK, with suspected broken ribs; and NikBrbora, 29, a software engineer from London, UK, with a suspected pelvic sprain, were transferred by small boat to the state of the art US Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf. Earlier the crew had made the decision not to attempt an airlift because of the conditions.

 

Video footage from the US Coast Guard shows the huge swell both vessels had to contend with during the rescue operation.

 

Jane and Nik are due to arrive at the Coast Guard facility at Alameda in San Francisco Bay on board the USCG Bertholf at approximately 3pm local time (2200 UTC/2300 BST) this afternoon and will be transferred by ambulance to hospital in San Francisco.

 

Meanwhile, Max Wilson, 62, who also has a suspected rib injury, and is determined to finish the race under the Golden Gate Bridge, and Mark Burkes, 47, whose back injury is not as serious as initially thought, have remained on board with the rest of the crew. They are now making good progress towards Oakland under their secondary steering system which they immediately set up after the massive force of the wave took out their wheel and steering column.

 

Messages of support for the crew from all over the world have been tweeted and posted on the official Clipper Race page on Facebook and Tourism Western Australia’s team in London said, “We can’t even begin to imagine the situation on board but wanted to send our best wishes to you all and belief that the team’s strength and tremendous courage, led by Juan [Coetzer], will get you safely to the US.

 

“We will closely follow your Race News and updates awaiting the safe arrival to shore.”

 

The team is expected to arrive in Jack London Square, Oakland, at approximately 1am local time on Wednesday morning (0800 UTC/0900 BST).

 

Last night three other yachts completed the longest individual stage of the 15-race 40,000-mile competition, arriving to a warm welcome in Oakland.

 

De LageLanden’s crew, who had their own drama earlier in the race when one of their crew members was injured close to Japan, fulfilled their promise to her as she left the boat and did not finish last.

 

The team completed the course in seventh place and immediately set about celebrating their achievement, which also sees them climb above Visit Finland to second place overall in Clipper 11-12.

 

Olly Osborne, the skipper of Visit Finland, which drops down to third place, explained just how tough it was in the North Pacific.

 

“It’s been relentless,” he said. “It’s certainly been very demanding, more so than any other race that we’ve done. The objective for the leg for me was finishing. Coming in ninth wasn’t our best result, but I think it was all about getting through it and getting here in once piece.

 

“At times I felt the sea state was quite threatening and you get a cross swell, especially at nightwhen it’s pitch black and you don’t see it coming. We took a few serious wallops. Visit Finlandwas never fully knocked down, but you just wonder when the next one is coming and you think, oh no, someone is going to get done in – but you don’t, you survive.

 

“Coming into the finish we saw the sun for the first time in the last month and we did about 27 knots coming into a big breaking wave. It was just an epic feeling; quite exhilarating. Then the Golden Gate Bridge appeared – a wonderful sight!”

 

Finnish round the world crew member, RiikkaPuustinen, was also thrilled to reach in Oakland.

 

“The arrival was absolutely fantastic and such a contrast. We have spent one month in grey, miserable, wet, horrible weather across the whole Pacific Ocean and then upon our arrival we have beautiful sunshine and we did our speed record, due to the swell just before the gate, as we surfed at 27 knots of boat speed. It was such an amazing finish to the whole journey.

 

“Even though we are finishing ninth, I can’t be unhappy, because this time it felt like it wasn’t about the race, it was about the endurance and just making it across in one piece with no injuries.”

 

Edinburgh Inspiring Capital’s crew also wasted no time in celebrating their arrival in port, finishing four hours behind De LageLanden and two before Visit Finland. Tales of adventure, what happened and what might have been were swapped long into the night by those who can now note in their log book an ocean crossing few will ever complete.

 

Eight arrivals in a little over 24 hours shows how closely the teams are matched three-quarters of the way into the world’s longest yacht race, and the final podium positions when the ten yachts return to Southampton on England’s south coast on 22 July are still very much up for the taking.

 

Gold Coast Australia scored an additional point in their bid to take the Clipper 11-12 title by winning the Ocean Sprint time trial. Their time of 25 hours 53 minutes and 42 seconds for the distance between longitudes 142 degrees west and 136 degrees west could not be beaten. Singaporecame the closest with a time of 27hours 29minutes and 58seconds for the 275-mile distance.

