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    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

      Sailing Anarchy is a very lightly moderated site. This is by design, to afford a more free atmosphere for discussion. There are plenty of sailing forums you can go to where swearing isn't allowed, confrontation is squelched and, and you can have a moderator finger-wag at you for your attitude. SA tries to avoid that and allow for more adult behavior without moderators editing your posts and whacking knuckles with rulers. We don't have a long list of published "thou shalt nots" either, and this is by design. Too many absolute rules paints us into too many corners. So check the Terms of Service - there IS language there about certain types of behavior that is not permitted. We interpret that lightly and permit a lot of latitude, but we DO reserve the right to take action when something is too extreme to tolerate (too racist, graphic, violent, misogynistic, etc.). Yes, that is subjective, but it allows us discretion. Avoiding a laundry list of rules allows for freedom; don't abuse it. However there ARE a few basic rules that will earn you a suspension, and apparently a brief refresher is in order. 1) Allegations of pedophilia - there is no tolerance for this. So if you make allegations, jokes, innuendo or suggestions about child molestation, child pornography, abuse or inappropriate behavior with minors etc. about someone on this board you will get a time out. This is pretty much automatic; this behavior can have real world effect and is not acceptable. Obviously the subject is not banned when discussion of it is apropos, e.g. talking about an item in the news for instance. But allegations or references directed at or about another poster is verboten. 2) Outing people - providing real world identifiable information about users on the forums who prefer to remain anonymous. Yes, some of us post with our real names - not a problem to use them. However many do NOT, and if you find out someone's name keep it to yourself, first or last. This also goes for other identifying information too - employer information etc. You don't need too many pieces of data to figure out who someone really is these days. Depending on severity you might get anything from a scolding to a suspension - so don't do it. I know it can be confusing sometimes for newcomers, as SA has been around almost twenty years and there are some people that throw their real names around and their current Display Name may not match the name they have out in the public. But if in doubt, you don't want to accidentally out some one so use caution, even if it's a personal friend of yours in real life. 3) Posting While Suspended - If you've earned a timeout (these are fairly rare and hard to get), please observe the suspension. If you create a new account (a "Sock Puppet") and return to the forums to post with it before your suspension is up you WILL get more time added to your original suspension and lose your Socks. This behavior may result a permanent ban, since it shows you have zero respect for the few rules we have and the moderating team that is tasked with supporting them. Check the Terms of Service you agreed to; they apply to the individual agreeing, not the account you created, so don't try to Sea Lawyer us if you get caught. Just don't do it. Those are the three that will almost certainly get you into some trouble. IF YOU SEE SOMEONE DO ONE OF THESE THINGS, please do the following: Refrain from quoting the offending text, it makes the thread cleanup a pain in the rear Press the Report button; it is by far the best way to notify Admins as we will get e-mails. Calling out for Admins in the middle of threads, sending us PM's, etc. - there is no guarantee we will get those in a timely fashion. There are multiple Moderators in multiple time zones around the world, and anyone one of us can handle the Report and all of us will be notified about it. But if you PM one Mod directly and he's off line, the problem will get dealt with much more slowly. Other behaviors that you might want to think twice before doing include: Intentionally disrupting threads and discussions repeatedly. Off topic/content free trolling in threads to disrupt dialog Stalking users around the forums with the intent to disrupt content and discussion Repeated posting of overly graphic or scatological porn content. There are plenty web sites for you to get your freak on, don't do it here. And a brief note to Newbies... No, we will not ban people or censor them for dropping F-bombs on you, using foul language, etc. so please don't report it when one of our members gives you a greeting you may find shocking. We do our best not to censor content here and playing swearword police is not in our job descriptions. Sailing Anarchy is more like a bar than a classroom, so handle it like you would meeting someone a little coarse - don't look for the teacher. Thanks.

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Soñadora

Sons's Baba Rebuild Thread

680 posts in this topic

The drains clog and there's nowhere for the water to go but in through the anchor hawse (or whatever you call it).

 

It is called the spurling pipe, no kidding.

 

 

awesome! Thanks Jose! ;)

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transducer...brilliant! :D

 

my speed transducer is somewhere in there.

 

Just put a big sign on the boat to remind you to put the transducer back in when you launch. :D

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transducer...brilliant! :D

 

my speed transducer is somewhere in there.

 

Just put a big sign on the boat to remind you to put the transducer back in when you launch. :D

 

:ph34r:

 

I never launch without putting my hand on every through hull and I board while the boat is floating but still in the slings and check them again before "committing" to being in the water. In flying, you take the attitude that everybody is trying to kill you. On the water, everybody and everything is trying to sink the boat until proven otherwise.

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transducer...brilliant! :D

 

my speed transducer is somewhere in there.

 

Just put a big sign on the boat to remind you to put the transducer back in when you launch. :D

+1 - If you do something out of the ordinary, make a sign. I drained the water lift muffler & put a tape sign on my engine key to remind me that the plug was out, so I wasn't spewing exhaust into the bilge. :huh:

 

IB's theory works well too..When I drilled two new holes in the boat for speed & depth and replaced the pipe nipples in the other thru-hulls, you can be damn sure I had every locker open and inspected. I asked the guys to launch me at lunch & leave it in the slings, so I had plenty of time to observe any leaks I was sure would develop :rolleyes: ...I figured I could bail for an hour waiting for them to come back if needed. Amazingly, there were none! :P

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slings? we don't need no stinkin' slings! My previous and long, long forgotten marina (we left this spring) launched Soñadora 'Dukes of Hazzard' style.

 

Back the cradle up...back....back...NOW SLAM ON THE BRAKES!!!