 

Today Ms Wang Look Fung, Director, Group Corporate Affairs for the yacht’s sponsor, Keppel Corporation, sent skipper Ben Bowley and his crew a message:

 

“Congratulations on a well-executed race!” she said. “Despite the grueling conditions that the Pacific Ocean is known for, the team has exemplified the Keppel Can Do! spirit and overcame all odds to secure a commendable podium win.

 

“Keppelites are proud to be associated with the spirit of achievement, tenacity, perseverance and teamwork that saw the whole crew through the ups and down in this leg that is the toughest in the whole race.”

 

The fleet will be berthed at Jack London Square until 14 April and will be hosted by the 2012 Strictly Sail Pacific boat show. Gold Coast Australia’s crew will be presented with the Strictly Sail Pacific Clipper Race Cup when the show opens on 9 April.

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Can we have a report on your experiences on your two legs please.

 

You can have a sealed version as well if you like !!!!

 

d

OK...

2 watches 4/24 on & off except a dog leg where everyone was awake from 11am-3pm most of the work go done in this time, during the dog leg one watch wold do 2 hours up on deck & then we'd swap. Not all the boats do it this way.

 

We had 13 on the boat so...

Skipper didn't routinely helm unless we couldn't manage the sail changes with only 5, he did stay up with us when it was hairy & basically slept on the floor fully dressed when it was crap weather - described his role as the bus driver so we did the work

 

1 mother (cooking & sleeping all night)may get called up to give us a hand

1 on helm

1 always in a harness - they went up pole for the shift & in the case of anyone going over we are all able to walk down the freeboard & do the business

1 had cleaning duties

1 had engineering duties

 

 

 

The hardest physical things were

1 squalls from Aus-Singers

2 wind against tide from Singers - Qingdao

 

Aus-Singers...

Squalls

Basically it was groundhog day mainly evenings & nights as the water sucked into clouds cooled - you could see them coming

 

We had 1 person on radar watch as well judging the size & reporting where & how far away

 

On this leg we were going down wind with kite up - so as soon as clouds were likely it would be up the pole ready for a drop & basically you stayed up there until the drop & then until they were ready for you to come down & someone was keeping an eye on you, someone else easing the winch.

 

I didn't helm too much as everyone was nervous they or I would screw up (thats my only regret out of the whole thing that i didn't insist & just have someone sitting beside me - I'll probably never do that again)

 

Basically just before the squall hit we took it all down & then put it all back up in varying stages depending on wind speed.

 

Was very warm on this leg so we didn't wear foulies just got drenched about 4-6 times on the night 4/24 shifts, hung your clothes up & put another outfit on when you woke up - 3 shorts & t shirts on the go, rinsed every night & yes we had shower gel & shampoo on deck. I have thick long hair which i would have cut off if I was going around the world & i used to pop a (purple of course) shower cap on as the wind got up ready for the rain. usually the rain was going sideways & hurt like stink but you were so involved in getting the sails down there wasn't too much of a fuss about that.

 

My shoulder started to play up coming into Singers, from getting myself onto the pole (I'm older than Tuffie) & when we got there I found out that 3 people had been taken off other boats & had rotator (sp) cuff surgery. I played the old lady card & asked for physio so I got a massage every day on insurance & didn't have to go to the spa for that!

 

Hands peeled, feet peeled, yachtie bottie peeled.

 

I lost about 6kg in 32 days but must have gained some muscle somewhere. Don't bother with the expensive sport bras ladies cause they don't fit after 1/2 way & be prepared to sleep & be seen in all your underwear - all black looks matching & not dirty. Bamboo stuff is great, has time to dry - the technical quick dry stuff just feels slimy all the time.

 

Fantastic Ozee! Ive been waiting for something like this from you too :D

 

So bamboo beats marino? :)

 

 

 

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Can we have a report on your experiences on your two legs please.

 

You can have a sealed version as well if you like !!!!

 

d

OK...

2 watches 4/24 on & off except a dog leg where everyone was awake from 11am-3pm most of the work go done in this time, during the dog leg one watch wold do 2 hours up on deck & then we'd swap. Not all the boats do it this way.

 

We had 13 on the boat so...