 

So someone had to be Johnny on-the-Spot immediately on board to make sure all thru hulls were good. I learned that early on.

 

"Do you hear that?"

 

"Hear what?"

 

"WATEROMFG!"

 

sure, I checked all the thru hulls. But I didn't check the coolant hose they left disconnected after winterizing it in the fall dry.gif

 

That only happened once and it's a sound I'll never forget.

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Started tearing into the headliner. On my vintage, the headliner isn't removeable, but at least (unlike everything else in the boat) it's not epoxied in place. On later models, I think TaShing realized what a PITA this was so they made the panels removeable.

 

Initially, I wasn't going to remove them and instead was going to go lazy and just put the beadboard on top of the headliner. But then I started poking around in the headliner panels and have been pulling them off. 'Pulling' is a relative statement. Really I'm tearing them off into jagged, dusty, splinters. I was going to try using my cheap Fein Imitation to cutt the panels off, but there are wires underneath and I didn't want to cut through those. So I just grab on to the panels and rip them out.

 

When I put the beadboard up I'll secure it with battens and nice brass hardware.

 

Pics to come...

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Pretty typical condition of the headliner throughout...

 

This is below the cowel

post-4721-050356600 1309490175_thumb.jpg

 

This is below the stays'l traveler

post-4721-053912400 1309490187_thumb.jpg

 

headliner removed

post-4721-076531600 1309490242_thumb.jpg

 

Did I mentione I'll be refinishing the sole :D

post-4721-011695800 1309490285_thumb.jpg

 

Bead board being fitted

post-4721-086883100 1309490319_thumb.jpg

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Is the new headliner going to be easily removable for repair and refit?

 

The bead board looks really good.

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Is the new headliner going to be easily removable for repair and refit?

 

The bead board looks really good.

 

The beadboard look good

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Is the new headliner going to be easily removable for repair and refit?

 

The bead board looks really good.

 

The beadboard look good

 

 

Thanks! Keep in mind it will be epoxy painted white.

 

Yes, it will be removeable. I will use battens along with brass screws and 'escutcheons'? (basically, decorative brass washers) to keep it in place.

 

The results from the beadboard I put in the companionway hatch turned out better than I thought. It should add a lot to the salty nature of one of Bob's 'character' boats.

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I think so too, Jose. In fact, it looks 100 times better than I thought it would. Which is good, because that really motivates me to get it done!

 

 

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You sure do seem to be hustling.

 

Keep up the great work! (btw: don't buy the harbor freight fein knockoff. It'll vibrate your fillings out!)

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ha...well, I'm going to admit. I did. I fell for the cheap one. I know that's going to make you cringe. It was cheap enough that if I still want to get a Fein (or maybe even just upgrade to the Dremel), I could swing it. It's tough to justify a purchase like that with three very busy kids. If I were to sit down and figure out the percentage of our income that goes towards their activities I'd probably cry.

 

Truth is, I see those activities as a worthwhile investment and I think keeping them active will benefit them (and us) in many ways. Even though we see the boat as a major interest in our lives, it's secondary to the family. So yeah, I may go on the cheap on stuff. Time is short here in the weather toilet. We're already makeing plans for Fall dry.gif .

 

 

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Sons:

We are still waiting for summer here. We haven't had a day over 75 degrees this year.

Not that I am complaining.

I love that wet cold shit. It suits my curmudgeonly ways.

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Bob

 

I like that wet cold shit too. But I'm the only one in my clan who does. It must be that 1/8th Welsh I'm made of.

 

It's fucking HOT and steamy today. Big storms on the way then beautiful 80s for the weekend. I'm going go work on the boat. I need to find some extra hands so I can take off all the deck hardware.

 

I won't say "I need some extra hands to hold my nuts" bucause around here, that kinda talk will make the thread post count go through the roof for absolutely no reason.

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So you know what I mean about the vibration? :huh: I used one during an EAA composite workshop. I think my teeth are still loose! :blink:

 

 

Good on you for putting the kids first. I can only imagine how expensive the little rugrats are. (we have a hard time keeping up with gifts for my Nieces and Nephews)

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eh, the vibration isn't too bad. I have enough flab to absorb it.

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Just wait on the cost of rugrats. One out of grad school. One in undergrad and a HS senior. I still don't understand how HS sports takes more money than a 42 foot boat, but it does.

 

If no one will hold your nuts, a small pair of vice grips comes in handy. Just find a way to tether them or pad the sole so they don't fall 6 feet and leave dents. Ask me how I know....

 

Then you can tell your friends at your 4th of July picnic that your couldn't get anyone to hold your nuts so you had to clamp them in vice grips. You'll be the most popular guy there.

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the vice grips'll work if I can find a way to keep 'em from turning with the nuts.

 

and I think I can.

 

keep them from turning with my nuts.

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the vice grips'll work if I can find a way to keep 'em from turning with the nuts.

 

and I think I can.

 

keep them from turning with my nuts.

 

If there's something nearby to stop the vice grips jusy let it turn against it. Make sure you stop turning before your nuts drop off int the bilge though. I've dragged my nuts out of the bilge more than once.

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(btw: don't buy the harbor freight fein knockoff. It'll vibrate your fillings out!)

 

Rick..I have that one too..it works great & right now it is under $30. It help me cut the "slurry" (what the Catalina 30 owners call all the resin slop in the hull layup) up for smoothing out areas as I work on the interior...I had (still have) humps and bumps everywhere. That tool is great. If I have to buy 10 of them before I buy one Fein, I am still ahead.. (Sorry, GK!)

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This tool has really saved the day. Before I even started on this project, I fretted over how I was ever going to make a pattern for the headliner pieces. I've been worrying about it for the last two or three years.

 

This tool has really saved the day.Whether it's a Fein or Dremel, or whatever, this kind of tool is a real lifesaver

 

 

I can easily cut out the entire headliner section

post-4721-058844600 1309667915_thumb.jpg

 

and it comes out perfectly as a pattern.

post-4721-000407900 1309667936_thumb.jpg

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On another note, while I am impressed at every turn with the craftsmanship TaShing used to build this boat, I'm also baffled by the complete disregard for access to critical maintenance areas.

 

This is how I had to gain access to the fasteners holding on the traveler arch.

 

 

There's a teak batten that runs along the laminated 'beam' that runs athwartship under the traveler arch. When the boat was built, the batten was first coated with epoxy then nailed on. How about just nails? or maybe some decorative brass screws?

post-4721-085199300 1309668179_thumb.jpg

I took a chunk out of the batten. The stbd side came off in pieces and I'll need to fabricate a new one. The port piece is salvageable. I will replace them and fasten them in with brass screws so we can have access in the future if needed.

 

But man, I was really glad to be able to get that arch off!

 

What's missing in this picture :)

 

post-4721-008534900 1309668457_thumb.jpg

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What's missing in this picture :)

 

post-4721-008534900 1309668457_thumb.jpg

 

Varnish?

 

:rolleyes:

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What's missing in this picture :)

 

post-4721-008534900 1309668457_thumb.jpg

 

Varnish?

 

:rolleyes:

 

And lots of it, shit Sons you have some work ahead of you!!

 

PS the V groove paneling is the shniz!! (thats good)

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trust me, I am really looking forward to the day I can relax by slathering on layer after layer of varnish. I <3 varnish. There's just something about all the warm, gleaming brightwork that really adds to the 'wow' factor.

 

I'm trying to coordinate building a temporary shelter so she can stay covered while I do that stuff. Not sure if it's in the funds. Shelter is around $2k.

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Water, beer and a steering wench in a tropical location (see the mystic front page)are missing.

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On another note, while I am impressed at every turn with the craftsmanship TaShing used to build this boat, I'm also baffled by the complete disregard for access to critical maintenance areas.

 

I've read a little over at the baba/panda/tashiba yahoo group. I'm under the impression that the later boats are somewhat better - as an example, the later boats have removable headliners, and the bobstay bolts aren't covered in resin.

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On another note, while I am impressed at every turn with the craftsmanship TaShing used to build this boat, I'm also baffled by the complete disregard for access to critical maintenance areas.

 

I've read a little over at the baba/panda/tashiba yahoo group. I'm under the impression that the later boats are somewhat better - as an example, the later boats have removable headliners, and the bobstay bolts aren't covered in resin.

 

all true

 

So I'll cut them some slack for On the Job Training.

 

On another note, I need to completely rebuild the sides on my teak fwd hatch. Anyone have a good source for teak lumber? Specifically, I need 1/2" (+/- 1/16) x 2.5" x 2' pieces.

 

I'm also interested in some suggestions for a decent mitre/box saw. I don't need a giant power mitre saw.

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On another note, while I am impressed at every turn with the craftsmanship TaShing used to build this boat, I'm also baffled by the complete disregard for access to critical maintenance areas.

 

I've read a little over at the baba/panda/tashiba yahoo group. I'm under the impression that the later boats are somewhat better - as an example, the later boats have removable headliners, and the bobstay bolts aren't covered in resin.

 

all true

 

So I'll cut them some slack for On the Job Training.

 

On another note, I need to completely rebuild the sides on my teak fwd hatch. Anyone have a good source for teak lumber? Specifically, I need 1/2" (+/- 1/16) x 2.5" x 2' pieces.

 

I'm also interested in some suggestions for a decent mitre/box saw. I don't need a giant power mitre saw.

 

I have a Hitachi Miter saw. 12"

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/photos/0,,20419758_20839828,00.html

 

I love it but if I was buying again I would swing for the C12RSH as I would like the sliding feature as I sometimes cut big things with one pass instead of two.

http://www.hitachipowertools.com/index/main-navigation/tools.aspx?d=11,53&p=549

 

I also have a Hitachi table saw that I like less...

C10RB

Hitachi seems to have gotten out of the table saw biz though.

 

I find the miter saw is the most useful saw I own. I have a band saw & table saw along with a circular saw - a jig saw - a sawzall and some handsaws... I use the miter saw more then the rest combined. If I had a better table saw I might use that instead.

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I'm actually more interested in this:

 

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053&productId=100197650&R=100197650

 

If I end up making more than about a dozen mitres during this project, I'll be surprised.

 

And when I'm done getting the boat restored, I'll be too busy sailing to do any other woodworking projects. :)

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Sons, I built a 35' x 15' shed for $250 in 2x4s and a $100 tarp. Clears the deck by enough to stand in the cockpit and at least kneel on the cabin top. It was completely clear - hip roof and no supports inside - until the fourth major windstorm, now there are two braces across the deck and one in the cockpit. I could have done better on the tarp - it's working okay but getting a few small holes at the wear points. Google can find better deals, look for used billboards - they're made out of heavy tarp fabric, used ones are around $100 to $150 but they're much heavier and more durable than the tarp I used.

 

If I was doing it again I'd probably also do 3/4" PVC for the roof pieces. Cheaper, lighter, and just as easy to work with.

 

Bow sheds are popular - light PVC or thin wood supports every couple of feet, basically as long as you can get them and standing strait up on either side of the boat. Then pull them together and fasten them to a rooftree at the top, cover with plastic or tarp.

 

Cheap and "just durable enough" is the order of the day for a temporary boat shed. You can do much better than $2k.