Skipper didn't routinely helm unless we couldn't manage the sail changes with only 5, he did stay up with us when it was hairy & basically slept on the floor fully dressed when it was crap weather - described his role as the bus driver so we did the work

 

1 mother (cooking & sleeping all night)may get called up to give us a hand

1 on helm

1 always in a harness - they went up pole for the shift & in the case of anyone going over we are all able to walk down the freeboard & do the business

1 had cleaning duties

1 had engineering duties

 

 

 

The hardest physical things were

1 squalls from Aus-Singers

2 wind against tide from Singers - Qingdao

 

Aus-Singers...

Squalls

Basically it was groundhog day mainly evenings & nights as the water sucked into clouds cooled - you could see them coming

 

We had 1 person on radar watch as well judging the size & reporting where & how far away

 

On this leg we were going down wind with kite up - so as soon as clouds were likely it would be up the pole ready for a drop & basically you stayed up there until the drop & then until they were ready for you to come down & someone was keeping an eye on you, someone else easing the winch.

 

I didn't helm too much as everyone was nervous they or I would screw up (thats my only regret out of the whole thing that i didn't insist & just have someone sitting beside me - I'll probably never do that again)

 

Basically just before the squall hit we took it all down & then put it all back up in varying stages depending on wind speed.

 

Was very warm on this leg so we didn't wear foulies just got drenched about 4-6 times on the night 4/24 shifts, hung your clothes up & put another outfit on when you woke up - 3 shorts & t shirts on the go, rinsed every night & yes we had shower gel & shampoo on deck. I have thick long hair which i would have cut off if I was going around the world & i used to pop a (purple of course) shower cap on as the wind got up ready for the rain. usually the rain was going sideways & hurt like stink but you were so involved in getting the sails down there wasn't too much of a fuss about that.

 

My shoulder started to play up coming into Singers, from getting myself onto the pole (I'm older than Tuffie) & when we got there I found out that 3 people had been taken off other boats & had rotator (sp) cuff surgery. I played the old lady card & asked for physio so I got a massage every day on insurance & didn't have to go to the spa for that!

 

Hands peeled, feet peeled, yachtie bottie peeled.

 

I lost about 6kg in 32 days but must have gained some muscle somewhere. Don't bother with the expensive sport bras ladies cause they don't fit after 1/2 way & be prepared to sleep & be seen in all your underwear - all black looks matching & not dirty. Bamboo stuff is great, has time to dry - the technical quick dry stuff just feels slimy all the time.

 

Fantastic Ozee! Ive been waiting for something like this from you too :D

 

So bamboo beats marino? :)

Bamboo beats QuickDry in heat (25-40 degrees C)

Quick Dry & Merino worked for me in the cooler to cold leg (yes I took my wooly knickers!)

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Question I couldn’t answer out there…

 

In the Celbes Sea we got ink over the deck squirted by a squid (68 foot boat)

 

The ink came from about 3 foot above the waterline up the freeboard (usually stands about shoulder height on me on a dock – have to use springers if you are climbing up the side)

 

In front of the mast it made it to about 2 foot from the other side with plenty of fluid.

 

At least 2-3 litres & I’m used to people bleeding big time.

 

Q: how big was the squid – none of us heard anything it was just there in the morning so we think we hit it

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With the drama of the North Pacific over for another race, the crews of all ten Clipper Race yachts are now safely in California. The dramatic scenes of the last few days brought the size and scale of the challenge that the crew on the Clipper Race face, clearly into focus. Before taking part in the comprehensive training programme, 40% of the non-professional sailors on this unique event had never sailed before. It is testament to their bravery, skill and strength of character that they deal with all levels of adversity, and as a team, overcome it. Whether this is the stifling heat and no wind areas of the doldrums, or the icy, mountainous seas in the Pacific. Every physical and mental challenge imaginable, and sometimes unimaginable ones. Having raced across the North Pacific myself, I know first-hand how the crew will be feeling right now. The first beer tastes amazing. The first steak delicious. The first hug from friends and family is draining and up-lifting at the same time. What is hard to put into words though, is the feeling of euphoria, of personal accomplishment, of knowing that you just raced across the largest ocean on the planet.