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Thanks Matt! Great suggestion

 

I'm actually considering using electrical conduit. Stronger than average PVC pipe

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Sons, if something gets destroyed I have some tips for pattern making that were passed on to me by a friend that has built boat interiors for years (even an entire Westsail I think that was delivered as a bare hull.)

 

Get 1.5"-2" strips of luan and use a hot glue gun to build patterns..after it is dry (several seconds! :D), the hot glue pops right off the fiberglass & the pattern is intact. The 1/8" luan is thin enough to snap by hand, and you can contour the hull/deck with many small pieces glued together. Then you can write notes & mark edges & stuff right on the pattern.

 

here is a pic of a pattern I did when building my chart table this spring...the square edges were easy, but I needed a pattern to contour the hull & complex deck shape. The cross braces were glued in there to keep the pattern intact as a one piece unit. I got my luan by purchasing a closet door for $26 at Lowe's and ripping it in strips on the table saw..it was much cheaper than buying a sheet of the stuff.

post-4755-005742600 1309881973_thumb.jpg

post-4755-087071800 1309882094_thumb.jpg

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that is cool HB!

 

Fortunately, I managed to salvage all the panels and I am almost done making new ones. I wish this whole day job thing wasn't in the way.

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I've found that drywall cardboard shims (very inexpensive), a utility knife and a hot glue gun work really well for making patterns.

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Got most of the panels in. Looks cool except I may need to go find a warmer white. Good thing they're removeable!

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I'll try to get some pics tonight. Tomorrow for sure.

 

I just ordered some teak for battens and various other stuff.

 

forget about basing currency on gold. base it on teak! holy shit that stuffs expensive. dry.gif

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Got some off the panels in and did some more work on the hatch. Now that the traveler arch is off, I can work on the hatch.

post-4721-098374700 1310275999_thumb.jpg

post-4721-080951700 1310276016_thumb.jpg

post-4721-034240700 1310276066_thumb.jpg

post-4721-034153100 1310276082_thumb.jpg

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Hatch is pretty much done now. Still need to do some touch-up on the seams.

post-4721-034243200 1310398937_thumb.jpg

post-4721-076690500 1310398943_thumb.jpg

post-4721-052310000 1310398949_thumb.jpg

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Hatch is pretty much done now. Still need to do some touch-up on the seams.

 

Looking good Sons. Did you end up going with the GP Ply-bead panels?

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Thanks crash

 

yes. GP ply-bead painted with a zillion coats of rust-oleum white. All panels removeable except the ones inside the hatch. I tried to make them removeable, but stupd me I nailed them in instead of screws. It was all the paint fumes, it made me dizzy.

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Thanks crash

 

yes. GP ply-bead painted with a zillion coats of rust-oleum white. All panels removeable except the ones inside the hatch. I tried to make them removeable, but stupd me I nailed them in instead of screws. It was all the paint fumes, it made me dizzy.

 

Don't beat yourself up. Not like you are going to drop the panels out of the hatch to wire up a light or anything.

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Don't beat yourself up. Not like you are going to drop the panels out of the hatch to wire up a light or anything.

 

hey now that's a great idea. I am going to be re-doing the lighting situation throughout, LEDs where possible.

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Don't beat yourself up. Not like you are going to drop the panels out of the hatch to wire up a light or anything.

 

hey now that's a great idea. I am going to be re-doing the lighting situation throughout, LEDs where possible.

 

NO, NO, NO!

 

You don't want electrics going into a sliding hatch. :huh:

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awww c'mon. You're trashin' my idea of turnin' Soñadora into a pimped out disco brothel.

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Sons, So..an interesting turn of events made me think of you & your boat. I was aboard the "Manitou" (JFK's old boat) yesterday evening and all the new overhead panels are beadboard...I instantly thought of your project...

 

Ok..carry on..that is all..keep up the good work! B)

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HB...hah...yeah. It really is great looking. I'm going to have to get the color to match the rest though. That white is REALLY white.

 

I should be getting my teak trim today. And my Harbor Freight oscillating saw will come in handy.

 

oh wait, that piece 'o shit died. :unsure:

At least I got my $30 out of it.

 

Hel-lo Fein Multimaster!

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And my Harbor Freight oscillating saw will come in handy.oh wait, that piece 'o shit died. :unsure: At least I got my $30 out of it.Hel-lo Fein Multimaster!

 

oh boy...here comes GK! :P

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And my Harbor Freight oscillating saw will come in handy.oh wait, that piece 'o shit died. :unsure: At least I got my $30 out of it.Hel-lo Fein Multimaster!

 

oh boy...here comes GK! :P

 

 

heh..yeah. I figured that would summon the GK Tool Snob (I mean that in the best possible way ;))

 

Honestly, I didn't even know what an 'oscillating multi-tool' was. The only reference I'd ever had about the Fein was for use as a caulking remover. $400 for a caulking remover? crazy. But now I see how versitile these tools are and I won't have a problem dropping the dough on a good one.

 

I've since checked out all the options out there. I like the Ridgid tool, but not crazy about battery powered. 8 mins of continuous use before the battery dies. Lame. Of course, I don't think I've used it continuously for more than 20 seconds or so, but when it comes time to clean out the deck caulking, I'll need more time than that.

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When I was cutting out "slurry" (that is what all the Catalina owners call the resin slop left in the bilges by the builders around various structures like keel bolts, battery boxes, shaft tubes, tabbing in tanks, etc..) I had mine running for long enough I had to let it cool off...8 minutes would never cut it.

 

Glad you ponied up for the good model. It may outlast you.

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Cool off you say? :huh:

 

how long did you need to let it cool off? Mine died when I was sanding. Probably running well over 8 minutes.

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Seriously, how many different tools can the Fein replace? Give me the rundown, because I may actually get one this fall if I can consolidate several power tools into one.

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Sons, it was getting hot enough I was having trouble holding it..even with gloves on. All of these types of tools seem to have some sort of fan spinning with the motor & vents in the housing to circulate air...usually those vents are right where you want your fingers/hand to be on the tool. :rolleyes:

 

I probably ran it 10 minutes straight at the most. I can only take the vibrating that thing does in short spurts. That usually meant is was time for a beer break anyway. :P

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Seriously, how many different tools can the Fein replace? Give me the rundown, because I may actually get one this fall if I can consolidate several power tools into one.

 

detail sander

saw for cutting all kinds of different stuff. Plunge cuts are the coolest.

 

The ridgid model has a bunch of attachments that seem pretty handy.

 

Basically they do all kinds of things you'd have a hard time doing otherwise. Can't say it really replaces stuff.

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Sons:

I'm getting worried you might hurt yourself with all this gadgetry.

 

When I was a kid in Australia we lived in a brick fourplex.

There was a detatched garage big enough for one car but our upstairs neighbor John Ewing rented it for his workshop.

John was married to my piano teacher Ivy. Ivy was at least part Chinese and germ phobic. She played the piano wearing rubber gloves. She would peel a potato by putting on rubber gloves, picking up a fork with tissue paper, poking the fork into the potato and then with the other hand in a rubber glove repeat the process until she had as many layers as possible between her and the potato.

But John Ewing was a wood worker. I would sit and watch him work. John did not talk.

John made the most marvelous things out of wood.

I'm dead certain to this day he never owned a power tool while I was there.

I think the workshop was his way of escaping from that nut Ivy.

Power tools just would have made the work faster.

What would be the point in that?

Ah, the eternal "Journey or Arrival" question. If you aren't doing the woodworking to arrive at an end then by all means do it by hand. But if you are building something you want to use now - power tools can not be beat.

 

I'm pretty sure they are using a few power tools to build Kimb's boat... and doing a sweet job of it!

 

I've got to get me a Fein multimaster. Haven't rationalized it yet though.

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Sons:

I'm getting worried you might hurt yourself with all this gadgetry.

 

When I was a kid in Australia we lived in a brick fourplex.

There was a detatched garage big enough for one car but our upstairs neighbor John Ewing rented it for his workshop.

John was married to my piano teacher Ivy. Ivy was at least part Chinese and germ phobic. She played the piano wearing rubber gloves. She would peel a potato by putting on rubber gloves, picking up a fork with tissue paper, poking the fork into the potato and then with the other hand in a rubber glove repeat the process until she had as many layers as possible between her and the potato.

But John Ewing was a wood worker. I would sit and watch him work. John did not talk.

John made the most marvelous things out of wood.

I'm dead certain to this day he never owned a power tool while I was there.

I think the workshop was his way of escaping from that nut Ivy.

Power tools just would have made the work faster.

What would be the point in that?

Ah, the eternal "Journey or Arrival" question. If you aren't doing the woodworking to arrive at an end then by all means do it by hand. But if you are building something you want to use now - power tools can not be beat.

 

I'm pretty sure they are using a few power tools to build Kimb's boat... and doing a sweet job of it!

 

I've got to get me a Fein multimaster. Haven't rationalized it yet though.

 

yes. making the work faster. That is a very important aspect of things in Minnesota.

 

If you noticed, my 'workshop' is outside. Outside in Minnesota. I can probably work into October, but after that the annual Ice Age takes over. Sure, I could man-up and keep working, spending hours shoveling snow and chipping away ice, not to mention keeping the road plowed so I can actually get to the boat.

 

But I'll admit. I'm a pussy.

 

Still on the list of things to do:

 

Finish headliner

Install coaming 'pocket' to fill in where the instruments were

prep/sand/paint coach roof

re-caulk deck

prep/sand/varnish/varnish/varnish/varnish/varnish/varnish

 

And a lot of that needs to be done when there's a fairly long stretch of no rain, low humidity, not too hot, not too cold, not too sunny.

It's raining now

Forecast for the next 10 days - temps between 90 - 100

 

So yeah, anything I can do to speed things up is a bonus B)

 

In my dream world, I have a nice shop full of tools. A big shop. Where I could put the boat. And my cars. I'd have room for all the woodworking tools I'd need. As well as enough tools, lifts, and stuff to rebuild the engine in my rickety old Porsche. I like boats. And cars.

 

And then my wife says, "oh sure, so we'll never see you then." And she has a point. I do like seeing her. She's not a germaphobe. She can be kinda nutty sometimes, but that's just from being a Laplander. And yes, with 4 women in the house, getting away does have its appeal. But god love 'em anyway.

 

Tomorrow I'll be skipping work and heading to the boat again. Still waiting on the teak I ordered.

 

With all that Bob, you do have a point. I would love to have the time and skill to do this stuff by hand. At least when it comes time for me to make some mitres, I won't be using a gigantic, high powered mitre saw. I'll be using a simple, hand-powered mitre box.

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so I got the wild hair to remove the butterfly hatch. At first, I figured this would be an impossibility. Given the way TaShing wanted to make sure nothing would ever come apart, I was expecting it to be thru-bolted, epoxied, nailed, and wood-screwed in place. Turns out that's not the case! 12 bolts and a lot of prying, and I should be able to get the hatch off. If I can totally remove all coachroof hardware, my paint job will be a cinch.

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Important tip:

 

If you are removing something and your intuition is telling you that it sure is a lot harder than you thought it would be, STOP!!!