 

 

 

For the crew now, there is some respite. Time to gather thoughts, fix boats, relax and recuperate and get ready to go again. On 14 April the boats will be heading to the start line to race to Panama for the start of Leg 7. The next few days will be a blur of parties, boat maintenance and site seeing – after such a gruelling race, where better to be than California!

 

 

 

Next week the Clipper Race fleet will be centre stage at Strictly Sail Pacific, the west coast’s largest sailing only boat show. Boats will be open for members of the public to look around on 12 and 13 April during show times. Crew members will be on hand to talk about their own experiences.

 

 

 

There will also be a series of presentations about the race –

 

Strictly Sail

Jack London Square, Oakland

12th @ 1530

 

OCSC

1 Spinnaker Way Berkeley, 94710

12th @ 1900

 

Strictly Sail

Jack London Square, Oakland

13th @ 1300

 

Strictly Sail

Jack London Square, Oakland

14th @ 1300

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I'd love to make a photo book of my trip - I made a note of the Long & Lats at UT midnight every day. Does anyone know of a way I can plot them & then turn it into a jpeg or something?

Thanks chaps

You will need a navigation program for the computer. Plot the positions as waypoints. Then use the "snip" that comes with later windows versions and save it as a jpeg or PNG file.

 

edit ... its Lat & Long. Not the other way around.

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I sailed over to Jack London Square yesterday to see the boats. Very impressive. I don't get around 68 footers that often so the robustsness of the boats and gear really struck me. I was invited onboard Edinburgh and got a tour below deck. These boats are very industrial down below. No teak or even wood as I recall. Two water tight doors. Captians quarters (cramped) was aft and off limits to crew. Depending on amount of crew some had to hot bunk. Big 125 hp deisel mid ship,1600nm range, galley and nav station to stbd. Heads stbd and port, first come first served. No showers below, washing was done topside. Apparently this will be the last race for these boats as new 75 footers are being built in China and they will have assy spinnakers.

Minutes after I left the Coast Guard Cutter with wounded crew sailed by and can only imagine it got lots of claps and cheers. It was a good day .

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Good points Ozee.

I have another question.

Was it value for money?

One of the things that always amazes me is the cost in money and time that it costs to do RTW.

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Oh, another question. Was there a level of divide between crew who were on for the full round the world and people who were only on for a leg? Was there any level of divide between people who had sailed a lot prior vs people who hadn’t sailed at all? How does that all mash out between people on the crew as the race goes on?

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Thanks Ozee fr your thoughts.

 

Was it harder than you thought it was going to be?

No I knew it would be really intense periods - I was really out of breath on some of those sail chages 7 we worked out that i'd do the hanking while the boys lifted sails to me sometimes - skipper called me a harness monkey so i was up & down the pole alot on the first leg & i had to go up the mast to help pull sail down to put a reef in if i wasn't on another position - I couldn't pull from below effectively. So I was happy to do that no matter what the weather wereas someof the others didn't want to.

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Good points Ozee.

I have another question.

Was it value for money?

One of the things that always amazes me is the cost in money and time that it costs to do RTW.

I thought so, I would have paid that for the holiday of a lifetime - I paid fortnightly for over a year & the insurance was a big sting but as you can see its well used!

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Oh, another question. Was there a level of divide between crew who were on for the full round the world and people who were only on for a leg? Was there any level of divide between people who had sailed a lot prior vs people who hadn’t sailed at all? How does that all mash out between people on the crew as the race goes on?

When I got on they were 1/2 way round so all their teething had been worked out plus they had done Southern Ocean. First time it hit me was when an email came around for the RTW women to have a spa session in Indo wheich was quickly opened to all women. I was told I behaved like a RTW as i was on & off other boats & not just socialising with my own crew.

Some were shocked when i went to say goodbye in Qingdao as they thought I was RTW! I'm faaaaaar from a 20yo party animal as we know!

Definate bonds between the RTW & they really accept each other for what they are & what they bring - thats established when you get on - our crew looked forward to new crews as it mixed up the dynamics for the next leg so it wasn't always the same.

Skip only took 2 guys up the front of the boat for a chat once on my entire trip, they were both RTW & both behaved really well afterwards - had differeing opinions about how they wanted to race.