 

Initially I thought there were 12 bolts holding this in. There are also four wood screws that attach to the interior trim. I didn't know about these. I pried the livin' shit out of the hatch. On one end it came free only to stop at the coachroof. I continued to pry until I heard a crunching sound and stopped. That's when I discovered the other screws.

 

Now that I've bent the crap out of those screws, there's no way to back them out :(

 

So I need to cut them off with either a sawsall or my Fein (when it come in)

 

The orange arrows show the nuts that need to be removed (should be interesting getting those back on). The purple arrows show the bungs covering the screws I missed.

 

 

post-4721-025121500 1310952134_thumb.jpg

 

Can't wait to get this thing off. I'm hopeful this will solve several mystery leaks I've had.

 

post-4721-075581500 1310952215_thumb.jpg

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FWIW, get that oil lamp off the bracket and somewhere safe. Those chimneys are expensive.

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hey ... is it possible to stop those butterfly hatches from leaking ? I thought that was part of their charm ... :P

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hey ... is it possible to stop those butterfly hatches from leaking ? I thought that was part of their charm ... :P

 

Oh Bat, you are such a shit stirrer.

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Client: "The roof you built on my new house is leaking right on my rare Walnut dining room table! You need to get out here and fix it immediately!"

 

Frank Lloyd Wright: "That's an easy fix. Move the table."

 

When I'm done fixing the leaks, it's going to be so dry people will start complaining.

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Don's Marine Salvage

 

it's what crack is to a junkie as teak is to a Baba-phile.

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hey ... is it possible to stop those butterfly hatches from leaking ? I thought that was part of their charm ... :P

 

Oh Bat, you are such a shit stirrer.

 

moi ? :rolleyes:

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sometimes it feels like I'm just going backwards :(

 

Got the butterfly hatch removed. Found some rot due to a poor repair by one of the P.O.s

 

Had to remove the interior beams to get at the rot which required drilling holes into the beams. The beams are held in place with wood screws but the heads are covered over by a decorative batten that was nailed/glued in place. It's impossible to remove this batten without destroying both the batten and the beam so I decided to try to guess where the screw head is and drill a hole in the batten. I was always off on the holes I drilled so I had to drill a few holes. I'm thinking I can drill a bigger hole (1") and use 1" bungs to fill the holes. Won't look as nice as the continuous batten, but it's the only way I could think of.

 

When it's time to re-bed, I'll be folliwing this guy's suggestions.

 

Oh, and my Fein should be in next week :). I ordered the MM 'Start'. It doesn't have the quick release of the Top model. I don't see that as a major problem.

 

Look ma, no hatch!

post-4721-090598800 1311358305_thumb.jpg

 

The outlined area is the area I need to replace. I can dig it out below the GRP and fill with ply then glass it all in.

post-4721-050004500 1311358327_thumb.jpg

 

Kind of depressing seeing how much I've removed and how much I'll have to put back! :unsure:

post-4721-036989600 1311358318_thumb.jpg

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Sons:

You are a brave man. I can design boats but I can't fix them. I just never deveoped any skill with tools. I didn't have to when Spike was around. He'd just say, "Hey Dad, let me do that." Actually my wife Jill is better with tools then I am.

 

You'll get all this behind you soon and the boat will be primo.

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Thanks Bob. Lots of inspiration on this board.

 

and Ish, you can sleep now. I put those lamps in a safe place ;)

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I think I'm finally past the disassembly phase. All hardware and brightwork has been removed from the coachroof. I patched the core where I had a leak around the butterfly hatch. I used this cool honeycomb material that a friend had used on his lazarette hatch.

 

This is the core removed before I patched it. The brown areas on the core aren't rot. Those are burn marks from the saw blade.

 

I'll post some pics of the material today.

post-4721-081338400 1312120249_thumb.jpg

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Sons even though my interior headliner and all that is still trashed and crappy looking, it's really comforting to know the structure is new and sound. Kind of make the "pretty" details become less important. I'll get mine back together and looking good someday, as will you. Was really hard starting my project by ripping out the "pretty" things and making my boat look horrible. I remember asking myself wtf was I thinking?!?! lol

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memo, your rehab thread has motivational, and I really mean that!

 

When I went to the boat this weekend, the deck was covered with yellow leaves. That means....FALL :(

 

Now I need to scramble if I want to get the deck painted. I'm trying to get my accountant (wife) to agree to getting a temporary storage shelter. I kicked around several ideas for building it myself, but I will probably want to have something I can work in over the winter and I just don't have the time to futz around with some jury rigged thing that might collapse.

 

We could sell the shelter when we're done with it.

 

 

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Wow, very aggressive work. Fall?? Dude, it's August 1st for cryin' out loud!

 

 

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Ajax, because Minnesota is in the higher lattitudes, time goes faster here. Earth's diameter is smaller. It's like gears or smaller pulleys. Yeah. Like that.

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Sons, in August around here the leaves turn yellow and fall off from lack of water...especially the poplar trees. It is fabulous here in late September & October when we get a little rain again...then all the leaves fall off for good. :(

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Sons, in August around here the leaves turn yellow and fall off from lack of water...especially the poplar trees. It is fabulous here in late September & October when we get a little rain again...then all the leaves fall off for good. :(

 

 

HB,

 

You left out the great winds, geese flying south and Thanksgiving being a good time to think about winterizing - so we can get sailing again March 1.

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somewhere in these sticks, a hatch is waiting.

 

I hope.

 

post-4721-095173900 1312645685_thumb.jpg

 

If your plywood is too thick, a grinder makes fast work of thining it

 

and makes one helluva mess!

 

 

post-4721-013218400 1312645739_thumb.jpg

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and heeere it is!