 

sailing before - had never sailed a 68 fotter before in their team environment with their norms - just got up the pole & mast quicker & asked different questions on the helm, knew my own limitations better & my limitations in bad weather - remebered how to do sail evolutions because they made sense to me - I didn't have to be watched or told ALL the time at the beginning

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I sailed over to Jack London Square yesterday to see the boats. Very impressive. I don't get around 68 footers that often so the robustsness of the boats and gear really struck me. I was invited onboard Edinburgh and got a tour below deck. These boats are very industrial down below. No teak or even wood as I recall. Two water tight doors. Captians quarters (cramped) was aft and off limits to crew. Depending on amount of crew some had to hot bunk. Big 125 hp deisel mid ship,1600nm range, galley and nav station to stbd. Heads stbd and port, first come first served. No showers below, washing was done topside. Apparently this will be the last race for these boats as new 75 footers are being built in China and they will have assy spinnakers.

Minutes after I left the Coast Guard Cutter with wounded crew sailed by and can only imagine it got lots of claps and cheers. It was a good day .

Showerhead is the tap on the port head & there is a foot pump to get rid of it! Please go to any boat with people 7 they will show you around - if you get to Qingdao say hi for me & have a look!

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Thanks Ozee fr your thoughts.

 

Was it harder than you thought it was going to be?

No I knew it would be really intense periods - I was really out of breath on some of those sail chages 7 we worked out that i'd do the hanking while the boys lifted sails to me sometimes - skipper called me a harness monkey so i was up & down the pole alot on the first leg & i had to go up the mast to help pull sail down to put a reef in if i wasn't on another position - I couldn't pull from below effectively. So I was happy to do that no matter what the weather wereas someof the others didn't want to.

Going upwind i used to sqweak at the top of a wave cause i knew there was nothing on the other side & i had to rip the wheel over to get us down the back of the wave sideways rather than slam off it (we got bad boy points for slamming & setting off alarms! Winner cleans out lazarette on their own in the next port). At one stage i could only do that for 20 mins at a time & the boys were doing 40 - I'd just go in between & give them a break - some of the leggers & even a RTW stopped helming for a few days in that weather/tide side on to Taiwan

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I have to ask..... how much does this cost per leg?

Legs differ; I just went back thru my paperwork I paid about

~ 480 pounds per week for my leg – 10 weeks

~ 100 pounds per day for training (includes the HL gear) – 32 days

~ 750 pounds in insurance I was insured to the hilt

 

Except for the insurance this all got rolled together & I had to be paid by the June before the race started, so I chose to pay fortnightly over a year/18months

 

RTW would be ~ 39000 pounds all up

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I have to ask..... how much does this cost per leg?

Legs differ; I just went back thru my paperwork I paid about

~ 480 pounds per week for my leg – 10 weeks

~ 100 pounds per day for training (includes the HL gear) – 32 days

~ 750 pounds in insurance I was insured to the hilt

 

Except for the insurance this all got rolled together & I had to be paid by the June before the race started, so I chose to pay fortnightly over a year/18months

 

RTW would be ~ 39000 pounds all up

 

 

 

AU$60,000. I could think of more comfortable ways to travel around the world for that amount of money. QE2 for example. But each to his own.

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I have to ask..... how much does this cost per leg?

Legs differ; I just went back thru my paperwork I paid about

~ 480 pounds per week for my leg – 10 weeks

~ 100 pounds per day for training (includes the HL gear) – 32 days

~ 750 pounds in insurance I was insured to the hilt

 

Except for the insurance this all got rolled together & I had to be paid by the June before the race started, so I chose to pay fortnightly over a year/18months

 

RTW would be ~ 39000 pounds all up

 

 

 

AU$60,000. I could think of more comfortable ways to travel around the world for that amount of money. QE2 for example. But each to his own.

Hello - where are you at the moment - approaching winter says you should be South & heading North soon - is that right?

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I have to ask..... how much does this cost per leg?

Legs differ; I just went back thru my paperwork I paid about

~ 480 pounds per week for my leg – 10 weeks

~ 100 pounds per day for training (includes the HL gear) – 32 days

~ 750 pounds in insurance I was insured to the hilt

 

Except for the insurance this all got rolled together & I had to be paid by the June before the race started, so I chose to pay fortnightly over a year/18months

 

RTW would be ~ 39000 pounds all up

 

 

 

AU$60,000. I could think of more comfortable ways to travel around the world for that amount of money. QE2 for example. But each to his own.