 

post-4721-016566600 1312725054_thumb.jpg

 

...and maybe this is a stupid idea, but I'm willing to give it a shot.

 

Typically, teak construction like this uses polysulfide (life caulk) in the seams. In larger areas like decks or on the cockpit hatches, this is good as it allows for maintenance. On this hatch, I was thinking of filling the seams with thickened epoxy (died black) and just be done with seams on this hatch. You can actually see I accidently filled the seam closest to the camera. That's what gave me the idea. There would be absolutely no more leaks. The hatch will be varnished and also lives under a sunbrella cover. If it didn't wok out, I'd scrap the hatch and replace it with a Lewmar Ocean unit.

 

Thoughts?

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What size Ocean Hatch? Maybe Minney's has one in stock for less than wholesale and save you the teak fixit.

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Thanks from

 

Not sure what 'Minneys' is.

 

The one I was looking at is 21" square and Defender sells it for around $650. Don't recall the number. But if I go down that road, I will have to make irreversible modifications to the mounting frame (which is also teak), so I won't do that unless this doesn't work.

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and heeere it is!

 

post-4721-016566600 1312725054_thumb.jpg

 

...and maybe this is a stupid idea, but I'm willing to give it a shot.

 

Typically, teak construction like this uses polysulfide (life caulk) in the seams. In larger areas like decks or on the cockpit hatches, this is good as it allows for maintenance. On this hatch, I was thinking of filling the seams with thickened epoxy (died black) and just be done with seams on this hatch. You can actually see I accidently filled the seam closest to the camera. That's what gave me the idea. There would be absolutely no more leaks. The hatch will be varnished and also lives under a sunbrella cover. If it didn't wok out, I'd scrap the hatch and replace it with a Lewmar Ocean unit.

 

Thoughts?

 

That should work well, they make whole boats out of wood covered with epoxy, why not a hatch? Consider covering the whole thing with epoxy once the seems are filled. Even under 3-4 coats the wood will look great. Better quaility varnish will work over the epoxy very well and will protect it as epoxy is not UV stable. For more strength cover the hatch with light weight cloth saturated in epoxy. If you have not tried this in the past you will be surprised how the cloth disappears and lets the grain show through. This little kayak was made with thickened epoxy holding the seams together then the whole hull covered in cloth and epoxy covered with 4 coats of standard spar varnish.

 

post-27422-034986600 1312736663_thumb.jpg

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Steele

 

What kind of fabric? I would think you'd at least see the pattern.

 

On another note, I'm preparing to refinish the deckhouse. I was all set in my mind to paint. But I've been reading about gelcoat and I'm wondering if that might be a better option. Thoughts?

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Ok, after reading a bit, sounds like paint is the way to go. Going to start this week. Goal is to be done paining by end of next week. Could be sooner!

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Steele

 

What kind of fabric? I would think you'd at least see the pattern.

On another note, I'm preparing to refinish the deckhouse. I was all set in my mind to paint. But I've been reading about gelcoat and I'm wondering if that might be a better option. Thoughts?

 

Here are before and after pics of my repair to the coaming of my cedar strip kayak. If the cloth is properly wetted out, you'll see no print through of the fabric. In the first pic, I dry fitted 4oz cloth and then used a cheap foam roller wetted out with West System epoxy ( 105 Resin/207 Special Clear Hardener). After wet sanding and 4 coats of Z-Spar Admiral, it looked like the second picture. No print through. BTW, the entire hull was sandwiched with 7oz cloth. I used 4oz on the coaming so it would conform easily to the tighter curves.

post-5483-008157100 1312900643_thumb.jpg post-5483-027494100 1312900658_thumb.jpg

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That's pretty slick. I may have to look into that. I haven't started varnishing that hatch yet.

 

The major work recently though has been getting the deck ready for paint.

 

These spider cracks are everywhere on the deck, especially the non-skid

post-4721-060991700 1313387712_thumb.jpg

 

All the non-skid was ground off with a belt sander. The whole time I was using it, I kept thinking of Cap't Ron

 

"Always stand clear of the ladder, boss"

 

I also sanded the rest of the deck with 80grit. I'll be prming 2 coats then painting. Hopefully have it all done by the weekend.

 

post-4721-067009300 1313387890_thumb.jpg

 

post-4721-076495600 1313387871_thumb.jpg

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Finally had a string of nice enough weather to get the coach painted.

 

Brightside is some amazing stuff. One more coat and I'm done. This marks a turning point, I think. I can actually start ASSEMBLING stuff.

 

post-4721-077109500 1315199473_thumb.jpg

post-4721-009843600 1315199491_thumb.jpg

post-4721-029035900 1315199507_thumb.jpg

post-4721-040371900 1315199516_thumb.jpg

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Next project will be brightwork. Here's an idea I have and I need to talked out of it.

 

I have the eyebrow removed. I'd like to varnish the brightwork while it's off the boat, but I nee dto screw it down which means I have to leave the bungs out which sort of defeats the purpose of putting on varnish with the wood off the boat.I was thinking of plugging the holes and attaching with 4200. I know, crazy, right?

 

Otherwise I'll have to either varnish on the boat or varnish then finish the areas around the bungs. Kind of a PITA if I'm going to put the 6 coats or so of varnish that I want to accomplish.

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Put it back on, bung it, trim and varnish! Is it that hard to mask off the eyebrow? No sense in doing it halfass now, in for a penny in for a pound!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There, did I talk you out of it? :unsure::lol:;)

 

Looking great BTW!

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Thanks Kim

 

And Greever, It was a momentary lapse of reason.

 

I am getting to the point where I'm starting to hallucinate about taking shortcuts. Just need to stay the course.

 

heading back out...

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Glad you decided to not take shortcuts. Like you, I am sometimes tempted to do that. Then I kick myself.

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Seriously, how many different tools can the Fein replace? Give me the rundown, because I may actually get one this fall if I can consolidate several power tools into one.

 

detail sander

saw for cutting all kinds of different stuff. Plunge cuts are the coolest.

 

The ridgid model has a bunch of attachments that seem pretty handy.

 

Basically they do all kinds of things you'd have a hard time doing otherwise. Can't say it really replaces stuff.

 

 

Sons, et al,

 

There are some jobs that the vibrator makes down right simple. (Mine is a Dremel-Max)

And some that you just couldn't do without it.

 

I wanted to add a water stop to the bottom of my plywood walls - stop a constant source of worry

and keep the plywood ends from soaking up water that sometimes collects there..

 

No other tool would have done this anywhere as easily.

 

Pics and words at:

http://www.home.earthlink.net/~sv_temptress/refine.htm#waterstop

 

It was about indispensable when trimming veneer on the head wall.

Any edge pressure can cause the veneer to "bubble" up, so running the saw blade in between

the edge of the wall and the hull trimmed the contact area and removed the cause of the bubble.

 

No matter how careful you are working with contact cement, getting veneer in exactly the right

place can be challenging. 1/16" placement on a vertical surface is near impossible. So...

A simple way to trim-to-fit is important.

 

The sander especially is handy for close detailing small fiberglass parts.

http://www.home.earthlink.net/~sv_temptress/parts.htm

and getting around odd places like hand rails, etc.

 

It was expensive ($100!) but has earned it's place in my tool bag.

post-36012-034839300 1315258593_thumb.jpg

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Thanks Kim

 

And Greever, It was a momentary lapse of reason.

 

I am getting to the point where I'm starting to hallucinate about taking shortcuts. Just need to stay the course.

 

heading back out...

 

:)

 

It's looking beautiful...

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Steele

 

What kind of fabric? I would think you'd at least see the pattern.

 

On another note, I'm preparing to refinish the deckhouse. I was all set in my mind to paint. But I've been reading about gelcoat and I'm wondering if that might be a better option. Thoughts?

 

even a couple of layers of "deck cloth" (1/2 to 1 ounce) will be completely transparent.

You won't be able to see the weave!

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Sons, have you considered laying a couple of coats of your selected sealer and varnish or even epoxy on the back and sides of the trim boards before you do the install. At least that way you have good protection on the very edge against the painted surface. When the tape goes on you'll lessen the risk of a raw edge against the good looking paint job you've already done. You'll have a crisp straight line at the joint, top and bottom. You could actually cover most all of the trim with varnish, just be carefull not to get it in the plug holes, though they can be carefully redrilled (with a sharp countersink) after the varnish is dry. Then you can apply however many coats of varnish without getting varnish on the paint. Just a thought?

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Seriously, how many different tools can the Fein replace? Give me the rundown, because I may actually get one this fall if I can consolidate several power tools into one.

 

detail sander

saw for cutting all kinds of different stuff. Plunge cuts are the coolest.

 

The ridgid model has a bunch of attachments that seem pretty handy.

 

Basically they do all kinds of things you'd have a hard time doing otherwise. Can't say it really replaces stuff.

 

 

Sons, et al,

 

There are some jobs that the vibrator makes down right simple. (Mine is a Dremel-Max)

And some that you just couldn't do without it.

 

I wanted to add a water stop to the bottom of my plywood walls - stop a constant source of worry

and keep the plywood ends from soaking up water that sometimes collects there..

 

No other tool would have done this anywhere as easily.

 

Pics and words at:

http://www.home.earthlink.net/~sv_temptress/refine.htm#waterstop

 

It was about indispensable when trimming veneer on the head wall.

Any edge pressure can cause the veneer to "bubble" up, so running the saw blade in between

the edge of the wall and the hull trimmed the contact area and removed the cause of the bubble.

 

No matter how careful you are working with contact cement, getting veneer in exactly the right

place can be challenging. 1/16" placement on a vertical surface is near impossible. So...

A simple way to trim-to-fit is important.

 

The sander especially is handy for close detailing small fiberglass parts.

http://www.home.earthlink.net/~sv_temptress/parts.htm

and getting around odd places like hand rails, etc.

 

It was expensive ($100!) but has earned it's place in my tool bag.

 

I had the Dremel, broke it and got the Fein after all. I don't know why I have to keep reminding myself to skip the Chinese crap tools and just buy the good ones from the start. If you plan on using it for more than 4 hours, you'll have paid for it in improved productivity, and it's all positive from that point forward. I also look very closely at country of origin nowadays.

 

I also dumped a bunch of sanders (RO, belt, jitterbug) and finally bought a Festo RO125 after wasting hours and many $$$ on bad sanders and sandpaper. After one year of home work its paid for itself many times over. Same reason you grill a prime New York strip with a microbrew over a choice one and a Bud; yeah, it cost 2 bucks more, but you enjoyed it ten times as much. ;-)

 

Mike

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That paint looks fantastic. I can't wait to see what it looks like when all the hardware goes back on.

 

 

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Sons, why don't you use spar urethane on external (& internal) parts? Varnish is soft and never seems to actually "cure" & I don't think holds up as well in UV as urethane either. I am kicking myself for even using varnish on the interior teak ..it is not very durable, but my tiller & flag staff which were finished with Helmsmans urethane (the only external finished pieces of wood) are holding up beautifully.

 

I have used the Brightsides for the touch up (temporarily permanent :rolleyes: ) I did around my chainplate repairs..pretty impressive stuff indeed. B)

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