Hello - where are you at the moment - approaching winter says you should be South & heading North soon - is that right?

 

Tweed Heads. Boats up north.

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Pacific Ocean adventures - 05 April 2012

 

Spending close to a month at sea, racing across 6,000 miles and daily facing waves the size of buildings is a challenge few will encounter in life but for those willing to throw down the gauntlet, the satisfaction upon completing such an adventure is truly unique.

 

“Everyone said I was crazy for doing the Southern and Pacific Ocean,” declares Qingdao crew member, David Holloway.

 

“But I wanted to do the two big ones. I originally thought the Southern Ocean was the big one until Joff Bailey (Clipper Race Director), described the Pacific as wetter, colder and longer!

 

“It was the challenge I was looking for, I really wanted to be tested and I really was,” continues David, who took on two of the world’s fiercest ocean just three years after suffering a heart attack.

 

“Geraldton Western Australia felt the full force of it and it brings it home to you that there’s only 100 miles difference you can be in a very different weather system. We had a lot of wind and a lot of water, but it could of easily that bit more which is always at the back of your mind.

 

“In terms of the adventure I think it’s an amazing experience. A friend came to see us off in Qingdao and he said he had two things to do fill in his tax return and apply for the Clipper Race. I really think anyone would find it great and met their expectations.

 

“I’ll be definitely be seeing the team into Southampton, as we were sailing under the Golden Gate Bridge I was feeling quite sad, very pleased to be here, but sad to be leaving.”

 

Also part of the Qingdao crew who took on the Pacific Ocean was 39-year-old, Sean Campbell.

 

“It’s as big as everyone says it is for sure,” explains Sean.

 

“Quiet a hell of a leg, a lot of heavy weather. I was asked a similar question earlier and I likened it to the world’s biggest fairground ride, imagine a 6,000 mile rollercoaster, cross that with a log flume and then cross that one more time with the old motorcycle wall of death who are pined by gravity. If you could put all three of those things together on a 6,000 mile race that would be pretty much the Pacific Ocean.

 

“One thing that was a standout memory for me, David and I were on watch it was 3 or 4am and like a lot of the Pacific it was pitch black, we hardly saw any stars or moon for weeks on end.

 

“The boat was flying away at some pace, if you imagine being strapped to the top of a freight train as it goes into a tunnel that’s the kind of sensation we had, something else just extraordinary.”

 

During the stopover in Oakland, San Francisco Bay a diverse programme awaits the crew and skippers of the ten-strong fleet, including being part of the Strictly Sail Pacific boat show hosted in Jack London Square. Sponsors will also be using the Clipper Race as a platform for promotion, to do business and build relationships with Californian businesses.

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New skipper for Edinburgh Inspiring Capital in Clipper Race - 05 April 2012

 

Italian yachtsman, Flavio Zamboni, is to take over as interim skipper of Edinburgh Inspiring Capital the Scottish entry in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race, which is currently in Oakland, San Francisco Bay at the end of the Pacific Ocean crossing.

 

Flavio, a 38-year-old yachtsman, who was born in Venice and lives in Southampton, UK, has a competitive racing background. He won the first ever RORC Caribbean 600 Race in 2009, and has been notching up a number of ‘first in class’ results in a variety of regattas in Europe and the Caribbean. As an experienced skipper of large yachts he has numerous Atlantic crossings under his belt, and has also competed in the Tall Ships Race on a boat run by the Italian Navy.

 

Furthermore Flavioknows what is required of the world’s longest yacht race, having worked for Clipper Training for the last two years, training crew members to prepare them for the rigours of ocean racing and has been working with Clipper Ventures in a freelance capacity since 2006.

 

He said, “I am looking forward to meeting the Edinburgh Inspiring Capital crew and discussing with them their goals for the next few races. I hope I can help them fulfil their potential. We will have a week or so on shore before the start of the next race to Panama, which will give us some time to get to know each other. I hope we will be able to take the boat out sailing for a day to help with the settling in process.”

 

Born in Venice, Flavio graduated from the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia with a degree in Law before becoming a professional sailor. He has brought a little Italian flair to Southampton, UK, where he now lives and can be seen riding around on his Honda Hornet.

 

He adds, “As an Italian, I can guarantee to improve the quality of food on board!”

 

Flavio joins Edinburgh Inspiring Capital in Oakland, California, ahead of the start of Race 10 of Clipper 11-12. He replaces Gordon Reid who has been skipper since race start in the UK and has stood down for personal reasons. Flavio will be interim skipper until a permanent replacement can be appointed.

 

The fleet will set sail for Panama, on Saturday 14 April.

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AU$60,000. I could think of more comfortable ways to travel around the world for that amount of money. QE2 for example. But each to his own.

Yeah, there's always the Virtual Regatta option.

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Rest and recuperation - 11 April 2012

 

After an action packed race from China to Oakland, San Francisco, the crews taking part in the Clipper 11-12 Race, the world’s longest race at 40,000 miles, are busy preparing for the next race to Panama.

 

Race 10 starts on Saturday at 1400 local time (2100 UTC) and several crew members have taken time out from general boat maintenance to get to know their temporary home, the city of Oakland.

 

Visit Oakland, treated a group of crew members from each of the ten ocean racing teams to a guided tour of the city which included a hike around the Redwood Regional Park, lunch at the Chalet Seafood Bar & Grill and a visit to Dashe Cellars for wine tasting.

 

“We’re walking through the Redwood Forest, walking through trees which are hundreds of years old, the smell is fantastic. I’d forgotten I actually miss trees after nothing but oceans!” explains Welcome to Yorkshire crew member, Ann Finch during the trip.

 

The next race of Clipper 11-12, Race 10 to Panama, will start off fast and furious but as the temperature rises the wind start to drop as changeable conditions along the coast of central America and as the fleet near the ITCZ (Inter Tropical Convergence Zone or Doldrums) take effect.

 

The last thousand miles will be sailed in light and fickle winds potentially requiring a shortened course as the Clipper fleet head towards a date with the Panama Canal.

 

Friends, family members and supporters have all been invited to watch the Race 10 start from the Golden Gate Yacht Club, home of the 34th America's Cup, who have kindly offered to start the race from their deck. It guarantees to offer the best view of the start for the ten-strong fleet departing San Francisco Bay for the race to Panama.

 

Golden Gate Yacht Club

1 Yacht Road

San Francisco,

CA 94123

post-23213-051000800 1334222702_thumb.jpg

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Thank you Ozee for your insights.

 

Did you always feel comfortable that your crew had the ability (experience) to deal with particularly heavy weather?

 

daniel

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"We humans can never beat the sea" - 12 April 2012

 

“If anyone doubted the awesome power that the oceans can unleash, the wave smashing into Geraldton Western Australia in the final stages of the leg from Qingdao to Oakland should be proof enough that we humans can never beat the sea,” explains Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, the Clipper Race’s founder and Chairman.

 

“The damage to the boat and injuries to the crew members were very regrettable but not avoidable in the circumstances of a rogue wave. The members of the crew have an experience that few other sailors have, or want to have! And this does not just happen to small boats.

 

“Some years ago a giant wave smashed into the QE2, breaking over the bridge way above the sea level. We learn, train and gain experience so we can limit the effects of rogue waves, but we cannot rule them out of our contingency planning,” continues Sir Robin, who became the first man to sail solo, non-stop around the world in 1968.

 

“But now, repairs completed in California, the crews aboard the fleet can hopefully look forward to a more benign leg to Panama.”

 

The next race of Clipper 11-12, Race 10 to Panama, will start off fast and furious but as the temperature rises the wind start to drop as changeable conditions along the coast of central America and as the fleet near the ITCZ (Inter Tropical Convergence Zone or Doldrums) take effect.

 

Friends, family members and supporters have all been invited to watch the Race 10 start from the Golden Gate Yacht Club, home of the 34th America's Cup, who have kindly offered to start the race from their deck. It guarantees to offer the best view of the start for the ten-strong fleet departing San Francisco Bay for the race to Panama.

 

You can race the same course as the Clipper 11-12 Race fleet from your arm chair by playing the Virtual Clipper Race.

 

While crews taking part in Clipper 11-12 are battling on bucking foredecks to change a headsail in pitch darkness, high winds and rough seas, the same manoeuvre in the game is achieved by a simple click of the mouse!

post-23213-033787800 1334272292_thumb.jpg

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